FindsGood

Articles Page 15

Articles Page 15

  1. Complete possession is proved only by giving. All you are unable to give possesses you.
  2. Believe those who are seeking the truth. Doubt those who find it.
  3. Be faithful to that which exists within yourself.
  4. Art is the collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better.
  5. Art is a collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better.
  6. Art begins with resistance – at the point where resistance is overcome. No human masterpiece has ever been created without great labor.
  7. A straight path never leads anywhere except to the objective.
  8. ‘Therefore’ is a word the poet must not know.
  9. You have to have great passion, because to sing operatic music requires lots of work. I study for at least two hours every day. The voice is like an instrument and requires constant exercise.
  10. You can be great only if it is your destiny.
  11. While they are kids, my children must do as I say.
  12. When you’re on stage singing, you’re naked. Your voice is something very intimate, and that’s why I’m scared every time before I perform. It doesn’t matter if I’m singing for a king or a queen or the Pope, it’s enough to be in front of anybody. I suffer, but I can’t do anything about it.
  13. When you sing and people want that you sing, then you can hope to be great.
  14. When the mood takes me, I like to be a man of action. I like to windsurf and ski, and most of all I love to ride horses. The wilder and faster the better!
  15. When a little more than a teenager, I was a piano-bar pianist in the land where I was born and raised, Tuscany.
  16. When I was very young, I started trying to sing like the great tenor Mario Lanza; my family used to play his records. We all learn best by imitating others.
  17. When I sing, I think mostly about the music. But I know that, through singing, my body shows everything that I am. I am a very passionate man and I suffer a lot and have a lot of joy also. In my opinion, it is very important for me to find this stimulus and motivation for singing.
  18. When I sing for myself, I sing in a more free, athletic way. When I face an audience, there is always some fear that makes me put the brakes on a bit.
  19. When I hear that young people have come to the theater for the first time to listen to opera, I’m very happy. Because it’s the same thing that happened to me as a child. When I first heard the tenor voice, I immediately fell in love with this kind of music.
  20. When I get on stage, my first goal is not to show my expertise, but on the contrary, to give a bit of happiness, of joy, of cheerfulness. I am firmly convinced that in order to sing well, you must love your neighbor and be passionate about life.
  21. When I began singing, it was the first time I was happy in my life. As a baby, I would stop crying when I heard a great singer.
  22. What is certain is that singing is not merely modulating a song by means of the voice: we sing and we celebrate the beauty that we can grow and live every day. If you want to sing and give emotions to those who are listening, you must have something to tell through your singing; you have to use singing like an instrument to tell something.
  23. What is beautiful enchants me. I mean not just physical beauty but a wider concept of beauty. There is beauty in poetry and in great musical or singing performances. There is beauty everywhere if you can just see it.
  24. Very often, I recognize many, many defects, so I try to improve myself every day. I think my voice is very communicative.
  25. To sing opera, one needs two things: the voice and the passion – and above all, the passion.
  26. To sing a song is like whispering to a child’s ear. It is an art heavily relying on improvisation.
  27. To sing a duet together means sharing with someone both the pleasure and the responsibility of making music for an audience which is there to feel enjoyment through music.
  28. To be happy when you are travelling, you need to be happy inside before you leave. A positive frame of mind will definitely enhance your travelling experience. If I’m not in a positive frame of mind then the whole thing definitely becomes more of a challenge for me.
  29. The world is full of many beautiful voices; I will perform with many of them. I love women’s voices.
  30. The voice is something very mysterious. It’s difficult to say what is inside a voice that moves people.
  31. The voice changes very slowly. I keep mine well under control and try with all my might to keep it exactly as it was at the very beginning.
  32. The nature of music is mysterious and so much so that it generates strong emotions within us. It moves along passages that reach the most intimate areas of our psyche without being tried by prejudices or influences of any kind.
  33. The most widely criticised singers in the history of opera, Maria Callas and Franco Corelli, happen also to be the best singers. I am honoured for being part of their group.
  34. The feeling of an evolution is a constant for every artist who is pursuing the search of refinement and enlargement of his/her own means of expression.
  35. The fact that I am blind is not what defines my life. It should be of no more interest than my blood type. People wonder if there is a relationship between my lack of sight and the way I sing. But there’s no connection.
  36. The activity of a singer that sings opera is similar to that of an athlete.
  37. Success is related to faith. Faith comes first.
  38. Stage fright is my worst problem. A voice is very intimate. It’s something of your own. So there’s always this fear, because you feel naked. There’s a fear of not reaching up to expectations.
  39. Stage fright is my worst problem.
  40. Some years ago I gave a concert in the mountains with snow all around, and that was much colder.
  41. Some of us are born with a weakness for music. As a baby, music would stop whatever thought I was having. If I was worried, it would stop me worrying; if I was crying, it would stop me crying. Music was a healing thing for me.
  42. Singing provides a true sense of lightheartedness. If I sing when I am alone, I feel wonderful. It’s freedom.
  43. Probably the first time I left Italy was to travel by train to Lourdes. I went with my mother and my grandmother – who was a very religious person – so it was a pilgrimage of sorts. I remember it as a very intense, but beautiful experience.
  44. Popularity gets up people’s noses. But I understand the importance and the function of popular music. There is an artistic purpose. Popular music helps people to develop a curiosity and leads them towards classical music.
  45. People wonder if there is a relationship between my lack of sight and the way I sing. But there’s no connection.
  46. People are often quite surprised by the sport and leisure activities practised by the blind. For example, tandem cycling is very popular.
  47. Opera singing is in every way of inestimable value; a real heritage for all mankind that has been reached over centuries of studies, attempts, flights of the spirit.
  48. Opera is complex for those who perform it, but also for those who listen to it. It takes more time, more patience and more spirit of sacrifice. All this is well worth it because opera offers such deep sensations that they will remain in a heart for a lifetime.
  49. Often, I went in love with some friends in school. And, no, I suffered. Only later, things went better.
  50. Now I’m more sure and I feel myself more comfortable singing.
  51. Naturally, women are drawn to a man who understands the subtlety of emotions, and they know I’m a passionate man. But the reason I try to keep myself in shape is so I can sing better, not to look good.
  52. My style in Italian is very old-style.
  53. My real passion is for opera. It was born and developed by listening to records, and my dream as a child was to record entire operas when I grew up, and this dream came true.
  54. My life experience has taught me nothing happens by chance. Even the idea of the ball in a roulette game: it’s not chance it ends up in a certain place. It’s forces that are at play.
  55. My idol has been Franco Corelli. But every singer can teach you something.
  56. Music is an art that goes well beyond science. Proof can be found in the huge amount of studies that have been carried out throughout the world based on music-therapy and the important results achieved.
  57. Music is able to make a person dream. When you dream, you dream of something good, something beautiful, and when you dream, you always dream of yourself better than you are.
  58. Music is a prerogative of those who are willing to spend time to study it, understand and love it, well aware of the fact that one life is not enough to improve just one single note of what has already been written and performed.
  59. More people are listening to opera, and I’m happy – everybody must be given that opportunity.
  60. Losing my sight had nothing to do with my focus on music. My passion for music was already there, so it would be a mistake to give too much significance to my blindness.
  61. Living is dangerous. The important thing is to know the limits.
  62. Listen to what others tell you about your voice. If you’re only singing to please yourself, you might as well just sing under the shower. But if you’re singing for others, you are reliant on them to ask you to sing.
  63. Let me say that I’ve never thought to conduct because the conductor has to think to the music before the orchestra. And the orchestra comes later. For me, it’s terrible.
  64. It’s very important for me to try to relax when I’m travelling, and playing my flute helps me to unwind.
  65. It’s true that I suffered a lot, especially when I was younger.
  66. It’s important for me who is at the table with me; the moment when everyone speaks to each other and everyone listens. If there’s good food, it’s much better.
  67. It’s always beautiful to sing with other great voices. I like voices in general. It’s a big privilege to have great singers next to me.
  68. It is the uninvolved parent who has to resort to strictness.
  69. It is not Christian to go against someone. I am in favour of life.
  70. In singing, you cannot ‘cheat’ if you want to give emotions to those who are listening. You must have something to tell.
  71. In preparing my thesis, I have had the pleasure of collecting testimonies from colleagues such as Placido Domingo but also from singing teachers and musicologists. The entire course of study has confirmed what I already thought, that the value and meaning of opera singing, at the beginning of the third millennium, remain intact.
  72. In my iPod, there are many operas, from A to Z. I have ‘Aida’ and ‘Boheme’ and ‘Butterfly’ and ‘Cavalleria’. My passion is for opera, but when I’m in the car, I listen to everything.
  73. In essence, I set myself the objective of doing what I feel is right without having any ambition.
  74. If you have a great love of singing, supported by others’ fondness for your voice, then it is worth making every effort, of making every sacrifice, to achieve your goal. A great voice will easily find teachers who are willing to help a struggling young talent, and the ways of the Lord are infinite.
  75. I’ve been to almost every country in the world, and the most frustrating thing for me has been that my schedule has always been so busy that there’s so little time before and after performances to explore where I’m visiting.
  76. I’ve always known that I was born to sing, ever since I was a child.
  77. I’ve always been on the side of science that tries to help man. I play an active part with the foundations I’m involved in. Science gives hope. If it were offered to me? Never say never. But I wouldn’t kill or steal to have my sight. My blindness doesn’t define my life.
  78. I’ve always been on the side of science that tries to help man. I play an active part with the foundations I’m involved in. Science gives hope.
  79. I’m quite shy, so I hate seeing my private life splashed over the papers.
  80. I’m most impressed by the Russian writers, so I love reading the works of Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky. Another author who has informed the way I think is the French philosopher, Blaise Pascal.
  81. I’m a country boy, and we’re the product of our upbringing. As a boy, I was told that men don’t cry.
  82. I was an agnostic until I realized that I had to choose between God and fate. The idea that humanity and nature are the result of fate was not convincing at all. I find the presence of God everywhere.
  83. I was a daredevil before, and after I lost my sight I was the same. I loved riding bikes, scooters and horses. I even learned to box. Muhammad Ali is my hero.
  84. I want to have time for myself, my family and my friends. It’s important because in order to sing well, you must have inspiration, and inspiration comes from life, from living.
  85. I try to find some time for my horses. I began when I was a child, because I was born and grew up in a little village. And many people ride the horses. So, it was a big – it has been a big passion for me.
  86. I think I don’t want to use drugs or medicine, so nothing. The only way is to go on stage and to hope.
  87. I studied to be a lawyer, and after that I did something, obviously, completely different. With change, you learn something. If you do the same thing over and over again, you never learn anything.
  88. I started as a lyrical singer. But it was through the pop universe that I reached international fame.
  89. I speak to God every day.
  90. I respect very much my public and also the music I perform.
  91. I prefer to work for my country in a free and independent way. I was born free, and I want to die free. I am always suspicious of ideology. Instead, I respect men with ideas.
  92. I never think about gifts. It’s enough to have my family present.
  93. I loved riding bikes and horses. I was eight when I started having lessons, and when my father bought me my own horse I couldn’t wait to go off on my own.
  94. I loved playing football. In this particular match the ball happened to hit my right eye, the only one which I could see light and colour with.
  95. I love eating shabu-shabu in Japan – a kind of beef hotpot. But if you’re talking about authentic, traditional food, then Italian cooking is one of the best in the world.
  96. I live for my children, so my number one rule is I won’t go away from home for more than two weeks.
  97. I like very much to ride horses. I like soccer, I have had a passion for boxing since I was a child, although it would be stupid for me to box.
  98. I like to windsurf and ski, and most of all I love to ride horses. The wilder and faster the better! If I’m presented with a fast horse or a fast boat, I still get that shiver of excitement and I cannot resist. Luckily I never seem to have any accidents, and thank God for that.
  99. I like reading… French, Russian classics – Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Flaubert. I also like Hemingway, Virginia Woolf.
  100. I know that my passion is for opera, but sometimes I like also to sing songs, because there are many beautiful melodies.
  101. I have trouble with modern art. But in general, all art forms fascinate me – art is the way human beings express what we can’t say in words.
  102. I have to face life with a newly found passion. I must rediscover the irresistible will to learn, to live and to love.
  103. I have had the good fortune of being able to sing with many of the finest voices in the world, and for someone who loves voices as I do, this is an enormous privilege.
  104. I have big, big stage fright.
  105. I have always tried to perform the music I love, and I think I am lucky because my preferences are often the ones of the public.
  106. I have always loved music and singing, and I am open to listen to any type of music. Regardless of my mood, my heart is always set racing when I listen to opera. When I decide which music I want to hear, my choice is almost invariably an opera recording.
  107. I have always felt an excellent rapport ever since my very first concert in Britain at Hampton Court. I have always felt understood. The British understand opera very well.
  108. I have a European frame of mind and Europe is my home.
  109. I first started playing in piano bars for three reasons – to make money, to be in the company of my friends – and also to hook up with young girls. I always knew, even before I played in piano bars, about the effect of my voice.
  110. I don’t like crying. I’m a country boy, and we’re the product of our upbringing. As a boy, I was told that men don’t cry.
  111. I don’t like being called ‘macho.’ Macho basically means stupid and a real Italian man is not macho, he’s smart. That’s smart in both senses: elegant and clever.
  112. I don’t know if One Direction will stand the test of time. I have a niece who goes crazy for them. But the only way to judge art is to wait and see if it becomes evergreen. This takes a bit of time. Adele is a very good musician and I’d like to sing with her. But, again, time will tell if her music will become evergreen.
  113. I don’t have an extraordinary degree of self-confidence, but I know the gift I have been given from God, and I try to share it with as many people as possible.
  114. I don’t have an extraordinary degree of self-confidence, but I know the gift I have been given from God and I try to share it with as many people as possible. Having a great voice is not a merit. I don’t think it is a merit.
  115. I do not think anyone can ever do anything without the help and will of God.
  116. I did a pop album, ‘Sogno,’ in 1999. I think it’s important to record another pop album because many people love pop music. By this kind of repertoire, some people can later discover classical music.
  117. I consider the voice a gift from the heavens, and as all the gifts from the heavens, they must be used, but the minute that the heavens call it back then of course I will stop.
  118. I change the language with which I use my voice. In opera, I know I have an orchestra behind me; I have to communicate to people very far from me.
  119. I began when I was a child, because I was born and grew up in a little village. And many people ride the horses. So, it was a big – it has been a big passion for me.
  120. I am honored I have performed ‘Quizas Quizas Quizas’ with Jennifer Lopez, an eclectic artist who thanks to the charismatic power of her voice and to her soft sensuality, has managed to make this song particularly convincing.
  121. I am a very lazy man, so, for me, the dream is to be at home on the chair with my family.
  122. I always knew I would sing. I just didn’t know if I would be successful or not. But I sang at school, I sang at parties, I sang at church. Everyone always asked me to sing. I’d be playing football with my friends, and my parents would ask me to sing for their guests. I was never very happy about that because I wanted to play football.
  123. I also always carry my flute. It’s very important for me to try to relax when I’m travelling, and playing my flute helps me to unwind.
  124. For me, the most enjoyable type of singing is opera. It allows you to move, to wear a costume… to do something with your body. When singing in concert, you have to stand up in front of the audience, next to the conductor, which is less natural.
  125. For me, riding a two-wheeler bike was very risky. Counting the pedal strokes before turning a corner and learning to hear the sounds coming from buildings, grass and the climbing frame made all the difference to basic survival and ensured that I didn’t end up head-first in the sandpit.
  126. Fatherhood is a very natural thing; it’s not something that shakes up my life but rather it enriches it.
  127. Faith has a role to play in life. It is not related to success. It is the other way round. Success is related to faith. Faith comes first.
  128. Every audience has its character; I like America – they love me. I suffer from stage fright, but in America not so much.
  129. Even in the most beautiful music there are some silences, which are there so we can witness the importance of silence.
  130. Destiny has a lot to do with it, but so do you. You have to persevere, you have to insist.
  131. Criticism in good faith is good. When it’s targeted solely to destruction, I’m not interested.
  132. Because, in opera, I have to sing for people that are very far from me, instead of, when I sing a song, I try to imagine to sing like in an ear of a child.
  133. Because I practice often with my children at home.
  134. Apart from a period of crisis during my adolescence, when my voice was changing and I could not tame it – it was like a kicking foal that does not listen to reason – I have always been told I have a pleasant and recognizable voice.
  135. An opera singer is like an athlete before a match. An athlete cannot overdo anything. In order to perform at the highest possible level, you need to refrain from activities so as to be able to express this power.
  136. All that counts in life is intention.
  137. A voice is very intimate. It’s something of your own. So there’s always this fear, because you feel naked. There’s a fear of not reaching up to expectations. As you become more famous, people come and expect to hear something extraordinary, so you don’t want to disappoint them. I feel this sense of responsibility.
  138. A positive frame of mind will definitely enhance your travelling experience. If I’m not in a positive frame of mind then the whole thing definitely becomes more of a challenge for me.
  139. A love song must respect the canons of music beauty, entering the fibers of those who are listening. It must make them dream and pleasantly introduce them to the universe of love.
  140. A country that has really resonated with me and I was really impressed with was Israel. I found that the whole country had a very special atmosphere. I was there to perform, but it was one of the few places that I’ve visited over the years that I had some free time to explore, and I was hugely impressed by all the religious history there.
  141. A career is like a house: it’s made of many bricks, and each brick has the same value, because without any one of them, the house would collapse.
  142. ‘Passione’ is a selection of the music moments that have accompanied my youth; a collection of cherished memories, of moments, of fleeting emotions, of sleepless nights.
  143. You think intercourse is a private act; it’s not, it’s a social act. Men are sexually predatory in life; and women are sexually manipulative. When two individuals come together and leave their gender outside the bedroom door, then they make love.
  144. Women have been taught that, for us, the earth is flat, and that if we venture out, we will fall off the edge. Some of us have ventured out nevertheless, and so far we have not fallen off. It is my faith, my feminist faith, that we will not.
  145. While gossip among women is universally ridiculed as low and trivial, gossip among men, especially if it is about women, is called theory, or idea, or fact.
  146. Undernourished, intelligence becomes like the bloated belly of a starving child: swollen, filled with nothing the body can use.
  147. The genius of any slave system is found in the dynamics which isolate slaves from each other, obscure the reality of a common condition, and make united rebellion against the oppressor inconceivable.
  148. The common erotic project of destroying women makes it possible for men to unite into a brotherhood; this project is the only firm and trustworthy groundwork for cooperation among males and all male bonding is based on it.
  149. Seduction is often difficult to distinguish from rape. In seduction, the rapist often bothers to buy a bottle of wine.
  150. Only when manhood is dead – and it will perish when ravaged femininity no longer sustains it – only then will we know what it is to be free.
  151. No woman needs intercourse; few women escape it.
  152. Money speaks, but it speaks with a male voice.
  153. Men who want to support women in our struggle for freedom and justice should understand that it is not terrifically important to us that they learn to cry; it is important to us that they stop the crimes of violence against us.
  154. Men know everything – all of them – all the time – no matter how stupid or inexperienced or arrogant or ignorant they are.
  155. Men have defined the parameters of every subject. All feminist arguments, however radical in intent or consequence, are with or against assertions or premises implicit in the male system, which is made credible or authentic by the power of men to name.
  156. Men are distinguished from women by their commitment to do violence rather than to be victimized by it.
  157. Male supremacy is fused into the language, so that every sentence both heralds and affirms it.
  158. Genocide begins, however improbably, in the conviction that classes of biological distinction indisputably sanction social and political discrimination.
  159. Feminism is hated because women are hated. Anti-feminism is a direct expression of misogyny; it is the political defense of women hating.
  160. Childbearing is glorified in part because women die from it.
  161. Being a Jew, one learns to believe in the reality of cruelty and one learns to recognize indifference to human suffering as a fact.
  162. As long as there is rape… there is not going to be any peace or justice or equality or freedom. You are not going to become what you want to become or who you want to become. You are not going to live in the world you want to live in.
  163. ‘Women’s fashion’ is a euphemism for fashion created by men for women.
  164. You really have to do something Bruce Banner-like to me to cause me to go into my righteous indignation mode.
  165. Women’s Studies, Queer Studies, African-American Studies, and Chicano Studies all produce culturally acceptable separatist and supremacy mind-sets and countenance movements that resemble those of white supremacists.
  166. Women want to get to know Sarah Palin. And they want to meet her family.
  167. With its emphasis on star power, the Obama campaign from Day One emphasized the candidate’s perfectly cut presidential presence.
  168. Whole Foods is a wonderland molded to accommodate the psyche of the socially-responsible, guilt-ridden liberal – the crunchy Kucinich capitalist.
  169. While I have no desire to see Mr. Obama’s birth certificate, I do want to see his college transcripts.
  170. When I started to work in Hollywood at a fairly low level delivering scripts around town, listening to AM talk radio, I at first listened to it as a novelty.
  171. What’s in your closet, John Podesta?
  172. We just assumed that Walter Cronkite was unbiased. In hindsight, it is clear that Walter Cronkite was biased and that he used feigned objectivity as the cudgel to change the American narrative from being a right of center one to being a left of center one.
  173. They want to portray me as crazy, unhinged, unbalanced. OK, good, fine.
  174. There’s nothing in this country that is a worse accusation – in America, if you accuse somebody of racism, that person has to disprove that.
  175. There isn’t a day when I don’t look in the mirror and think, ‘How in the hell did I become a conservative Republican?’ It’s still a weird reckoning, because it shouldn’t have happened.
  176. There is an extensive body of writing from both sides of the political aisle that has analyzed the extraordinary depths of hatred leveled at former President George W. Bush.
  177. The thematically related ‘Boys Don’t Cry’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’ reinforced the narrative that gays like Mr. Shepard are regularly isolated for cruel and unusual attacks.
  178. The sad fact is that actual artistic oppression – book banning in its many modern forms – is a matter of course in the entertainment industry, especially when the underlying product is declared politically incorrect or runs contrary to the interests of Hollywood’s political altar, the Democratic Party.
  179. The real hate crime these days is the Orwellian intimidation wielded by the Left against those that don’t think the way they do. It’s worse than waterboarding.
  180. The making of the Barack Obama franchise far exceeded the skill set of Washington’s best. In fact, the recipe for Mr. Obama’s global popularity can be attributed less to political minds and chance than to the enduring power of Hollywood.
  181. The mainstream media choose to flaunt story lines that make white America appear guilty of continued institutional racism, while black racism against whites is ignored as an acceptable disposition given our nation’s history.
  182. The downside to the Whole Foods experience is that its success is driven by one of our era’s more grotesque phenomena: the upwardly-mobile urban dweller, the one who wants to indulge class-conscious epicurean yearnings and save the world, too.
  183. The center-right alternative media has been playing a passable prevent defense, constantly saying ‘That’s not right’ for consistently biased reporting.
  184. The anti-big-government movement is pure. Its participants represent something close to what used to be considered normative in this country.
  185. The Democratic Media Complex, in its pursuit of Orwellian hate-crime legislation, reparations, and sundry non-ameliorative resolutions to America’s troubled racial past, pursues its victims with blood lust.
  186. Tea Party attendees and health care town-hall protesters share the common belief that the extravagant spending of President Obama and the Democratic Party – absent any checks and balances – will eventually lead more people into government dependency, higher taxes, and, perhaps, our country’s financial ruin.
  187. Since war became a geographically distant but very real way of life after Sept. 11, 2001, no Hollywood star has stepped up to support active duty U.S. military personnel and wounded veterans like Gary Sinise.
  188. Sarah Palin may best serve her country by entering the media fray.
  189. Primarily motivated by a desire to keep abortion ‘safe, legal and rare,’ female liberals in the media have carte blanche to do and say anything.
  190. Political correctness – the rigging of politics using different rules for different groups, and buttressed by the media – ensures that Democrats always have the upper hand.
  191. Perhaps resigning from her first term in office may hurt Mrs. Palin’s attempts to run for higher office. Even I, a Palin supporter, now have qualms about her seeking higher office.
  192. Our country was not built to support blood dynasties or to elevate the rich and famous to a higher ethical or constitutional plain.
  193. One thing is for certain: under President Obama, home schooling will become a huge growth industry.
  194. On college campuses, in newsrooms, and now in the highest corridors of power, with Barack Obama in the Oval Office, the politically correct Left is wielding its weaponry with the confidence that it can take down any group, anyone, or anything.
  195. My long-held fear is that Mr. Obama is hiding something about his education. During the endless 2008 campaign, Mr. Obama would not release his college grades. Given that President George W. Bush and Sens. Al Gore and John Kerry all had proved mediocre grades were no impediment to a presidential bid, Mr. Obama likely had other concerns.
  196. My entire business model is to go on offense.
  197. My ability to be emotive and cry… I think I’m so fearful of tapping that that I won’t know how to turn it off.
  198. Much of Mr. Bush’s 28 percent approval rating is born not of ‘failed policies’ – of which there are many – but of the ill-gotten gains pilfered from a pre-Bush inauguration strategy to send the message to Republicans that the Democrats play politics harder and better.
  199. Much of America rooted for Mr. Obama simply because he is black.
  200. Much of America is petrified to bring up race, especially in public forums – the media, in particular.
  201. Mrs. Palin is history in a dress. And her script is straight out of Hollywood – like those teen movies with the cliched ending featuring the female valedictorian delivering the speech of a lifetime projecting a bold and transformative future with an independent-minded woman in charge.
  202. Mrs. Palin has neither pushed for creationism in Alaska schools nor moved to ban a single book in Wasilla.
  203. Media is everything. It’s everything.
  204. Liberalism has never been about establishing a universal standard. Liberalism is simply intellectual cover for those wanting to gain political power and increase the size of the state.
  205. Let me tell you this: if Marco Rubio – even though he’s only been in the Senate for a very short period of time, that man has a huge, huge opportunity in this country, and I think he could be the president.
  206. Less about politics, ‘The Path to 9/11’ focused on the emergence of radical Islamic terror as a clear and present American threat.
  207. Just because I am paying attention to politics and culture doesn’t mean that I should be talking about the health-care bill, talking about the minutiae.
  208. It’s almost embarrassing to go back into my liberal background because it was about as shallow a belief system as humanly possible.
  209. It would be my goal for Palin to become Oprah and be the ultimate kingmaker for twenty-odd years.
  210. It was go-along to get-along social. It was living in Los Angeles, being young and single, and flowing with the trendy liberal crowd.
  211. It may be a task that’s so Herculean, but I think it’s a worthy goal to try to open up America to individuals who just so happen to have a different skin color, that they have every right and every freedom to think what they want to think.
  212. In the public eye, being a victim of past injustices does not win the right to propagate current and future ones, and that’s intolerable to those in charge of the race industry today, whose power relies on maintaining forever a latent rage that can be turned on and off at the will of the nation’s elites.
  213. In a media instant, Sarah Palin went from an unknown moose hunter to a mass phenomenon on the precipice of becoming the vice president of the United States.
  214. In a country where the individual is ‘innocent until proven guilty,’ conservatives have been forced to actively disassociate themselves from an ideological lineage to white supremacists, anti-Semites, and other racist miscreants.
  215. In GOP land, apologies and resignations are never enough.
  216. If you go into an academic institution with a clean slate, you are very likely to come out a liberal. That is a huge problem.
  217. If there is a person behaving more destructively in popular culture than Mario Lavandeira, I cannot think of one. He has used cruelty as a crass mechanism to build up his own celebrity and has utilized political correctness to protect himself while using it as a weapon to dehumanize those he doesn’t agree with.
  218. If ever there were a candidate destined to shine on ‘The Oprah Winfrey Show,’ Sarah Palin would be that woman.
  219. I’ve met many journalists who impress me with their ability to play it straight. I think they’re the exception to the rule.
  220. I’ve lost friends, perhaps dozens. But I’ve gained hundreds, thousands – who knows? – of allies.
  221. I’m sorry, you leftists: you’re not the only people whose motives are pure.
  222. I’m sick of seeing my face on television.
  223. I’m not up for changing the Tenth Amendment or the Fourteenth Amendment, the First Amendment or the Second Amendment.
  224. I’m not a huge fan of Bruce Springsteen, and it’s certainly not because of his politics. I just don’t like the aesthetic.
  225. I’m fighting back against years and years and years of the cultural and the political left telling people to sit down and shut up.
  226. I’m a ‘Saturday Night Live’ guy. I’m a comedy guy. As long as they’re giving it to everyone, I don’t care about how low they go, most of the time.
  227. I would never call people that are born in this country who are from Mexico ‘terror babies.’
  228. I will say this: Boy, did I get lucky to work with Matt Drudge and Arianna Huffington.
  229. I want to make things equal.
  230. I want people to have a free and open voice.
  231. I think that a good portion of the ‘Institutional Left’ hates the building blocks of America.
  232. I think that 99 percent of the time, I’m jocular, lighthearted.
  233. I think if you accept the Left’s premise of a living Constitution, then you accept the Left’s premise of a living America, meaning that they think that America’s history is rotten.
  234. I still like George W. Bush. A lot.
  235. I remember thinking when I was in college that a lot of these known Chomsky-like, verbose, high-lefty thinkers made absolutely no sense, but I thought that was my problem.
  236. I recognized… very, very early on that ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and Fox News were dependent on The Associated Press and Reuters. So my daily intake of information is from watching the newswires.
  237. I love reporting stories that the Complex refuses to report.
  238. I love fighting for what I believe in. I love having fun while doing it.
  239. I love fighting back. I love finding allies, and – famously – I enjoy making enemies.
  240. I love Whole Foods. I love the Austin-based boutique supermarket chain so much I find ways to go there almost every day.
  241. I have no bigger goal than to eradicate racism, to grant Americans who have a different color of skin the right to disagree against the Left’s style of orthodoxy.
  242. I have dreams that I will reach balance in my life, and, at forty-one, I have none.
  243. I get stopped by people on the Upper West Side of Manhattan – actors, directors, people that I revere – who are closet conservatives who feel the same way but can’t speak out. And they think I am fighting for them so they can come out of the closet eventually and express themselves without worrying about losing their jobs.
  244. I don’t think Albert Einstein could have devised an equation to guide the leader of the free world during the wildly tumultuous post-9/11 realities without a modicum of help from the opposition party and the vast majority of the print and electronic media.
  245. I don’t believe in altering the Constitution.
  246. I didn’t come up through the ranks of the conservative movement… I came to these revelations about my own personal politics in a realm in which those books, those ideas, the canon of conservatism, is nonexistent.
  247. I deal with gay and black conservatives who don’t want to be called Uncle Toms of their politically correct Marxist multi-cultural unit structure. And they come to me saying, ‘What can I do?’ And I say, ‘Lay low.’
  248. I am the political psychiatrist to the stars.
  249. I am righteous and righteously indignant, the Tea Party is righteously indignant, and our goal is to not just save the country, but quite frankly, if America goes, so goes the world, so in our desire to save the country, we are trying to save the world.
  250. I am not as partisan as people think I am.
  251. George W. Bush is history’s president, a man for whom the long-term success or failure of democracy in Iraq will determine his place in history.
  252. From its skillful editing to its out-of-control budget and its relentless marketing, Mr. Obama’s team played a different game at a different level than Sen. John McCain and his traditionalist staff.
  253. For free-speech principles to be reinforced and free-market ideas to win the day, more people are going to have to stand up and be heard.
  254. Exposed in the relentless Palin attacks is not just political bias but unmitigated class bias. The American mainstream media in its current free-fall is begging for more comeuppance when it continues to berate the values and lifestyles of the folks in flyover country who, in simpler times, used to be considered valued customers.
  255. Different identity groups hold specific levels of power over others when their battles play out in the media. To wit: Black beats white. Gay beats white. Black beats gay.
  256. Celebrity is everything in this country.
  257. Celebrities like to pay lip service to causes but rarely do so by putting their lives in peril. And even more rarely do they do so in the name of the United States of America, not on their own behalf.
  258. Barack Obama is a radical, and we should not be afraid to say that.
  259. As long as it is supported by Democratic politicians and by liberal Hollywood players, censorship is a useful tool to stifle dissent.
  260. America is Tiger Woods country for a reason, and she elected Barack Obama to punctuate this new reality.
  261. All left-wing activists, whether it be WTO, anti-WTO, or anti-war, are idealistic as framed by the Democratic Media Complex.
  262. ‘Exculpatory’ is in the eye of the beholder.
  263. You must capture and keep the heart of the original and supremely able man before his brain can do its best.
  264. You cannot push any one up a ladder unless he be willing to climb a little himself.
  265. Whatever I engage in, I must push inordinately.
  266. Think of yourself as on the threshold of unparalleled success. A whole, clear, glorious life lies before you. Achieve! Achieve!
  267. There is no class so pitiably wretched as that which possesses money and nothing else.
  268. There is little success where there is little laughter.
  269. The way to become rich is to put all your eggs in one basket and then watch that basket.
  270. The men who have succeeded are men who have chosen one line and stuck to it.
  271. The man who acquires the ability to take full possession of his own mind may take possession of anything else to which he is justly entitled.
  272. The first man gets the oyster, the second man gets the shell.
  273. The average person puts only 25% of his energy and ability into his work. The world takes off its hat to those who put in more than 50% of their capacity, and stands on its head for those few and far between souls who devote 100%.
  274. The ‘morality of compromise’ sounds contradictory. Compromise is usually a sign of weakness, or an admission of defeat. Strong men don’t compromise, it is said, and principles should never be compromised.
  275. Surplus wealth is a sacred trust which its possessor is bound to administer in his lifetime for the good of the community.
  276. People who are unable to motivate themselves must be content with mediocrity, no matter how impressive their other talents.
  277. No person will make a great business who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit.
  278. No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself or get all the credit for doing it.
  279. Mr. Morgan buys his partners; I grow my own.
  280. Immense power is acquired by assuring yourself in your secret reveries that you were born to control affairs.
  281. I would as soon leave my son a curse as the almighty dollar.
  282. I shall argue that strong men, conversely, know when to compromise and that all principles can be compromised to serve a greater principle.
  283. I resolved to stop accumulating and begin the infinitely more serious and difficult task of wise distribution.
  284. He that cannot reason is a fool. He that will not is a bigot. He that dare not is a slave.
  285. Every act you have ever performed since the day you were born was performed because you wanted something.
  286. Do your duty and a little more and the future will take care of itself.
  287. Do not look for approval except for the consciousness of doing your best.
  288. Concentration is my motto – first honesty, then industry, then concentration.
  289. Concentrate your energies, your thoughts and your capital. The wise man puts all his eggs in one basket and watches the basket.
  290. As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what they do.
  291. And while the law of competition may be sometimes hard for the individual, it is best for the race, because it ensures the survival of the fittest in every department.
  292. All honor’s wounds are self-inflicted.
  293. Aim for the highest.
  294. You must pay the price if you wish to secure the blessing.
  295. We are beginning a new era in our government. I cannot too strongly urge the necessity of a rigid economy and an inflexible determination not to enlarge the income beyond the real necessities of the government.
  296. War is a blessing compared with national degradation.
  297. Unless you become more watchful in your states and check the spirit of monopoly and thirst for exclusive privileges you will in the end find that… the control over your dearest interests has passed into the hands of these corporations.
  298. To the victors belong the spoils.
  299. There is nothing that I shudder at more than the idea of a separation of the Union. Should such an event ever happen, which I fervently pray God to avert, from that date I view our liberty gone.
  300. There is no pleasure in having nothing to do; the fun is having lots to do and not doing it.
  301. There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses.
  302. The wisdom of man never yet contrived a system of taxation that would operate with perfect equality.
  303. The safety of the republic being the supreme law, and Texas having offered us the key to the safety of our country from all foreign intrigues and diplomacy, I say accept the key… and bolt the door at once.
  304. The planter, the farmer, the mechanic, and the laborer… form the great body of the people of the United States, they are the bone and sinew of the country men who love liberty and desire nothing but equal rights and equal laws.
  305. The people are the government, administering it by their agents; they are the government, the sovereign power.
  306. The great constitutional corrective in the hands of the people against usurpation of power, or corruption by their agents is the right of suffrage; and this when used with calmness and deliberation will prove strong enough.
  307. The duty of government is to leave commerce to its own capital and credit as well as all other branches of business, protecting all in their legal pursuits, granting exclusive privileges to none.
  308. The brave man inattentive to his duty, is worth little more to his country than the coward who deserts in the hour of danger.
  309. The Constitution and the laws are supreme and the Union indissoluble.
  310. The Bible is the rock on which this Republic rests.
  311. Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, stop thinking and go in.
  312. Peace, above all things, is to be desired, but blood must sometimes be spilled to obtain it on equable and lasting terms.
  313. Our government is founded upon the intelligence of the people. I for one do not despair of the republic. I have great confidence in the virtue of the great majority of the people, and I cannot fear the result.
  314. Nullification means insurrection and war; and the other states have a right to put it down.
  315. No one need think that the world can be ruled without blood. The civil sword shall and must be red and bloody.
  316. Mr. Van Buren, your friends may be leaving you but my friends never leave me.
  317. Money is power, and in that government which pays all the public officers of the states will all political power be substantially concentrated.
  318. Mischief springs from the power which the moneyed interest derives from a paper currency which they are able to control, from the multitude of corporations with exclusive privileges… which are employed altogether for their benefit.
  319. It was settled by the Constitution, the laws, and the whole practice of the government that the entire executive power is vested in the President of the United States.
  320. It is to be regretted that the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of government to their own selfish purposes.
  321. It is a damn poor mind indeed which can’t think of at least two ways to spell any word.
  322. In England the judges should have independence to protect the people against the crown. Here the judges should not be independent of the people, but be appointed for not more than seven years. The people would always re-elect the good judges.
  323. If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
  324. I’ve got big shoes to fill. This is my chance to do something. I have to seize the moment.
  325. I would sincerely regret, and which never shall happen whilst I am in office, a military guard around the President.
  326. I weep for the liberty of my country when I see at this early day of its successful experiment that corruption has been imputed to many members of the House of Representatives, and the rights of the people have been bartered for promises of office.
  327. I have always been afraid of banks.
  328. I feel in the depths of my soul that it is the highest, most sacred, and most irreversible part of my obligation to preserve the union of these states, although it may cost me my life.
  329. I cannot consent that my mortal body shall be laid in a repository prepared for an Emperor or a King my republican feelings and principles forbid it the simplicity of our system of government forbids it.
  330. I am a Senator against my wishes and feelings, which I regret more than any other of my life.
  331. Heaven will be no heaven to me if I do not meet my wife there.
  332. Fear not, the people may be deluded for a moment, but cannot be corrupted.
  333. Every good citizen makes his country’s honor his own, and cherishes it not only as precious but as sacred. He is willing to risk his life in its defense and is conscious that he gains protection while he gives it.
  334. Every diminution of the public burdens arising from taxation gives to individual enterprise increased power and furnishes to all the members of our happy confederacy new motives for patriotic affection and support.
  335. Elevate those guns a little lower.
  336. Disunion by force is treason.
  337. Democracy shows not only its power in reforming governments, but in regenerating a race of men and this is the greatest blessing of free governments.
  338. As long as our government is administered for the good of the people, and is regulated by their will; as long as it secures to us the rights of persons and of property, liberty of conscience and of the press, it will be worth defending.
  339. Any man worth his salt will stick up for what he believes right, but it takes a slightly better man to acknowledge instantly and without reservation that he is in error.
  340. Americans are not a perfect people, but we are called to a perfect mission.
  341. All the rights secured to the citizens under the Constitution are worth nothing, and a mere bubble, except guaranteed to them by an independent and virtuous Judiciary.
  342. Who, then, will govern? The answer must be, Man – for we have no angels in the shape of men, as yet, who are willing to take charge of our political affairs.
  343. There are no good laws but such as repeal other laws.
  344. The goal to strive for is a poor government but a rich people.
  345. Slavery exists. It is black in the South, and white in the North.
  346. Outside of the Constitution we have no legal authority more than private citizens, and within it we have only so much as that instrument gives us. This broad principle limits all our functions and applies to all subjects.
  347. Legislation can neither be wise nor just which seeks the welfare of a single interest at the expense and to the injury of many and varied interests.
  348. If the rabble were lopped off at one end and the aristocrats at the other, all would be well with the country.
  349. If I am shot at, I want no man to be in the way of the bullet.
  350. I hold it the duty of the executive to insist upon frugality in the expenditure, and a sparing economy is itself a great national source.
  351. I feel incompetent to perform duties… which have been so unexpectedly thrown upon me.
  352. I am sworn to uphold the Constitution as Andy Johnson understands it and interprets it.
  353. Honest conviction is my courage; the Constitution is my guide.
  354. You’ve got to go out there and kill what you’re going to eat.
  355. Yeah, it turns out that guys don’t like deals on laser hair removal or pole dancing lessons.
  356. When you think of couponing, you picture a mom cutting coupons out of the back of the newspaper.
  357. There are over 2,000 direct clones of the Groupon business model. However, there’s an equal amount of proof that the barriers to success are enormous. In spite of all those competitors, only a handful are remotely relevant.
  358. The popularity of Groupon has almost rendered the group-buying element of it obsolete, because we’re able to deliver so many customers that the merchants are very happy with even the smallest number that we can provide.
  359. The list of companies that have added their own financial metrics is not a savory group.
  360. The experience is fundamentally different for buying from local businesses than it is for buying consumer goods.
  361. One thing I’ve come to learn about myself is that I have to keep going.
  362. One of the things I realized… is how few success stories there are in websites or products or businesses that exist primarily for an altruistic purpose.
  363. One of the challenges of innovation is figuring out how to wipe your mind clean about what you should be doing at any given moment, and not having a religious attachment to what’s gotten you there thus far.
  364. Once you have something so deeply infused in your culture and your brand, it would be very difficult to reverse that inertia if you wanted to.
  365. Most small business owners are not particularly sophisticated business people. That’s not a criticism; they’re passionate about cutting hair or cooking food, and that’s why they got in the business, not because they have an MBA.
  366. Most of the time, the things that really change the world exist for something fundamentally selfish and then the world-changing ends up being a side-effect of that.
  367. Local commerce, without question, will be one of the fundamental use cases enabled by mobile devices over the next several years.
  368. Local businesses have never had a great way to get customers in the door.
  369. Life is too short to be a boring company.
  370. Life is not about money.
  371. In terms of fear, I still am most afraid of Freddie Kruger.
  372. In music, which was my world before, you’ve got thousands and thousands of years of great ideas that have already been thought of. But the internet is basically 20 years old. So you can be way stupider and still have world-changing ideas.
  373. If you’re open with people and provide context for the decisions that your making, customers will stick with you.
  374. If you look at Myspace, Facebook was a better product. It’s as simple as that.
  375. If you have a great business, if you’re great at your craft people should be coming in there. It shouldn’t be this secret.
  376. If you don’t have those moments where you go too far, then you’re probably not going far enough.
  377. If I told people that I knew what I was doing, nobody would believe me, so why even try and fake it?
  378. If I could get a deal on whatever my impulse was, whenever my impulse struck, and it was nearby, I would use that all the time. It would reshape the way that I shop.
  379. I’ve been very lucky, from the beginning. I’ve found that as long as you’re fundamentally good – as long as you’re not being bad to people – people give you a lot of room to be yourself, because being yourself is being honest. And that’s what people want to see.
  380. I’m just not used to talking that much about myself. It feels strange.
  381. I’m going to continue doing my thing and work my butt off to add value for shareholders and as long as they and the board see fit to keep me in this role, I feel enormously privileged to serve.
  382. I’m appalled that an industry has grown around teaching a practice as wholesome and spiritual as yoga, so I decided to create my own free video to help people get started.
  383. I think the big thing about Groupon is just people had never seen anything grow quite so fast.
  384. I think if there’s any difference between me and a traditional CEO, it’s that I’ve been unwilling to change myself or shape my personality around what’s expected.
  385. I think I was probably that kid in the neighborhood who you could expect once or twice a year to be knocking on your door trying to sell you something stupid.
  386. I own over four ties.
  387. I look at being a capitalist businessperson like riding a bike – if I go too slowly, I’ll fall over. Or it’s kind of like a shark: if I stop swimming, I’ll just die.
  388. I just like to build things and do things.
  389. I find myself using the word ‘executives’ now.
  390. I feel like clout is something that builds up on your teeth.
  391. I don’t get stressed out.
  392. I didn’t realize how hard it was to run a small business.
  393. I can’t predict the future.
  394. Groupon as a company – it’s built into the business model – is about surprise. A new deal that surprises you every day. We’ve carried that over to our brand, in the writing and the marketing that we do, and in the internal corporate culture.
  395. Generally, what people tend to underestimate is the cyborg nature of Groupon. We are a company that has the DNA of being both a technology company and a heavily operational company.
  396. Everybody loves a deal on a restaurant or skydiving or laser-hair removal.
  397. Am I as experienced, or mature, or smart as others CEOs? No probably not, but there’s something, I think, very useful about having a founder as the CEO.
  398. All the trends show that email usage among the younger cohorts of Internet users is declining. Whether it will take five or 30 years for email to go extinct, I’m not sure.
  399. A lot of people can raise money.
  400. To have all your life’s work and to have them along the wall, it’s like walking in with no clothes on. It’s terrible.
  401. To be interested solely in technique would be a very superficial thing to me.
  402. One’s art goes as far and as deep as one’s love goes.
  403. It’s all in how you arrange the thing… the careful balance of the design is the motion.
  404. It’s a moment that I’m after, a fleeting moment, but not a frozen moment.
  405. If you clean it up, get analytical, all the subtle joy and emotion you felt in the first place goes flying out the window.
  406. I’m a secretive bastard. I would never let anybody watch me painting… it would be like somebody watching you have sex – painting is that personal to me.
  407. I surrendered to a world of my imagination, reenacting all those wonderful tales my father would read aloud to me. I became a very active reader, especially history and Shakespeare.
  408. I search for the realness, the real feeling of a subject, all the texture around it… I always want to see the third dimension of something… I want to come alive with the object.
  409. I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape. Something waits beneath it; the whole story doesn’t show.
  410. I love to study the many things that grow below the corn stalks and bring them back to the studio to study the color. If one could only catch that true color of nature – the very thought of it drives me mad.
  411. I dream a lot. I do more painting when I’m not painting. It’s in the subconscious.
  412. I don’t really have studios. I wander around around people’s attics, out in fields, in cellars, anyplace I find that invites me.
  413. I can’t work completely out of my imagination. I must put my foot in a bit of truth; and then I can fly free.
  414. At 18 I began painting steadily fulltime and at age 20 had my first New York show at the Macbeth Gallery.
  415. Artists today think of everything they do as a work of art. It is important to forget about what you are doing – then a work of art may happen.
  416. You have to start living for something that’s worth dying for.
  417. Wishing of all strategies, is the worst.
  418. When people ask where I studied to be an ambassador, I say my neighborhood and my school. I’ve tried to tell my kids that you don’t wait until you’re in high school or college to start dealing with problems of people being different. The younger you start, the better.
  419. When I took the SAT, I didn’t get accepted into a single white school that I applied to. Now I’ve got honorary degrees from a lot of those schools that rejected me. Things are different now, but not that much different.
  420. What we forget is that African Americans made the largest contribution to America, economically, before the Civil War of any sector of society. I read that the railroads were worth about $2 billion, but slavery was a $3 billion asset.
  421. What Iran wants and what North Korea wants is respect.
  422. We’ve changed in the sense that we flipped – and this is no longer the Republican party of Lincoln. This is the party of suppression.
  423. We think it is complicated to change the world. Change comes little by little. Nothing worthwhile can happen in one generation.
  424. We rise in glory as we sink in pride.
  425. Violence is not more efficient than non-violence.
  426. Tomorrow is the day when idlers work, and fool reform, and mortal men lay hold on heaven.
  427. To whom much is given, much is required – not expected, but required.
  428. To find people who don’t want anything is rare.
  429. There’s no problem on the planet that can’t be solved without violence. That’s the lesson of the civil rights movement.
  430. There were lots of smart black people at Harvard before Barack Obama, but none of them ever got to head up the law review. There has been a history of discrimination.
  431. There is no safer place to put your money than in the middle of the U.S.
  432. There is a sense in which the United States ambassador speaks to the United States, as well as for the United States. I have always seen my role as a thermostat rather than a thermometer. So I’m going to be actively working… for my own concerns. I have always had people advise me on what to say, but never on what not to say.
  433. There can be no democracy without truth. There can be no truth without controversy, there can be no change without freedom. Without freedom there can be no progress.
  434. The unsung heroes of the civil rights movement were always the wives and the mothers.
  435. The two are not mutually exclusive, but we think we can have wealth without good ideas and without values and without a clear vision. Wealth without vision is insanity.
  436. The commercialization of sport is the democratization of sport.
  437. Surely, if we can land a spaceship on Mars, we can certainly put a voter ID card in the hand of every eligible voter.
  438. Some kind of affirmative action is important in a democracy and for economic competitiveness and national security. The Army was the first to realize that you had to have desegregation of a military to have it working properly.
  439. Slavery didn’t break up the black families as much as liberal welfare rules.
  440. Profits should be for a purpose. Profits should be productive. You should make money for producing benefits that make the world a better place. Making money is a good thing when it is made in service to humanity or the democracy.
  441. President Jimmy Carter was a citizen soldier. Ironically, he was considered weak because he didn’t kill anybody and he didn’t get anyone killed.
  442. Our school systems have to realize that everybody doesn’t learn the same way, and no one learns without some emotional support.
  443. Our children lost our direction because they have been compromised. They have found freedom at the ballot box, and then they have taken on plastic chains around their minds and souls and mortgage their future on credit cards. They have to learn better – they have to learn the value of ideas and health as opposed to wealth.
  444. One of the principles of nonviolence is that you leave your opponents whole and better off than you found them.
  445. Once the Xerox copier was invented, diplomacy died.
  446. On the soft bed of luxury many kingdoms have expired.
  447. Nothing is illegal if one hundred businessmen decide to do it.
  448. Nobody black had learned anything from the ‘Letter from the Birmingham Jail’ or from the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech. That was a revelation of white people.
  449. No one who’s white thinks he’s innocent. No one who’s black thinks he’s guilty.
  450. My hope for my children must be that they respond to the still, small voice of God in their own hearts.
  451. My feeling is that you don’t go looking for troubles. The cross ought to find you. And so I never go out of my way. I figure I only get involved in things that I can’t get around.
  452. Most of my teachers wanted to send me to the principal’s office. But my fourth-grade teacher once put her arms around me and said, ‘You sure write well.’ And I’ve had good penmanship until this day. She was the only one who ever said anything nice to me. That’s the kind of motivation that students need.
  453. Moral power is probably best when it is not used. The less you use it the more you have.
  454. Look at those they call unfortunate and at a closer view, you’ll find many of them are unwise.
  455. It stands to reason that unloved and unwanted children are going to get into crime.
  456. It is a blessing to die for a cause, because you can so easily die for nothing.
  457. Influence is like a savings account. The less you use it, the more you’ve got.
  458. In a world where change is inevitable and continuous, the need to achieve that change without violence is essential for survival.
  459. In a sane, civil, intelligent and moral society, you don’t blame poor people for being poor.
  460. If you’re a preacher, you talk for a living, so even if you don’t make sense, you learn to make nonsense eloquently.
  461. If I wanted to develop a scenario to destroy America, I would do what the Republicans are doing. Take the brightest and best young black men off the streets, put them in jail, make them meaner than hell for 8 or 10 years and then turn them lose in a society where there are plenty of guns for them to play with.
  462. If I hadn’t been so outspoken, Jimmy Carter wouldn’t have wanted me.
  463. If Congress can move President’s Day, Columbus Day and, alas, Martin Luther King’s Birthday celebration for the convenience of shoppers, shouldn’t they at least consider moving Election Day for the convenience of voters?
  464. I’ve been dyslexic and had Attention Deficit Disorder at some time in my life. I still read with a highlighter, but I’ve always loved to read.
  465. I’ve always seen the Olympics as a place where you could act out your differences on the athletic field with a sense of sportsmanship and fairness and mutual respect.
  466. I’m against voter fraud in any form, and I have long supported a national voter ID card. But ID cards need not – and must not – restrict voting rights in any way, shape or form.
  467. I wouldn’t listen to my parents, but I found out that I absorbed. I never heard what they said – told me – but I did what they did.
  468. I wasn’t predicted to be anything. I just followed an inner spirit, and it put me in the right place and the right time. I didn’t want to be the mayor of Atlanta. I didn’t want to run for Congress. I didn’t want to work for Martin Luther King Jr. I wanted to work close to him and be a writer and write about the movement.
  469. I was raised that way: don’t get mad, get smart.
  470. I was much more comfortable and a much better congressman running in a district that was 37 percent black, where I had to have a white constituency to get elected, than I would have been if I was in a 75 percent black district.
  471. I tried. But not everybody thought so.
  472. I think we’ve made tremendous progress on racism. We’ve even made progress on war. We’ve made almost no progress on poverty.
  473. I see the war problem as an economic problem, a business problem, a cultural problem, an educational problem – everything but a military problem. There’s no military solution. There is a business solution – and the sooner we can provide jobs, not with our money, but the United States has to provide the framework.
  474. I like my life. I’ve had a good life. I think the reason is my parents taught me that life is a burden. But if you take it one day at a time, it’s an easy burden.
  475. I have committed my life to helping the poor, and I believe that if more companies followed Wal-Mart’s lead in providing opportunity and savings to those who need it most, more Americans battling poverty would realize the American dream.
  476. I have about concluded that wealth is a state of mind, and that anyone can acquire a wealthy state of mind by thinking rich thoughts.
  477. I grew up in the middle of a block where there was an Irish grocery store on one corner, an Italian bar on another corner and the Nazi Party was on the third corner.
  478. I believe in humanitarian capitalism, and there are good people on Wall Street.
  479. Having personally watched the Voting Rights Act being signed into law that August day, I can’t begin to imagine how we could have all been so wrong in believing that more Americans would vote once they were all truly free to do so.
  480. Freedom is a struggle, and we do it together. Not only together as black citizens, but black and white together.
  481. For most of the world, civil and political rights… come as luxuries that are far away in the future.
  482. Everything that has happened in my life is because of good government and because the United States of America was the greatest nation on the face of the earth.
  483. Everybody is determined by his own experience.
  484. Everybody in America has been dependent on the government at some time. We owe everybody in America the right to vote and access to capital. What I say is, let’s make America work, let’s make democracy and free enterprise work for everybody.
  485. Egypt’s problem is that you’ve got an economy that works for about 40 million people, only you have 90 million people. The answer to the Egyptian problem is not guns, but jobs. We’ve got to find a private-sector, nongovernmental, aggressive way of creating jobs. That’s not America’s role totally.
  486. Do not try to live your children’s lives out of your own frustrations.
  487. Civil rights leaders are involved in helping poor people. That’s what I’ve been doing all my life.
  488. Affirmative action is an effort to include every aspect of society in the decision making.
  489. Winter makes a bridge between one year and another and, in this case, one century and the next.
  490. Three or four stones in one firing will all react differently. I try to achieve a balance between those that haven’t progressed enough and those about to go too far.
  491. The stones tear like flesh, rather than breaking. Although what happens is violent, it is a violence that is in stone. A tear is more unnerving than a break.
  492. The relationship between the public and the artist is complex and difficult to explain. There is a fine line between using this critical energy creatively and pandering to it.
  493. The reason why the stone is red is its iron content, which is also why our blood is red.
  494. The hardened mass of liquid stones had much stronger qualities than those which had simply torn. The skin remained a recognisable part of the molten stone.
  495. The first stone was just tried in the spirit of experimentation. The opening of the stone was far more interesting than the drawing that I had done on it.
  496. The first snowball I froze was put in my mother’s deep freeze when I was in my early 20s.
  497. The early firings contained many stones.
  498. The difference between a theatre with and without an audience is enormous. There is a palpable, critical energy created by the presence of the audience.
  499. Stones are checked every so often to see if any have split or at worst exploded. An explosion can leave debris in the elements so the firing has to be abandoned.
  500. Some of the snowballs have a kind of animal energy. Not just because of the materials inside them, but in the way that they appear caged, captured.
  501. Snow provokes responses that reach right back to childhood.
  502. Photography is a way of putting distance between myself and the work which sometimes helps me to see more clearly what it is that I have made.
  503. People do not realise that many of my works are done in urban places. I was brought up on the edge of Leeds, five miles from the city centre-on one side were fields and on the other, the city.
  504. People also leave presence in a place even when they are no longer there.
  505. Once the fired stone is out of the kiln, it is still possible to mentally reconstruct it in its original form.
  506. Occasionally I have come across a last patch of snow on top of a mountain in late May or June. There’s something very powerful about finding snow in summer.
  507. Not being able to touch is sometimes as interesting as being able to touch.
  508. My art is an attempt to reach beyond the surface appearance. I want to see growth in wood, time in stone, nature in a city, and I do not mean its parks but a deeper understanding that a city is nature too-the ground upon which it is built, the stone with which it is made.
  509. It’s frightening and unnerving to watch a stone melt.
  510. It takes between three and six hours to make each snowball, depending on snow quality. Wet snow is quick to work with but also quick to thaw, which can lead to a tense journey to the cold store.
  511. Ideas must be put to the test. That’s why we make things, otherwise they would be no more than ideas. There is often a huge difference between an idea and its realisation. I’ve had what I thought were great ideas that just didn’t work.
  512. I’m cautious about using fire. It can become theatrical. I am interested in the heat, not the flames.
  513. I soon realised that what had happened on a small scale cannot necessarily be repeated on a larger scale. The stones were so big that the amount of heat required was prohibitively expensive and wasteful.
  514. I have worked with this red all over the world – in Japan, California, France, Britain, Australia – a vein running round the earth. It has taught me about the flow, energy and life that connects one place with another.
  515. I have walked around the same streets so many times, and then seen a place that had been hidden to me. I now know the sites in a way that makes me think I could have made better use of the connections between place and snowball.
  516. I enjoy working in a quiet and subversive way.
  517. I did tests on small stones before collecting and committing myself to the larger ones.
  518. I am not a performer but occasionally I deliberately work in a public context. Some sculptures need the movement of people around them to work.
  519. Fire is the origin of stone. By working the stone with heat, I am returning it to its source.
  520. Even in winter an isolated patch of snow has a special quality.
  521. Confrontation is something that I accept as part of the project though not its purpose.
  522. As with all my work, whether it’s a leaf on a rock or ice on a rock, I’m trying to get beneath the surface appearance of things. Working the surface of a stone is an attempt to understand the internal energy of the stone.
  523. Abandoning the project was incredibly stressful after having gone through the process of building the room, installing the kiln, collecting the stones, sitting with the kiln day and night as it came to temperature, experiencing the failures.
  524. A stone is ingrained with geological and historical memories.
  525. A snowball is simple, direct and familiar to most of us. I use this simplicity as a container for feelings and ideas that function on many levels.
  526. You tell me that ‘Date Night’ was good? I’m not going to see it. I will debate you on it, having no knowledge of the footage in the film. I was next to someone on the plane watching it, and they were dozing off.
  527. You can’t go wrong with pizza, unless it’s terrible pizza.
  528. Why did God have to make Mo’Nique a good actress? What was God thinking when he decided to give Mo’Nique acting chops. Now we have to endure Mo’Nique comedy specials.
  529. When did I start comedy? I came out of the womb and did 10 minutes.
  530. When I started out in the late ’80s, my act was pretty terrible, and for years, I kind of toiled in obscurity. I don’t believe in a hierarchy in comedy; I feel that a person deserves respect the first time they get onstage, and after that, they just have to be funny and get more consistent.
  531. When I played a club in Salt Lake City, I complained to the crowd about the low turnout. It’s always good to berate the people who paid to see you because you’re upset about the people who didn’t show up. It’s called misplaced anger, and without it, I wouldn’t have an act.
  532. Very unique: I was a singer-songwriter-guitarist. Very unusual in the late Seventies to find a singer-songwriter, and on top of that, a guitarist.
  533. There are so many people who just want a flashy object in front of their eyes and don’t want to think at all; I find that disturbing.
  534. The right wing is appealing to a shrinking, shrinking demographic of angry white people who blame their predicament in life on the fact that there are immigrants coming into the country; it’s pretty ludicrous.
  535. The cliche that comics always use is that whatever is happening in the news is ‘the gift that keeps on giving.’ I always thought that was a bunch of nonsense.
  536. The Comedy Bar is an intimate club, which I prefer. I refuse to play theatres, because large empty spaces make me nervous, and I don’t enjoy the echo. I’m no sell out. Literally.
  537. Sometimes things can be a guilty pleasure, but with ‘Idol,’ everyone talks about it like it’s a real thing; they argue over who’s gonna win… There’s no laughing at it.
  538. Nobody gets excited when they see me. If I put on my wizard outfit and walk around the airport for a couple of hours, I get a couple of puzzled glances.
  539. My manager came up with the name ‘State of the Industry,’ and it was just one of those things. It just took off. Well, I don’t know about ‘took off.’ I’m not in the stratosphere.
  540. My goal isn’t to wake up in the morning and hurt people’s feelings.
  541. My goal is to be exactly how I am offstage – although I realize I’m supposed to punctuate it with jokes.
  542. My favorite comedians are basically themselves onstage.
  543. My big fear is that I’ll put down so many people, I’ll have to leave show biz.
  544. Most of the people in my family were pretty funny. Everyone had a good sense of humor. I came to California right after college, wanting to be a musician.
  545. Louie is hugely talented. But I get very annoyed at the way the media… say, ‘Louis C.K. is the greatest stand-up in the world.’ He’s not the greatest stand-up in the world. He’s not funnier than Dave Attell.
  546. Jimmy Fallon is handsome. This is an indisputable fact.
  547. In the ’90s, comedy was at a very low point, but these days, you’ve got people like Hannibal Burress, Ron Funches, Maria Bamford – people who can play any club, anywhere.
  548. If everything was good, maybe I wouldn’t have a career. I wouldn’t have anything to make fun of.
  549. If I love a comic but they have an off night, who am I to say they should have taken out this or added that? It doesn’t work that way… I have no interest in hurting people’s feelings.
  550. I’ve sold a lot of different product. Very briefly, I sold Time Life Books on the phone.
  551. I’ve never been paid as a prognosticator. I don’t get a lot of work as a mentalist.
  552. I’ve given myself permission to say whatever’s on my mind when I’m on stage.
  553. I’ve always felt that there’s a Catskills comic who lives in my head and is constantly trying to get out. There’s all these jokes that have been passed down from Jewish generation to Jewish generation, which I love but which I’ve always made fun of.
  554. I’m tired of demographic appeal being more important than talent. I want to fight against that.
  555. I’m still doing what I’ve always wanted to do, and how big it gets or how much money I make for it or how popular I am in the public’s eye is really not that important, even though it’s hard to let that go.
  556. I’m on a mission. If I can make even one person not enjoy something they’re currently enjoying, it’s all worth it!
  557. I’m not trying to do anything except entertain America.
  558. I’m not really in Louis CK’s circle. It’d probably be harder if we were really close and I went off on him.
  559. I’m not a confrontational person in real life, so I really don’t wanna get into arguments or fistfights with people I’m making fun of.
  560. I’m interested in Jeff Bridges. I love that guy. And I did like Carey Mulligan in ‘An Education.’ And I love Meryl Streep, but if they could ban ‘Julie & Julia,’ I’d be in favor of that.
  561. I would like Albert Brooks to have received the Oscars for best actor, best director and best screenplay for ‘Modern Romance.’ I love that movie.
  562. I will say that I wasn’t susceptible to Tony Robbins-like pitches, even as a younger man.
  563. I wanted to like ‘Up in the Air’ – I like Jason Reitman – but Vera Farmiga left me cold.
  564. I try to go out for everything. I go out for any acting stuff that comes up, and voice-over stuff.
  565. I think that most people will spend their whole life not figuring out what they’re meant to do, or figuring out what they’re meant to do on their way to do something else. So I just feel lucky that I know what I love to do. Everything else figures itself out.
  566. I sold door to door for a couple years. As the years recede from the event, I remember less about it, which is probably good for my mind. It was home improvement in Cerritos California, Buena Park, that area.
  567. I have to say, after hanging out with Republicans for four days, I want to take a look at my own birth certificate. I don’t think I was born in this country.
  568. I have so many strong opinions on the entertainment industry, but if I’m in a deli somewhere, and someone says they love that Adam Sandler movie where he dresses up as his twin sister – well, I don’t want to make people feel bad for how they feel about things. I’m always courteous, not mean.
  569. I have a true love for the old style of Catskill comic. There’s a joy in discovering a bad joke… and then there’s the joy of delivering it like, ‘Isn’t this a hacky joke?’
  570. I feel completely fearless when I’m on stage. And also totally fearful. There’s the fear that I’m not making a very smart career move sometimes, but there’s the stronger belief that these things need to be said.
  571. I even get tired performing standup, which is normally a low-impact exercise in futility but looks hard the way I do it. That’s why I take a lot of breaks, often stopping in the middle of a joke to catch my breath, or blame the crowd for not laughing before the punchline.
  572. I don’t know what Tracy Morgan does onstage, but I can assure you, it’s no act.
  573. I don’t hate Dane Cook, but I am trying to go after people I think are capable of more.
  574. I don’t enjoy writing newspaper articles any more than people like reading them. I’m a standup comic, not a journalist, although sometimes onstage I will say: ‘What else is in the news?’ Writing is work, which I’m not comfortable with.
  575. I don’t consider myself a political comedian because it’s so hard. It takes time away from me saying terrible things about TV.
  576. I do notice a lot of people who want to shock to get laughs. It’s such a tricky thing; you don’t want to make rules about it. There’s nobody more hilarious than Dave Attell, and he’d break every rule you set up. But he’s funny.
  577. I did not sell Amway, but I sold Shaklee, which was an Amway-type product sold through multi-level marketing.
  578. I can open up any can of worms and get people upset.
  579. I came out to L.A. in ’78 to be a musician. I didn’t get into comedy until the mid-Eighties.
  580. I am the smartest comedian in the history of the world.
  581. I always had a tremendous amount of rage about the business, and I thought turning that into comedy was healthy.
  582. George Lopez is always on the verge of hilarity. If he could ever think of something funny to say, if he had a funny thought in his mind, he’s ready to go.
  583. From 1987 to 1992, I was on the road for 40 weeks a year playing comedy clubs, and that was during the ‘comedy boom.’
  584. Can we all admit that ‘Parks and Recreation’ is horrible? Is this something we would all know, but don’t say? Maybe everything should not be improv’d.
  585. ‘The Graduate’ should have won best picture over ‘In the Heat of the Night.’
  586. ‘Ambulatory’ is my favorite word to use because it never gets a laugh.
  587. You have to go into each match believing you can beat all of the players.
  588. You can’t focus on other people’s careers. Everybody is different.
  589. You are always talking about yourself and tennis and how you are feeling. I try to avoid it when I don’t have to.
  590. Wimbledon, for me, is the most important tournament of the year, so you know there’s always going to be people expecting me to do well.
  591. When you have beaten guys a few times, you don’t want them to think they know how you are going to play them. You have to try and find different ways of beating them. You have to do things they don’t expect sometimes, put something unpredictable into your game.
  592. When a lot of things are going the wrong way for a country, for a people, when you can’t really think of anything worse than a war, you always try to take life on the brighter side and that’s how I grew up with my parents.
  593. When I’m training in December, I have to eat like 6,000 calories a day to maintain my weight. It’s a bit tiring.
  594. When I’m in Miami I like to go and watch basketball, the Miami Heat.
  595. When I’m at home, I enjoy going go-karting.
  596. When I lost the Wimbledon 2012 final, I didn’t know if I’d ever win a slam.
  597. Well, my mum’s been a tennis coach – she coached me till I was 12.
  598. To be honest, I think bananas are a pathetic fruit.
  599. There’s two people I would say to try to go and watch who are probably the future of tennis. One girl called Taylor Townsend, she got a wildcard from the event into Wimbledon; she’s an American girl. On the men’s side, there’s an Australian guy called Nick Kyrgios; he’s 19, and he was the number one junior in the world.
  600. There is a fear of emotion in tennis.
  601. The only pressure I feel is the pressure I put on myself to win.
  602. Tennis is an individual sport, and I am quite a self-conscious person.
  603. Staying more controlled mentally stemmed from taking my fitness more seriously. When you’re doing track work, sprints and so on, it’s pretty painful, but that does make you feel better prepared and therefore mentally stronger when you’re going into a match. You know, without a doubt, that you are strong enough to last.
  604. Sometimes you’re looking to play perfect tennis but it’s not going to happen all the time and you have to accept it.
  605. People say to me, ‘You don’t seem that interested in interviews.’ Well, you know, I’m not, often. I’m not going to talk tactics with the press, so you are left with talking about how you are feeling; for me, it is not the most interesting thing to be doing.
  606. One of the things I would have loved to have had was a family that worked better together, although I love my mother and father to bits.
  607. One day for dinner I’ll have fish, then the next day chicken, and then I’ll have steak. I just try to mix it up all the time. I don’t eat the same thing every day.
  608. Obviously you try to keep as much of your private life as private as you can.
  609. Normally I sleep for 9, 10 hours a night.
  610. My speed is something that has made a difference to my whole career. When I’ve felt quick and I’m moving well, it makes a huge difference to my entire game. When I feel a bit slower, I end up doing a lot more defending. When I’m a bit quicker to the ball, I feel I can attack a lot more.
  611. My fitness trainer’s English, my physio’s English, some of my friends are English. I don’t have a problem with English people at all.
  612. My dinner options are kept simple during Wimbledon. I have either salmon with rice, roast chicken with vegetables and potatoes, or steak with salad. My girlfriend Kim will cook, and I know each night that it will be one of those three.
  613. Like most guys, I’ve always liked watches. I can always check the time on my phone, but having a watch is so much better.
  614. It’s not the end of the world to lose.
  615. It’s easy to start over-thinking things and over-analysing things.
  616. In tennis, it is not the opponent you fear, it is the failure itself, knowing how near you were but just out of reach.
  617. If you want a player to serve and volley more, you need to teach them to do that more, how to move at the net.
  618. I’ve realised over the years I play my best when I have time to prepare for each tournament as best as possible.
  619. I’ve never felt nervous in front of big crowds and in big stadiums.
  620. I’ve been asked a lot lately if tennis is clean or not. I don’t know any more how you judge whether a sport is clean. If one in 100 players is doping, in my eyes that isn’t a clean sport.
  621. I’m definitely open to change, but at the same time I am quite stubborn.
  622. I used to think that losing made you more hungry and determined but after my success at the Olympics and the U.S. Open I realise that winning is the biggest motivation.
  623. I used a lot of sports psychologists when I was younger… sometimes it helped, sometimes it didn’t.
  624. I think most players would love, at one stage in their career, to say, ‘I’ve been No. 1 in the world.’
  625. I tend not to argue about things that I don’t believe in.
  626. I play fantasy basketball and fantasy football, soccer.
  627. I often find that pundits are quite negative… not just in tennis, but in sport in general. I just don’t like that. Obviously, the job of a pundit is to create interest and a bit of controversy. I get that. Listeners like that. But I do think there’s a duty there to promote the sport and talk about how good these people are at what they do.
  628. I never read. The paper or anything. I watch a lot of movies, and TV series and stuff. But I never, never read.
  629. I love music. I listen to a lot of it.
  630. I just enjoy watching tennis. And there’s things that you can learn from the men’s and the women’s game.
  631. I hate losing.
  632. I had great success with Ivan Lendl. Was he a perfect coach? No. Was he a very good coach? Yeah. He had some very strong qualities and some things that weren’t so good.
  633. I feel like I’m more a fan of tennis rather than it being men’s or women’s. I enjoy watching doubles as well when it’s on. I think that there are certain players that I enjoy watching on the men’s and women’s side. There’s some players that I don’t enjoy watching on both sides.
  634. I don’t want a flashy car, just something that would allow me to stop using the Tube. And it would be good not to have to rely on my mum all the time, particularly when I have to listen to her singing in her car.
  635. I don’t play any tournaments to come second best.
  636. I don’t actually go to that many concerts.
  637. I do think your personal life has an impact on your tennis. If your private life is up and down, and you’re thinking about what is going on back home, then you aren’t solely focused on your job, but when things are good back home, it’s so much easier when you’re on court. It’s not necessarily marriage; it’s more having a stable relationship.
  638. I do some 400 m. repetition running for endurance on the court. I’ll be in the gym lifting weights, or I’ll be putting in a lot of core stability to work to improve my balance.
  639. I believe you should give 100% on the court, so I chase every ball.
  640. I am not stroppy at all.
  641. I am not anti-English, and I never was.
  642. I am Scottish. I am also British.
  643. Having a normal knee would make life a lot easier.
  644. Getting married is great, and I feel really good away from the court, and my private life and stuff is good. But you still need to train and work hard. Like, I didn’t go on a honeymoon after we got married; I went to Barcelona and trained for 10 days to get ready for the clay-court season. It’s been good, but you still have to put the work in.
  645. For much of the year, you’re just trying to maintain your fitness. It’s not often you get a lot of time to really concentrate on improving it.
  646. For me, by far, the Olympics is the biggest sporting event in the world.
  647. Everything in tennis is so neat and nice but boxing has sport down to its essence; it is very pure and I like that.
  648. Everyone has to try to give back as much as possible because I think in all sports it helps kids to have role models or people to look up to. Someone like Jess Ennis, I know a lot of young girls have started to get into athletics stuff because of her, because of her success.
  649. Everybody always talks about the pressure of playing at Wimbledon, how tough it is, but the people watching make it so much easier to play.
  650. Earlier in my career, I used to spend a lot of time practising my tennis on court. Now I’ve learned that it’s better to do just a couple of hours on court and two gym sessions a day. That’s what’s made me fitter and stronger.
  651. Contrary to my image, I do have a sense of humour.
  652. Boxing, mixed martial arts and tennis are the hardest sports to train for.
  653. Boxers risk a lot in the ring. That’s one of the things that attracts me to it. You want to see a knockout but I also really don’t want to see people get hurt. It’s this constant dilemma when I’m watching boxing. The only times I get nervous is watching a really big fight or when my brother is playing. I get to the stage where I’m actually shaking.
  654. A lot of times, the press guys ask why I take an hour and a half to come to the interview room, but if you don’t do the massage and the ice baths and the stretching and the cooling down and the eating, and your opponent is doing that stuff, they already have an advantage.
  655. A lot of the players are very complimentary about each other; they embrace at the end of matches because the level of the tennis has been so good. I think that’s something that tennis has got to be proud of.
  656. A lot of athletes use sports psychologists.
  657. Writers don’t retire. I will always be a writer.
  658. Would a real man get caught eating a twinkie?
  659. When those waiters ask me if I want some fresh ground pepper, I ask if they have any aged pepper.
  660. We’re all proud of making little mistakes. It gives us the feeling we don’t make any big ones.
  661. We need people who can actually do things. We have too many bosses and too few workers.
  662. Vegetarian – that’s an old Indian word meaning lousy hunter.
  663. The world must be filled with unsuccessful musical careers like mine, and it’s probably a good thing. We don’t need a lot of bad musicians filling the air with unnecessary sounds. Some of the professionals are bad enough.
  664. The only people who say worse things about politicians that reporters do are other politicians.
  665. The federal government has sponsored research that has produced a tomato that is perfect in every respect, except that you can’t eat it. We should make every effort to make sure this disease, often referred to as ‘progress’, doesn’t spread.
  666. The dullest Olympic sport is curling, whatever ‘curling’ means.
  667. The closing of a door can bring blessed privacy and comfort – the opening, terror. Conversely, the closing of a door can be a sad and final thing – the opening a wonderfully joyous moment.
  668. The average dog is a nicer person than the average person.
  669. The average bright young man who is drafted hates the whole business because an army always tries to eliminate the individual differences in men.
  670. The Super Bowl isn’t for kids, I had a great time though and it was worth every nickel of it because by doing this lame piece about the game I can put it on my expense account.
  671. The 50-50-90 rule: Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there’s a 90% probability you’ll get it wrong.
  672. Taxes are important. President Bush’s tax proposals leave no rich person behind. Voters approve of President Bush helping the kind of people they wish they were one of.
  673. People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe.
  674. One of the most glorious messes in the world is the mess created in the living room on Christmas day. Don’t clean it up too quickly.
  675. Obscenities… I think a lot of dumb people do it because they can’t think of what they want to say and they’re frustrated. A lot of smart people do it to pretend they aren’t very smart – want to be just one of the boys.
  676. Nothing in fine print is ever good news.
  677. My own time is passing fast enough without some national game to help it along.
  678. Most of us end up with no more than five or six people who remember us. Teachers have thousands of people who remember them for the rest of their lives.
  679. Making duplicate copies and computer printouts of things no one wanted even one of in the first place is giving America a new sense of purpose.
  680. Let’s make a statement to the airlines just to get their attention. We’ll pick a week next year and we’ll all agree not to go anywhere for seven days.
  681. It’s paradoxical, that the idea of living a long life appeals to everyone, but the idea of getting old doesn’t appeal to anyone.
  682. If you smile when no one else is around, you really mean it.
  683. If dogs could talk it would take a lot of the fun out of owning one.
  684. I’m in a position of feeling secure enough so that I can say what I think is right and if so many people think it’s wrong that I get fired, well, I’ve got enough to eat.
  685. I obviously have a knack for getting on paper what a lot of people have thought and didn’t realize they thought. And they say, ‘Hey, yeah!’ And they like that.
  686. I like ice hockey, but it’s a frustrating game to watch. It’s hard to keep your eyes on both the puck and the players and too much time passes between scoring in hockey. There are usually more fights than there are points.
  687. I just wish we knew a little less about his urethra and a little more about his arms sales to Iran.
  688. I hope all of you are going to fill out your census form when it comes in the mail next month. If you don’t return the form the area you live in might get less government money and you wouldn’t want that to happen, would you.
  689. I don’t think the government is out to get me or help someone else get me but it wouldn’t surprise me if they were out to sell me something or help someone else sell me something. I mean, why else would the Census Bureau want to know my telephone number?
  690. I don’t pick subjects as much as they pick me.
  691. I don’t like food that’s too carefully arranged; it makes me think that the chef is spending too much time arranging and not enough time cooking. If I wanted a picture I’d buy a painting.
  692. I didn’t get old on purpose, it just happened. If you’re lucky, it could happen to you.
  693. Happiness depends more on how life strikes you than on what happens.
  694. Figure skating is an unlikely Olympic event but its good television. It’s sort of a combination of gymnastics and ballet. A little sexy too which doesn’t hurt.
  695. Elephants and grandchildren never forget.
  696. Don’t rule out working with your hands. It does not preclude using your head.
  697. Death is a distant rumor to the young.
  698. Computers may save time but they sure waste a lot of paper. About 98 percent of everything printed out by a computer is garbage that no one ever reads.
  699. Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don’t need to be done.
  700. As an old reporter, we have a few secrets, and the first thing is we try the phone book.
  701. Anyone who watches golf on television would enjoy watching the grass grow on the greens.
  702. All men are not created equal but should be treated as though they were under the law.
  703. A writer’s job is to tell the truth.
  704. You’re watching your kids playing football, and you’re not present. It’s like the worst… it’s horrible. I despise myself for it. I think it’s a particularly male thing. Being present and in the moment with your kids is something a lot of men struggle with.
  705. You’ll very rarely find that you can enhance a performance to give it a real emotional centre and truth… after the fact.
  706. You never really know why you become an actor: it’s a visceral thing, an emotional thing.
  707. You don’t really think about 3D when you’re acting. As a director, you do.
  708. You could go so wrong with a ‘Planet of the Apes’ reboot; you could make it melodramatic, you could make it campy, you could fall into so many traps with it.
  709. You can’t just come up with an idea for a game and stick the drama on top. It all has to be one driving thrust.
  710. Yeah, I mean, climbing’s always been a massive hobby of mine up until, kind of, recent times when I’ve had family, but no, it’s been a driving passion in my life and, uh, I’ve always wanted to climb the Matterhorn. It was the mountain that, sort of, inspired me to climb, as a youngster. So, it was great to be able to get to do it.
  711. Working with and collaborating with and for Peter Jackson was an incredible experience because he is such a phenomenal filmmaker.
  712. When you have children, you realize that at the end, it’s all about passing on, about handing down.
  713. When you do animation – well, straightforward animation, although it’s not straightforward – the voice for a character or something, they’re always singular experiences, really.
  714. When we, as humans, articulate, our tongues tend to hit the back of the teeth.
  715. When I’m working on the scripts or working with the other actors or rehearsing with the director, and when the director is cutting the movie, and we’ve shot the scene, the director is not looking at the visual effects.
  716. When I was in theater I was forever trying to inhabit a space which puts yourself under the microscope as an actor and your personality and your take on life, but actually through another portal of a character.
  717. When I played Gollum in ‘Lord of the Rings,’ if I was climbing up the side of a mountain, which I physically did, you know, I was on every single occasion swimming through streams, all of that, that wasn’t captured. That was filmed on 35 millimeter, and for certain of those shots, it was rotoscoped and painted over.
  718. When I first did ‘The Lord of the Rings,’ I was acting on the set with the other actors, but then I had to go back and repeat the process on my own to do the physical capture on a motion capture stage.
  719. What’s wonderful about Tolkien and Shakespeare is that they show up your own individual microscope. They’re so infinitely vast. You can reinterpret them in so many ways.
  720. What’s fantastic is that there’s a real growing appreciation for performance-capture technology as a tool for acting.
  721. What you can do with visual effects is enhance the look of the character, but the actual integrity of the emotional performance and the way the character’s facial expressions work, that is what is going to be created on the day with other actors and the director.
  722. We’ve never had nannies. We’ve had great grandparents, great support from family, and the kids have been on every set: they’ve seen me play Gollum, King Kong, Captain Haddock, the lot. They totally get it, and they want to go into the business. Ruby, my daughter, is very keen to become an actress.
  723. There’s a huge gulf between people who can afford to go to drama school and those who can’t.
  724. There are parts of New Zealand that I absolutely fell in love with that I will miss going back to, but I kind of think that is the part that can continue and will continue on. I don’t imagine I’ll stop going back to New Zealand, because I feel part of the fabric there, really.
  725. The wonderful thing about 48 fps is the integration of live action and CG elements; that is something I learned from ‘The Hobbit.’ We are so used to 24 fps and the romance of celluloid… but at 48 fps, you cannot deny the existence of these CG creations in the same time frame and space and environment as the live action.
  726. The whole chameleon thing about acting. That’s why I’m moving towards directing – it’s a much more healthy occupation.
  727. The thing is, I don’t just take roles because they’re performance capture.
  728. The reason that some motion-capture films don’t work is if the scripts are not good, and the characters aren’t engaging, then you don’t believe in the journey, and you’re not connected to it. It’s not the technology’s fault.
  729. The learning curve is ‘The Hobbit’ is being shot in 3D.
  730. The great thing about performance capture is you can go off, and then, without changing costume, you can become another character.
  731. The fact of the matter is that an actor, if I’m playing a performance capture role and you’re playing a live action role and we’re having a scene together, there’s no difference in our acting processes.
  732. The fact of the matter is I have done so many parts.
  733. The art of transformation is a very important thing to me, and I always believe I can say something more truthful through characters that are further away from me.
  734. That’s why I ended up going to Lancaster University, because they had a visual arts course, and in the first year it was like a broad visual arts course in sculpture, painting, graphics – all of that.
  735. Thank God for Skype!
  736. Recently I read that half the world or more has read ‘The Lord of The Rings,’ but then I found out that something like 75 per cent of the world knows the ‘Tintin’ books.
  737. Put it this way: If I had to go back to 1968 and wear the makeup that John Chambers made for the original ‘Planet of the Apes’ series, I think I would rather wear a unitard.
  738. Playing a character in a video game is different to other performances because your character can’t lead the audience of players in one direction.
  739. Performance capture, for me, is finding the essence of a performance.
  740. Performance capture is a tool that young actors will need in the next 10, 20 years. It’s on the increase, as you say. It’s not going away.
  741. Performance capture is a technology, not a genre; it’s just another way of recording an actor’s performance.
  742. People will come up to me and try and be secretive and say, ‘Can you do the Gollum voice for me?’ And I’m like, ‘Are you kidding? It’s 8:30 in the morning on the Victoria Line.’
  743. People used to say, ‘Andy Serkis lent his movements to Gollum,’ and now they say, ‘Andy Serkis played Caesar.’ That’s a significant leap.
  744. People think, ‘Oh, well how can ‘The Hobbit,’ which is one book, become three films?’ But you can take one line from an appendice and it turns into a whole sequence.
  745. People find it hard to get their heads around nominating a computer-generated character, but every time you see Gollum on the screen, that’s me who is acting up there – even if it is behind a mass of pixels – and it’s my voice you hear.
  746. Over the years, people have asked me, ‘Do you think there should be a separate category for acting in the digital realm? Or hybrid sort of awards for digital characters?’ and so on. And I’ve always really maintained that I don’t believe so.
  747. Our family were outsiders, and I’ve always had a sense of the outsider, the underdog, and a strong sense of justice towards people who are excluded.
  748. Originally, I thought, ‘Gollum’s such a fantastic character, why are you doing him CG? Surely you need to be able to humanise him as much as possible – he’s so full of pathos and real emotion.’
  749. Originally when I went off to work on ‘The Lord of The Rings’ I got a call from my agent saying that I was just going to do a voice. But I couldn’t really approach it like that. To get Gollum’s voice I had to play the character.
  750. On ‘The Avengers,’ I’ve been working closely with Mark Ruffalo.
  751. Nowadays, there’s no such thing as a stable job.
  752. Not a day goes by where I’m not reminded of Gollum by some person in the street who asks me to do his voice or wants to talk to me about him. But because ‘The Hobbit’ has been talked about as a project for many years, I knew that at some point I’d have to reengage with him.
  753. My very, very first moment on set on ‘Lord of the Rings’ in 2000 was me in a lycra suit, six and a half thousand feet up on a mountain in New Zealand, standing in front of 250 crew who were all wondering what I was doing – myself included.
  754. My take is that acting is acting. A performance is a performance. With performance capture, if you don’t get the performance on the day, you can’t enhance the performance.
  755. My natural bent is to have an overabundance of energy, and motion-capture essentializes your every breath, your every move. Seeing yourself through that mask, you realize how far you can pull back and make the performance even more powerful.
  756. My livelihood depends on the art of animators.
  757. My first job when I got my equity card was acting in 14 plays back-to-back. Playing that many roles, you look for ways of differentiating the characters physically, which goes hand in hand with understanding them psychologically.
  758. My father was interested in justice, always working for people who needed to be supported.
  759. My dad was working abroad, in Iraq, and he was a doctor. We used to go and visit him, in Baghdad, off and on. For the first ten years of my life, we used to go backwards and forwards to Baghdad, so that was quite amazing. I spent a lot of time traveling around the Middle East.
  760. Mountaineering has always been a huge hobby of mine.
  761. Motion capture is exactly what it says: it’s physical moves, whereas performance capture is the entire performance – including your facial performance. If you’re doing, say, martial arts for a video game, that is motion capture. This is basically another way of recording an actor’s performance: audio, facial and physical.
  762. More and more good actors are now transmigrating into the videogame space and playing roles there because it’s where my generation of kids get stories from.
  763. Middle-earth is a universe I know very well.
  764. Looking back, when I was Gollum, I suppose I did break the mold to a certain extent. I’m proud, and very thrilled, to be a part of that.
  765. Just being an ape is a workout.
  766. J.J. Abrams is an all-time hero of mine, really lovely to be working with him.
  767. J.J. Abrams and I met, and we just had this incredible kind of vibe between us.
  768. It was a fairly happy childhood. My father was working away, and my mum brought up five kids all on her own.
  769. It has been great portraying Gollum, but it will be great to see my face on screen for a change.
  770. In the same way ‘Lord of the Rings’ was an interpretation of the book, ‘The Hobbit’ is being treated the same way. It will be faithfully represented with a fresh interpretation.
  771. In terms of animation, animators are actors as well. They are fantastic actors. They have to draw from how they feel emotionally about the beat of a scene that they’re working on. They work collaboratively.
  772. In performance capture roles, it’s not a committee of animators that author the role, it’s the actor. I think that’s a significant thing for people to understand.
  773. In ‘Tintin,’ it’s like a live-action role. You’re living and breathing and making decisions for that character from page 1 to page 120, the whole emotional arc. In an animated movie, it’s a committee decision. There are 50 people creating that character. You’re responsible for a small part.
  774. If you’re in a motion-capture studio, you have spherical, reflective markers, which are picked up by cameras that emit infrared – it reflects it, and then the cameras pick up the data.
  775. If you are not moved by the character, no amount of CGI will give you a performance that is emotionally engaging or devastating – what a live-action performance does.
  776. If it was a great script and a great character, I would love to do a romantic comedy.
  777. If James Franco’s wearing a costume, and I’m wearing a motion capture suit, we don’t act any differently with each other because of what we’re wearing. We’re embodying our roles.
  778. If I hear someone say something, and they’re 100 per cent about it, then it’s almost inevitable that I’ll take the opposite view. I guess I feel at odds with things like society. Absolutism is always a trigger for me.
  779. If ‘The Hobbit’ happens – and there’s reason to believe that it will – then I think I’m in with a chance! Gollum is very much part of ‘The Hobbit,’ after all.
  780. I’ve done a lot of films that are purely live-action roles, and even if I hadn’t come across performance capture as a technology, I think I’d always consider myself a sort of mercurial actor.
  781. I’ve been writing and wanting to direct for a long time.
  782. I’ve been told that some guy wrote something like, ‘Andy Serkis does everything, animators do nothing.’ Of course I never in a million years said that, wouldn’t ever say that. It’s not within my understanding of filmmaking to ever say anything like that.
  783. I’ve been on stage and been an actor for many years and used different mediums.
  784. I’ve always thought of acting as a tool to change society. I watch a lot of actors and I see panic in their eyes because they don’t know why they act and I know why I act. Whether I’m a good or a bad actor, I know why I do it.
  785. I’ve always been really in touch with my primal instincts. In my profession, you have to be.
  786. I’ve always been a huge fan of Charles Lawton’s performance in ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame,’ so somewhere along the line, I’ve always wanted to play that character.
  787. I’m quite contrary. If people agree on something, I tend to gravitate the other way by my nature. I don’t like to be told what to do. I think it goes back to school. I like to do things I want to do and I really don’t like doing what I don’t want to do.
  788. I’m in the early stages of a film called ‘Freezing Time’ about Eadweard Muybridge, the Victorian photographer who was really the forefather of cinema. Digital animators still treat his images like the Bible. He was a very obsessed man.
  789. I’m definitely moving more towards directing now.
  790. I’m a shockingly bad sleeper. In bed very late. Awake at the crack of dawn.
  791. I’m a Mac user. I think it depends on how you were brought up, and I was introduced to Apple quite early. They’re certainly the best for visual stuff and film-directing.
  792. I’d like to think that we strive in film and theatre to tell great stories, and I believe in the power of storytelling in our culture.
  793. I’d already started directing short films when we were doing ‘Lord of the Rings,’ then videogame projects.
  794. I would love to direct an ‘Apes’ movie. It would be in the spirit of where I’m going with my career – avatars played by actors to say something about the human condition.
  795. I wanted to be a painter, really, when I was growing up as a kid. It was one thing that really took a grip on me.
  796. I want to link together ancient forms of storytelling and the future.
  797. I understand why people went nuts for ‘The Artist.’ We use words so much, it’s nice to be able to explore a different way of communication, to be able to express silently what someone – or something – is thinking or feeling.
  798. I think when actors run away from their work that they’re slightly crazy, really!
  799. I think there will always be a particular generation of actors who… think that they’re going to be replaced by robots. But certainly the emerging actors… understand that that’s part of the craft.
  800. I think the actors in ‘Greystoke’ were amazing. They had a really good performance coach called Peter Elliott who’s, of his time, one of the greatest simian performance coaches for actors.
  801. I think that Gollum is really the character who is a very human character, and he’s very flawed, like most humans are, and has good and bad sides.
  802. I think parenting is very different now. We’re totally governed by our children!
  803. I think my mum wanted me to join the army or something, or become a surveyor – something with good career prospects.
  804. I think even back as far as ‘Lord of the Rings,’ there was always the chance that ‘The Hobbit’ would be made, even way back then. Of course at that point, Peter Jackson didn’t probably think at that point that he’d be directing it.
  805. I think acting really helps as a director. It’s just no question, because you totally understand the acting process.
  806. I think I’d like to be a lion tamer, actually. That – that would provide the most audience entertainment if something went really badly.
  807. I think I spend most of my time not living in reality, actually.
  808. I think I have a lot of internal energy, which does need to come out.
  809. I think Caesar is one of the most empathetic characters that I’ve played. I think that’s the key to a successful leadership. Being able to keep your ears open at all times.
  810. I stayed in Baghdad every summer until I was 14. My dad’s sister is still there, but many of my relatives have managed to get out. People forget that there are still people there who are not radicalized in any particular direction, trying to live normal lives in a very difficult situation.
  811. I spent a lot of time on my own working out the physical vocabulary for how Gollum moved. As I say, I drew on a lot of Tolkein’s descriptions of how he moves, but also the conceptual artist sketches.
  812. I remember kind of doing early acting and thinking, ‘God, they don’t paint behind the sets.’ It’s a bit of a shame, really – ‘Oh, what’s on the other side of this wall? Oh, you can see the plywood.’ I was really disappointed. I just thought that these things were real, from watching things as a kid.
  813. I play saxophone, I play tenor sax.
  814. I never felt totally, 100%, patriotically English… I’d seen a lot of the world by an early age – sort of spent a lot of time traveling around Lebanon and I’d seen Babylon, and Damascus, and all sorts of places in the Middle East by the time I was ten. Then we’d return to Ruslip in West London… Done a fair bit of traveling really.
  815. I love the ability to transform because that, for me, is a liberation.
  816. I love acting and certainly won’t give it up, but it’s part of a bigger canvas for me now.
  817. I have a road bike and a mountain bike, and I tend to use them both a lot. They help you keep your balance and your stamina.
  818. I have a company in the U.K., a performance-capture studio. We’re looking to push the boundaries of performance-capture technology in film and video games, but also in live theater, using real-time performance capture with actors onstage, and combining that with holographic imagery.
  819. I had to relearn how to ride a horse like an ape. I had to change how I jumped off and how I gripped them with my thighs and distribute my weight differently.
  820. I had a cat called Dizz, after Dizzy Gillespie.
  821. I had a body wax. It’s the most painful thing I have ever done in my life. I had every single hair on my body pulled out, and I really bruised.
  822. I guess I just tend to feel at home wherever I go.
  823. I grew up with ‘Star Wars’ and was a massive fan of the original films.
  824. I expect at some point I’ll probably want to go back on stage and do some theater, because I’ve not done theater in 10 years.
  825. I enjoy high-speed about-turns in thought.
  826. I don’t want to play a voice.
  827. I don’t see a difference between playing a performance capture role and a live action role, they’re just characters to me at the end of the day and I’m an actor who wants to explore those characters in fantastically written scripts. The only caveat is a good story is a good character.
  828. I do love nature, but I don’t suppose I’d spent more time in zoos as a child than anyone else!
  829. I do listen to myself sometimes and think, ‘Is my moral compass so easily swayed by the characters I play, or is it me growing as a human being?’
  830. I do have anger management issues. Not clinical. Probably no more than most people.
  831. I can get on with all different sorts of people, and I never feel homesick, particularly, or I’ve never felt kind of patriotic towards any one country.
  832. I believe that when people experience an event as a community, it can transcend and change people’s lives.
  833. I am a bit evangelical, I know, but performance-capture is still misunderstood.
  834. Having done a lot of theater, I’m used to sustaining characters over long periods of time.
  835. Great actors like Willem Dafoe and Ellen Page and Samuel L. Jackson will go and do a videogame, because they understand that storytelling isn’t just necessarily about filmmaking.
  836. Gorillas have a belch vocalization, which is sort of like, ‘I’m OK, you’re OK.’ They do a pig grunt, which is reprimanding. They sing, they laugh, and they hoot, which grows into a chest-beating display.
  837. Gorillas are still wild creatures. That’s made very clear when you observe them in nature. They charge and perform other displays that are terrifying by design. But they don’t attack unless they feel threatened.
  838. Gorilla tourism is vital to Rwanda’s economy: It’s the third highest source of income.
  839. Gollum’s never really gone too far away from me because he’s indelibly kind of printed into my DNA now, I think.
  840. Gollum was so interesting to me because he’s morally ambivalent, and I love the notion of a quest that is to lose something. Not to gain, but to get rid of something.
  841. Gollum is my picture of Dorian Gray. He will be with me for the rest of life, and I will grow to look more like him as I get older.
  842. Gollum is entirely based on the notion of addiction. The way that the ring pervades him, makes him craving, lustful, depletes him physically, psychologically and mentally.
  843. Gollum is Gollum – though in ‘Lord of the Rings’ he’s 600 years old and in ‘The Hobbit’ he’s 540, so he looks a little bit more handsome.
  844. Gollum has a weak personality and isn’t able to cope with the power of the ring.
  845. Games aren’t going to go away. BAFTA’s got a category for games as an art form. The Academy should think about that, too.
  846. For me, I’ve never drawn a distinction between live-action acting and performance-capture acting. It is purely a technology.
  847. For film and games, there is now a fantastic method of actors portraying characters which don’t necessarily look like themselves. And yet you’ve still got the heart and soul of the performance.
  848. Everybody thinks performance capture is about thrashing around and doing a lots of movement, but it’s actually about being able to contain and think and be believed in a close-up, as much as anything else.
  849. Every age has its storytelling form, and video gaming is a huge part of our culture. You can ignore or embrace video games and imbue them with the best artistic quality. People are enthralled with video games in the same way as other people love the cinema or theatre.
  850. Did you happen to catch the film I did between ‘Lord of the Rings’ and ‘Kong?’ It was a nice little Jennifer Garner comedy, ’13 Going on 30,’ and I play her boss. In my big scene, I get to moonwalk – pretty well, I thought – to Michael Jackson.
  851. Climbing’s always been a massive hobby of mine up until, kind of, recent times when I’ve had family, but no, it’s been a driving passion in my life, and, uh, I’ve always wanted to climb the Matterhorn. It was the mountain that, sort of, inspired me to climb, as a youngster.
  852. Certain gorillas are more evolved than certain human beings I know.
  853. But I think there’s something wonderful and extraordinary about climbing on your own and just that kind of relationship to the environment. I’m very addicted to the mountains. You know, so, I do like that solitude.
  854. Britain has enormous amount of talent, as we’ve seen from the BAFTAs. It’s all here, and it has to be allowed to flourish.
  855. Both my parents are Catholic and staunch believers. I’m not a Catholic now, but I still carry part of it with me.
  856. Before I became an actor, I was a visual artist, and I’ve always hankered for the storytelling behind the camera.
  857. Be magnificent. Life’s short. Get out there. You can do it. Everyone can do it. Everyone.
  858. As soon as you do it, actors realize there is no difference playing a performance-captured role or a live-action role.
  859. As long as you have the acting chops and the desire to get inside a character, you can play anything.
  860. As I started to research gorillas, I began to understand that they’re all totally individual and idiosyncratic, and they have their own personalities.
  861. Any sort of role requires a certain amount of research and embodiment of the character and psychological investigation.
  862. And ‘Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll’ was a very transitional film for me in that I was one of the producers and you know, came up with the idea with the writer and the producer, as well. But, it was a very collaborative event. You know, I really love working in that way.
  863. An actor finds things in the moment with a director and other actors that you don’t have time to hand-draw or animate with a computer.
  864. After ‘Kong,’ my knuckles have never recovered because I had to wear very heavy weights on my forearms and around my hips and ankles to get the sense of size and scale of the movement of the character… You are telling your body that you are these things and that you’re feeling these thoughts and that you’re experiencing these experiences.
  865. Actors’ performances in films are enhanced in a million different ways, down to the choice of camera shot by the director – whether it’s in slow motion or whether it’s quick cut – or… the choice of music behind the close-up or the costume that you’re wearing or the makeup.
  866. Actors’ performances do not stand alone in any film, live action or whatever.
  867. Acting is a sort of pressure cooker that allows the fizz to come out the top. God knows what I’d be like if I didn’t have that.
  868. A lot of people have asked me to do answer phone messages for them.
  869. A lot of actors on film sets… very often they’re not paying attention to the physical world around them. I think through studying art, I’ve always had that awareness and that’s something that I’ve wanted to bring in to go beyond acting… As a form of expression, they are intrinsically linked.
  870. ‘The Hobbit’ was one of the first biggish books I ever read. I remember vividly the ‘riddles in the dark’ passage, and it meant a lot to me to finally get to play it after all these years.
  871. ‘Macbeth’ is an amazing story.
  872. ‘How To Train your Dragon 2’ is an amazing film. I think it’s an extraordinary film. The animation in it is fantastic.
  873. You cannot communicate complicated information to large groups of people. As you increase the number of people, you have to decrease the complexity of the information.
  874. When a plan or strategy fails, people are tempted to assume it was the wrong vision. Plans and strategies can always be changed and improved. But vision doesn’t change. Visions are simply refined with time.
  875. What people pray for will tell you more than anything else whether they are locked into the vision and priorities of the church.
  876. Uncertainty is not an indication of poor leadership; it underscores the need for leadership.
  877. Uncertainty is a permanent part of the leadership landscape. It never goes away.
  878. There will be very few occasions when you are absolutely certain about anything. You will consistently be called upon to make decisions with limited information. That being the case, your goal should not be to eliminate uncertainty. Instead, you must develop the art of being clear in the face of uncertainty.
  879. The issue is: how do you engage the audience? And one of the things I talk to our communicators about is: The outline is great; the stories are great. But how do you engage them? How do you make it feel like we are on a journey, not you are just up there giving me information.
  880. The church wasn’t an organization in the first century. They weren’t writing checks or buying property. The church has matured and developed over the years. But for some reason, the last thing to change is the structure of leadership.
  881. Success means your options multiply. Size increases complexity, and complexity can confuse vision.
  882. Somehow, what’s in our hearts, good or bad is eventually translated into words and deeds.
  883. Preaching on Sunday mornings is such a simple thing, and by complicating it, I think we all do ourselves and the audience a disservice. It is very simple. Here is the model: Make people feel like they need an answer to a question.
  884. Preachers prepare with this fear: ‘Am I going to be able to fill the time?’ The audience never worries about that.
  885. People pray in one direction but they walk in a different direction, and direction always determines where we end up.
  886. People are not on a truth quest; they are on a happiness quest. They will continue to attend your church – even if they don’t share your beliefs – as long as they find the content engaging and helpful.
  887. Most of us wake up every day and make decision that will make us happy, and generally decisions that will make us happy right then in the moment or that day. We are not really on a truth quest.
  888. Leadership is all about taking people on a journey. The challenge is that most of the time, we are asking people to follow us to places we ourselves have never been.
  889. If you’re a preacher’s kid, you see the church differently.
  890. Guys that preach verse-by-verse through books of the Bible – that is just cheating. It’s cheating because that would be easy, first of all. That isn’t how you grow people. No one in the Scripture modeled that.
  891. Greed is not a financial issue. It’s a heart issue.
  892. God is a God of systems and predictability and order, and God honors planning.
  893. Communicators need to figure out how well do they engage people, and they should not talk one word longer than people are engaged.
  894. As a pastor, I’ve spent 30 years talking to people and heard every kind of story imaginable.
  895. All Scripture is equally inspired, but not all Scripture is equally applicable or relevant to every stage of life.
  896. A principle is a principle, and God created all the principles.
  897. When you think about it, department stores are kind of like museums.
  898. When I got my first television set, I stopped caring so much about having close relationships.
  899. What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you can know that the President drinks Coke. Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too.
  900. What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest.
  901. We live in an age when the traditional great subjects – the human form, the landscape, even newer traditions such as abstract expressionism – are daily devalued by commercial art.
  902. Voyeurism is a director’s job description. It’s an artist’s, too.
  903. They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.
  904. The most exciting thing is not doing it. If you fall in love with someone and never do it, it’s much more exciting.
  905. The most exciting attractions are between two opposites that never meet.
  906. The clothes of Courreges are so nice.
  907. Sociological critics are waste makers.
  908. So many people seem to prefer my silver-screenings of movie stars to the rest of my work. It must be the subject matter that attracts them, because my death and violence paintings are just as good.
  909. Since people are going to be living longer and getting older, they’ll just have to learn how to be babies longer.
  910. Since I was shot, everything is such a dream to me. Like I don’t know whether I’m alive or whether I died. I wasn’t afraid before. And having been dead once, I shouldn’t feel fear. But I am afraid. I don’t understand why.
  911. Sex is more exciting on the screen and between the pages than between the sheets.
  912. People sometimes say the way things happen in the movies is unreal, but actually, it’s the way things happen to you in life that’s unreal.
  913. People need to be made more aware of the need to work at learning how to live because life is so quick and sometimes it goes away too quickly.
  914. Once you ‘got’ Pop, you could never see a sign again the same way again. And once you thought Pop, you could never see America the same way again.
  915. Now and then, someone would accuse me of being evil – of letting people destroy themselves while I watched, just so I could film them and tape-record them. But I didn’t think of myself as evil – just realistic.
  916. My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person.
  917. My fascination with letting images repeat and repeat – or in film’s case ‘run on’ – manifests my belief that we spend much of our lives seeing without observing.
  918. Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.
  919. Land really is the best art.
  920. It’s the movies that have really been running things in America ever since they were invented. They show you what to do, how to do it, when to do it, how to feel about it, and how to look how you feel about it.
  921. It would be very glamorous to be reincarnated as a great big ring on Liz Taylor’s finger.
  922. Isn’t life a series of images that change as they repeat themselves?
  923. In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes.
  924. If you’re not trying to be real, you don’t have to get it right. That’s art.
  925. If you wear a wig, everybody notices. But if you then dye the wig, people notice the dye.
  926. If you want to know all about Andy Warhol, just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me, and there I am. There’s nothing behind it.
  927. I’ve decided something: Commercial things really do stink. As soon as it becomes commercial for a mass market it really stinks.
  928. I’ve been invited to the White House about five times. I think the greatest thing would be if they actually invited everybody to the White House every night… they’d just take about 500 people a night. Everybody would just love this country because it’s so thrilling to go there. It really is.
  929. I’m the type who’d be happy not going anywhere as long as I was sure I knew exactly what was happening at the places I wasn’t going to. I’m the type who’d like to sit home and watch every party that I’m invited to on a monitor in my bedroom.
  930. I’m for mechanical art. When I took up silk screening, it was to more fully exploit the preconceived image through the commercial techniques of multiple reproduction.
  931. I’m bored with that line. I never use it anymore. My new line is ‘In 15 minutes everybody will be famous.’
  932. I’m afraid that if you look at a thing long enough, it loses all of its meaning.
  933. I’ll bet there are a lot of artists that nobody hears about who just make more money than anybody. The people that do all the sculptures and paintings for big building construction. We never hear about them, but they make more money than anybody.
  934. I’d asked around 10 or 15 people for suggestions. Finally one lady friend asked the right question, ‘Well, what do you love most?’ That’s how I started painting money.
  935. I went to vote once, but I got too scared. I couldn’t decide whom to vote for.
  936. I want to die with my blue jeans on.
  937. I want to be a machine.
  938. I used to think that everything was just being funny but now I don’t know. I mean, how can you tell?
  939. I used to have the same lunch every day, for 20 years, I guess, the same thing over and over again.
  940. I think they should have movies in restaurants. I can’t believe that so many people get together just to sit there. It’s so abstract… isn’t it abstract? What are these people sitting here watching?
  941. I think the first photograph I did was a ballplayer. It was a way of showing action or something.
  942. I think kids should go to high school until they’re 30. No, really, because people are staying younger now and there’s nothing to do. If you stayed longer, then it would be really great.
  943. I think it would be terrific if everybody was alike.
  944. I think having land and not ruining it is the most beautiful art that anybody could ever want to own.
  945. I think everybody should like everybody.
  946. I think Chris Burden is terrific. I really do.
  947. I suppose I have a really loose interpretation of ‘work’, because I think that just being alive is so much work at something you don’t always want to do. The machinery is always going. Even when you sleep.
  948. I never understood why when you died, you didn’t just vanish, everything could just keep going on the way it was only you just wouldn’t be there. I always thought I’d like my own tombstone to be blank. No epitaph, and no name. Well, actually, I’d like it to say ‘figment.’
  949. I never think that people die. They just go to department stores.
  950. I love Los Angeles, and I love Hollywood. They’re beautiful. Everybody’s plastic, but I love plastic. I want to be plastic.
  951. I like to work when I’m not working – do something that may not be considered work, but to me it’s work. Getting exercise by going to the grocery store.
  952. I like boring things.
  953. I just happen to like ordinary things. When I paint them, I don’t try to make them extraordinary. I just try to paint them ordinary-ordinary.
  954. I have Social Disease. I have to go out every night. If I stay home one night I start spreading rumors to my dogs.
  955. I had a lot of dates but I decided to stay home and dye my eyebrows.
  956. I am a deeply superficial person.
  957. I always wished I had died, and I still wish that, because I could have gotten the whole thing over with.
  958. I always thought I’d like my own tombstone to be blank. No epitaph, and no name. Well, actually, I’d like it to say ‘figment.’
  959. I always like to see if the art across the street is better than mine.
  960. I always hear myself saying, ‘She’s a beauty!’ or ‘He’s a beauty!’ or ‘What a beauty!’ but I never know what I’m talking about.
  961. Human beings are born solitary, but everywhere they are in chains – daisy chains – of interactivity. Social actions are makeshift forms, often courageous, sometimes ridiculous, always strange. And in a way, every social action is a negotiation, a compromise between ‘his,’ ‘her’ or ‘their’ wish and yours.
  962. Fantasy love is much better than reality love.
  963. Everyone needs a fantasy.
  964. Employees make the best dates. You don’t have to pick them up and they’re always tax-deductible.
  965. Dying is the most embarrassing thing that can ever happen to you, because someone’s got to take care of all your details.
  966. During the 1960s, I think, people forgot what emotions were supposed to be. And I don’t think they’ve ever remembered.
  967. Don’t pay any attention to what they write about you. Just measure it in inches.
  968. Checks aren’t money.
  969. Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art. Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.
  970. Being born is like being kidnapped. And then sold into slavery.
  971. Before I was shot, I always thought that I was more half-there than all-there – I always suspected that I was watching TV instead of living life. Right when I was being shot and ever since, I knew that I was watching television.
  972. Art? That’s a man’s name.
  973. Art is what you can get away with.
  974. An artist is somebody who produces things that people don’t need to have.
  975. We know what happens to people who stay in the middle of the road. They get run down.
  976. This island is made mainly of coal and surrounded by fish. Only an organizing genius could produce a shortage of coal and fish at the same time.
  977. This is my truth, tell me yours.
  978. The purpose of getting power is to be able to give it away.
  979. The Tories, every election, must have a bogy man. If you haven’t got a programme, a bogy man will do.
  980. The Prime Minister has an absolute genius for putting flamboyant labels on empty luggage.
  981. Stand not too near the rich man lest he destroy thee – and not too far away lest he forget thee.
  982. Reading is not a duty, and has consequently no business to be made disagreeable.
  983. Reactionary: a man walking backwards with his face to the future.
  984. Poor fellow, he suffers from files.
  985. Politics is a blood sport.
  986. No attempt at ethical or social seduction can eradicate from my heart a deep burning hatred for the Tory Party. So far as I am concerned they are lower than vermin.
  987. No amount of cajolery, and no attempts at ethical or social seduction, can eradicate from my heart a deep burning hatred for the Tory Party. So far as I am concerned they are lower than vermin.
  988. It is not possible to create peace in the Middle East by jeopardizing the peace of the world.
  989. It is an axiom, enforced by all the experience of the ages, that they who rule industrially will rule politically.
  990. I would rather be kept alive in the efficient if cold altruism of a large hospital than expire in a gush of warm sympathy in a small one.
  991. I read the newspapers avidly. It is my one form of continuous fiction.
  992. I know that the right kind of political leader for the Labour Party is a desiccated calculating machine.
  993. I have never regarded politics as the arena of morals. It is the arena of interest.
  994. He seems determined to make a trumpet sound like a tin whistle.
  995. Freedom is the by-product of economic surplus.
  996. Fascism is not in itself a new order of society. It is the future refusing to be born.
  997. You can never stop and as older people, we have to learn how to take leadership from the youth and I guess I would say that this is what I’m attempting to do right now.
  998. Yes, I think it’s really important to acknowledge that Dr. King, precisely at the moment of his assassination, was re-conceptualizing the civil rights movement and moving toward a sort of coalitional relationship with the trade union movement.
  999. When Bush says democracy, I often wonder what he’s referring to.
  1000. What this country needs is more unemployed politicians.
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