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Articles Page 16

Articles Page 16

  1. What I think is different today is the lack of political connection between the black middle class and the increasing numbers of black people who are more impoverished than ever before.
  2. Well, we see an increasingly weaker labor movement as a result of the overall assault on the labor movement and as a result of the globalization of capital.
  3. Well of course there’s been a great deal of progress over the last 40 years. We don’t have laws that segregate black people within the society any longer.
  4. Well of course I get depressed sometimes, yes I do.
  5. Well for one, the 13th amendment to the constitution of the US which abolished slavery – did not abolish slavery for those convicted of a crime.
  6. Well I teach in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. So that’s my primary work. I lecture on various campuses and in various communities across the country and other parts of the world.
  7. We know the road to freedom has always been stalked by death.
  8. We have to talk about liberating minds as well as liberating society.
  9. To understand how any society functions you must understand the relationship between the men and the women.
  10. The work of the political activist inevitably involves a certain tension between the requirement that position be taken on current issues as they arise and the desire that one’s contributions will somehow survive the ravages of time.
  11. The campaign against the death penalty has been – while a powerful campaign, its participants have been those who attend all of the vigils, a relatively small number of people.
  12. That’s true but I think the contemporary problem that we are facing increasing numbers of black people and other people of color being thrown into a status that involves work in alternative economies and increasing numbers of people who are incarcerated.
  13. Radical simply means ‘grasping things at the root.’
  14. Racism, in the first place, is a weapon used by the wealthy to increase the profits they bring in by paying Black workers less for their work.
  15. Racism is a much more clandestine, much more hidden kind of phenomenon, but at the same time it’s perhaps far more terrible than it’s ever been.
  16. Poor people, people of color – especially are much more likely to be found in prison than in institutions of higher education.
  17. Now, if we look at the way in which the labor movement itself has evolved over the last couple of decades, we see increasing numbers of black people who are in the leadership of the labor movement and this is true today.
  18. My name became known because I was, one might say accidentally the target of state repression and because so many people throughout the country and other parts of the world organized around the demand for my freedom.
  19. Jails and prisons are designed to break human beings, to convert the population into specimens in a zoo – obedient to our keepers, but dangerous to each other.
  20. It’s true that it’s within the realm of cultural politics that young people tend to work through political issues, which I think is good, although it’s not going to solve the problems.
  21. In a sense the quest for the emancipation of black people in the U.S. has always been a quest for economic liberation which means to a certain extent that the rise of black middle class would be inevitable.
  22. I’m suggesting that we abolish the social function of prisons.
  23. I’m involved in the work around prison rights in general.
  24. I think the importance of doing activist work is precisely because it allows you to give back and to consider yourself not as a single individual who may have achieved whatever but to be a part of an ongoing historical movement.
  25. I think that has to do with my awareness that in a sense we all have a certain measure of responsibility to those who have made it possible for us to take advantage of the opportunities.
  26. I never saw myself as an individual who had any particular leadership powers.
  27. I grew up in the southern United States in a city which at that time during the late ’40’s and early ’50’s was the most segregated city in the country, and in a sense learning how to oppose the status quo was a question of survival.
  28. I decided to teach because I think that any person who studies philosophy has to be involved actively.
  29. Had it not been for slavery, the death penalty would have likely been abolished in America. Slavery became a haven for the death penalty.
  30. First of all, I didn’t suggest that we should simply get rid of all prisons.
  31. But at the same time you can’t assume that making a difference 20 years ago is going to allow you to sort of live on the laurels of those victories for the rest of your life.
  32. As soon as my trial was over, we tried to use the energy that had developed around my case to create another organization, which we called the National Alliance against Racist and Political Repression.
  33. As a black woman, my politics and political affiliation are bound up with and flow from participation in my people’s struggle for liberation, and with the fight of oppressed people all over the world against American imperialism.
  34. And I guess what I would say is that we can’t think narrowly about movements for black liberation and we can’t necessarily see this class division as simply a product or a certain strategy that black movements have developed for liberation.
  35. You can much better have an influence on the debate when you sit at the bargaining table and you can give input.
  36. Whoever decides to dedicate their life to politics knows that earning money isn’t the top priority.
  37. Whenever you have political conflict, such as the one that we have now between Russia and Ukraine, but also in many other conflicts around the world, it has always proved to be right to try again and again to solve such a conflict.
  38. Whenever I was able to work with Hillary Clinton, it was a great pleasure.
  39. When it comes to human dignity, we cannot make compromises.
  40. When I’m stirring a saucepan, I don’t say to myself, ‘Now the chancellor is stirring a saucepan.’
  41. We’ve stated very clearly that no negotiating chapters between the European Union and Turkey will be concluded before the Ankara Protocol is complied with: that’s to say before Turkey grants all E.U. member states, including Cyprus, access to its ports.
  42. We’ve always had this experience that things take long, but I’m 100% convinced that our principles will in the end prevail. No one knew how the Cold War would end at the time, but it did end. This is within our living experience… I’m surprised at how fainthearted we sometimes are and how quickly we lose courage.
  43. We’re saying this to both countries: We want a two-state solution. We want a Jewish state of Israel and alongside a independent Palestinian state. Unilateral measures are not helping at all to bring about this cause, and we agree that we wish to cooperate very closely on this, because as we both say, time is of the essence.
  44. We work well together with the United Kingdom – particularly, perhaps, when we talk about new rules for the European Union.
  45. We will have to accept a certain degree of legal immigration; that’s globalisation… In the era of the smartphone, we cannot shut ourselves away… people know full well how we live in Europe.
  46. We will be very persistent when it comes to enforcing freedom, justice, and self-determination on the European continent.
  47. We needed 40 years to overcome East Germany. Sometimes in history, one has to be prepared for the long haul and not ask after four months if it still makes sense to keep up our demands.
  48. We need… to say to people that this is a temporary residential status, and we expect that, once there is peace in Syria again, once IS has been defeated in Iraq, that you go back to your home country with the knowledge that you have gained.
  49. We need a really credible perspective toward long-term de-carbonization.
  50. We know that our life of freedom is stronger than terror.
  51. We have to ensure politically that what’s doable can indeed by translated into law, but what’s not doable mustn’t become European law. Otherwise, the auto industry will work somewhere with higher carbon emissions – and we can’t want that.
  52. We have shared responsibility for global climate; we have to reduce climate change below 2 degrees Celsius.
  53. We have a duty as the state to protect our economy… We are for the protection of intellectual property.
  54. We feel bound to the Christian image of humanity – that is what defines us. Those who do not accept this are in the wrong place here.
  55. We believe that from both a German and a Polish perspective, it is desirable for Great Britain to remain in the European Union.
  56. We are a country based on democracy, tolerance, and openness to the world.
  57. We abide by our responsibility as Germany for the Shoah.
  58. We Germans have a special responsibility to be alert, sensitive, and aware of what we did during the Nazi era and about lasting damage caused in other countries. I’ve got tremendous sympathy for that.
  59. Very early, it became clear to me that East Germany could not function.
  60. Ukraine must be permitted to bring their own relief supplies safely to areas in the east of the country that are controlled by the separatists.
  61. Today’s Russia is not to be compared with the Soviet Union of back then.
  62. To grow up in the neighborhood of handicapped people was an important experience for me. I learned back then to treat them in a very normal way.
  63. Thus, the focus on this main political goal must become more visible in EU politics and to achieve this, we need a political impulse. It must be clear what the priorities on the agenda are.
  64. This multicultural approach, saying that we simply live side by side and live happily with each other has failed. Utterly failed.
  65. This inclination to hoard is deeply ingrained in me because in the past, in times of scarcity, you took what you could get.
  66. There is no doubt the NATO-Russia Act should remain valid.
  67. There is a lot that binds Germany to Turkey, and even if we have a difference of opinion on an individual matter, the breadth of our links, our friendship, our strategic ties, is great.
  68. There are many conflicting interests in Europe.
  69. There are achievements of European integration that cannot be haggled over: for example the principle of free movement and the principle of non-discrimination.
  70. There are 1600 German companies active in India, and some of them are more than 100 years old. Our companies value India as a location for manufacturing and as a market.
  71. The willingness to learn new skills is very high.
  72. The way I lived my life, I truly wasn’t an active resistance fighter.
  73. The question is not whether we are able to change but whether we are changing fast enough.
  74. The problem is, of course, that these interest groups are all asking for changes, but their enthusiasm for change rapidly disappears when it affects the core of their own interests.
  75. The people in East Germany have lived through so many changes in the last 15 years like never before in the country, and they did this often with great enthusiasm. But in the West we also have a high degree of transformations.
  76. The only thing the East German system taught us was that we should never do it that way again.
  77. The markets want to force us to do certain things. That we won’t do. Politicians have to make sure that we’re unassailable, that we can make policy for the people.
  78. The majority of decisions in Europe are done by unanimity. That’s why it is important to be to have good relations with all parts.
  79. The goal of our actions is and will remain a sovereign and territorially intact Ukraine that can decide its own future.
  80. The euro is our common fate, and Europe is our common future.
  81. The West was a wonderful world to me. I decided then that if this is the way they did things, then I wanted to be part of it.
  82. The G7 – and earlier, the G8 – were a group of countries that shared the same values with regard to freedom and democracy, and through the annexation of Crimea, Russia made it clear at a certain point that these values of keeping the peace, integrity of the borders of a country were not being respected.
  83. The European Army is our long-term goal. But first we have to strengthen the European Defence Union.
  84. The ‘community method’ can only be applied in those areas in which the European Union actually has competence. Where the community has no competence, the ‘community method’ clearly cannot be applied.
  85. That makes me think of the 2002 World Cup Final above all else. Nobody thought at the time that our team would get through to the Final against Brazil. We should remember that this summer.
  86. That is why everyone in politics, and we do it, must make sure that they do not depend on one single interest group. A good compromise is one where everybody makes a contribution.
  87. Spying among friends is never acceptable.
  88. Sometimes I can’t stop myself from buying things just because I see them – even when I don’t really need them.
  89. Solidarity and competitiveness are the two sides of a European coin.
  90. So Europe needs to be competitive and we also need to be competitive if we wish to remain an interesting economic partner for the United States. This has to be done on the basis of strength, of competitiveness.
  91. Russia has nothing: no successful politics or economy.
  92. Politicians have to be committed to people in equal measures.
  93. Personally, I think that for example the chemical directive in its present form does too much damage to the chemical industry – especially the medium sized businesses – and will hurt our worldwide competitiveness.
  94. Overcoming the Cold War required courage from the people of Central and Eastern Europe and what was then the German Democratic Republic, but it also required the steadfastness of Western partner over many decades when many had long lost hope of integration of the two Germanys and Europe.
  95. On the one hand, the financial projection is on the agenda – we will see if this problem can be resolved or not. I think it is a right idea to stage a special summit, which would deal with the question of priorities of European politics.
  96. Nobody in Europe will be abandoned. Nobody in Europe will be excluded. Europe only succeeds if we work together.
  97. Multiculturalism leads to parallel societies and therefore remains a ‘life lie.’
  98. More reforms will give more impetus to German industries to invest in India. German companies want to be treated on par with Indian companies, and creation of an equitable market is crucial for investments.
  99. Let us answer the terrorists by living our values with courage.
  100. Let me say this on a personal note. Without the United States of America, I would in all probably not be able to stand here before you today.
  101. It’s my damn duty and obligation to do everything possible for Europe to find a united path.
  102. It will not be possible to solve the current crisis with euro bonds.
  103. It is nonsense to say that Germans are unable to change.
  104. It is always the case that when something emerges – which, of course, from the perspective of the former West Germany looks very different – then people say, ‘She hasn’t told us this yet’ and ‘She hasn’t told us that yet.’ I don’t know – maybe there are other things I didn’t talk about because no one ever asked me.
  105. It is a fact that, if I single out Germany, our rate of growth is too low and we have very high unemployment.
  106. It certainly is dangerous that there are only a few clubs left in Europe that can afford to pay millions. At the end of the day however, the spectators decide the rates of pay – by watching the games and consuming the goods and services advertised on sports TV programmes.
  107. Industrialised countries must take the responsibility of helping poorer countries in the climate change action plan.
  108. India needs jobs, Germany needs people, and collaboration is crucial to meet the demographic needs of both countries.
  109. In the German football team players from different clubs need to get on with each other both on and off the pitch. In the grand coalition Christian Democrats and Social Democrats sit in the same boat and need to pull in the same direction.
  110. In many regions, war and terror prevail. States disintegrate. For many years, we have read about this. We have heard about it. We have seen it on TV. But we had not yet sufficiently understood that what happens in Aleppo and Mosul can affect Essen or Stuttgart. We have to face that now.
  111. In Europe it is particularly important that we build good relations to everyone who holds political responsibility because Europe can only be build together.
  112. If you wish to have free access to the single market, then you have to accept the fundamental rights as well as obligation that come from it.
  113. If we remind ourselves of the fact that every fifth American today rightly points and perhaps also with a certain degree of pride to his German ancestry or her German ancestry, we can safely say that we, indeed, share common roots.
  114. If we look at where relations between the Soviet Union and Germany were in 1945 and where we stand now, then we have achieved so much.
  115. If the euro fails, Europe fails.
  116. IT companies in Bangalore are a reliable engine of development for India.
  117. I’ve spoken several times with Prime Minister Erdogan about relations between Turkey and Israel. I’m pleased that, following President Obama’s visit to Israel, talks between Israel and Turkey are again taking place and hope that relations between them will further improve in the interest of both countries.
  118. I’ve often made critical comments about settlement expansion in the occupied West Bank and in east Jerusalem, and my position hasn’t changed. At the same time, it’s equally important to me that the two sides, both Israel and the Palestinians, work towards a durable peace settlement: that’s to say a viable two-state solution.
  119. I’ve learned that even the word ‘jubilee’ used in connection with the Reformation can give rise to discussions.
  120. I’m someone who is very supportive of us eliminating all discrimination.
  121. I will not let anyone tell me we must spend more money. This crisis did not come about because we issued too little money but because we created economic growth with too much money and it was not sustainable growth.
  122. I think the political class in Berlin doesn’t need to be supervised and monitored by intelligence services in order to find out what they’re thinking. Just go to lunch with them, go to dinner with them, or read the papers.
  123. I think that the EU with the Lisbon agenda has put the right emphasis on growth and employment.
  124. I think it has been a tremendous feat on the part of East Germans since 1990 to adapt to everything changing.
  125. I see nothing that points to a recession in Germany. But I see considerable long-term tasks ahead of us that have to do with markets regaining confidence in Europe and that have a lot to do with reducing debt.
  126. I said, yet again, for Germany, Europe is not only indispensable, it is part and parcel of our identity. We’ve always said German unity, European unity and integration, that’s two parts of one and the same coin. But we want, obviously, to boost our competitiveness.
  127. I personally hope and wish that Britain will stay part and parcel of the European Union.
  128. I never felt the GDR was my home country.
  129. I have just explained my idea of how a constructive period of reflection, one that would send a clear message to the citizens of Europe: You should now what our priorities are. For Germany this means: Unemployment is one of one of our biggest problems.
  130. I have a relatively sunny spirit, and I always had the expectation that my path through life would be relatively sunny, no matter what happened. I have never allowed myself to be bitter.
  131. I felt really sorry for Oliver Kahn. Up to that point he had made lots of saves for the German team. Of course he could have caught the ball but it just happened. It was bad luck. In that situation, you need to be very strong psychologically to carry on.
  132. I feel sorry sometimes for these sportsmen and women who put in just as much effort as the footballers. For example, athletes train at least as hard as footballers but have to be happy if they can earn enough to finance a decent education.
  133. I don’t carry any early childhood trauma around with me, if that’s what you’re hinting at. The story of the bicycles – and there were three of them which were stolen from me – I’ve dealt with it well.
  134. I come from a country in which I experienced economic collapse.
  135. I chose to pursue a career in physics because there the truth isn’t so easily bent.
  136. I can say that we are very clear in our mind about the responsibility of the national soldiers for the break with civilisation that was the Shoah. We are firmly convinced that this is something that will have to be handed over to generations to come… so we don’t see any reason to change our view of history.
  137. I believe those that produce the least emissions in autos will also be those who have the greatest success worldwide.
  138. I am not an expert in this field but I do try to keep up to date with the Bundesliga. And I do follow World Cups and European Championships more closely.
  139. I am for registered civil partnerships.
  140. I am for our not having any discrimination in tax legislation.
  141. I always wanted to know what I’d face next, even though that was maybe a bit detrimental to spontaneity. Structuring my life and avoiding chaos was more important.
  142. I always used the free room that the G.D.R. allowed me… There was no shadow over my childhood.
  143. Herr Schroder has conducted two electoral campaigns, and he is doing it again now, by not telling people what is really necessary. He keeps avoiding the difficult and uncomfortable issues, those that imply changes and therefore provoke discussions.
  144. Here we have the Schengen agreement, and the truth is that for years we trusted each other and set border controls on the outer borders of the European Union. And as was the case with the economic and monetary union, with this step, regarding the management of the Schengen area, we did not go all the way in terms of political solutions.
  145. Having led many negotiations with countries outside the E.U. in the past, we would never enter the same compromises and reach the same good outcomes with states that don’t shoulder the responsibilities and costs of the common market.
  146. Hatred, racism, and extremism have no place in this country.
  147. Greece wishes to be part of the eurozone, but it must, of course, go through with the necessary reforms to make this happen.
  148. Germany’s strength lies largely in the fact that the Federal Republic is a center of industry and that it’s an export nation.
  149. Germany wants peaceful coexistence of Muslims and members of other religions.
  150. Germany stands in the fight against terrorism at France’s side, united with many, many others. I am convinced that, despite all the difficulties, we shall win this fight.
  151. Germany has become a country that many people abroad associate with hope.
  152. From this experience we have learned that in a big party it is important to have the necessary and often controversial discussions on policy issues such as the health system while in opposition.
  153. Free access to the single market will be granted to a country which accepts the four fundamental freedoms of movement of people, goods, services, and capital.
  154. Former president Wulff said Islam belongs to Germany. That is true. I also hold this opinion.
  155. For those who share my view that the Jews as a people have a right to self-determination, Zionism as a national movement of the Jewish people is the embodiment of this very right, which its opponents want to deny.
  156. For somebody who comes from Europe, I can only say if we give up this principle of territorial integrity of countries, then we will not be able to maintain the peaceful order of Europe that we’ve been able to achieve.
  157. For me, personally, marriage is a man and a woman living together.
  158. For me, it is always important that I go through all the possible options for a decision.
  159. For a few years, more people have been leaving our country than entering it. Wherever it is possible, we must lower the entry hurdles for those who bring the country forward.
  160. Eurobonds are absolutely wrong. In order to bring about common interest rates, you need similar competitiveness levels, similar budget situations. You don’t get them by collectivizing debts.
  161. Especially in a very secular world, we should always stress what is common in the Christian religion.
  162. During the course of 1989, more and more East Germans lost their fears of the state’s repression and chicanery and went out on the streets. There was no turning back then. It is thanks to their courage the Wall was opened.
  163. Controversial disputes are a part of democratic culture.
  164. Climate change knows no borders. It will not stop before the Pacific islands and the whole of the international community here has to shoulder a responsibility to bring about a sustainable development.
  165. At this time – we’re in a dramatic crisis – euro bonds are precisely the wrong answer. They lead us into a debt union, not a stability union. Each country has to take its own steps to reduce its debt.
  166. At the beginning of the 60’s our country called the foreign workers to come to Germany and now they live in our country. We kidded ourselves a while, we said: ‘They won’t stay, sometime they will be gone.’ But this isn’t reality.
  167. At German unification, we were lucky to get so much help from West Germany. Now, we have the good fortune of being able to help each other in Europe.
  168. As politicians we have to react to the fact that many people do not feel that they can relate to the EU.
  169. As a 7-year-old child, I saw the Wall being erected. No one – although it was a stark violation of international law – believed at the time that one ought to intervene militarily in order to protect citizens of the GDR and whole Eastern bloc, of the consequences of that – namely, to live in lack of freedom for many, many years.
  170. After the reunification, there was a certain sense of foreignness because daily life in the former East German states was completely turned inside out – everything from the shops to the bureaucracy to the working world.
  171. Above all it is important to point out that we can only maintain our prosperity in Europe if we belong to the most innovative regions in the world.
  172. Women have a certain sexuality, and I think their bodies are beautiful, and I’m not embarrassed to explore that in a film. But there are things you get offered that are vulgar and violent – just like there’s a side of me that’s vulgar and violent.
  173. Without pain, there would be no suffering, without suffering we would never learn from our mistakes. To make it right, pain and suffering is the key to all windows, without it, there is no way of life.
  174. Where ever I am I always find myself looking out the window wishing I was somewhere else.
  175. When you are an actor, you have to stay inside this world, but when you are with the crew, on the outside, you are in the dirt, working through all the issues. It’s just a different way of working, and I think I preferred it.
  176. When other little girls wanted to be ballet dancers I kind of wanted to be a vampire.
  177. When I was little… I didn’t relate to princesses. I saw Maleficent, and I just thought she was so – she was so elegant.
  178. When I was growing up, I wanted to adopt, because I was aware there were kids that didn’t have parents.
  179. When I get logical, and I don’t trust my instincts – that’s when I get in trouble.
  180. When I first went to places where people were suffering from war and persecution, I felt ashamed of my feelings of sadness. I could see more possibilities in my life.
  181. What nourishes me also destroys me.
  182. We have a choice about how we take what happens to us in our life and whether or not we allow it to turn us. We can become consumed by hate and darkness, or we’re able to regain our humanity somehow, or come to terms with things and learn something about ourselves.
  183. War is so complex; human nature is so complex. There’s no filmmaker who has ever figured it out perfectly.
  184. To be intimate with a married man, when my own father cheated on my mother, is not something I could forgive. I could not look at myself in the morning if I did that. I wouldn’t be attracted to a man who would cheat on his wife.
  185. To be in any way a positive contribution, that’s all anybody wants to be. It’s all I’ve ever wanted to be. I wanted to be an artist, be a mother. You want to feel that in your life you’ve been of use, in whatever way that comes out.
  186. They’re right to think that about me, because I’m the person most likely to sleep with my female fans, I genuinely love other women. And I think they know that.
  187. There’s something about death that is comforting. The thought that you could die tomorrow frees you to appreciate your life now.
  188. There’s people constantly asking you for something on set, so the multi-tasking of motherhood transfers very well to being a director. And I think you’re compassionate.
  189. There’s nothing I have to hide or defend. I’m gonna live my life. And there are times when people wanna try to attack me, and I don’t know why, but they will. And that’s okay.
  190. There’s certainly a side of me that isn’t completely… sane. Or completely ‘even’ all the time. We all have our dark sides.
  191. Therapy? I don’t need that. The roles that I choose are my therapy.
  192. The truth is I love being alive. And I love feeling free. So if I can’t have those things then I feel like a caged animal and I’d rather not be in a cage. I’d rather be dead. And it’s real simple. And I think it’s not that uncommon.
  193. The side of fairytales I don’t like is that they always have happy endings, that there’s just good and evil, and things are perfect. But life is a little more complicated, and that’s what I try to teach my kids.
  194. The moment you have a child, in an instant your life is not for you, and your life is completely, 100 percent dedicated to another human being, and they will always come first. It changes you forever. It changes your perspective, and it gives you a nice purpose and focus.
  195. The loss of a child is my greatest nightmare.
  196. The great thing about having a bunch of kids is they just remind you that you’re the person who takes them to go poop!
  197. The fact is I am not having sex. But I feel absolutely ripe for the, what would you say? plucking?
  198. Sometimes I think my husband is so amazing that I don’t know why he’s with me. I don’t know whether I’m good enough. But if I make him happy, then I’m everything I want to be.
  199. Sadly, of course, there is real evil in the world. You watch the news, and you see all of the people suffering and so much cruelty.
  200. Real food, I’ve found, is actually better than dieting.
  201. People wonder aloud about whether I am an okay mother. That is obviously painful because it’s so important to me. It’s hard to hear that people think I’m not a capable mother and a good person, that they just think I’m nuts.
  202. Once you have six children, you’re committed.
  203. Oh, God, I struggle with low self-esteem all the time! I think everyone does. I have so much wrong with me, it’s unbelievable!
  204. Obviously, there’s a part of me that takes the world of violence and death very seriously. However, when it comes to protection, or when it comes to just the skill of shooting… I’ve gone to the range with sniper rifles and things like that.
  205. Not many people know this about me, but I’m a natural blonde. My hair went from light blonde naturally to a darker kind of blonde. My mother dyed my hair dark when I was a child, as I loved the look then. So I’m basically a natural blonde.
  206. My mother was a full-time mother. She didn’t have much of her own career, her own life, her own experiences… everything was for her children. I will never be as good a mother as she was. She was just grace incarnate. She was the most generous, loving – she’s better than me.
  207. My children love Maleficent’s voice, so they always make me do it at home.
  208. Maleficent was always so elegant. She always was in control. And to play her was difficult. I worked on my voice a lot. She’s bigger than me. She’s on a different level of performance that I have never done.
  209. Maleficent has suffered abuse in the past, and there’s a reason why she is now as furious as she is. And I think that children who have been outcast and abused in any way will relate to her. There’s a beautiful side to her; she’s not just a dark person. She has all these facets. And that is interesting.
  210. Make bold choices and make mistakes. It’s all those things that add up to the person you become.
  211. Like every parent, when you start your family, your life completely changes. And you completely live for someone else. I find that the most extraordinary thing. Your life is handed over to someone else. From that moment on, they come first in every choice you make. It’s the most wonderful thing.
  212. Life comes with many challenges. The ones that should not scare us are the ones we can take on and take control of.
  213. It’s hard to be clear about who you are when you are carrying around a bunch of baggage from the past. I’ve learned to let go and move more quickly into the next place.
  214. It’s getting harder to make decisions to just want to do something to work… I’m trying to find things that are extremely challenging or mean something to me deeply.
  215. It’s a great thing about being pregnant – you don’t need excuses to pee or to eat.
  216. It was weird to be married; you kind of lose your identity. You’re suddenly somebody’s wife. And you’re like, ‘Oh, I’m half of a couple now. I’ve lost me.’
  217. In my father’s generation, the product was 80 percent of what you were putting into the world, and your personal life was 20 percent. It now seems that 80 percent of the product I put out is silly, made-up stories and what I’m wearing.
  218. If you have enough people sitting around telling you you’re wonderful, then you start believing you’re fabulous, then someone tells you you stink and you believe that too!
  219. If you don’t get out of the box you’ve been raised in, you won’t understand how much bigger the world is.
  220. If you ask people what they’ve always wanted to do, most people haven’t done it. That breaks my heart.
  221. If every choice you make comes from an honest place, you’re solid, and nothing anybody can say about you can rock you or change your opinion.
  222. If I think more about death than some other people, it is probably because I love life more than they do.
  223. If I make a fool of myself, who cares? I’m not frightened by anyone’s perception of me.
  224. If I didn’t have my films as an outlet for all the different sides of me, I would probably be locked up.
  225. I’ve told Billy if I ever caught him cheating, I wouldn’t kill him because I love his children and they need a dad. But I would beat him up. I know where all of his sports injuries are.
  226. I’ve realized that being happy is a choice. You never want to rub anybody the wrong way or not be fun to be around, but you have to be happy. When I get logical and I don’t trust my instincts – Thats when I get in trouble.
  227. I’ve never lived my life in the opinion of others. I believe I’m a good person. I believe I’m a good mom. But that’s for my kids to decide, not for the world.
  228. I’ve learned that we all change constantly. It’s rare to find that person who is growing with you in the same way at the same time, who encourages you to grow.
  229. I’ve been reckless, but I’m not a rebel without a cause.
  230. I’m terrible at reading scripts. I love to read, and I hate reading scripts.
  231. I’m odd looking. Sometimes I think I look like a funny muppet.
  232. I’m not somebody that thinks about destiny and fate, but I don’t walk away from it when something unfolds.
  233. I’m not somebody that just wants to hold up a white flag and say, ‘Let’s all just get along.’ I think people that do horrible things should be held accountable.
  234. I’m just glad I was able to return to some of that innocence and beauty I had as a child when I started my own family, and my children brought me back some of that spirit.
  235. I’m happy being myself, which I’ve never been before. I always hid in other people, or tried to find myself through the characters, or live out their lives, but I didn’t have those things in mine.
  236. I’m getting a wrinkle above my eyebrow because I just can’t stop lifting it, and I love that you know.
  237. I’m always doing something. I never shut my brain off. I always have something going on.
  238. I’m a woman, and anytime you tell a woman that she looks nice, it’s not going to upset her.
  239. I’d like to believe that the people that have supported me in my work or identified with me in films, the people that feel they know me, they do and they don’t have misconceptions – they understand. I believe that.
  240. I’d go from film to film and almost detach from one world and jump in another. I was living as these people and not having a self. I didn’t know who I was. And things just get really dark.
  241. I went through a period when I felt my film characters were having more fun than I was. It might partly explain why I ended up tattooed or doing certain extreme things in my life.
  242. I was the punk outsider who nobody messed with. I was fearless. At 16, I graduated and moved out.
  243. I was of the generation where most of the Disney princesses and female characters were not girls that I admired. They just weren’t characters I looked up to and identified with.
  244. I want to work; then, as my kids get older, I want to have adventures. I want to visit all their countries: learn and live inside all their cultures.
  245. I think the depth, what children can handle and what they’re interested in, is much deeper than I think what people assume. I think it’s why sometimes we make things too simple for them.
  246. I think if you make a good movie, people walk away arguing.
  247. I think all women go through periods where we hate this about ourselves, we don’t like that. It’s great to get to a place where you dismiss anything you’re worried about. I find flaws attractive. I find scars attractive.
  248. I think I should learn French and be a better cook – basic, really good life stuff.
  249. I take my kids to school. And if I go to work, I go to work, and they visit me on set. I come home. I have dinner with my family. I have breakfast with my family. I have a very solid, very warm home.
  250. I seem to be getting a lot of things pushed my way that are strong women. It’s like people see Hackers and they send me offers to play tough women with guns, the kind who wear no bra and a little tank top. I’d like to play strong women who are also very feminine.
  251. I notice that my characters go out to dinner and have fun and take these great trips, but I spend so much time on their lives, I don’t have much of a personal life of my own. I have to sort of remember to fill out that little notebook on me.
  252. I never thought I’d have children; I never thought I’d be in love, I never thought I’d meet the right person. Having come from a broken home – you kind of accept that certain things feel like a fairy tale, and you just don’t look for them.
  253. I never like being touched, ever. People used to say I held my breath when they were hugging me. I still do.
  254. I never felt settled or calm. You can’t really commit to life when you feel that.
  255. I need more sex, OK? Before I die I wanna taste everyone in the world.
  256. I loved being Maleficent. I was quite sad to put my staff down and put my horns away because somehow, she just lives in a different world.
  257. I love to put on lotion. Sometimes I’ll watch TV and go into a lotion trance for an hour. I try to find brands that don’t taste bad in case anyone wants to taste me.
  258. I love great journalism. I appreciate it. I love a good, you know, I love good news stories. I love great books. I love great articles. I appreciate them so much, and they’ve been part of my education as a woman.
  259. I like to hide behind the characters I play. Despite the public perception, I am a very private person who has a hard time with the fame thing.
  260. I like someone who is a little crazy but coming from a good place. I think scars are sexy because it means you made a mistake that led to a mess.
  261. I like everything. Boyish girls, girlish boys, the heavy and the skinny. Which is a problem when I’m walking down the street.
  262. I learned to fly a few years ago in England. It’s the only place I’m completely alone – up in the air, detached from everything.
  263. I have so much in my life. I want to be of value to the world.
  264. I had a C-section, and I found it fascinating. I didn’t find it a sacrifice, and I didn’t find it a painful experience. I found it a fascinating miracle of what a body can do.
  265. I grew up as this very carefree, happy kid then things turned darker for me. Maybe it was because I saw that the world wasn’t as happy a place as I had hoped it would be for me.
  266. I get impatient with people working on a film that have their head in their hands like it’s the most complicated thing in the world.
  267. I don’t think the money people in Hollywood have ever thought I was normal, but I am dedicated to my work and that’s what counts.
  268. I don’t see the point of doing an interview unless you’re going to share the things you learn in life and the mistakes you make. So to admit that I’m extremely human and have done some dark things I don’t think makes me unusual or unusually dark. I think it actually is the right thing to do, and I’d like to think it’s the nice thing to do.
  269. I don’t see myself as beautiful, because I can see a lot of flaws. People have really odd opinions. They tell me I’m skinny, as if that’s supposed to make me happy.
  270. I don’t believe in guilt; I believe in living on impulse as long as you never intentionally hurt another person. And don’t judge people in your life. I think you should live completely free.
  271. I do have tatoos, and I do wear leather, but there are other sides of me, that my film express.
  272. I didn’t really want to live, so anything that was an investment in time made me angry… but also I just felt sad. When the hopelessness is hurting you, it’s the fixtures and fittings that finish you off.
  273. I didn’t die young. So I am very lucky. There are other artists and people that didn’t survive certain things… people can imagine that I did the most dangerous, and I did the worst… for many reasons, I shouldn’t be here.
  274. I became an actress because my mom wanted me to become an actress. It took me until my mid-30s to realize I actually didn’t. I actually wanted to write and direct and be more involved in politics and humanitarian issues.
  275. I am odd-looking. I sometimes think I look like a funny Muppet.
  276. I am deeply grateful to the citizens of Sarajevo and the Sarajevo Canton assembly for bestowing upon me this incredible honor of citizenship. I am so proud to now be a part of such an extraordinary part of the world and fellow citizen to the people I deeply love and admire.
  277. I am a strong believer that without justice, there is no peace. No lasting peace, anyway.
  278. I always wanted a great love affair: something that feels big and full, really honest, and enough. No moment should feel slight, false, or a little off. For me, it had to be everything.
  279. I always play women I would date.
  280. I always felt caged, closed in, like I was punching at things that weren’t there. I always had too much energy for the room I was in.
  281. Honestly, I like everything, boyish girls, girlish boys, the heavy and the skinny.
  282. Homework’s hard. Especially math. My kids joke with me. They tell me they have homework. I say, ‘Okay.’ And then I sit down and they say, ‘It’s math.’ ‘No! Not math! English, history, anything!’
  283. First and foremost comes my family and my life with Brad. We have so much joy in raising our children and teaching them about the world that nothing really compares to that.
  284. Everyone got kind of crazy with me mentioning I was in love with a woman.
  285. Breast cancer alone kills some 458,000 people each year, according to the World Health Organization, mainly in low- and middle-income countries. It has got to be a priority to ensure that more women can access gene testing and lifesaving preventive treatment, whatever their means and background, wherever they live.
  286. Brad and I have never wanted our kids to be actors, but we also want them to be around film and be a part of Mommy and Daddy’s life and for it not to be kept from them, either. We just want them to have a good, healthy relationship with it.
  287. Anytime I feel lost, I pull out a map and stare. I stare until I have reminded myself that life is a giant adventure, so much to do, to see.
  288. All women do have a different sense of sexuality, or sense of fun, or sense of like what’s sexy or cool or tough.
  289. Acting helped me as I was growing up. It helped me learn about myself, helped me travel, helped me understand life, express myself, all those wonderful things. So I’m very, very grateful; it’s a fun job. It’s a luxury.
  290. Yes, we’re still five little people with a noisy attitude.
  291. With AC/DC, we’ve always started with rock, and we’ve just kept it going. The critic’s view is always, ‘They just made an album and it’s the same as the last one.’ I’ll have fifteen of them, anytime.
  292. When I’m on stage the savage in me is released. It’s like going back to being a cave man. It takes me six hours to come down after a show.
  293. We’re a rock group. we’re noisy, rowdy, sensational and weird.
  294. There are all sorts of cute puppy dogs, but it doesn’t stop people from going out and buying Dobermans.
  295. That’s usually what happens with AC/DC: you make an album, and then you’re on the road flat out. And the only time you ever get near a studio is generally after you’ve done a year of touring.
  296. Soloing was pretty easy for me because it was probably the first thing I’ve ever done.
  297. My part in AC/DC is just adding the color on top.
  298. I’m sick to death of people saying we’ve made 11 albums that sounds exactly the same, Infact, we’ve made 12 albums that sound exactly the same.
  299. I wouldn’t know any newer bands. We’re past the pimple stage.
  300. I saw Deep Purple live once and I paid money for it and I thought, ‘Geez, this is ridiculous.’ You just see through all that sort of stuff. I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin.
  301. I remember one of the first gigs I played with that amp was at a local church. They wanted someone to fill in with the guitar and my friend say, ‘Ah, he can play.’ And so I dragged the amplifier down and started playing and everybody started yelling ‘turn it down!’
  302. I never bothered with cars. I was probably one of the few kids in school who didn’t run around with hot-rod magazines. As I would be at home fiddling with my guitar, they would be fiddling with a car engine.
  303. I just go where the guitar takes me.
  304. I honestly believe that you have to be able to play the guitar hard if you want to be able to get the whole spectrum of tones out of it. Since I normally play so hard, when I start picking a bit softer my tone changes completely, and that’s really useful sometimes for creating a more laid-back feel.
  305. Every guitarist I would cross paths with would tell me that I should have a flashy guitar, whatever the latest fashion model was, and I used to say, ‘Why? Mine works, doesn’t it? It’s a piece of wood and six strings, and it works.’
  306. Actually, because I’m so small, when I strike an open A chord I get physically thrown to the left, and when I play an open G chord I go right. That’s how hard I play, and that’s how a lot of my stage act has come about. I just go where the guitar takes me.
  307. A lot of times you’ll hear bands and it’s a different sound coming out than what’s on stage. Because you can clean it up through a PA and make it sound completely different than what they really sound like.
  308. A lot of people say, ‘AC/DC – that’s the band with the little guy who runs around in school shorts!’
  309. You can’t start with imbalance and end with peace, be that in your own body, in an ecosystem or between a government and its people. What we need to strive for is not perfection, but balance.
  310. Why do you think I write these feminist songs, to try and teach myself to respect myself. You know, it’s not because I’m a hero.
  311. When all you can think of is your own personal problems, you have nothing to give to your society. If you’re trying to figure out where your next meal is coming from, you can’t go march on Washington.
  312. When I first started writing songs and being very explicit, it was hard, but one of the main things people respond to in my writing is that ‘just say it’ attitude of my songs. There really is nothing personal or private; it’s all universal, if you can just find the courage to be open about your life.
  313. We have to be able to criticise what we love, to say what we have to say ’cause if your not trying to make something better, than as far as I can tell, you are just in the way.
  314. They taught me different was wrong.
  315. These days, my main guitar amps have been Magnatone. They’re beautiful. Magnatones have actual tremolo, which I recently learned about guitar amps. Often what guitar amps call vibrato is really just a volume Up and Down. But Magnatone has a true vibrato, which is pitch bending. And so, it’s just a lush sound.
  316. There isn’t much I have to say, that I wouldn’t rather just shut up and do.
  317. The stronger I am in my personal life, the more energy I have to look outward, to address my society.
  318. Taking me seriously is a big mistake. I certainly wouldn’t.
  319. Taken out of context I must seem so strange.
  320. Strangers are exciting, their mystery never ends. But, there’s nothing like looking at your own history in the faces of your friends.
  321. Sometimes the beauty is easy. Sometimes you don’t have to try at all. Sometimes you can hear the wind blow in a handshake. Sometimes there’s poetry written right on the bathroom wall.
  322. Someone’s got to be interested in how I feel, just because I’m here and I’m real.
  323. Some people wear their heart up on their sleeve. I wear mine underneath my right pant leg, strapped to my boot.
  324. Pop stardom is not very compelling. I’m much more interested in a relationship between performer and audience that is of equals. I came up through folk music, and there’s no pomp and circumstance to the performance. There’s no, like, ‘I’ll be the rock star, you be the adulating fan.’
  325. Playing show after show is like my bread and butter.
  326. People need something or someone to fasten themselves to in order to reassure themselves that they are real.
  327. Patriarchy is like the elephant in the room that we don’t talk about, but how could it not affect the planet radically when it’s the superstructure of human society.
  328. Patriarchy is a fundamental imbalance underlying society And it’s one we rarely address because it’s so universal. But as I get older, I see that peace is a product of balance.
  329. My songs are just little letters to me.
  330. My political mission is as acute as ever. For me, in addition to kind of looking at the world and trying to engage in my society politically, having the kid around sort of makes me check in with myself. I think you’re all busy trying to fix the world, but what about yourself?
  331. My parents split up when I was young, and I was living with my mom for a little while, then I was kind of just on my own really young. It wasn’t some kind of global tragedy, it was just never really a very close-knit family. So there was support in the sense that they didn’t stand in my way.
  332. My idea of feminism is self-determination, and it’s very open-ended: every woman has the right to become herself, and do whatever she needs to do.
  333. Music has as many roles as people make it.
  334. Men make angry music and it’s called rock-and-roll; women include anger in their vocabulary and suddenly they’re angry and militant.
  335. Maybe you don’t like your job, maybe you didn’t get enough sleep, well nobody likes their job, nobody got enough sleep. Maybe you just had the worst day of your life, but you know, there’s no escape, there’s no excuse, so just suck up and be nice.
  336. Love is a piano dropped from a fourth story window, and you were in the wrong place at the wrong time.
  337. Just let me go, we have to be able to criticize what we love, to say what we have to say ’cause if you’re not trying to make something better, then as far as I can tell, you are just in the way.
  338. It’s great being your own boss, but then, you know, you make your own mistakes, you know, and you own them. You know, so it’s empowering, and it’s also humbling along the way.
  339. It seems that different people have an idea of what I am, and what I should be. And then there’s me.
  340. It can be very frustrating and very deflating to be constantly defined and described by other people, so I’ve stopped reading anything written about me, and I find it much healthier. I just sort of concentrate on what I do and don’t worry too much about that.
  341. In order to keep anything cultural, logical, or ideological, you have to reinvent the reality of it.
  342. If you like it, let it be, and if you don’t please do the same.
  343. If I’m gonna go down I’m gonna do it with style. You won’t hear me surrender, you won’t hear me confess cause you’ve left me with nothing but I have worked with less.
  344. I’ve never had a very closely connected family. My parents split up when I was young and I was living with my mom for a little while, then I was kind of just on my own really young. It wasn’t some kind of global tragedy, it was just never really a very close-knit family. So there was support in the sense that they didn’t stand in my way.
  345. I’ve been trying to learn how to not be so conflicted about things like my own anger. I’ve always had a place in my music for my anger as a way of compensating for not having a mechanism to express it in my everyday life. So I’ve been trying to be more true to myself, and that helps me to chill out a little bit. But politically, uh-uh. No.
  346. I’ve been saying the Occupy Movement has got the ball rolling, and now we need to take the fight to the great indoors!
  347. I’ve been collecting some more high-end guitars. I have an old Martin D28 from the ’60s, a beautiful, classic Martin that I know I played on ‘Mariachi.’
  348. I’ve been a long time coming, and I’ll be a long time gone. You’ve got your whole life to do something, and that’s not very long.
  349. I’m searching, as we all are, for ways to feel good about myself. Certainly, looking in the mirror doesn’t do it!
  350. I’m not one of those people who has an act.
  351. I’m a little hibernating animal. Anonymity is one of my favorite things. I mean, that’s why I moved to New York when I was like 18, because there, there are just so many people that there’s no one and you’re just lost. You’re completely invisible and I find that very liberating.
  352. I’d rather be able to face myself in the bathroom mirror than be rich and famous.
  353. I was blessed with a birth and a death, and I guess I just want some say in between.
  354. I was attracted to a lot of different art forms – dancing, painting. But there’s something about music that people hold so close. It’s such a powerful art form, and that’s why I live for it.
  355. I think the gay community should get smart and drop the word ‘marriage.’ Do you really need to change every right-wing Christian to make sure you get your equal rights? Eyes on the prize, we should be sticking to getting equal rights.
  356. I think I’m a very solitary person. To actually not be anonymous is a bit claustrophobic for me.
  357. I seriously hate pop music and all things super-commercial.
  358. I see a lot of connections between folk and punk music just because they’re both subcorporate music – I mean, traditionally.
  359. I really have been enjoying performing more lately than I have in a long time and you know, it’s all about that sort of centered feeling that I have now. You know, thanks to, not just my kid, but her father before her. You know, I have a kind of a grounding through them that I really relish, and I think is also good for my work, you know.
  360. I know there is strength in the differences between us. I know there is comfort where we overlap.
  361. I have something to prove, as long as I know there’s something that needs improvement, and you know that everytime I move, I make a woman’s movement.
  362. I hate it when people don’t recognize the work of women as being universal, or having any import to the world at large, as opposed to men’s work, which is generally tends to be seen as more universal – men’s writing about their own experience tends to be put in a broader context.
  363. I had a little bit of resistance to the idea of taking energy away from my work, and the baby comes along and, lo and behold, that’s exactly what happens.
  364. I don’t know if there are artists out there who love their own records. I haven’t met any, and I’m kind of extreme in the other direction, but therein lies the impetus to keep working and keep making new songs and new records.
  365. I don’t hate being compared with female musicians. I don’t mind that at all. I have no problem with seeing connections between women’s work.
  366. I don’t care if they eat me alive, I’ve got better things to do then survive.
  367. I do believe that music has an intense power to connect us together, to inspire us to become ourselves.
  368. I did a lot of work with myself over the course of being pregnant and the first few months of being pregnant. It’s nice, the pace of being pregnant; it gives you a long time to not just germinate a baby but germinate the mother that you’re gonna be.
  369. I basically get stereotyped a lot in terms of being a girl and writing ‘chick’ music for teenage girls or something. I think, if anything, the press kind of, because of my gender and my age, tends to kind of relegate my work to this sort of special-interest group. It’s part of the cultural dynamic, I guess.
  370. Having more exposure is kind of a bittersweet thing for me, honestly, because it’s nice to have a little more job security in life now.
  371. God forbid you be an ugly girl, ‘course too pretty is also your doom, ’cause everyone harbors a secret hatred for the prettiest girl in the room.
  372. For me, the stronger ground I have in my personal life, then the more will I have to fight the good fight.
  373. Feminism is not only for women It’s something everyone can participate in, and evolve together, as the first step in the right direction. I see feminism as a tool to achieve that balance and peace.
  374. Either you are a feminist or you are a sexist/misogynist. There is no box marked ‘other.’
  375. Being a parent has taught me a lot of things already, you know, though it’s only been a year and half, and has made me address parts of myself that I would otherwise live in comfortable denial of, or you know and – you know, for instance, my self-loathing.
  376. Before Katrina, you didn’t see criticism of the Bush administration in the media. Here they are, stealing elections, enacting illegal wars, huge crimes against humanity and democracy, and you didn’t even see criticism. It wasn’t until Katrina that people started to come down on them.
  377. Art may imitate life, but life imitates TV.
  378. Art is why I get up in the morning but my definition ends there. You know I don’t think its fair that I’m living for something I can’t even define.
  379. Any tool is a weapon if you hold it right.
  380. All of youth culture is packaged and sold back to us at this furious rate these days. I think it’s part and parcel to this corporate encroachment on our lives in general.
  381. A lot of women these days, a lot of young women don’t want to call themselves feminists. You have this cheap, hideous ‘girl power’ sort of fad, which I think is pretty benign at best, but at worst, I think it’s a way of taking the politics out of feminism and making it some kind of fashion.
  382. You know that day after day of, Oh God what am I going to do with myself feeling? The fear of the emptiness that it implies keeps me going.
  383. Work grows out of other work, and there are very few eureka moments.
  384. What one does in the studio is to pose a series of problems to oneself. I’ve got to look for some deeper meaning, for some reason for this thing to be in the world. There’s enough stuff in the world.
  385. What interests me is the sense of the darkness that we carry within us, the darkness that’s akin to one of the principal subjects of the sublime – terror.
  386. We live in a fractured world. I’ve always seen it as my role as an artist to attempt to make wholeness.
  387. There’s something imminent in the work, but the circle is only completed by the viewer.
  388. The work itself has a complete circle of meaning and counterpoint. And without your involvement as a viewer, there is no story.
  389. The idea is that the object has a language unto itself.
  390. The eye is a very quick instrument, much quicker than the ear. The eye gets it immediately.
  391. That freedom that Picasso afforded himself, to be an artist in a huge number of ways, seems to be a huge psychological liberation.
  392. Sculpture occupies the same space as your body.
  393. Red, of course, is the colour of the interior of our bodies. In a way it’s inside out, red.
  394. Red is a colour I’ve felt very strongly about. Maybe red is a very Indian colour, maybe it’s one of those things that I grew up with and recognise at some other level.
  395. Re-investing in one’s own little moments of insight is very important.
  396. One of the great currents in the contemporary experience of art is that it seems to come out of the experience of the author.
  397. One must not believe any of those mythologies about oneself as an artist.
  398. One doesn’t make art for other people, even though I am very concerned with the viewer.
  399. One does not set out with the idea that I’ve just had a great idea and now I’m going to go and carry it out. Almost all art that’s made like that doesn’t go anywhere.
  400. One does afford oneself the luxury to come into the studio and all day, every day, spend one’s life making aesthetic propositions. What an immense luxury.
  401. One cannot set out to make a work that’s spiritual. What is a contemporary iconography for the spiritual? Is it some fuzzy space?
  402. One can hardly be Indian and not know that almost every accent, which hand you eat your food with, has some deeper symbolic truth, reality.
  403. My work is not about my life history. It’s not about the story of my neurosis.
  404. My first show sold within the first 3 minutes, and I came back to the studio and spent the next two and a half years making almost nothing.
  405. Much of what I make is geometric, and has a kind of almost mathematical logic to the form.
  406. Maybe the way we have learned to look has changed in the last 25 years, and the exotic is much more acceptable. There are many artists now, younger artists, who work out of the exotic.
  407. It’s the role of the artist to pursue content.
  408. It’s precisely in those moments when I don’t know what to do, boredom drives one to try a host of possibilities to either get somewhere or not get anywhere.
  409. If you get a bad review, you take that in your stride.
  410. I, in the end, make art for myself.
  411. I’ve nothing to say.
  412. I’ve always felt that if one was going to take seriously this vocation as an artist, you have to get beyond that decorative facade.
  413. I’m not an artist who has an agenda that’s set by the work.
  414. I used to empty the studio out and throw stuff away. I now don’t. There will be a whole series of dead ends that a year or two down the line I’ll come back to.
  415. I think I understand something about space. I think the job of a sculptor is spatial as much as it is to do with form.
  416. I feel there’s everything to do yet.
  417. I feel the symbolic world is the nub of a problem for an artist.
  418. I am Indian, and I’m proud of it. Indian life is mythologically rich and powerful.
  419. Content arises out of certain considerations about form, material, context-and that when that subject matter is sufficiently far away.
  420. Being an artist is a very long game. It is not a 10-year game. I hope I’ll be around making art when I’m 80.
  421. Artists don’t make objects. Artists make mythologies.
  422. All ideas grow out of other ideas.
  423. A work will only have deep resonance if the kind of darkness I can generate is something that is resident in me already.
  424. Why couldn’t Obama have picked somebody respectable as his running mate, you know, like John Kerry did?
  425. While the form of treachery varies slightly from case to case, liberals always manage to take the position that most undermines American security.
  426. Whether they are defending the Soviet Union or bleating for Saddam Hussein, liberals are always against America. They are either traitors or idiots, and on the matter of America’s self-preservation, the difference is irrelevant.
  427. Whenever a liberal begins a statement with ‘I don’t know which is more frightening’, you know the answer is going to be pretty clear.
  428. When you try to figure out what the religious right is, it ultimately comes down either to one man, Pat Robertson, or anyone who believes in a higher being and wants their taxes cut.
  429. When we were at peace, Democrats wanted to raise taxes. Now there’s a war, so Democrats want to raise taxes. When there was a surplus, Democrats wanted to raise taxes. Now that there is a mild recession, Democrats want to raise taxes.
  430. When every one of your arguments is characterized an attempt to bring back slavery or resegregate lunch counters, it’s a little hard to have any sort of productive debate.
  431. What liberals mean by ‘goose-stepping’ or ‘ethnic cleansing’ is generally something along the lines of ‘eliminating taxpayer funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.’ But they can’t say that, or people would realize they’re crazy.
  432. We’ve finally given liberals a war against fundamentalism, and they don’t want to fight it. They would except that it would put them on the same side as the United States.
  433. We should invade their countries, kill their leaders and convert them to Christianity. We weren’t punctilious about locating and punishing only Hitler and his top officers. We carpet-bombed German cities; we killed civilians. That’s war. And this is war.
  434. We don’t want someone who will get 98 percent of the vote. We want someone who will get 51 percent of the vote.
  435. Usually the nonsense liberals spout is kind of cute, but in wartime their instinctive idiocy is life-threatening.
  436. They’ve hit us and we’ve got to hit back hard, and I’m not just talking about the terrorists.
  437. There are lots of bad Republicans, there are no good Democrats.
  438. The really amazing part, to me, was when Florida made it into the Final Four, the Democrats didn’t demand a recount.
  439. The fact that a Republican is in the late Senator Kennedy’s old seat probably must have him rolling in his grave, probably spilling his drink.
  440. The New York Times editorial page is like a Ouija board that has only three answers, no matter what the question. The answers are: higher taxes, more restrictions on political speech and stricter gun control.
  441. The Democrats have no actual policy proposals of their own unless constant carping counts as a policy.
  442. Taxes are like abortion, and not just because both are grotesque procedures supported by Democrats. You’re for them or against them. Taxes go up or down; government raises taxes or lowers them. But Democrats will not let the words ‘abortion’ or ‘tax hikes’ pass their lips.
  443. Swing voters are more appropriately known as the ‘idiot voters’ because they have no set of philosophical principles. By the age of fourteen, you’re either a Conservative or a Liberal if you have an IQ above a toaster.
  444. Political debate with liberals is basically impossible in America today because liberals are calling names while conservatives are trying to make arguments.
  445. My libertarian friends are probably getting a little upset now but I think that’s because they never appreciate the benefits of local fascism.
  446. Liberals become indignant when you question their patriotism, but simultaneously work overtime to give terrorists a cushion for the next attack and laugh at dumb Americans who love their country and hate the enemy.
  447. Liberals are stalwart defenders of civil liberties – provided we’re only talking about criminals.
  448. Liberal soccer moms are precisely as likely to receive anthrax in the mail as to develop a capacity for linear thinking.
  449. It would be a much better country if women did not vote. That is simply a fact. In fact, in every presidential election since 1950 – except Goldwater in ’64 – the Republican would have won, if only the men had voted.
  450. Ironically, since Obama was elected, for the first time in my life I’m sometimes not proud of my country.
  451. In fact Sarah Palin has created more jobs than Obama has. She created eleven jobs fact-checking at the AP just for the Palin autobiography.
  452. If we’re so cruel to minorities, why do they keep coming here? Why aren’t they sneaking across the Mexican border to make their way to the Taliban?
  453. If we took away women’s right to vote, we’d never have to worry about another Democrat president.
  454. If the press really thinks Obama is Lincoln, they ought to treat him like they treated Bush, ’cause that’s how they treated Lincoln. His critics compared Lincoln to an ape; they called him an illiterate baboon.
  455. If only Al Sharpton were around, Lincoln would have known he was a victim of racism.
  456. If a university official’s letter accusing a speaker of having a proclivity to commit speech crimes before she’s given the speech – which then leads to Facebook postings demanding that Ann Coulter be hurt, a massive riot and a police-ordered cancellation of the speech – is not hate speech, then there is no such thing as hate speech.
  457. If John Kerry had a dollar for every time he bragged about serving in Vietnam – oh wait, he does.
  458. I’ve decided to cut out the part of the speech where I say anything nice about Democrats.
  459. I’m not going to be lectured to.
  460. I’m a Christian first, and a mean-spirited, bigoted conservative second, and don’t you ever forget it.
  461. I think there should be a literacy test and a poll tax for people to vote.
  462. I might be in favor of national healthcare if it required all Democrats to get their heads examined.
  463. I love to engage in repartee with people who are stupider than I am.
  464. I know Jesus Christ died for my sins, and that’s all I really need to know.
  465. I am emboldened by my looks to say things Republican men wouldn’t.
  466. Four years of Jimmy Carter gave us two titanic Reagan landslides, peace and prosperity for eight blessed years – and even a third term for his feckless vice president, George H.W. Bush.
  467. Even Obama’s staunchest supporters are starting to leave him. Last week Michelle Obama demanded to see a copy of his birth certificate.
  468. Democrats couldn’t care less if people in Indiana hate them. But if Europeans curl their lips, liberals can’t look at themselves in the mirror.
  469. Democrats always assure us that deterrence will work, but when the time comes to deter, they’re against it.
  470. Conservatives have a problem with women. For that matter, all men do.
  471. Clinton’s attempt to socialize healthcare was the second most disgusting thing he did in the oval office. I can’t remember was the first thing was.
  472. As the leader of twelve apostles, even Jesus had more executive experience than Obama.
  473. ‘Moderate Republican’ is simply how the blabocracy flatters Republicans who vote with the Democrats. If it weren’t so conspicuous, the ‘New York Times’ would start referring to ‘nice Republicans’ and ‘mean Republicans’
  474. You need that guy like a giraffe needs strep throat.
  475. Too many people today know the price of everything and the value of nothing.
  476. There could be no honor in a sure success, but much might be wrested from a sure defeat.
  477. The trouble with talking too fast is you may say something you haven’t thought of yet.
  478. The poor wish to be rich, the rich wish to be happy, the single wish to be married, and the married wish to be dead.
  479. The Lord gave us two ends – one to sit on and the other to think with. Success depends on which one we use the most.
  480. Television has proved that people will look at anything rather than each other.
  481. Sensual pleasures have the fleeting brilliance of a comet; a happy marriage has the tranquillity of a lovely sunset.
  482. People who drink to drown their sorrow should be told that sorrow knows how to swim.
  483. People who care about each other enjoy doing things for one another. They don’t consider it servitude.
  484. Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don’t recognize them.
  485. One out of four people in this country is mentally unbalanced. Think of your three closes friends; if they seem OK, then you’re the one.
  486. Nobody gets to live life backward. Look ahead, that is where your future lies.
  487. Nobody ever drowned in his own sweat.
  488. No one has the right to destroy another person’s belief by demanding empirical evidence.
  489. Maturity: Be able to stick with a job until it is finished. Be able to bear an injustice without having to get even. Be able to carry money without spending it. Do your duty without being supervised.
  490. Love is friendship that has caught fire. It is quiet understanding, mutual confidence, sharing and forgiving. It is loyalty through good and bad times. It settles for less than perfection and makes allowances for human weaknesses.
  491. Know yourself. Don’t accept your dog’s admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful.
  492. Know when to tune out, if you listen to too much advice you may wind up making other peoples mistakes.
  493. Keep in mind that the true measure of an individual is how he treats a person who can do him absolutely no good.
  494. If you marry a man who cheats on his wife, you’ll be married to a man who cheats on his wife.
  495. If you have love in your life, it can make up for a great many things that are missing. If you don’t have love in your life, no matter what else there is, it’s not enough.
  496. I don’t believe that you have to be a cow to know what milk is.
  497. I advise keeping four feet on the floor and all hands on deck.
  498. Expect trouble as an inevitable part of life and repeat to yourself, the most comforting words of all; this, too, shall pass.
  499. Don’t accept your dog’s admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful.
  500. Class never tries to build itself up by tearing others down. Class is already up and need not strive to look better by making others look worse.
  501. Class is the sure-footedness that comes with having proved you can meet life.
  502. Class is real. It can’t be faked.
  503. Class is considerate of others. It knows that good manners is nothing more than a series of petty sacrifices.
  504. Class can ‘walk with kings and keep its virtue and talk with crowds and keep the common touch.’ Everyone is comfortable with the person who has class because that person is comfortable with himself.
  505. At every party there are two kinds of people – those who want to go home and those who don’t. The trouble is, they are usually married to each other.
  506. All married couples should learn the art of battle as they should learn the art of making love. Good battle is objective and honest – never vicious or cruel. Good battle is healthy and constructive, and brings to a marriage the principles of equal partnership.
  507. Well, you know, too much democracy is a sort of sad thing.
  508. Well, you know my number one cause has always been that women’s reproductive health needs to be protected.
  509. Well, let me tell you, any conservative that’s unhappy with George Bush warms my heart, in any way that they can wake up and smell the coffee would be really great.
  510. Well it’s really hard to satisfy the right wing. I can tell you that.
  511. Weight-bearing exercise builds bone density, builds your muscular strength so that you can hold your body up where those bones have a tendency to get weak.
  512. We’re not going to have the America that we want until we elect leaders who are going to tell the truth – not most days, but every day.
  513. We’re living in a whole new social and economic order with a whole new set of problems and challenges. Old assumptions and old programs don’t work in this new society and the more we try to stretch them to make them fit, the more we will be seen as running away from what is reality.
  514. There is not a doubt in my mind that the people of America are hunkered down. They are afraid.
  515. Teaching was the hardest work I had ever done, and it remains the hardest work I have done to date.
  516. Sometimes when I’m watching television and something, an image, will come on that has to do with 9/11 or some of these families telling their stories, or children talking about drawing pictures of airplanes flying into towers, you know, I find myself still choking up.
  517. People work for a living. They got families to raise. Their lives are tough.
  518. People don’t know that New York really is just made up of a group of very small neighborhoods.
  519. Osteoporosis is a disease that attacks the bones in your body. It happens to really almost everyone when they get really old. But for women, after menopause, they can lose up to 30 percent of their bone mass.
  520. Now we Democrats believe that America is still the country of fair play, that we can come out of a small town or a poor neighborhood and have the same chance as anyone else, and it doesn’t matter whether we are black or Hispanic, or disabled or women.
  521. Let me tell you, sisters, seeing dried egg on a plate in the morning is a lot dirtier than anything I’ve had to deal with in politics.
  522. Jesse Jackson is a leader and a teacher who can open our hearts and open our minds and stir our very souls.
  523. I’ve had lots of good advice.
  524. I’ve always said that in politics, your enemies can’t hurt you, but your friends will kill you.
  525. I work very hard on my health, and I think about it, of course, like I’ve never thought before.
  526. I was born during the Depression in a little community just outside Waco, and I grew up listening to Franklin Roosevelt on the radio.
  527. I travel all over the country making speeches for people I believe in.
  528. I thought I knew Texas pretty well, but I had no notion of its size until I campaigned it.
  529. I think you have to deal with grief in the sense that you have to recognize that you have it, and say that it’s OK to have all the sadness.
  530. I think in the immediate days after 9/11, the administration acted very, very well. I liked the decisiveness of it.
  531. I like candidates who tell me something that is going to make a difference to me.
  532. I just feel like I’m a very lucky person to have a new life outside of politics.
  533. I have very strong feelings about how you lead your life. You always look ahead, you never look back.
  534. I have an awfully good life.
  535. I have always had the feeling I could do anything and my dad told me I could. I was in college before I found out he might be wrong.
  536. I have a real soft spot in my heart for librarians and people who care about books.
  537. I had such high expectations of myself. I was going to be the best mother, the best housewife, the best entertainer, the best nurse, you know – what it was, I was going to be the best. And I could never live up to my expectations.
  538. I don’t think people maybe think that the government does tell them the truth. I think they expect politicians who are going to tell them one thing and then when they get in office do something else.
  539. I did not want my tombstone to read, ‘She kept a really clean house.’ I think I’d like them to remember me by saying, ‘She opened government to everyone.’
  540. I believe in recovery, and I believe that as a role model I have the responsibility to let young people know that you can make a mistake and come back from it.
  541. Everything that we used to think got taught at home now seemingly has to be taught in the public school system, and something is going to get lost in the process.
  542. When we can’t bottle our tears up anymore, God catches every one in His bottle. God’s catching every falling tear because He won’t let us fall apart.
  543. When grief is deepest, words are fewest.
  544. Whatever I’m writing comes organically out of my life.
  545. The real romantics imagine greying and sagging and wrinkling as the deepening of something sacred.
  546. The real romantics are the boring ones – they let another heart bore a hole deep into theirs.
  547. The brave who focus on all things good and all things beautiful and all things true, even in the small, who give thanks for it and discover joy even in the here and now, they are the change agents who bring fullest Light to all the world.
  548. Sometimes God answers our questions with questions.
  549. Scales always lie. They don’t make a scale that ever told the truth about value, about worth, about significance.
  550. Romance isn’t measured by how viral your proposal goes. The Internet age may try to sell you something different, but don’t ever forget that viral is closely associated with sickness – so don’t ever make being viral your goal.
  551. Really good writing, from my perspective, runs a lot like a visual on the screen. You need to create that kind of detail and have credibility with the reader, so the reader knows that you were really there, that you really experienced it, that you know the details. That comes out of seeing.
  552. Pick up a yardstick to measure your life against anyone else’s, and you’ve just picked up a stick and beaten up your own soul.
  553. My husband is Dutch, and his family, when you sat down to eat food at the table, you never left the table until you ate living bread and drank living water. They never left the table until they’d read Scripture together. So morning, lunch, suppertime, Scripture was always read at the table, and then there was prayer to close.
  554. Measuring sticks try to rank some people as big and some people as small – but we aren’t sizes. We are souls. There are no better people or worse people – there are only God-made souls.
  555. In a storm of struggles, I have tried to control the elements, clasp the fist tight so as to protect self and happiness. But stress can be an addiction, and worry can be our lunge for control, and we forget the answer to this moment is always yes because of Christ.
  556. If I don’t have words, it’s a sign I’m not reading enough.
  557. I’m not a fast writer at all. I come empty and wait upon the Lord. So it really is all a waiting process, a patient process.
  558. I write a chapter, then edit it and edit it and edit it and edit it. I don’t think we mine creativity from within. It’s bestowed from on high, from God.
  559. I think the fall in Eden was ultimately a failure to give thanks.
  560. I have lived pain, and my life can tell: I only deepen the wound of the world when I neglect to give thanks the heavy perfume of wild roses in early July and the song of crickets on summer humid nights and the rivers that run and the stars that rise and the rain that falls and all the good things that a good God gives.
  561. I came into this world the way every person on the planet does – with clenched fists.
  562. Gratitude’s not a natural posture. The prince of darkness is ultimately a spoiled ingrate, and I’ve spent most of my life as kin to the fist-shaker.
  563. Giving thanks is that: making the canyon of pain into a megaphone to proclaim the ultimate goodness of God when Satan and all the world would sneer at us to recant.
  564. Get this, kids – how a man proposes isn’t what makes him romantic. It’s how a man purposes to lay down his life that makes him romantic.
  565. Counting one thousand gifts, I discovered I could count on God.
  566. Comparison is a thug that robs your joy. But it’s even more than that – Comparison makes you a thug who beats down somebody – or your soul.
  567. By default, most of us have taken the dare to simply survive. Exist. Get through. For the most part, we live numb to life – we’ve grown weary and apathetic and jaded… and wounded.
  568. Adults are tempted to produce and perform Christmas for their kids and their families, and they arrive at Christmas Day weary and disillusioned.
  569. A simplified Christmas isn’t about circumstances as much as it is about focus.
  570. You can relax more when you’re playing a silly character than when you’re playing a really rigid character. But to be fair, I think George Clooney is a bigger teenager than any of the ‘Twilight’ cast. He’s the guy throwing a football at your head and then hiding around the corner, pretending it wasn’t him!
  571. While I wouldn’t wish being teased on anyone, I think it eventually leads to a kind of solidarity in adult life. The few people I know who weren’t picked on in school are people I find I can’t relate to on much more than a surface level. There’s a sensitivity that comes with feeling like an outsider at some point in your life.
  572. When you have no money in New York, you’re living in a shoebox, and it’s freezing. When you have no money in L.A., you’re living in a slightly larger shoebox, and you can go outside and feel okay about your life for a minute.
  573. When you grow up middle class, you just always feel like you’ve got to be working, or you won’t be able to pay the bills.
  574. When you first saw ‘The Truman Show,’ did anyone else walk around for the next week not picking your nose just in case?
  575. When I was 12, I did this show on Broadway called ‘High Society,’ so we moved to New York for the run of that.
  576. When I have a big enough handbag to carry a little pair of booties with, I always do – those pointy Christian Louboutin heels are just no fun to walk around in.
  577. When I get recognized for ‘Twilight,’ it’s usually a teenage girl, and they’re usually really loud. So it certainly feels like I get recognized the most from that, but it could just be because of the nature of how vocal those fans are.
  578. Voiceover excited me and terrified me. I thought I was going to be really bad at it. It was so freeing and fun to not have to wait for 10 minutes between every setup. They just throw you a direction, and you just say it.
  579. To not be self-conscious of your appearance is huge, and something that I desperately hope to carry into film at some point in my useless life – to not be thinking, ‘My ear looks weird from this angle, why is the camera over there?’
  580. To me, accessorizing is the most fun part of an outfit. While I don’t think you can’t rely on accessories to make a dress that isn’t working work, I do love jewelry and handbags more than anything.
  581. There’s always moments where you creep yourself out, and you think you heard something and you convince yourself that some spirit is in the room with you, but truly, I don’t believe in any of that kind of thing. A lot of my friends really do.
  582. There’s a difference between being an actress who can sing and being a Sally Song-and-Dance.
  583. There will always be a part of me that wants to do a movie musical. I feel like you’re doing yourself a disservice when you say something like that, because you never know if that thing is gonna come along and be right, but I’d be lying if I said that that wasn’t true.
  584. There have definitely been more than a few moments in my life where I’m wondering where the next paycheck will come from and how I’m gonna pay rent.
  585. The sneaker heels thing is a myth. They were saying, ‘They’re like sneakers.’ No, they’re like heels is what they’re like. That’s like saying a denim skirt is like jeans. It’s not.
  586. The music for ‘The Last Five Years’ is like running a 26-mile marathon, and singing Sondheim is like ballroom-dancing up Everest.
  587. The movie industry can be tricky and occasionally creepy, and I have this sense that the music industry is just shady as hell. I don’t want to be a part of it.
  588. The consummate gentleman on the planet today is George Clooney, who never fails to go the extra mile for people. Every person matters to George.
  589. Sometimes when I try to make jokes or have a sense of humor in interviews, it doesn’t go over very well. But Twitter made my life easier in this way that I didn’t expect. It would have taken probably 10 times as long for people to accept my voice and my sense of humor if I didn’t have Twitter.
  590. People send you stuff if you say you’re interested in something. I have a tonne of body lotion. So I could mention I was interested in, you know, surfing, and some company would send me a surfboard.
  591. People like to make fun of the fans who camp out but people have renaissance fairs; people do Civil War re-enactments; people do what they like. I’m tired of hearing people rage on the fans. If you don’t like ‘Twilight,’ don’t buy a ticket.
  592. Okay, I am happy with the way I look, but I have never, never, ever thought of myself as a ‘pretty girl.’ Honestly. When I read some of these scripts I’m sent, and they describe the heroine as ‘incredibly beautiful,’ I wonder why they sent it to me.
  593. Nobody pulls a prank like George Clooney.
  594. My parents were really, really cool about supporting what I wanted to do at a really young age. I think I was about 10 when I caught the bug. They would drive me down to New York if there were auditions. When I was 12, I did this show on Broadway called ‘High Society,’ so we moved to New York for the run of that.
  595. My parents got married late and they had kids late, so I never felt a social or cultural thing to be married or pregnant or a homeowner by a certain age.
  596. My goal all along has just been to work and support myself. I’ve been really lucky to walk away from the ‘Twilight’ series unscathed. Somebody asked me recently what it’s like to be a star. I thought that was the strangest question. If you saw my day-to-day life, the word ‘star’ just doesn’t apply.
  597. My favorite movie is ‘The Women’ from 1939. It’s been my favorite movie since I was like 12 years old. I love the dialogue, really. It’s just a lot of really strong female performances. Rosalind Russell kills it, you know.
  598. My family has had to become quite understanding about me not returning phone calls when I’m filming.
  599. It’s like an OCD thing, it’s not as much something I enjoy. If I see a chapstick that I’ve never tried, I have to buy it. And then once that door’s been opened, I have to check the whole store to see if there are more chapsticks that I don’t have.
  600. It’s almost better that Twitter limits me to 140 characters. There’s only so much trouble I can get in.
  601. It’s a lot easier to act when the writing is good. Nothing is more frustrating than trying to figure out ‘Well, why did I say this next?’
  602. It would be fun to be a redhead… you can get away with being, like, really volatile and fire-y because you’re like, ‘I’m just a redhead; what can I say?’
  603. In my dreams, I have Keira Knightley’s eyebrows.
  604. If I’m on set and there’s no other option, I get on a treadmill, but that’s my most hated thing.
  605. If I took myself too seriously, I would be a mess every day because the world keeps my ego in check.
  606. If I could play the ukulele like Zooey Deschanel, I would find my own personal M. Ward, and we would do a side album; but I don’t, you know?
  607. I’ve never really gone for the razzle-dazzle types: no quarterbacks, no flashy guys, and no Prince Charmings.
  608. I’ve never felt like I’ve exactly traded on my looks. When I was a teenager, I was an ultra late bloomer, and my mom would say it was a blessing because it means you never have to wonder if guys are only interested in you because you’ve got boobs.
  609. I’ve always had volume on my side: the big-voice-in-a-small-package thing. I surprise people.
  610. I’m the person who wouldn’t send back my food even if I got steak when I’d ordered fish.
  611. I’m really into lip cream. I have this one by Hourglass: it’s an oil with this gold-tip applicator, and it’s schmancy-schmancy. When you get to the point that your lips are cracking, the price is worth it.
  612. I’m not one who can get by on six hours sleep night after night. You can see it on my face and hear it in my voice. When working 14-hour days, I have to go home, go to sleep, and wake up in time for crew call. I hate naps. They throw me off the rest of the day.
  613. I’m not big on lip color, but I like to have a little something.
  614. I’m into ‘The Walking Dead,’ ‘Shaun of the Dead,’ obviously, and I’ve seen all the Romero movies. I am a classic zombie queen. And I love the White Walkers on ‘Game of Thrones.’ Weirdly, it wasn’t until pretty late in life that I found my entry point into horror films.
  615. I’m glad I got to do ‘The Last Five Years’ and ‘Into the Woods,’ which are both shows that I just don’t think I could have the stamina to do them eight times a week. I just have so much respect for the women who do these vocal roles eight times a week. They’re so challenging.
  616. I’m constantly playing this game in my head where I’m thinking, ‘Can this quote be pared down and misinterpreted?’ It doesn’t matter what outlet I’m talking to and how comprehensive the interview is, because I have to think in terms of, ‘Right, but ‘People’ magazine could just take this one quote and take it out of context.’
  617. I’m attracted to things that are in direct opposition to something that I’ve just done. It’s not like I’m trying to make the right chess move. It’s more just that personal thing where you get connected to something for so long and then you want to do something that’s in opposition to that.
  618. I’m a pretty big dork. It’s crazy. I’m one of those people who grew up with all kinds of musicals, but I was right at that age where ‘Rent’ was a big deal for me and for my friends.
  619. I’m a big fan of ’30 Rock,’ which I think is the most genius show on television.
  620. I was really overwhelmed by the amount of roles that I got offered that were carbon copies of what I did in ‘Up in the Air.’ I got every offer for every ambitious, unfeeling practically robotic character.
  621. I want to do stage again, because there just aren’t words for how great it is. People say that all the time, ‘There’s nothing like live theater, blah blah,’ but it’s really true. I see a show and I know how they feel, and it feels great.
  622. I used to think that guys preferred tall women. But plenty of them like short girls.
  623. I used to exercise an hour every day – no excuses. I live in absolutes: I either exercise every day, or I let myself off the hook. I’m trying to find that balance of working out three or four days a week and sticking to it.
  624. I think tights make a comeback out of necessity every season: you can only go so far with naked legs in the cold! You’ve got to protect yourself. I remember going to a fashion show and saying, ‘And it’s okay if I wear nude tights with this?’ to the designer, who looked at me like I just killed his dog or something.
  625. I think there are rock stars within every subgenre, and for people who are obsessed with musical theater Sutton Foster and Audra MacDonald are like Beyonce to them. I’m sure the a cappella world has their own version of that, and that exists in every geeky subculture.
  626. I think right after ‘Up in the Air’ everyone wanted me to play the girl from ‘Up in the Air,’ and it took a little while for people to think of me as an actress from a film that they liked instead of just that character.
  627. I think my iTunes is a kind of strange and embarrassing mix of show tunes and artists that I have no perception of whether or not they’re huge or not, you know? I’m the kind of person who doesn’t realize that The Arcade Fire is a big deal, but then I expect everybody to know Cocoon, and people tend to not know Cocoon.
  628. I think a good script is a rare thing, and I think no matter who you are you have to fight for the good ones.
  629. I think a gentleman is someone who holds the comfort of other people above their own. The instinct to do that is inside every good man, I believe. The rules about opening doors and buying dinner and all of that other ‘gentleman’ stuff is a chess game, especially these days.
  630. I think I’m trouble-adjacent. I remember hearing once that good girls don’t get caught. I think that’s sort of a lot of what my teen years were like. I skirted the stuff that other kids were doing because the idea of actually getting in trouble was not appealing to me, but I still wanted to have adventures.
  631. I stole comic books from my brother when I was a kid, but I was never like an avid fan. I can’t claim to be like a comic book geek.
  632. I stole a little snow globe from the set of the first ‘Pitch Perfect’ that I don’t think ever made it on-screen, so it’s not like fans would be tickled by that information, but I still have it.
  633. I started auditioning when I was about 10 and I didn’t get my first job until I was 12, and two years at that age is really hard.
  634. I rarely get recognised. It’s always a shock when someone notices me. I always think they must be confusing me with someone else.
  635. I never thought that tailoring was something that normal people did; I just thought that it was something that guys who had suits made of Italian silk depended on, and I wish someone had told me what a difference tailoring makes!
  636. I never have used a trainer. I’m slightly intimidated by the idea of somebody in my face.
  637. I like to buy a new fragrance for each film. I’ll go out in the city where I’m filming and snap it up. The one I have for ‘Into the Woods’ is Terry de Gunzburg Flagrant Delice, which I bought in London.
  638. I like figuring out where I need to be mentally so that I’m not thinking about the camera and that it’s second nature. I want to get to a place where I can exist within the confines of what you can do with filmmaking and not have to think about it.
  639. I just got on Twitter because there was some MTV film blog that quoted me on something really innocuous that I supposedly said on Twitter before I was even on Twitter. So then I had to get on Twitter to say: ‘This is me. I’m on Twitter. If there’s somebody else saying that they’re me on Twitter, they’re not.’
  640. I heard people saying they were going to become millionaires by the time they were 25 – that’s gross and obnoxious, but in California it’s looked on as an asset.
  641. I have the advantage of being pretty small, so if I’m flying myself, I’m flying coach. To save the money. I just put in my headphones, and it’s no big thing. I keep my head down, wear a hoodie or a hat – but sometimes not even that. I’m small. People miss me.
  642. I hate when people think you’re broken because your parents are divorced. And I really reject the idea of staying together for the kids. If they’re growing up in a house that’s not healthy, it’s better to know that’s not the model of what marriage should be.
  643. I happen to be a huge ‘Lord of the Rings’ fan. I do an annual marathon of the extended editions.
  644. I guess my silly dream is to be on ‘Game of Thrones.’ I don’t think that I can do that, but that’s my silly dream. And there are a lot of American comedies, particularly on NBC, that I would, I would love to do.
  645. I guess as long as people think of me for different ages, I’ll trust their opinion. I remember noticing one year that Michelle Monaghan played 34 and 19, so I’ve kind of clung to that as my justification that I can be Jake Gyllenhaal’s wife and a freshman in college in the same year.
  646. I guess I feel I’m masquerading as an adult when I don’t have the kind of friendships and routines that I thought you were supposed to have as an adult. It’s the ‘Friends’ lied to me! syndrome.
  647. I graduated from high school early so I could move to New York to do ‘A Little Night Music’ out of the New York City Opera.
  648. I get really excited every time there’s a female character who is really strong because a lot of females in film are really soft.
  649. I find getting my nails done the most tedious thing. I’m such a fidgety person; it’s like torture. Everybody loves massages; I don’t know what my problem is. I feel like I have to talk to the masseuses.
  650. I filmed seven movies in 2011 and I think that was a mistake. I pushed myself too hard and I want to be able to come to work each day and give 100 percent. I guess I found out what my boundaries are.
  651. I felt different at 29 because 29, to me, is 30. There are times when I still feel like an actual toddler in a grown-up – well, semi-grown-up – body.
  652. I feel like you can’t get an audience to like your character if she’s actually cool, but you can if she’s trying to be cool and sometimes fails.
  653. I feel like what I say on Twitter has actually a lower rate of misinterpretation than what I say on interviews because I’m just kind of rambling on interviews, and I’m just talking, talking and talking.
  654. I feel like people want there to be this mystery between film and theater, but I just kind of went where I got jobs, you know?
  655. I feel like I’m still learning a lot. I think there’s a tendency for people who are just doing their first couple of films that I see now where they seem to be really resentful of the technical limitations that come along with filmmaking.
  656. I fall in love with characters when they’re out of their element or are uncomfortable and you really feel for them in a knee-jerk sympathetic way.
  657. I don’t usually drink caffeine so that when I need it, it actually does something.
  658. I don’t care for physical activity. I’m not sporty. I’m not very coordinated.
  659. I do admit that I’ve never been one to fit in easily to any given pattern. It’s not my choice. It’s just the way I am. So if the characters I wind up playing are all a bit different, it must be because that’s the way I like it. Anna Kendrick is different, and she’s going to stay that way.
  660. I definitely think it exercises an interesting muscle, auditioning for bad parts and trying to figure out how to make it real. I don’t know what I’m talking about now.
  661. I am neither such a great songwriter or such a great singer that the world must hear my album. There’s just no point to make.
  662. I admit that I look at my social media when I’m killing time, like on a plane and such. It’s just less embarrassing getting caught on Twitter than getting caught playing Candy Crush.
  663. I actually love actresses who look like they feel really natural. I like Patricia Clarkson, Laura Linney, Frances McDormand. Those are actresses where the second they show up on screen you’re like, oh my gosh, this movie just got so much better.
  664. Humility was an important part of the way I grew up. And I found that to be less common when I moved to California. That’s not to say humble people don’t exist there, but ambition seems really important.
  665. For every person that says, ‘I love your work, and my daughter thinks you’re great, and we watch all your movies,’ and is very kind, there are 10 more that are like, ‘Who are you? What’s your name? Are you on ‘House of Cards’?’
  666. As an actress, you’re perpetually about to be unemployed. That fear – when you have two parents who worked 9-to-5 jobs and went through periods of being unemployed – is real. Those were not welcome times in my childhood.
  667. An actor should always let humility outweigh ambition.
  668. After we shot the first ‘Twilight,’ we organized our own wrap party. We really didn’t know what this was going to be. Something like that can come at you unexpectedly, and you just have to try your best to deal with it.
  669. After doing ‘Pitch Perfect,’ I didn’t expect to do other musicals, but then I was offered ‘The Last Five Years’ and ‘Into the Woods,’ which are two of the greatest pieces of theater that I can think of. So obviously I wasn’t going to be like, ‘Oh I’m trying to really stay away from musicals right now, so thanks, but I’ll pass.’
  670. ‘The Last Five Years,’ we sang almost everything live. When we’re in a convertible on the West Side Highway, there was no point – it’s not going to be usable sound. But any time we were indoors, we were singing live.
  671. ‘Rocket Science’ is really where I fell in love with filmmaking, I think ‘Camp’ was incredible, but it was so bizarre, and I was trying to find my footing in this world where you don’t have an audience for immediate validation.
  672. ‘Cinderella’ the cartoon scared me. I watched the bits with the mice, and the scenes with the stepsisters ripping her dress apart scared me. Cinderella was never even my favorite character in ‘Into the Woods.’
  673. You want to have fun with your kids, and no one has fun with someone who runs roughshod.
  674. Women who marry early are often overly enamored of the kind of man who looks great in wedding pictures and passes the maid of honor his telephone number.
  675. When children are small, parents should run their lives and not the other way around.
  676. There is something so settled and stodgy about turning a great romance into next of kin on an emergency room form, and something so soothing and special, too.
  677. There is only room in the lifeboat of your life for one, and you always choose yourself, and turn your parents into whatever it takes to keep you afloat.
  678. There is little premium in poetry in a world that thinks of Pound and Whitman as a weight and a sampler, not an Ezra, a Walt, a thing of beauty, a joy forever.
  679. There is a lot of talk now about metal detectors and gun control. Both are good things. But they are no more a solution than forks and spoons are a solution to world hunger.
  680. The victim mentality may be the last uncomplicated thing about life in America.
  681. The thing that is really hard, and really amazing, is giving up on being perfect and beginning the work of becoming yourself.
  682. The problem… is emblematic of what hasn’t changed during the equal opportunity revolution of the last 20 years. Doors opened; opportunities evolved. Law, institutions, corporations moved forward. But many minds did not.
  683. The issue is privacy. Why is the decision by a woman to sleep with a man she has just met in a bar a private one, and the decision to sleep with the same man for $100 subject to criminal penalties?
  684. The greatest public health threat for many American women is the men they live with.
  685. The future is built on brains, not prom court, as most people can tell you after attending their high school reunion. But you’d never know it by talking to kids or listening to the messages they get from the culture and even from their schools.
  686. The clearest explanation for the failure of any marriage is that the two people are incompatible; that is, that one is male and the other female.
  687. Somewhere between a third and a quarter of all people living in America today were born between 1946 and 1965 and if you think you’re tired of hearing about us, you should try being one of us.
  688. Raising a child is a little like Picasso’s work; in the beginning he did very conventional representational things. Cubism came after he had the rules down pat.
  689. People always blame the girl; she should have said no. A monosyllable, but conventional wisdom has always been that boys can’t manage it.
  690. New York City has finally hired women to pick up the garbage, which makes sense to me, since, as I’ve discovered, a good bit of being a woman consists of picking up garbage.
  691. Look back, to slavery, to suffrage, to integration and one thing is clear. Fashions in bigotry come and go. The right thing lasts.
  692. Life is not so much about beginnings and endings as it is about going on and on and on. It is about muddling through the middle.
  693. In the family sandwich, the older people and the younger ones can recognize one another as the bread. Those in the middle are, for a time, the meat.
  694. Ignorant free speech often works against the speaker. That is one of several reasons why it must be given rein instead of suppressed.
  695. If you want something, it will elude you. If you do not want something, you will get ten of it in the mail.
  696. If there is anyone who’s living the work of the New Testament, it’s the nuns of the Catholic church and not the Catholic hierarchy.
  697. If I get the forty additional years statisticians say are likely coming to me, I could fit in at least one, maybe two new lifetimes. Sad that only one of those lifetimes can include being the mother of young children.
  698. If God had meant Harvard professors to appear in People magazine, She wouldn’t have invented The New York Review of Books.
  699. Ideas are only lethal if you suppress and don’t discuss them. Ignorance is not bliss, it’s stupid. Banning books shows you don’t trust your kids to think and you don’t trust yourself to be able to talk to them.
  700. Ideas are like pizza dough, made to be tossed around.
  701. I’m sure not afraid of success and I’ve learned not to be afraid of failure. The only thing I’m afraid of now is of being someone I don’t like much.
  702. I would even go to Washington, which is saying something for me, just to glimpse Jane Q. Public, being sworn in as the first female president of the United States, while her husband holds the Bible and wears a silly pill box hat and matching coat.
  703. I would be the most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.
  704. I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.
  705. I will never understand people who think that the way to show their righteous opposition to sexual freedom is to write letters full of filthy words.
  706. I realized that, while I would never be my mother nor have her life, the lesson she had left me was that it was possible to love and care for a man and still have at your core a strength so great that you never even needed to put it on display.
  707. I read and walked for miles at night along the beach, writing bad blank verse and searching endlessly for someone wonderful who would step out of the darkness and change my life. It never crossed my mind that that person could be me.
  708. I once wanted to be a personage. Now I am comfortable being a person.
  709. I don’t have to listen to the Gospel on Sunday to know the stories of the New Testament. They inform so much of what I write that they’re practically like a news scrim that goes through my brain 24/7.
  710. I am an affirmative action hire.
  711. Here is the real domino theory – gay man to gay man, bisexual man to straight woman, addict mother to newborn baby, they all fall down and someday it will come to you.
  712. Even as we enumerate their shortcomings, the rigor of raising children ourselves makes clear to us our mothers’ incredible strength. We fear both. If they are not strong, who will protect us? If they are not imperfect, how can we equal them?
  713. Children should have enough freedom to be themselves – once they’ve learned the rules.
  714. But it’s important, while we are supporting lessons in respecting others, to remember that many of our youngest kids need to learn to respect themselves. You learn your worth from the way you are treated.
  715. And I don’t have to listen to a sermon to know what to think or feel about them. It’s almost as if I absorbed completely what mattered most to me, and the rest could go.
  716. America is a country that seems forever to be toddler or teenager, at those two stages of human development characterized by conflict between autonomy and security.
  717. All parents should be aware that when they mock or curse gay people, they may be mocking or cursing their own child.
  718. All of the qualities that you need to be a good opinion columnist tend to be qualities that aren’t valued in women.
  719. After all those years as a woman hearing ‘not thin enough, not pretty enough, not smart enough, not this enough, not that enough,’ almost overnight I woke up one morning and thought, ‘I’m enough.’
  720. A finished person is a boring person.
  721. To be in ‘Vogue’ has to mean something. It’s an endorsement. It’s a validation.
  722. There’s barely a strand of the modern media that the Kardashian-Wests haven’t been able to master, and for good reason: Kanye is an amazing performer and cultural provocateur, while Kim, through her strength of character, has created a place for herself in the glare of the world’s spotlight, and it takes real guts to do that.
  723. The notion that a contemporary woman must look mannish in order to be taken seriously as a seeker of power is frankly dismaying. This is America, not Saudi Arabia.
  724. The Fashion Fund celebrates the real passion that underlies the fashion business, not the frothy world of glamour and celebrity that so often surrounds it.
  725. Previous first ladies seemed to feel the need to wear a sort of uniform, whereas Michelle Obama likes fashion and is very comfortable in fashion. She’s happy to mix high and low, and she loves emerging designers. That will do nothing but good for our industry.
  726. Part of the pleasure of editing ‘Vogue,’ one that lies in a long tradition of this magazine, is being able to feature those who define the culture at any given moment, who stir things up, whose presence in the world shapes the way it looks and influences the way we see it.
  727. One doesn’t want fashion to look ridiculous, silly, or out of step with the times – but you do want designers that make you think, that make you look at fashion differently. That’s how fashion changes. If it doesn’t change, it’s not looking forward. And that’s important to me.
  728. My father was a newspaper editor, so I was surrounded by journalists my entire life. I think the fact that he was so well known may be why I chose to go into magazines and move to the States at a young age.
  729. It’s very important to take risks. I think that research is very important, but in the end you have to work from your instinct and feeling and take those risks and be fearless. When I hear a company is being run by a team, my heart sinks, because you need to have that leader with a vision and heart that can move things forward.
  730. It’s very important to me that I look good when I go out publicly. I like looking at my clothes rack in the morning and deciding what to pick out. I enjoy fashion.
  731. It’s important for young women and men coming out of the fashion schools to think seriously before starting their own collections.
  732. It is so important for designers not to run scared, and not to be too worried about what’s safe and what’s commercial.
  733. It is important always to have really original talent. There are lots of good designers that make attractive clothes and make women look beautiful. But at the same time, one doesn’t want to lose the idea that there is someone out there who can change the way you look at fashion.
  734. In the end I do respond to my own instincts. Sometimes they’re successful, and obviously sometimes they’re not. But you have to, I think, remain true to what you believe in.
  735. If one comes across sometimes as being cold or brusque, it’s simply because I’m striving for the best.
  736. I’ve been very lucky to put women that I sincerely admire on the cover of ‘Vogue:’ the then First Lady and now Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and, more recently, First Lady Michelle Obama. Those were benchmarks for the magazine, and certainly covers that I’ve been very, very proud of.
  737. I’m very good at delegating – people work much better when they have a real sense of responsibility. But at the same time, I don’t like surprises. I don’t pore over every shoot, but I do like to be aware at all times of what’s going on.
  738. I’m very driven by what I do. I am certainly very competitive. I like people who represent the best at what they do, and if that turns you into a perfectionist, then maybe I am.
  739. I’m horribly hands-on, I’m afraid. I like to read every caption.
  740. I’m always looking for a cover subject that reflects the magazine, an interest in fashion, in culture, in society. We’re trying to bring the world into the pages of ‘Vogue.’ We do that by tapping into the zeitgeists with our cover subjects.
  741. I’d always been extremely fascinated by the French Nuit Blanche, which is a weekend that they have in Paris where they keep all the museums open until dawn. You can go and hang out in Versailles in the middle of the night and watch the sun come up.
  742. I went to Wimbledon before I could walk. It’s just been a lifelong passion.
  743. I wasn’t academically successful. And maybe I’ve spent a lot of my career trying to make up for that.
  744. I want ‘Vogue’ to be pacy, sharp, and sexy – I’m not interested in the super-rich or infinitely leisured. I want our readers to be energetic executive women, with money of their own and a wide range of interests. There is a new kind of woman out there. She’s interested in business and money.
  745. I think possibly what people working for one hate the most is indecision. Even if I’m completely unsure, I’ll pretend I know exactly what I’m talking about and make a decision. The most important thing I can do is try and make myself very clearly understood.
  746. I surround myself with a talented group of people that are opinionated and interesting. I try to remain very open to what others have to say.
  747. I never pay any attention. I’m sure it’s not such a good way to be, but I don’t really follow market research.
  748. I love coming in and changing magazines.
  749. I look for strong people. I don’t like people who’ll say yes to everything I might bring up. I want people who can argue and disagree and have a point of view that’s reflected in the magazine. My dad believed in the cult of personality. He brought great writers and columnists to ‘The Standard.’
  750. I like having young assistants in my office; they have energy, and I spend time with them to make sure they understand what we’re doing. By investing in them, I’m investing in the magazine. All over ‘Vogue,’ ‘Teen Vogue,’ and ‘Men’s Vogue,’ there are people who have been through not only my office but also many other offices at ‘Vogue.’
  751. I don’t think of myself as a powerful person.
  752. I don’t think I am that hands-on. I’m much more of a believer in finding a great team of people and trusting them to follow their instincts. They work better when they feel they have freedom and they are trusted.
  753. I don’t really follow market research. In the end, I respond to my own instincts.
  754. Fashion today is available to everybody in a way that it’s never been before: you’ve got every designer you’ve ever heard of working for H& or Target. That’s fantastic.
  755. By the time I came to the States, I really understood how a magazine works. I came to ‘Vogue’ as creative director, and three years later I went back to London to be editor in chief of British ‘Vogue.’
  756. Because of reality television and all these celebrities thinking they can be designers, everyone imagines that they can just become a designer, photographer, or model, but that’s not the way things work. People have to go to school, learn their craft, and build a brand – that’s the right, healthy way to do things.
  757. ‘Vogue’ is the best of everything that fashion can offer, and I think we point the way. We are, you know, a glamorous girlfriend.
  758. ‘Vogue’ is a fashion magazine, and a fashion magazine is about change.
  759. Writing in a diary is a really strange experience for someone like me. Not only because I’ve never written anything before, but also because it seems to me that later on neither I nor anyone else will be interested in the musings of a thirteen-year-old schoolgirl.
  760. Whoever is happy will make others happy too.
  761. Whoever doesn’t know it must learn and find by experience that ‘a quiet conscience makes one strong!’
  762. Who would ever think that so much went on in the soul of a young girl?
  763. When I write, I can shake off all my cares.
  764. We all live with the objective of being happy; our lives are all different and yet the same.
  765. This morning I lay in the bathtub thinking how wonderful it would be if I had a dog like Rin Tin Tin. I’d call him Rin Tin Tin too, and I’d take him to school with me, where he could stay in the janitor’s room or by the bicycle racks when the weather was good.
  766. Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.
  767. The final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.
  768. The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quiet, alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be.
  769. No one knows Anne’s better side, and that’s why most people can’t stand me. Oh, I can be an amusing clown for an afternoon, but after that, everyone’s had enough of me to last a month.
  770. No one has ever become poor by giving.
  771. My lighter, more superficial side will always steal a march on the deeper side and therefore always win. You can’t imagine how often I’ve tried to push away this Anne, which is only half of what is known as Anne – to beat her down, hide her.
  772. Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction.
  773. In the long run, the sharpest weapon of all is a kind and gentle spirit.
  774. If I read a book that impresses me, I have to take myself firmly by the hand, before I mix with other people; otherwise they would think my mind rather queer.
  775. If I haven’t any talent for writing books or newspaper articles, well, then I can always write for myself.
  776. I’ve reached the point where I hardly care whether I live or die. The world will keep on turning without me, and I can’t do anything to change events anyway.
  777. I’m afraid that people who know me as I usually am will discover I have another side, a better and finer side. I’m afraid they’ll mock me, think I’m ridiculous and sentimental and not take me seriously. I’m used to not being taken seriously, but only the ‘light-hearted’ Anne is used to it and can put up with it; the ‘deeper’ Anne is too weak.
  778. I soothe my conscience now with the thought that it is better for hard words to be on paper than that Mummy should carry them in her heart.
  779. I simply can’t build my hopes on a foundation of confusion, misery and death… I think… peace and tranquillity will return again.
  780. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness; I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too. I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more.
  781. I must uphold my ideals, for perhaps the time will come when I shall be able to carry them out.
  782. I live in a crazy time.
  783. I have often been downcast but never in despair; I regard our hiding as a dangerous adventure, romantic and interesting at the same time. In my diary, I treat all the privations as amusing.
  784. I have a family, loving aunts, and a good home. No, on the surface I seem to have everything except my one true friend. All I think about when I’m with friends is having a good time. I can’t bring myself to talk about anything but ordinary everyday things. We don’t seem to be able to get any closer, and that’s the problem.
  785. I don’t want to have lived in vain like most people. I want to be useful or bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death!
  786. I don’t think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains.
  787. Human greatness does not lie in wealth or power, but in character and goodness. People are just people, and all people have faults and shortcomings, but all of us are born with a basic goodness.
  788. How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.
  789. He who has courage and faith will never perish in misery!
  790. Generally speaking, men are held in great esteem in all parts of the world, so why shouldn’t women have their share? Soldiers and war heroes are honored and commemorated, explorers are granted immortal fame, martyrs are revered, but how many people look upon women too as soldiers?
  791. Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is!
  792. Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart.
  793. Boys will be boys. And even that wouldn’t matter if only we could prevent girls from being girls.
  794. Because we’re Jewish, my father immigrated to Holland in 1933, where he became the managing director of the Dutch Opekta Company, which manufactures products used in making jam.
  795. And finally I twist my heart round again, so that the bad is on the outside and the good is on the inside, and keep on trying to find a way of becoming what I would so like to be, and could be, if there weren’t any other people living in the world.
  796. Although I’m only fourteen, I know quite well what I want. I know who is right and who is wrong. I have my opinions, my own ideas and principles, and although it may sound pretty mad from an adolescent, I feel more of a person than a child. I feel quite independent of anyone.
  797. After May 1940, the good times were few and far between; first there was the war, then the capitulation, and then the arrival of the Germans, which is when the trouble started for the Jews.
  798. You have to want to be married to someone. You have to feel that reciprocated. Marriage for marriage’s sake doesn’t make any sense to me, and I found someone with whom I could put my money where my mouth is, I guess.
  799. You can alter movie singing so much because you go into the recording studio and, just technology for recording has gotten so good, you can hold out a note and they can combine a note from take 2 and a note from take 8.
  800. Whether or not you agree with Ayn Rand – and I have certain issues with some of her beliefs – the woman can tell a story. I mean, the novel as an art form is just in full florid bloom in ‘Atlas Shrugged.’ It’s an unbelievable story. The characters are so compelling, and what she’s saying is mind-expanding.
  801. When I was younger, I felt very much like, ‘Oh, I have to be a certain way, I have to look a certain way.’ You really, really don’t. That’s the way women are treated differently than men. I mean, I’ve had actors argue with me about this.
  802. When I was in my early twenties, parts would be written for women in their fifties, and I would get them. And now I’m in my early thirties, and I’m like, ‘Why did that 24-year-old get that part?’ I was that 24-year-old once. I can’t be upset about it; it’s the way things are.
  803. When I was a teenager, I would have tried anything that an actress I liked was doing to get thin.
  804. When I think back to some of the most fun nights of my life, it was just me out dancing without a care in the world. It’s a release, an outlet.
  805. When I meet people for the first time, I’m friendly but shy. I’m much less outwardly nervous than I used to be, but I still get anxious sometimes.
  806. When I look back on my twenties, I just remember being afraid of everything, and in my thirties, I’m actually excited by things. And if things don’t work out, you know, by the time you’ve hit your thirties, you’ve had your fair share of disappointments.
  807. What I’ve observed and what I’ve imagined – and definitely what I’m hoping – happens as you get older is that there’s a mellowing, an acceptance that comes with time. I guess that I’ll find out.
  808. Weddings are important because they celebrate life and possibility.
  809. We assume that we’ve come so far as compassionate citizens of the world if we do choose to read the news, yet the attitude towards life can be one where we put blinders on and forget that there are civil wars going on. It’s easy to forget that there are so many people starving to death every single day.
  810. There’s something very addictive about people pleasing. It’s a thought pattern and a habit that feels really, really good until it becomes desperate.
  811. The whole beauty of music is that it goes where your words won’t let you.
  812. So as long as I’m a working actor, I can improve. I want to work with people that frighten me and excite me, and characters that I don’t believe I’m the best person for the part but I’m still gonna try anyway. Those are my favorite roles.
  813. Quite frankly, I didn’t become an actor to become a movie star. I have never dreamed about being the most famous person on the planet. I just want to do really good work.
  814. On the scale of someone who’s really laid-back about stuff and someone who worries a lot, I fall more towards the latter.
  815. Oh, my God. I want to be a mother, and I anticipate loving my children quite fiercely. I think about it all the time, though it’s a silly thing to think about because the kind of mother I’ll be depends on the kind of children I have. I can’t wait to meet them.
  816. My whole M.O. in my 20s was being in as many different types of films as you can. Working with as many different types of directors as you can. I think, in part, that’s what I wanted to do as an actor.
  817. My feeling about growing up in New Jersey was, ‘How come I’m not in New York?’ That being said, I’m older and I have a better worldview now, and so I think I grew up in an incredibly privileged position. The town I grew up in is beautiful. I got a great education, and I’m very grateful for it.
  818. Michelle Pfeiffer in Tim Burton’s ‘Batman’ was one of the most inspiring – I saw that and I was like, ‘I want to be her, I want to do that.’
  819. Mellow doesn’t always make for a good story, but it makes for a good life.
  820. Loneliness is my least favorite thing about life. The thing that I’m most worried about is just being alone without anybody to care for or someone who will care for me.
  821. Kindness is really important to me in finding my own prince – so are patience and a sense of humor. Without those qualities he’s no Prince Charming!
  822. It’s definitely a thing to be sitting there, getting a pedicure, and you look over and someone is reading an article about an aspect of your life that you know is not true. It’s weird, it’s uncomfortable, but I don’t see it changing anytime soon, so I should figure a way to laugh through it.
  823. It takes a minute for me to let my guard down, but once I do and I get to know someone, I’m very open, very trusting. Some might say too trusting, because considering the amount of money that can be made from selling gossip, I could be very easily taken advantage of.
  824. Ireland is such an amazing country, and I have this little dream in the back of my head that someday I’ll end up living there. When I’ve established myself in America and I don’t need to live near the action, so to speak, and if you’re good, the work will come to you. I feel very Irish; maybe that’s why I’ve been so lucky with my career.
  825. If you’re not someone who has a natural and effortless love for yourself, it’s hard to let go of your desire to please other people, and that’s really not an ingredient for a happy life.
  826. If people weren’t watching, I’d be so much more eccentric. I know it makes me sound weak, but rather than make myself happy and wear the silly hat and say, ‘Oh, I don’t care,’ I actually really don’t feel like getting made fun of. So I put on something boring and navy and go out and try to disappear.
  827. I’ve worked with people and I’ve known people that were really competitive, but I’ve always said that I take an Elizabeth Bennett philosophy of life – I laugh. I love my job, but if it means hurting someone, I won’t do it.
  828. I’ve wanted to be a mother since I was 16, but I also just knew I wanted to have a career as well.
  829. I’ve honestly been really lucky. My only jobs have been babysitting and acting.
  830. I’ve always believed in people’s capacity for goodness. I still believe that people are good. What I’m not so trusting about anymore is their relationship to their own goodness.
  831. I’m very aware of my own background. I’m Irish, French, and then a little bit of everything else thrown in, ranging from German to Native American. We’re talking about tiny drops of blood.
  832. I’m pretty good at remaining calm during an emergency. My house burned down when I was 12, which made me really pragmatic about what needed to be done. But I can be bad in that I compartmentalize a lot of emotions and push them away to deal with them at a later date.
  833. I’m obsessed with Kate Middleton. Obsessed. I loved the Royal Wedding. I was so cynical going into it, and pseudo-political about the whole thing, but as soon as I saw her, I was utterly charmed. I’m just completely enchanted by Kate and William.
  834. I’m not very daring in my street style, usually because there’s a photographer around!
  835. I’m not one of those stars that goes out and literally dresses to be photographed. I’m kind of a ‘what you see is what you get’ type of girl when I dress. I go for comfort above everything else.
  836. I’m not Rihanna. I’m not cool. When people come up to me in the street, they often want a hug, not a photo, and they want that because they like my work.
  837. I’m much happier talking with people than I am flirting with them.
  838. I’m a homebody.
  839. I’ll wear my mom jeans in public that haven’t been tailored ‘just so’ yet, just because they feel good.
  840. I’ll start with one healthy kid, but I’d like to have a few naturally and adopt.
  841. I’d love to be an artist that’s multifaceted. At the moment, I am not. But wouldn’t that be cool if I was like, ‘Yeah, let me pull out my guitar and play you a song.’ I would adore that. I am so far not gifted in that way. But I am a very hard worker and a very determined person, so who knows?
  842. I was thrust into a really lofty, enviable, but isolated position with ‘Princess Diaries’ in that I could carry a film before I really knew if I could act.
  843. I was raised in a solidly upper-middle class family who had really strong values and excess was not one of the things that my family put up with. And there’s something wildy decadent about the young-star lifestyle, and I just don’t really see the point.
  844. I was on a starvation diet to look like I was near death in a film… but I went at it with a plan, and I had a guide; a nutritionist kind of helped me with it.
  845. I used to believe that love was finding someone who would lead you through the deep water.
  846. I used to be like everyone else and think the Kardashians are just famous for being famous. But I’ve been really impressed with how supportive Kim Kardashian has been of Caitlyn Jenner.
  847. I try to stay out of the spotlight as much as humanly possible, because I think that when actors, whether or not they’ve chosen it or it has been thrust upon them, are living very public lives, it affects your ability to get lost in their performances.
  848. I try not to date where I work. It makes life easier. I don’t say no to anybody because I’d hope that people wouldn’t say no to me just because I’m an actor – but they’d have to be pretty extraordinary.
  849. I think we all want to really live good lives, and we all really want to have a healthy planet, although I don’t know if we’re supposed to be on it forever. Now, does that mean that we should be building rocket ships to shoot us into outer space? Well if we can, I think we should.
  850. I think that Jersey Shore is awesome. I’ve gone to Cape May every summer of my life.
  851. I think relationships are work, but love is a gift.
  852. I think fashion is a lot of fun. I love clothes. More than fashion or brand labels, I love design. I love the thought that people put into clothes. I love when clothes make cultural statements and I think personal style is really cool. I also freely recognize that fashion should be a hobby.
  853. I still can’t believe I’m the girl who got to play Fantine.
  854. I sing everywhere. I have a very patient husband. He says he doesn’t mind. But we’ve only been married a year and a half!
  855. I remember when I was starting out as a young actress, thinking, ‘Oh my God, I have the fattest face.’ Now I look at those pictures and I think, ‘So much collagen!’
  856. I really love yoga.
  857. I love the short-haired lifestyle.
  858. I love rom-coms, and I was bummed that they sort of stopped making them around the time I was old enough to be in them. But at the same time, I so respected the fact that the genre kind of needed an update. But you know, even when rom-coms were at their hey-day, very few people did it at the level of Nancy Meyers.
  859. I love it when people are able to interpret thoughts and feelings on fabric or some kind of material.
  860. I love fashion; I love being able to have fun with it, but I think I need to get a little bit more organised before I ever become a true fashionista.
  861. I look my best after an entire hair and makeup team has spent hours perfecting me. When do I feel my best? When I haven’t looked in a mirror for days, and I’m doing things that make me happy.
  862. I look around at my peers, and I’m so blown away by their talent and their beauty and their cool style, as well as their ability to be an actress and be a movie star and be good at it. I mean, they’re so good, and we’re all trying to get the same parts.
  863. I like to watch MTV for escapist pleasure, but when I saw Snooki, I saw my twin. I couldn’t lose myself in the show anymore because there I was.
  864. I kind of got my big break with ‘The Princess Diaries’ and during the press rounds for that everyone asked me: ‘Did you always want to be a princess growing up?’ And the truth was, no I wanted to be Catwoman.
  865. I have no aspirations of world domination through the pop charts. None at all.
  866. I grew up in a pretty large family. We were really close-knit, so I definitely want to have lots and lots of children.
  867. I gave up my struggle with perfection a long time ago. That is a concept I don’t find very interesting anymore. Everyone just wants to look good in the photographs. I think that is where some of the pressure comes from. Be happy. Be yourself, the day is about a lot more.
  868. I disagree with a couple of the stances of the Catholic Church. My older brother is gay, and it’s important for me to be able to love him completely and freely, and it’s important for me to spread beliefs in the world that are not going to limit people in their love. I can’t support a religion that doesn’t support my brother.
  869. I did work at Christie’s for a couple of weeks, getting ready for ‘The Devil Wears Prada,’ getting people coffee and doing whatever they needed around the office. It was amazing. I got to see some wonderful art, and everybody was really nice. It was great.
  870. I damaged my health during ‘Les Mis,’ which I didn’t want to mention in case it seemed like I was courting sympathy.
  871. I believe I’ve always been a big believer in equality. No one has ever been able to tell me I couldn’t do something because I was a girl.
  872. I am crushing so hard on Amy Schumer. Women like her who have chosen to stand up for themselves and face the bullies are being so embraced.
  873. A lot of people have told me, ‘You’re not this and so can’t play that,’ and I can’t tell you the amount of times I’ve been told I’m not sexy. I just go: ‘I’m a lot of things. Just because I don’t wear my sexiness overtly doesn’t mean that I can’t become that girl for a role.
  874. ‘One Day’ is definitely heartbreaking in a few ways, but one of the main ways is that my character and Jim Sturgess’s character are just people from two different worlds who love each other in so many ways and can’t quite seem to get it together.
  875. Your problem is how you are going to spend this one odd and precious life you have been issued. Whether you’re going to spend it trying to look good and creating the illusion that you have power over people and circumstances, or whether you are going to taste it, enjoy it and find out the truth about who you are.
  876. Your experiences will be yours alone. But truth and best friendship will rarely if ever disappoint you.
  877. You want to give me chocolate and flowers? That would be great. I love them both. I just don’t want them out of guilt, and I don’t want them if you’re not going to give them to all the people who helped mother our children.
  878. You can safely assume that you’ve created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.
  879. When we’re dealing with the people in our family – no matter how annoying or gross they may be, no matter how self-inflicted their suffering may appear, no matter how afflicted they are with ignorance, prejudice or nose hairs – we give from the deepest parts of ourselves.
  880. When hope is not pinned wriggling onto a shiny image or expectation, it sometimes floats forth and opens.
  881. When I was a kid, our family used to watch ‘Bonanza.’ I really liked having a Sunday night TV ritual.
  882. We’re often ashamed of asking for so much help because it seems selfish or petty or narcissistic, but I think, if there’s a God – and I believe there is – that God is there to help. That’s what God’s job is.
  883. We must not inflict life on children who will be resented; we must not inflict unwanted children on society.
  884. We can’t understand when we’re pregnant, or when our siblings are expecting, how profound it is to have a shared history with a younger generation: blood, genes, humor. It means we were actually here, on Earth, for a time – like the Egyptians with their pyramids, only with children.
  885. These days cry out, as never before, for us to pay attention, so we can move through them and get our joy and pride back.
  886. There is nothing as sweet as a comeback, when you are down and out, about to lose, and out of time.
  887. The worst part about celebrating another birthday is the shock that you’re only as well as you are.
  888. The women’s movement burst forth when I was fifteen. That was when I began to believe that life might semi-work out after all. The cavalry had arrived. Women were starting to say that you got to tell the truth now, that you had to tell the truth if you were going to heal and have an authentic life.
  889. The whistle is always waiting to be blown, and in some ways, it gets me to do better work.
  890. The reason I never give up hope is because everything is so basically hopeless.
  891. The opposite of faith is not doubt: It is certainty. It is madness. You can tell you have created God in your own image when it turns out that he or she hates all the same people you do.
  892. The first holy truth in God 101 is that men and women of true faith have always had to accept the mystery of God’s identity and love and ways. I hate that, but it’s the truth.
  893. The earth is rocky and full of roots; it’s clay, and it seems doomed and polluted, but you dig little holes for the ugly shriveled bulbs, throw in a handful of poppy seeds, and cover it all over, and you know you’ll never see it again – it’s death and clay and shrivel, and your hands are nicked from the rocks, your nails black with soil.
  894. The Giants are usually described as rag tag, kind of a great garage sale team, and the Democrats are described as the Mommies to the Republican Daddies; and everyone hates the mommies, but wait, wait – I didn’t intend to get into the pathos and thrill of being a Democratic Giants fan.
  895. The American way is to not need help, but to help.
  896. Summer nearly does me in every year. It’s too hot and the light is unforgiving and the days go on way too long.
  897. Sometimes I think God loves the ones who most desperately ache and are most desperately lost – his or her wildest, most messed-up children – the way you’d ache and love a screwed-up rebel daughter in juvenile hall.
  898. Some people won’t go the extra mile, and then on their birthday, when no one makes a fuss, they feel neglected and bitter.
  899. Some people seem to understand this – that life and change take time – but I am not one of those people.
  900. Seeing yourself in print is such an amazing concept: you can get so much attention without having to actually show up somewhere… You don’t have to dress up, for instance, and you can’t hear them boo you right away.
  901. Presents can make up for some of the disappointments that life doles out, such as it makes almost no sense and is coming to an end more quickly than ever.
  902. Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor.
  903. Pay attention to the beauty surrounding you.
  904. Nothing heals us like letting people know our scariest parts: When people listen to you cry and lament, and look at you with love, it’s like they are holding the baby of you.
  905. No one tells you that your life is effectively over when you have a child: that you’re never going to draw another complacent breath again… or that whatever level of hypochondria and rage you’d learned to repress and live with is going to seem like the good old days.
  906. No one is more sentimentalized in America than mothers on Mother’s Day, but no one is more often blamed for the culture’s bad people and behavior.
  907. No one can appropriate God, goodness, the Bible or Jesus. It just seems that way.
  908. My parents, and librarians along the way, taught me about the space between words; about the margins, where so many juicy moments of life and spirit and friendship could be found. In a library, you could find miracles and truth and you might find something that would make you laugh so hard that you get shushed, in the friendliest way.
  909. My mother’s eyes were large and brown, like my son’s, but unlike Sam’s, they were always frantic, like a hummingbird who can’t quite find the flower but keeps jabbing around.
  910. My mother was a not-too-devoted atheist. She went to Episcopal church on Christmas Eve every year, and that was mostly it.
  911. My mother might find a thin gold chain at the back of a drawer, wadded into an impossibly tight knot, and give it to me to untangle. It would have a shiny, sweaty smell, and excite me: Gold chains linked you to the great fairy tales and myths, to Arabia, and India; to the great weight of the world, but lighter than a feather.
  912. My idea of absolute happiness is to be in bed on a rainy day, with my blankie, my cat, and my dog.
  913. My coming to faith did not start with a leap but rather a series of staggers from what seemed like one safe place to another. Like lily pads, round and green, these places summoned and then held me up while I grew. Each prepared me for the next leaf on which I would land, and in this way I moved across the swamp of doubt and fear.
  914. Mothers are supposed to listen and, afterward, to respond with some wisdom and perspective, but these things were not my mother’s strong suit.
  915. Mothering has been the richest experience of my life, but I am still opposed to Mother’s Day. It perpetuates the dangerous idea that all parents are somehow superior to non-parents.
  916. Mother’s Day celebrates a huge lie about the value of women: that mothers are superior beings, that they have done more with their lives and chosen a more difficult path.
  917. Most of me was glad when my mother died. She was a handful, but not in a cute, festive way. More in a life-threatening way, that had caused me a long time ago to give up all hope of ever feeling good about having had her as a mother.
  918. Most marriages are a mess, and the children get caught between two bitter, antagonistic parents. My parents stayed married for 27 unhappy years, till their kids were grown, and this was a catastrophe for us.
  919. Life is really pretty tricky, and there’s a lot of loss, and the longer you stay alive, the more people you lose whom you actually couldn’t live without.
  920. Left to my own devices, my first inclination is to mess in other people’s lives. I secretly believe my whole family, and really the whole world, is my responsibility.
  921. It’s a great time to be alive.
  922. It was simple reality – most competitive tennis players in my day were privileged, spoiled, entitled and white. Also, many of them were beautiful, fit, tan and of good stock – great big hair and white teeth and long legs. Then there were the rest of us.
  923. If you don’t die of thirst, there are blessings in the desert. You can be pulled into limitlessness, which we all yearn for, or you can do the beauty of minutiae, the scrimshaw of tiny and precise. The sky is your ocean, and the crystal silence will uplift you like great gospel music, or Neil Young.
  924. If you asked me, parents were supposed to affect the life of their child in such a way that the child grows up to be responsible, able to participate in life and in community.
  925. If the present is really all we have, then the present lasts forever.
  926. If our lives are made up of a string of a thousand moments, at some of those moments we look a lot more spiritually evolved than at others.
  927. I’ve written six novels and four pieces of nonfiction, so I don’t really have a genre these days.
  928. I’ve known for years that resentments don’t hurt the person we resent, but they do hurt us.
  929. I’ve heard that our greatest cross to carry is ourselves – how gravely we fall short.
  930. I’ve heard people say that God is the gift of desperation, and there’s a lot to be said for having really reached a bottom where you’ve run out of any more good ideas or plans for everybody else’s behavior; or how to save and fix and rescue; or just get out of a huge mess, possibly of your own creation.
  931. I’m much calmer as I get older, but I’m still just as capable of getting that strung-out stressed-out feeling of mental and spiritual unwellness.
  932. I’m kind of a gossip hound, but watching the media whip the small fires into giant forest fires so that they can cover the result is infuriating.
  933. I’m drawn to almost any piece of writing with the words ‘divine love’ and ‘impeachment’ in the first sentence. But I know the word ‘divine’ makes many progressive people run screaming for their cute little lives, and so one hesitates to use it.
  934. I’d like to learn to meditate with more enthusiasm. I can sit down and get quiet for 20 minutes, but it just has not been a part of my Christianity at all.
  935. I write because writing is the gift God has given me to help people in the world.
  936. I would seriously rather be in a long line at the DMV than eat with people I don’t know.
  937. I woke up full of hate and fear the day before the most recent peace march in San Francisco. This was disappointing: I’d hoped to wake up feeling somewhere between Virginia Woolf and Wavy Gravy.
  938. I wish I had thrown out the bathroom scale at age 16. Weighing yourself every morning is like waking up and asking Dick Cheney to validate your sense of inner worth.
  939. I went to church with my grandparents sometimes and I loved it.
  940. I went to Goucher College in Maryland for the best possible reasons – to learn – but then I dropped out at 19 for the best possible reasons – to become a writer.
  941. I was the angriest daughter on earth, and also, one of the most devoted.
  942. I was raised with no religious training or influence. Except the influence was to be a moral and ethical person at the secular level. And to be a peace marcher, an activist for civil rights, peace and justice.
  943. I was raised in a family where none of us ever raised a voice, so there was no room to express feelings of rage or even unabashed joy – a little bashed joy, here or there, or being mildly disgruntled.
  944. I was raised by my parents to believe that you had a moral obligation to try and help save the world.
  945. I used to tell my writing students that they must write the books they wished they could come upon – because then the books they hungered and thirsted for would exist.
  946. I used to love to untangle chains when I was a child. I had thin, busy fingers, and I never gave up. Perhaps there was a psychiatric component to my concentration but like much of my psychic damage, this worked to everyone’s advantage.
  947. I try to write the books I would love to come upon that are honest, concerned with real lives, human hearts, spiritual transformation, families, secrets, wonder, craziness – and that can make me laugh.
  948. I think Jesus is divine love manifest on Earth, as it comes through the community of Christians.
  949. I spent my whole life helping my mother carry around her psychic trunks like a bitter bellhop. So a great load was lifted when she died, and my life was much easier.
  950. I see that children fill the existential hollowness many people feel; that when we have children, we know they will need us, and maybe love us, but we don’t have a clue how hard it is going to be.
  951. I read the same amount of nonfiction and fiction.
  952. I quit my last real job, as a writer at a magazine, when I was twenty-one. That was the moment when I lost my place of prestige on the fast track, and slowly, millimeter by millimeter, I started to get found, to discover who I had been born to be, instead of the impossibly small package, all tied up tightly in myself, that I had agreed to be.
  953. I loved every second of Catholic church. I loved the sickly sweet rotting-pomegranate smells of the incense. I loved the overwrought altar, the birdbath of holy water, the votive candles; I loved that there was a poor box, the stations of the cross rendered in stained glass on the windows.
  954. I love readings and my readers, but the din of voices of the audience gives me stage fright, and the din of voices inside whisper that I am a fraud, and that the jig is up. Surely someone will rise up from the audience and say out loud that not only am I not funny and helpful, but I’m annoying, and a phony.
  955. I like to read away as much of the afternoon as possible, until real life rears its ugly head.
  956. I like the desert for short periods of time, from inside a car, with the windows rolled up, and the doors locked. I prefer beach resorts with room service.
  957. I just try to love and serve everyone, and bring everyone water, and lend an ear; that’s what Jesus said to do.
  958. I have a very dark sense of humor. I swear. I have a very playful relationship with Jesus.
  959. I hate the summer.
  960. I happen to be a Christian, but I know that there is one God. People worshipping goodness and love and kindness and truth are worshipping the same God.
  961. I got a lot of things that society had promised would make me whole and fulfilled – all the things that the culture tells you from preschool on will quiet the throbbing anxiety inside you – stature, the respect of colleagues, maybe even a kind of low-grade fame.
  962. I go to church every Sunday, which is like going to the gas station once a week and really, really filling up.
  963. I feel incredibly successful. I make a living as a writer and am able to help support a big family, my church, my bleeding-heart causes.
  964. I don’t want something special. I want something beautifully plain.
  965. I don’t have very sophisticated taste in music. I listen to a lot of folk music. I like reggae.
  966. I do not have deep theological understanding or opinion, but I do not read the Bible as the literal word of God.
  967. I do not at all understand the mystery of grace – only that it meets us where we are but does not leave us where it found us.
  968. I didn’t write about my mother much in the third year after she died. I was still trying to get my argument straight: When her friends or our relatives wondered why I was still so hard on her, I could really lay out the case for what it had been like to be raised by someone who had loathed herself, her husband, even her own name.
  969. I did not raise my son, Sam, to celebrate Mother’s Day. I didn’t want him to feel some obligation to buy me pricey lunches or flowers, some annual display of gratitude that you have to grit your teeth and endure.
  970. I am the woman I grew to be partly in spite of my mother, and partly because of the extraordinary love of her best friends, and my own best friends’ mothers, and from surrogates, many of whom were not women at all but gay men. I have loved them my entire life, even after their passing.
  971. I am skittish about relationships, as most of the marriages I’ve seen up close have been ruinous for one or both parties.
  972. I am not writing to try and convert people to fundamental Christianity. I am just trying to share my experience, strength and hope, that someone who is as messed up and neurotic and scarred and scared can be fully accepted by our dear Lord, no questions asked.
  973. I am going to try to pay attention to the spring. I am going to look around at all the flowers, and look up at the hectic trees. I am going to close my eyes and listen.
  974. I am going to notice the lights of the earth, the sun and the moon and the stars, the lights of our candles as we march, the lights with which spring teases us, the light that is already present.
  975. I am an Aries. Although I do not believe in astrology, I think this is exactly the right sign to have been born under.
  976. I accidentally forgot to graduate from college.
  977. Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.
  978. For me, Jesus is my cleft in the rock. He is my safest friend, my safe totally loving accepting big brother.
  979. Everyone is flailing through this life without an owner’s manual, with whatever modicum of grace and good humor we can manage.
  980. Every woman’s path is difficult, and many mothers were as equipped to raise children as wire monkey mothers. I say that without judgment: It is, sadly, true. An unhealthy mother’s love is withering.
  981. Evangelical Christians and I can sit down and talk one on one about how much we love Jesus, and yet I’m not carried in Christian bookstores.
  982. E-books are great for instant gratification – you see a review somewhere of a book that interests you, and you can start reading it five minutes later.
  983. Being on a book tour is like being on the seesaw when you’re a little kid. The excitement is in having someone to play with, and in rising up in the air, but then you’re at the mercy of those holding you down, and if it’s your older brother, or Paul Wolfowitz, they leap up, so that you crash down and get hurt.
  984. Bananas are great, as I believe them to be the only known cure for existential dread. Also, Mother Teresa said that in India, a woman dying in the street will share her banana with anyone who needs it, whereas in America, people amass and hoard as many bananas as they can to sell for an exorbitant profit. So half of them go bad, anyway.
  985. All parents are an embarrassment to their kids. Often, grandparents are the relief. Kids don’t have to resist you.
  986. Alice Adams wrote a sweet note to me after my first novel came out when I was 26, and I was so blown away that I sent her a bunch of stamps by return mail. I have no idea what I was thinking. It was a star-struck impulse.
  987. Age has given me the gift of me; it just gave me what I was always longing for, which was to get to be the woman I’ve already dreamt of being. Which is somebody who can do rest and do hard work and be a really constant companion, a constant, tender-hearted wife to myself.
  988. A whole lot of us believers, of all different religions, are ready to turn back the tide of madness by walking together, in both the dark and the light – in other words, through life – registering voters as we go, and keeping the faith.
  989. When the wedding march sounds the resolute approach, the clock no longer ticks, it tolls the hour. The figures in the aisle are no longer individuals, they symbolize the human race.
  990. What a circus act we women perform every day of our lives. Look at us. We run a tightrope daily, balancing a pile of books on the head. Baby-carriage, parasol, kitchen chair, still under control. Steady now! This is not the life of simplicity but the life of multiplicity that the wise men warn us of.
  991. Travelers are always discoverers, especially those who travel by air. There are no signposts in the sky to show a man has passed that way before. There are no channels marked. The flier breaks each second into new uncharted seas.
  992. To give without any reward, or any notice, has a special quality of its own.
  993. To be deeply in love is, of course, a great liberating force.
  994. Those fields of daisies we landed on, and dusty fields and desert stretches. Memories of many skies and earths beneath us – many days, many nights of stars.
  995. There are no signposts in the sky to show a man has passed that way before. There are no channels marked. The flier breaks each second into new uncharted seas.
  996. The wave of the future is coming and there is no fighting it.
  997. The sea does not reward those who are too anxious, too greedy, or too impatient. One should lie empty, open, choiceless as a beach – waiting for a gift from the sea.
  998. The punctuation of anniversaries is terrible, like the closing of doors, one after another between you and what you want to hold on to.
  999. The only real security is not in owning or possessing, not in demanding or expecting, not in hoping, even. Security in a relationship lies neither in looking back to what it was, nor forward to what it might be, but living in the present and accepting it as it is now.
  1000. The most exhausting thing in life is being insincere.
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