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Articles Page 21

Articles Page 21

  1. The gap between being a bad person and being a criminal is often wide.
  2. The first thing to understand about surveillance video in public places is that there is already a lot of it going on – though it is impossible to know how much.
  3. The civil rights and antiwar movements taught Americans to question authority.
  4. The blogosphere makes it possible to have a sprawling national conversation about the hard times – often among people who would never find each other offline.
  5. The anti-New Deal line is wrong as a matter of economics. F.D.R.’s spending programs did help the economy and created millions of new jobs.
  6. The United States may be a religious nation. But it is also a nation with a strong commitment to separation of church and state.
  7. The Supreme Court’s most conservative Justices have presented themselves as great respecters of precedent and opponents of ‘judicial activism’ – of judges using the Constitution to strike down laws passed by the elected branches of government. If they are true to those principles, they should uphold rent control.
  8. The Senate should refuse to confirm nominees who do not take Congressional power seriously.
  9. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is the major achievement of President Obama’s first term.
  10. The Enron scandal is worthy of the highest level of scrutiny, both because of the enormity of the crimes that may have been committed and because of what the largest bankruptcy in American history has already begun to reveal about the weaknesses in our nation’s corporate structures and regulatory oversight.
  11. Supporters of tough voter ID laws are not afraid of vote fraud – they are afraid of democracy.
  12. State assaults on the separation of church and state are nothing new.
  13. Social Security, all public and no option, rescued older Americans from living their final years in poverty.
  14. Set in the advertising world of the 1960s, ‘Mad Men’ is stunning to look at – a Camelot-era parade of smartly dressed professionals lounging around on midcentury modern furniture.
  15. Serving up ads based on behavioral targeting can itself be an invasion of privacy, especially when the information used is personal.
  16. Republicans and blacks had an unlikely alliance around ‘max black’ after the 1990 census. By concentrating black voters in some districts, the strategy elected a record number of black congressmen in 1992. But the remaining ‘bleached’ districts were more likely to elect white Republicans.
  17. Regency romances end in marriage; zombie stories end in the zombies being vanquished. ‘Pride and Prejudice and Zombies’ delivers both.
  18. People’s genes can say a great deal about their health. There are genes that reveal an increased likelihood of getting cancer, heart disease or Alzheimer’s.
  19. Patents have a place in medical science – for new inventions that advance the state of knowledge.
  20. Our movements reveal a great deal about who we are. A record of our locations over time can reveal whether we go to tent revivals or radical political meetings, abortion clinics or AIDS doctors.
  21. One way to reduce the need for layoffs would be to cut back on hours, spreading the available work among more employees.
  22. One of the great debates about the Internet is whether it is making people more or less free.
  23. Mississippi’s loose campaign finance laws allow lawyers and companies to contribute heavily to the judges they appear before. That is terrible for justice, since the courts are teeming with perfectly legal conflicts of interest.
  24. Mass layoffs produce big winners and losers. Most workers who remain are financially unscathed, even though their employer is struggling.
  25. Liberal judges tend to be expansive about things like equal protection, while conservatives read more into ones like ‘the right to bear arms.’
  26. Lawsuits prod companies to make their products safer.
  27. Law graduates have always ended up in business, government, journalism and other fields. Law schools could do more to build these subjects into their coursework.
  28. It’s tempting to engage in anti-gun polemics and hope that popular opinion will dramatically shift, but it is also likely a mistake. The smarter course for those who want stronger federal gun-control laws anytime soon is legislative stewardship and compromise.
  29. It was not until the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s that Congress got serious about the assignment laid out in the post-Civil War amendments.
  30. It makes sense to have cameras in places where terrorism and crime are of particular concern – such as in Times Square or near major bridges and tunnels. It would be more troubling to learn, however, that the government has focused cameras on the front doors of our homes just to keep track of our comings and goings.
  31. It is one thing to say that there is a constitutional right to keep a gun at home for protection. It is quite another to say there is a constitutional right to bring a hidden gun into a daycare center.
  32. It is not hard to see why the FBI wants wiretapping backdoors. It would certainly make its job easier. But rejiggering the Internet so government can conveniently monitor everything we say and do online is too high a price to pay for making law enforcement more efficient.
  33. It is hard to imagine an area in which Congress has more express constitutional authority to act than in protecting the right of minorities to vote.
  34. In zombie horror, the juxtaposition of the calm world of the living and the menace of the undead inspires terror. In zombie comedy, like ‘Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,’ it is played for laughs.
  35. In the James Cameron blockbuster ‘Avatar,’ 3-D cinematography is the real star. The bugs and crawling creatures seem to slither into the theater seats. The floating mountains of the planet Pandora hover gloriously overhead. And the Na’Vi, Pandora’s 10-foot-tall, blue-skinned natives, come convincingly to life.
  36. In a perfect world, we would have put users in control of their information when the Internet was first created.
  37. If you’re going to call a book ‘The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History,’ readers will expect some serious carrying on about race, and Thomas Woods Jr. does not disappoint.
  38. If we are going to have self-driving cars, the technical specifications should be quite precise.
  39. If the courts regarded tweets and other social media information as private, it would not prevent the law enforcement from getting information it really needs. But the government would have to get a search warrant, which requires it to show that it has probable cause connecting what is being searched to a crime.
  40. If the Supreme Court rules that rent control is an unconstitutional taking of property, it would put all sorts of zoning rules in danger.
  41. If the FBI gets the ‘back doors’ it wants, Internet services would be required to create a massive online infrastructure for law enforcement to spy on members of the public.
  42. If apes are given the right to humane treatment, it just might become harder to deny that same right to their human cousins.
  43. If a company knows it may have to pay a large amount of money if it poses an unreasonable threat to others, it will have a strong incentive to act better.
  44. Gun violence in the U.S. is an epidemic.
  45. For technology companies, information about what people do online is extremely valuable – it can be used to sell targeted advertising or sold to data clearinghouses.
  46. For people worried about the Great Recession and the uncertainty of what is coming next, the characters of ‘Mad Men’ are good company.
  47. Federal law should hold organizations like the League of Women Voters harmless if they make good-faith mistakes while registering people.
  48. Even a single Justice can have a profound impact on the country.
  49. Escapism makes a lot of intuitive sense – whisk people away from their cares with stories of a better life.
  50. Defending Congressional authority should not be a partisan issue.
  51. DMs are a lot like email – and should have the same privacy protections as a mailed letter.
  52. Corporations have enormous treasuries, and there are a lot of things they want from government, many of which clash with the public interest.
  53. Conservatives like to insist that their judges are strict constructionists, giving the Constitution and statutes their precise meaning and no more, while judges like Ms. Sotomayor are activists. But there is no magic right way to interpret terms like ‘free speech’ or ‘due process’ – or potato chip.
  54. Conservative Justices have a history of not standing by their professed commitment to judicial restraint.
  55. Congress needs to toughen the laws protecting elections and make clear that anyone interfering with democracy will pay a stiff price.
  56. Civil lawsuits do two important things: they compensate people who are injured by the bad acts of others, and they penalize people and companies for bad behavior.
  57. Being unemployed – or working at minimum wage – is rough in the best of circumstances.
  58. Ballot formats should be standardized nationally rather than left to the often bad judgment of local officials.
  59. As self-driving cars become more common, there will be a flood of new legal questions.
  60. As much as possible, location-specific information should not be collected in the first place, or not in personally identifiable form.
  61. As long as there have been elections, there have been attempts to keep eligible people from voting.
  62. Anti-New Deal rhetoric has never disappeared from American political life.
  63. An election in which people have to wait 10 hours to vote, or in which black voters wait in the rain for hours, while white voters zip through polling places, is unworthy of the world’s leading democracy.
  64. Amazon is holding its own because the service it provides – offering millions of books and other items quickly and easily from home at any hour of the day or night – is a real one, and one that was impossible before there was an Internet.
  65. Age discrimination is illegal. But when compared with discrimination against racial minorities and women, it is a second-class civil rights issue.
  66. After you pay your E-ZPass bill, there is no reason for the government to keep records of your travel.
  67. A smart phone essentially creates a dossier of your travels, and consumers have no control over who will eventually see that information.
  68. A publicly run health care program could compete with private insurance companies, which have a record of overcharging and underperforming.
  69. A little-appreciated downside of the technology revolution is that, mainly without thinking about it, we have given up ‘locational privacy.’
  70. A key reason that elections are run so badly is that in most states, political partisans are in charge.
  71. A federal Voters’ Bill of Rights could press the states to put non-partisan managers in charge of elections.
  72. A Reagan appointee, Justice Kennedy is no liberal, as he has shown on issues from affirmative action to corporate campaign spending. But he has repeatedly sided with gay litigants before the court.
  73. ‘Hard Times’ does not romanticize the Depression, but at least a few of Mr. Terkel’s subjects managed to find silver linings.
  74. You want to be excited about what you’re doing. So whenever I get tired, I think, ‘Would ten-year-old Adam be pretty stoked on what I’m doing and what’s happening?’ So I just live my life as if I’m using my ten-year-old brain.
  75. When telemarketers call me now, I won’t get the blow-horn. I’m more polite than the average person.
  76. When I was a teenager, I was an umpire for a competitive league for 8- to 9-year-olds. I was really bad at it because I didn’t know all the rules, and all these kids were better athletes than me. I made a bad call, and this dad snapped on me. Then he dumped his trash from his cooler, and I had to kick him out of the stands.
  77. When I was 15, I worked as a bag boy in a grocery store. I also needed to walk old ladies to their car and put their bags in the car, and they would give me two dollars. I felt like the richest man in the world.
  78. When I auditioned for ‘Pitch Perfect,’ I didn’t know it was a singing movie. I didn’t read the script. I go to the audition, and I’m like, ‘Oh, it’s a baseball movie.’ But then I’m reading the lines, and I’m like, ‘This doesn’t seem like a baseball movie.’
  79. What’s so cool about movies is once you’re done with the movie, you put it away and come up with a whole new different idea with different characters and a different world. But in TV, you build these characters, and you build this world, and then you’re there for however long you do the show.
  80. What happened to me is I gained a little weight so I could be more accessible to people. They’re not like, ‘Oh my God, he’s, like, a male model comedian; yuck, ugh.’ It’s like, ‘Oh, he’s a little squishy; He’s like me. He’s accessible.’ And girls are like, ‘Look how cuddly he is. I just want to cuddle up in his neck fat and go to sleep.’
  81. There’s not one thing that inspires me the most. Me and my friends joke around with each other and hang out so much that whatever makes us laugh really hard makes it into ‘Workaholics.’ But the characters that I think are funny are guys that are confidently stupid.
  82. The thing that I think a lot of guys need to know how to do is not take your mother’s advice about honesty being the best policy. Listen to your cool, drunk uncle who tells you to lie. Those are the relationships that last.
  83. The American school system’s a little warped, so anyone can get a degree if they have a little money.
  84. That’s another piece of advice: Don’t go to college; follow your dreams. Unless you’re a doctor – then go to college.
  85. Some celebrities like to get behind water conservation or helping the homeless get back on their feet. Me? Body grooming control: that’s what I like to step behind 100 percent.
  86. People want to be friends with someone who likes to have a good time.
  87. Naked dudes are inherently funny.
  88. My senior year of high school, I got into UCLA, but my family couldn’t afford it.
  89. My parents are very cool and wildly supportive – maybe almost too much. I want to tell them to chill out.
  90. My favorite sequels are basically all Mike Myers films – ‘Wayne’s World 2,’ ‘Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me,’ ‘Shrek 2.’ Anything he does, it’s best the second time around. He needs to do ‘So I Married an Axe Murderer 2.’
  91. Jealousy is the worst trait in any person.
  92. If you like standup and decide that it’s overtaking your life and want to hate it, watch 1,000 standup comedians who are trying to get on a TV show.
  93. I’m such a huge ‘Arrested Development’ fan.
  94. I’m not a good rapper. For whatever reason, my brain does not work that way. I just do the beginning, like, ‘Yeah, yeah! Ha ha! Woo! What up? Come on! Get at me!’ I’m Captain Hook.
  95. I tried out for my basketball team every year and I never made it. You had to buy the shoes before you knew if you were on the team because it took a few weeks for them to ship. I bought the shoes every year, never once made the team, had a ton of high school basketball shoes.
  96. I think making friends is not being afraid to look stupid, because everyone wants a friend who is willing to be stupid and fun. If you try and be too cool, it only works in high school. After that, being uncool is a very cool thing to do. So just have fun, and don’t worry what other people think of you and people will want to be your friends.
  97. I tend to have a lot of jokes about ex-girlfriends. They always ask me if they will be the subject of a joke, and I always tell them they won’t. Unless they do something crazy. They all tend to, so you know where that goes. There are no closed doors. The ‘art’ will suffer.
  98. I still haven’t found the humor in getting hit by a cement truck. My knees still hurt when I think about it, so no jokes about that yet.
  99. I sold steaks over the phone in Omaha, Nebraska. Marbling, fantastic. That’s what makes a great steak; a lot of people don’t know.
  100. I sold a bunch of stuff. I sold Omaha Steaks, vacation packages… the worst, though, was Time Life Books, because no one wants Time Life Books. No one wants an ‘Encyclopedia Brittanica’ showing up at their house.
  101. I sang the National Anthem at Dodger Stadium – at a baseball game – which was crazy; there was, like, 60,000 people there, which is a huge deal in America – singing the National Anthem.
  102. I loved Adam Sandler’s early stuff. I thought it was so cool how irreverent and weird he would get.
  103. I like the guys who wrote their own stuff and were able to perform it, like Seth Rogen. He popped off so young. When he did ‘The 40-Year-Old Virgin,’ and he was a co-producer on the movie, I was like, ‘Oh my God: that’s exactly what I want to do.’
  104. I like Louis C.K., Chris Rock. Old schools like Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy.
  105. I don’t want any competition; I’ve finally made it! I don’t want any young bucks knocking me off and taking my job, so stay in school! Stay in school and get a nice job working in an office!
  106. I don’t really write jokes down. I tend to have a premise that I work out and test on stage.
  107. I did telemarketing for years, starting at the age of 16, just selling steak knives to old people. Old people go through a weird amount of steak knives. I also sold straight meat over the telephone.
  108. I always wanted to be a stand-up comedian, even as a kid. Me and my dad would watch ‘Evening at the Improv’ on A&E.
  109. I always wanted to be a comedic actor – that’s what I wanted from the job – to do comedy and to create my own comedy. But I still love doing stand-up and will probably be doing it forever. I’d love to be an old guy who can’t really walk, can’t really stand-up, and I have to sit on the stool and tell jokes.
  110. Hot girls have so many options. Sitting at home alone any night of the week and searching the Internet for a dude is on zero hot girls’ agendas. So they’re definitely not coming after you.
  111. Even as a kid, I was a businessman. I figured out that if you plucked all the berries off my neighbor’s tree and smashed them up, they made a Nickelodeon Gak-type consistency. I sold them to all the neighborhood kids and made stacks of quarters. Of course, the berries were poisonous, and I got in all types of trouble.
  112. Be yourself. I had this three-week period where I wore this straw fedora. I thought it was what chicks wanted. And then it dawned on me that I was trying to be something that I wasn’t, so I took the fedora off. So be yourself.
  113. As far as stand-ups go, I always loved Richard Pryor, Chris Rock, and Sinbad. Basically, I love black comedians because they’re the funniest. I wish I were a black comedian, actually.
  114. After ‘Pitch Perfect,’ I only want to be in sequels. No. 2 of whatever.
  115. You have to be forward-moving and able to balance a lot of things at the same time. I attribute a lot of that to the Marine Corps and Juilliard both.
  116. You have friends, and they die. You have a disease, someone you care about has a disease, Wall Street people are scamming everyone, the poor get poorer, the rich get richer. That’s what we’re surrounded by all the time.
  117. You always read stories of people going out to California and making it as an actor with, like, two dollars, so I figured I’d try it.
  118. Yeah, September 11 happened and all my friends were like, ‘Let’s join the military!’ and I was the only one who actually did.
  119. Writers are so important.
  120. Working on ‘Girls’ opened up a lot of opportunity for me. It’s like a dream job. It’s a dream.
  121. With brain and body, it’s great if you have a connection between the two, but when separated, that leads to a lot of conflict.
  122. With ‘Girls’… I feel like there’s an impulse to try to make it look better or neater or more perfect, and when I watch theater, television, movies, it’s always the imperfection I’m always more attracted to.
  123. When you get out of the Marine Corps, you feel like you can do anything.
  124. When I read for ‘Girls,’ I was like, ‘The script says ‘Handsome Carpenter,’ so someone else is going to get the part. They’ll have someone handsome, not me.’
  125. When I happened to get into school, I felt like I could approach it as aggressively as things in the military.
  126. What is a struggle is that acting isn’t a place where you go to work and you do that thing. There aren’t set boundaries, like an office, where you go and work. For me, the work is always on my mind.
  127. We don’t understand why we’re here, no one’s giving us an answer, religion is vague, your parents can’t help because they’re just people, and it’s all terrible, and there’s no meaning to anything.
  128. Through theater and acting school, I found a way to articulate myself.
  129. There’s such an emphasis on having a character be likable. I don’t think it would be helpful if I worried about that. I mean, not everyone’s likable.
  130. There’s something really exciting about playing someone where you’re given license to be unpredictable.
  131. There’s so much emphasis on Daniel Day-Lewis and his process, which is appropriately his own. But I was just blown away by his generosity as an actor. He’s so giving as an actor that he just naturally commands the focus on set.
  132. There’s a kind of immediacy that comes with being constantly connected that I don’t really relate to in my generation.
  133. There were definitely dark nights when you’re like, ‘Maybe joining the military wasn’t such a good idea.’ But, in a way, it was the best training to be an actor.
  134. The most you play a character in the theater is, like, a couple months, and then you put it away.
  135. The military community in particular, I think, could always be more supported, especially people who are being processed out of the military and trying to readjust to being civilians.
  136. The first job I got was this TV job in this show called ‘The Unusuals.’ Then I did a play called ‘Slipping,’ and at the same time I was rehearsing another play at Playwrights Horizons, and that kind of snowballed into a bunch of plays.
  137. The Marine Corps is supposed to be the toughest and most rigorous of its class.
  138. The Marine Corps is some of the best acting training you could have. Having that responsibility for people’s lives, suddenly time becomes a really valuable commodity and you want to make the most of it. And for acting, you just have to do the work, just keep doing it.
  139. Sophocles was a general: a warrior writing plays about military situations.
  140. Something I learned in the Marine Corps that I’ve applied to acting is, one, taking direction, and then working with a group of people to accomplish a mission and knowing your role within that team.
  141. September 11 happened, and all my friends were like, ‘Let’s join the military!’ and I was the only one who actually did.
  142. People always are desperate to have others acknowledge that they are different.
  143. Obviously, ‘Lincoln’ is not about the telegraph operator. There’s a whole other movie before and after the two isolated scenes that I’m in.
  144. My wife changes the way that I dress. She makes me dress nicer than I want to dress. I feel like I perpetually dress like a 14-year-old boy, and she makes me stand up straight and wear clean clothes.
  145. My plan was to be able to make a living as an actor.
  146. My only close-to-game-plan is to follow good writing. If the writing is in TV or if it’s in theater or in film, that’s it. It doesn’t really matter what the medium is.
  147. My grandpa was in the Navy, but it wasn’t something that was expected or planned for me to do.
  148. Just having the internet is a weird and dangerous thing because people become accustomed to knowing things when they want to know them and not having to work for it. I definitely see the value in not knowing everything and having mystery in life and mystery in people.
  149. Just being in the military, you’re so violent. We got into fights about just random things all the time. I don’t think as aggressively as I did when I was in the Marine Corps.
  150. Juilliard definitely emphasizes the theater. They don’t train – at all really – for film acting. It’s mostly process-oriented, pretty much for the stage.
  151. It’s hard to kill that father-son bond.
  152. It was very clear to me I wanted to be an actor when I got out into civilian life.
  153. Interesting things always come from being really exhausted and really sick.
  154. In the military, you learn the essence of people. You see so many examples of self-sacrifice and moral courage. In the rest of life, you don’t get that many opportunities to be sure of your friends.
  155. In the Marine Corps, everything had a purpose.
  156. If there’s one organization in the United States that could work on its communication skills, it’s the military.
  157. If I’m not doing something or working on something, I literally just sit in the room and think, which I don’t think is productive. I won’t go outside for days.
  158. I’ve seen incredible acts of humanity in the military because people put themselves aside, and it’s about the other person.
  159. I’ve got weird conflicting feelings about my generation.
  160. I’m one of those crazy people, if I’m watching the trailer for a movie and I’m really excited by it, I’ll turn it off because I don’t want to know anything. I want to be surprised because I love that more than knowing anything.
  161. I’m not such a big fan of having a linear answer to things.
  162. I’m not fashionable.
  163. I’m not an acting monk or anything. I’m not, like, the most well-adjusted actor.
  164. I’m like a sight gag.
  165. I’m constantly thinking about the role, and there’s an infinite amount of questions you can ask yourself about a character to the point that it’s hard to find the boundaries of when to not work.
  166. I’m conflicted with theater in the city because you want to reach a diverse audience, and that audience doesn’t typically go to the theater.
  167. I wish I could pull shorts off. My wife tells me that I just can’t. But that’s okay. I’m tall, I can do other things, like change light bulbs.
  168. I was living in a small town in Indiana working as a telemarketer and a vacuum salesman. I was really bad: the vacuums seemed to always be falling apart. Every time I did a demonstration, I’d say, ‘This is the material the astronauts used on Apollo 13.’ And no sooner had that come out of my mouth, something would malfunction.
  169. I was in a mountain biking accident and broke my sternum about three months before my unit was supposed to deploy to Iraq, and it’s such a close-knit community that the idea of not getting to go is hugely jarring, so I tried to get put back in training and wound up injuring it worse.
  170. I was having an argument with my stepfather, and he was like, ‘Why don’t you join the Marine Corps?’ And I was like, ‘Noooo! Well, maybe, actually… ‘ I went and saw the recruiter, who was like, ‘Are you on the run from the cops? Because we’ve never had someone want to leave so fast.’
  171. I was born in California. When I was six, we moved to a small town in northern Indiana called Mishawaka.
  172. I was an infantry Marine, and there are only so many things you can do when you get out of the military that you can apply your job to. Either a janitor or a cop. I tried to do both of those things because what else are you going to do?
  173. I want to show that theater isn’t just talking about feelings or people wearing tights.
  174. I used to eat a whole chicken, every day, for lunch. I did that for four years. But it got tiring – go to the store, buy it, eat it. It’s a mess.
  175. I trained myself, whenever I walk into auditions, to hate everyone in the room.
  176. I think some of my best theatre training has been in the Marine Corps. Not only meeting a bunch of characters, but growing up. You’re in really adult situations at a young age, as far as being in charge of people.
  177. I think it’s good to live an artful life.
  178. I think it’s a common misconception in the civilian community that the military community is filled with just drills and discipline and pain. They forget that these are humans who are in an abnormal situation.
  179. I studied Morse code.
  180. I saw the pilot for ‘Girls’ about six months before it aired.
  181. I own a guitar, a piano, a bass.
  182. I originally passed on ‘Girls’ because I thought TV was evil.
  183. I never played sports or got into the whole guy camaraderie of, like, ‘I love you, man! Seniors forever!’ So suddenly being in the military with these guys who were under these very heightened circumstances, isolated from their families, living this very kind of Greek lifestyle, it changed my life in a really big way.
  184. I mean, I did plays in high school, but I was convinced you couldn’t make a living doing it.
  185. I loved being in the Marine Corps, I loved my job in the Marine Corps, and I loved the people I served with. It’s one of the best things I’ve had a chance to do.
  186. I like everything I do to have some kind of meaning.
  187. I have this really big face.
  188. I have a control problem. I hate the feeling of not being in control.
  189. I feel like I’ll never get over red carpets. They’re so bizarre and awkward.
  190. I feel like I have to move violently once a day, or I’ll lose my mind.
  191. I don’t understand technology, and I’m very scared of it.
  192. I don’t really have foresight as an actor as far as career trajectory – I just stick to no-brainer situations.
  193. I don’t know what else you could do that is more vulnerable – maybe dancing – than singing.
  194. I don’t have cable. I just never watched a lot of TV.
  195. I don’t feel like I have to dress up to go to the deli.
  196. I don’t consider myself a celebrity. That would be kind of sad.
  197. I did plays in high school, but I was convinced you couldn’t make a living doing it. You don’t have a lot of options in Indiana anyway, though, so I didn’t want to stay there. I graduated early and worked a bunch of really odd jobs, and then I joined the Marines.
  198. I can tell more about my weaknesses than my strengths.
  199. I auditioned in Chicago for Juilliard and didn’t get in. I was basically living in a back room of my parents’ house, paying rent and not doing anything with my life. I’d like to say it was patriotic to join the Marines, but it was also that I was doing nothing honorable with my life and spending too much time at McDonald’s.
  200. I actually run a non-profit where one of the main objectives is to branch out and get a new audience for the theater. Just because the writing is so good and nothing is more effective than seeing something live and happening right in front of your face, so I definitely want to continue to pursue that.
  201. How do you take what you do as seriously as possible but not so seriously that it ends up inhibiting what you do?
  202. For me, becoming a man had a lot to do with learning communication, and I learned about that by acting.
  203. Even on your hiatus, you feel like you need to keep the character in the back of your brain.
  204. Emphasis in the Marine Corps isn’t on talking about your feelings.
  205. Costume people are always saying they don’t have clothes big enough for me.
  206. College wasn’t something I saw myself doing.
  207. By the time I got into Juilliard, I was working at a Target distribution warehouse. It didn’t make anything, it just shipped things, and my job was just to stand there and look at the security codes on the back of trucks and see if they would lock, and check them in.
  208. At Juilliard, suddenly I was reading these great plays that could articulate the ways I was feeling in the Marine Corps, and that felt very therapeutic, by putting words to feelings, in a big way.
  209. Any actor is happy to be involved with something that’s challenging, controversial, and not easily palatable. Things that are too dumbed down or easy to swallow are uninteresting… It’s good when people have such a polarizing response.
  210. Acting, to me, has been many things: It’s a business, and it’s a craft, and it’s a political act – it’s whatever adjective is most applicable.
  211. Acting, believe it or not, can get very self-involved! I feel fortunate to have been able to work on things with people who have a very specific point of view and perspective, and who feel like they’re doing something very active.
  212. Acting is really about having the courage to fail in front of people.
  213. Acting is a business and a political act and a craft, but I also feel like it’s a service – specifically, for a military audience.
  214. ‘Girls’ feels very active and stirring a conversation and controversial, and you can’t really ask for more as an actor.
  215. You know you’re a hopeless record nerd when your time travel fantasies always come around to how cool it would be to go back to 1973 and buy all the great funk and jazz and salsa records that came out that year on tiny obscure labels and are now really rare and expensive.
  216. Writing novels is largely about endurance and patience. I take a lot of breaks, hit walls, and go do something else while I think things through. But I do it every day, and I try to treat it as a job, something that is not dictated by whimsy or muses.
  217. While I’m working, I stick with music that won’t distract me – the dub stylings of Scientist and King Tubby, maybe some Beethoven string quartets.
  218. When we talk about communities, we seldom discuss the margins. But for every person nestled comfortably in the bosom of a community, there is someone else on the outskirts, feeling ambivalent. Ambiguous. Excluded. Unwilling or unable to come more fully into the fold.
  219. When the kid goes to bed, you get a little bit of time for yourself and maybe your partner, so being delayed in that departure can be particularly frustrating.
  220. When it comes right down to it, developing a critical sensibility about parenting isn’t really about disapproval; it’s about honing your own sensibilities, figuring out how you want to parent.
  221. When I’m writing, I’m in an isolation chamber. I’m not one to think about that outside world stuff when I’m writing.
  222. We had a kid. The kid was awesome. She didn’t fall asleep easily. We complained about it. We got frustrated. But we didn’t look for an out. We just accepted that this was part of parenting.
  223. Vinyl is democratic, as surely as the iPod is fascist. Vinyl is representational: It has a face. Two faces, in fact, to represent the dualism of human nature. Vinyl occupies physical space honestly, proud as a fat woman dancing.
  224. Ultimately, very few people parent their kids in ways that strike anybody else as reasoned, appropriate or sane.
  225. To me, ‘The End of the Jews’ – both the title and the novel itself – is about the end of pat, uncritical ways of understanding oneself in the world.
  226. To capture sound is to isolate a moment, canonize it, enter it into the historical register.
  227. To be a white kid into hip-hop meant you’d sought it out and you practiced the art. Which meant dedication and diligence, as well as removing yourself at least occasionally from your own comfort zone and circumstances, and from people who looked like you.
  228. There’s a lot of demand to hear the new Kanye West album before it hits the streets. There’s much less demand to read the new Phillip Roth novel.
  229. There is perhaps no better way to appreciate the dizzying stupidity of the United States than to chat with 25 consecutive morning radio hosts.
  230. The trains were the beating heart of the New York graffiti scene.
  231. The thing I love about being a novelist is that with each project, you invent a new world. You approach it with a different set of aesthetic and structural ideas, and you grapple with a different series of problems in figuring out how to tell the story. And yet there are certain concerns that stay constant.
  232. The publishing industry stopped having new ideas out of respect for the untimely death of Ernest Hemingway in 1961 and has been doing everything the same way ever since.
  233. The paradox of being in an industry where other people are usually the gatekeepers: publishers, editors – there are a lot of barriers to having control over your career. But coming out of hip-hop, the mindset was always to create your own.
  234. The goal has been not to get pigeonholed. I like working in different genres. I’m gonna try to be entertaining and funny and do my usual thing.
  235. The genius of vinyl is that it allows – commands! – us to put our fingerprints all over that history: to blend and chop and reconfigure it, mock and muse upon it, backspin and skip through it.
  236. The city fought a $300 million, 18-year war on graffiti. New York Mayor John Lindsay declared war in 1972, and the battle for the transit system came later.
  237. Sometimes, it’s best to let the kids take control – and it’s never too early to instill positive eating habits or self-confidence in the kitchen.
  238. Sleeping is one of the more private aspects of parenting; it happens in a quiet room, whereas eating is a more public aspect of parenting. Other people can see it and compare it to what their kids eat.
  239. Religious traditions are easy to lose sight of in today’s marketing frenzy. Make sure you take time to gently usher your little ones into the rituals that have special meaning for you.
  240. One thing any DJ needs in his crate, especially at a barbecue, is a selection of 15-minute-plus jams.
  241. One of the pleasures of getting older and making a living the way you want to is that your social circle becomes rarified, and the people who enter have been vetted.
  242. Of course, the opposite of white privilege is not blackness, as many of us seemed to think then; the opposite of white privilege is working to dismantle that privilege. But my particular hip-hop generation proved to be very serious about figuring it all out and staying engaged.
  243. Novels are pirated all the time, but it’s hard to imagine that you’re at work and you open up the attachment that your brother sent you and it’s the new Phillip Roth novel.
  244. No one in my family has been observant for generations, but we all identify with being Jewish.
  245. My wife likes me to point out that she puts our daughter down to sleep more often than I do, which gives me time to write stupid books about it.
  246. My mother is really the person I learned to curse from. She discourages me from saying that in interviews. But it’s true.
  247. My daughter is a very adventurous eater. I’m not the guy who sits around lamenting that all my kid will eat it is Tater Tots and chicken nuggets. With my kid, it’s more a capricious and whimsical decision-making.
  248. My approach is to treat writing very much as a job.
  249. Look closely, and you can see where the grooves of a record widen, indicating a sparseness that can only be a bass solo, or grow denser to accommodate a cresting density of sound.
  250. It’s hilarious to me that by writing an obscene fake children’s book I am mistaken for a parenting expert.
  251. In theory, parents are supposed to empathize with one other – find common cause in the fervent desire to preserve and protect the world for the next generation, and connect on some deep, almost mystical level that those poor souls who have not experienced this kind of all-consuming love cannot possibly comprehend.
  252. If you’re a novelist, as I am in real life, you’re usually so desperate for any kind of feedback.
  253. If anything, I was a prodigious eater of everything that was put in front of me. That was probably the only thing my parents wouldn’t complain about.
  254. I’ve probably done more than a thousand interviews, and I can’t remember what people asked me two months ago or two days ago.
  255. I’ve planned book tours for myself, whether or not anybody wants to hear what I have to say. I’ve weighed in on things like what the cover looks like, what the copy looks like, how it’s going to be promoted – just every aspect of it.
  256. I’ve always been really involved in figuring out who my audience is and how to reach them.
  257. I would like to think that I curse expertly – it’s not something that I do without considering it. I never curse without intending to; it’s not something I resort to because of inability to articulate or find the correct word.
  258. I was a rapper and a DJ, and if you wanted to be involved in hip-hop, you had to be involved in the sonic, the kinetic and the visual aspects. The visual was graffiti.
  259. I try to write in the mornings, as soon as I’m up and caffeinated, and to stay in the chair as long as I can be productive.
  260. I think there’s a lot of anxiety about being seen as a bad parent. There’s still a lot of subjects that I think people aren’t entirely comfortable being honest about.
  261. I think that being Jewish is in some ways unique because there’s this conflation of race, culture and religion.
  262. I like to write in coffee shops in countries in which languages I do not speak are spoken. That way, you’re surrounded by the buzz of humanity, but you aren’t distracted by people’s conversations.
  263. I like to read in the bathtub. Ideally, that bathtub would be located on a small Greek island.
  264. I came up in hip-hop, where people value the ability to tell it straight.
  265. I believe that writers have a responsibility to evolve the language, whether by introducing new words or new usages. Shakespeare alone is responsible for something like 3400 words and phrases.
  266. How do you sustain yourself when all the old structures people looked to for support – religion, family, ethnic solidarity – are crumbling, or feel so false that you refuse to avail yourself of them? What comes next?
  267. Graffiti writers were the most interesting people in hip hop. They were the mad scientists, the mad geniuses, the weird ones.
  268. Graffiti has an interesting relationship to the broader world of hip-hop: It’s part of the culture, but also in a weird way a stepchild of the culture.
  269. Fundamentally, I’m profoundly influenced by hip-hop, so whatever I do is going to bear that seal.
  270. For me, most of the anxiety and difficulty of writing takes place in the act of not writing. It’s the procrastination, the thinking about writing that’s difficult.
  271. For me, graffiti writers were always the fascinating eccentrics of hip-hop culture. What they do is secretive by definition, and not remunerative in any way.
  272. For many families, gift-giving is a major source of stress – the relentless commercialism, the whining demands, the financial pressure.
  273. Eating is one of the great pleasures of life.
  274. Children crave routine and find listening to the same stories over and over again soothing. If you’ve grown weary of the holiday books you’ve read your kid 7,883 times, try adding ‘dude’ to the end of every line of dialogue.
  275. Being Jewish is a big part of my artistic sensibility and my humor… I think it gives me a certain take on the world on a literary level.
  276. Because Jews were kicked out of every country in Europe at one time or another, and plenty of other places as well, there isn’t an ability to identify with a national heritage – you’ll never hear a Jew say ‘I’m German’ or ‘I’m Polish,’ without saying something about being Jewish as well, and for good reason.
  277. As a writer, I’ve always been somebody who’s been productive and hustled hard.
  278. America has not produced a more salient political musician than Gil Scott-Heron.
  279. A holiday vacation can mean sampling all kinds of new cuisine – whether it’s Uncle Joe’s award-winning chili or the exotic flavors of Nepal. If your little ones are fussy, be sure to ease mealtime hassles by bringing along a supply of the familiar foods they’re accustomed to rejecting at home.
  280. A good cookout ought to last at least six hours; if you haven’t eaten and gotten full and gotten hungry and eaten again, you’re doing something wrong.
  281. ‘The Pushcart War’ is presented as a history of a conflict that has not yet taken place; in each edition of the book, the date on which the hostilities commenced is nudged forward.
  282. Why am I such a Euro-enthusiast? Because I knew it was an anchor of democracy.
  283. The threat to Russia isn’t liberal Europe or America. It is nonliberal Islam and nonliberal China. Russia has to change. It can’t be otherwise. It will take time. You have to be patient.
  284. The main difference between the Prague Spring and the Velvet Revolution was that the former was mostly the work of Communist party members and others who wanted to bring about ‘socialism with a human face.’
  285. The ethics of journalism are one thing. Another thing is the ethics of business.
  286. The Polish freedom movement of 1968 lost its confrontation with police violence; the Prague Spring was crushed by the armies of five Warsaw Pact members. But in both countries, 1968 gave birth to a new political consciousness.
  287. Politics is the art of realizing what there is to realize.
  288. Politics is the art of achieving political goals – of achieving what is possible in a given situation – that is, in a situation that has its conditions and its limits.
  289. Politics and ethics belong to different worlds.
  290. Poland is an ally of the United States of America. It was our duty to show that we are a reliable, loyal, and predictable ally. America needed our help, and we had to give it.
  291. Pacifism as a mass movement aims to avoid suffering; pacifists often say that no cause is worth suffering or dying for. The ethos of Solidarity is based on an opposite premise – that there are causes worth suffering and dying for.
  292. Israel is the only country in the Middle East where Arabs can be elected to the parliament in a democratic election.
  293. In Czechoslovakia in 1968, communist reformers appealed to democratic ideals that were deeply rooted in the country’s pre-second world war past.
  294. If you’re powerful, you are much more likely to be blind and deaf to signals from outside.
  295. I think it’s always dangerous to make political arguments in a religiously ideological way. And it’s very dangerous to treat as traitors to the American nation those who think differently.
  296. I do not accept being a prisoner of fear. Of Communism, of fascism. That, one can bear. But of one’s fear. No. Never.
  297. I do know that you have to choose between the logic of reconciliation and the logic of justice. Pure justice leads to new civil war. I prefer the negotiable revolution.
  298. I consider that 9/11 was the day when war was started against my own work and against myself. Even though we are not sure of the links, Iraq was one of the countries that did not lower its flags in mourning on 9/11.
  299. I believe that a man can only be useful to his country when he can look at it clearly.
  300. France can never accept that it is no longer a dominating power in the world of culture. This is true both of the French right and the French left. They keep thinking that Americans are primitive cowboys or farmers who do not understand anything.
  301. For those of us imprisoned in Poland, the Prague Spring was a harbinger of hope.
  302. Every revolution, bloody or not, has two phases. The first phase is defined by the struggle for freedom, the second by the struggle for power and revenge on the votaries of the ancien regime.
  303. An ethical action, like an unethical action, is usually analyzed by politicians purely in pragmatic terms.
  304. After the French Revolution, it was not the treason of the king that was in question; it was the existence of the king. You have to be very careful when you judge and execute somebody for being a symbol.
  305. While our country has made great strides in breaking down the barriers which for so long denied equal opportunity to all Americans, we are not yet the beautiful symphony of brotherhood of Dr. King’s dream.
  306. We will not let terrorists change our way of life; we will not live in fear; and we will not undermine the civil liberties that characterize our Democracy.
  307. We must either reduce the number of our engagements or increase the number of our troops.
  308. Unquestionably, the world is better off without Saddam.
  309. Unless action is taken soon – unless we can display the same vision of that earlier period – we will lose the treasure of California’s open space and environmental beauty.
  310. The war in Iraq has been extremely divisive here at home, and has also divided the world community.
  311. The prompt assimilation of that intelligence will be essential if we are to avoid another September 11th.
  312. The new century has brought on its own terrible dangers, which although not reaching the apocalyptic potential of the Cold War, still have the capacity to shake our world.
  313. The legacy of the Armenian Genocide is woven into the fabric of America.
  314. Some argue that recognition of the genocide has become even more problematic now, when the world is at war with terrorism and the United States cannot afford to offend the sensibility of our Turkish ally.
  315. So let us call genocide, genocide. Let us not minimize the deliberate murder of 1.5 million people. Let us have a moral victory that can shine as a light to all nations.
  316. Our failure to find weapons of mass destruction in Iraq thus far has been deeply troubling, and our intelligence-gathering process needs thorough and unbiased investigation.
  317. Notwithstanding these setbacks, the dream of a beautiful American orchestra goes on, and I share Dr. King’s faith that each year we move inexorably closer to a magnificent opening night.
  318. Neither the University of Michigan nor its law school uses a quota system.
  319. Much has changed since the end of the Cold War that augurs well for the survival of our nation.
  320. It is now conventional wisdom that Americans do not care why we went to war in Iraq, that it is enough that the world is better off without Saddam Hussein.
  321. In fact, the converse is true: At a time when the United States has been called on for a level of moral leadership, vision and inspiration not seen since World War II, we cannot afford to dissemble about crimes against humanity.
  322. If giving points to some students to achieve greater diversity is a quota system in violation of the Constitution, how can the awarding of points to the children of a less diverse alumni be upheld?
  323. Each year on the anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s birth, America has the opportunity to reflect on our nation’s progress towards the realization of his dream.
  324. Democracies are poor breeding grounds for terrorism and war.
  325. But it is equally incontrovertible that if our intelligence gathering process is seriously flawed, we had better find out and find out fast if we are to avoid another Sept. 11.
  326. But even race-neutral policies and recruitment efforts designed to achieve greater diversity are, in the end, not race neutral.
  327. At the very top state institutions, like UCLA, Berkeley and the University of Texas, however, the trend of downward minority enrollment remains persistent and discouraging.
  328. And in this community, as in all others, the Golden Rule still applies – we must be act toward other nations as we would have them act towards America.
  329. An America that inspires hope in its ideals must complement an America that inspires awe in its strength.
  330. Americans are blessed with great plenty; we are a generous people and we have a moral obligation to assist those who are suffering from poverty, disease, war and famine.
  331. America has a critical role to play as the most powerful member of the world community.
  332. Although every step must be taken to protect against a chemical or biological attack in America, our nation would survive the use of those weapons as we did when anthrax was mailed to our Capitol and other targets.
  333. You’ve got a guy in a cape and tights running around fighting crime 24-7; this is not normal. But it worked because the kids loved it and the adults laughed with it.
  334. You have no idea the people I meet when I do these Comic-Cons. When I go sign autographs and say hello to people, I see everything!
  335. You can’t play Batman in a serious, square-jawed, straight-ahead way without giving the audience the sense that there’s something behind that mask waiting to get out, that he’s a little crazed; he’s strange.
  336. When you wear a mask and create a character, nothing will pigeonhole you faster.
  337. When you go to the Sistine Chapel with Sophia Loren, it can be quite some time before your thoughts turn to the ceiling.
  338. When I was getting started, I was so busy just fighting my way through, and I was under contract at Warner Brothers. I did 40 hours of color television with the late Robert Taylor as a young cop.
  339. When I got to Hollywood, there wasn’t even a Boulevard. I’m that old. It was just a little dirt trail. I’m kidding.
  340. When I got the part, I tried to remember Batman as I knew him when I was a kid – with emotional recall.
  341. When ‘Family Guy’ came along, it was like a gift, and it expanded my fan base.
  342. Typecasting is really rampant in Hollywood, and because I played a costumed character and did it successfully, it was a real stigma.
  343. To play the leading man in a ‘Three Stooges’ movie, you’ve got to think funny. Thank God I think funny.
  344. To be an icon… I guess that’s a privilege.
  345. There were definitely times when I regretted ever being Batman.
  346. There was a time when ‘Batman’ really kept me from getting some pretty good roles, and I was asked to do what I figured were important features. However, Batman was there, and very few people would take a chance on me walking onto the screen. And they’d be taking people away from the story.
  347. The word that scares the hell out of me is ‘frail.’ I don’t want to be frail.
  348. The wonderful thing with some of the things I’ve done – most of them, really – is to be trusted. To be able to do your thing, to work on it, hone it into my gem of creativity!
  349. The new ‘Dark Knight’ movies, they’re wonderful in their own way.
  350. The Batmobile wasn’t a stickshift, and it was a challenge to drive, believe me.
  351. Some nights, I wear my cape, and I go out on the pier. It is foggy… I look for… Riddler.
  352. Playing Batman is an actor’s challenge. First, it’s different; then, you have to reach a multi-level audience. The kids take it straight, but for adults, we have to project it further.
  353. People love Batman, and I would be stupid, I would be a fool if I didn’t love Batman.
  354. Over the years, I’ve learned that if you can just hang in there and, regardless of what’s presented to you, take it as a challenge and try to bring in something fresh, then it works.
  355. One of the most gratifying, rewarding things is when people come up, and they tell you how the show influenced their lives in a very positive way. When I do these things like Comic Con, I get people who are lawyers, judges, plumbers, carpenters, and entire families, and it’s mostly for ‘Batman.’ But now, amazingly, it’s also for ‘Family Guy.’
  356. Oh, it’s fun to be an icon!
  357. Not to be able to move around or do things without thinking – that’s tough. I may end up that way, but if I do, I hope to hell my intellect will take over, and I’ll find some kind of joy and a way to contribute.
  358. My paintings capture the humor, zaniness, and depth of the Batman villains as well as the Freudian motivations of Batman as an all-too-human, venerable, and funny vigilante superhero.
  359. My grandfather and my father had wheat ranches, so we had quite a few trucks around and a lot of mules. Talk about horsepower – we had mule power.
  360. My art, like my acting, is a profound expression of poetic license.
  361. Maybe we could find some way to send barges of trash to the sun and incinerate it all. Hey, it’s an idea. It’s an idea!
  362. Look at ‘Batman’ – that was theater of the absurd, as is ‘Family Guy.’
  363. Life is full of ironies and absurdities.
  364. It’s part of my character not to take myself too seriously. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been able to survive.
  365. It’s a wonderful thing to be able to make fun of yourself and to do it in a way that sort of preserves your dignity but, at the same time, lets you play the theater of the absurd.
  366. Isn’t it fun to be nuts? Isn’t it fun to be crazy?
  367. In the late ’60s, there were the the three B’s: The Beatles, Batman, and Bond.
  368. In a very real sense, I represent pop culture in an iconic way. It’s been very good to me, so anything I can do to help the fans to tumble along – it’s good.
  369. If you’re a plumber, you plumb. I’m an actor. I act.
  370. If you paint a picture and I paint a picture, we each want to do it our own way. And we’ll stand or fall on whatever we did.
  371. If you hang around long enough, they think you’re good. It’s either my tenacity or stupidity – I’m not sure which.
  372. I’ve played dinner theaters. I’m a working stiff.
  373. I’ve hung on for a long time in this business and had some success, and I think it’s keeping an open mind and being curious and having a sense of humor about oneself that’s important.
  374. I’ve been almost everywhere. But I’ve never been to the steppes of Latvia. It’s something I’ve always wanted to do.
  375. I’ve been able to reinvent myself and to keep an audience going at whatever age. This is terrific. I mean, how many actors get that chance?
  376. I’ve always tried to fit what I do professionally into my family, rather than the other way around.
  377. I’ve always shied away from ‘Where are they now?’ shows, because I’ve been lucky enough to keep working, and people know where I am.
  378. I’ve always been able to work. I think it’s an actor’s obligation to keep working if you can.
  379. I’m very lucky. I do voiceovers, ‘Family Guy,’ on and on, and quite frankly, I’m one of the luckiest actors in the world. I was able to create a character who became iconic.
  380. I’m not a vindictive kind of guy.
  381. I’m like Madonna: I keep reinventing myself.
  382. I’m interested in film – any aspect – acting, directing, writing.
  383. I’m a fan of anything that’s good, especially when it’s conscientiously good.
  384. I would hate to be a bitter, aging actor.
  385. I was victimized by the old Hollywood typecasting thing. I had to really fight to get out of it, so I was uncomfortable with it.
  386. I was a maverick. I went to five different colleges looking for I don’t know quite what.
  387. I used to spend hours just sitting in an old wreck of a car with a stickshift; I’d just sit there and shift.
  388. I think our Batman had to be fun, light-hearted, funny, tongue-in-cheek… and I think that made kind of an homage to those earlier comic books, where Batman always had a quip or something.
  389. I think it’s an actor’s job, if you can, to keep working and to keep using that muscle. First of all, you’ve got to pay the bills, but it also helps you develop.
  390. I think I’ve said I’m the luckiest actor in the world. I mean that.
  391. I love to go home and do the chores and read.
  392. I love to do voiceover because, for me, if you know what you’re doing, it’s simple. No makeup, no costuming, none of the baloney. None of the egos – you don’t have to deal with all that crap. I love voiceovers.
  393. I like to make people laugh and have fun.
  394. I like Christian Bale. I’ve heard he’s a big fan of mine, but I certainly reciprocate. I think he’s really very good.
  395. I just go my own way. If my agent calls and presents me with something, and I find it refreshing or illuminating, yeah, I’ll do it.
  396. I have the curse of thinking funny!
  397. I have no patience with dinosaurs.
  398. I have become convinced that everything that is classy doesn’t go away.
  399. I grew up on a ranch in Walla Walla, Washington. Except for one lawyer, I don’t remember anyone in my family being anything else but ranchers.
  400. I get called ‘Mayor West’ a lot in airports. I’ve been very fortunate to have a fan base that keeps growing, and the work gets such a warm response and humor from people.
  401. I don’t want to be Batman. Let Val Kilmer do it. I just want to be Uncle Batman. I have this whole ‘warm relationship’ plot in my mind. In the final scenes, the new Batmobile breaks down, the new Batman’s stranded on the side of the road. We grab our old Batmobile, pick him up and drive away.
  402. I don’t paint butter dishes, doilies, or hummingbirds in my garden. It’s more raw, I suppose. But it always creates a reaction.
  403. I did a character called Captain Q for Nestle’s Quik. Those commercials were kind of funny.
  404. I come to Comic-Con in San Diego because this is where those fans are – those to whom I owe the longevity of my career.
  405. I am a simple man, though my wife says I am complicated. I’ll trust her on that one.
  406. I am a private person. I don’t need a lot of company. And I find it really, really difficult to talk about myself.
  407. How many actors have a shot at being a part of something that became a part of pop culture? It’s been very rewarding. I’m not getting the 20 million bucks for the new movies, but at least I’m getting warmth and recognition from people wherever I go.
  408. Favorite Bat-gadget was probably the Batboat, because it was fun to get out on the ocean and run that thing around at high speed.
  409. Crummy pictures, live appearances, circuses, avant garde theater, dinner theater. I’ve done it all. I’ve been shot out of cannons. I know what the people want. I’m out there with the people.
  410. Burgess Meredith taught me a lot about wine.
  411. Batman had a certain speech pattern that I established because he was always Sherlock Holmes-ian. He was Basil Rathbone. In other words, he was always musing about something.
  412. Anything with ‘Family Guy’ is great.
  413. Anything that triggers good memories can’t be all bad.
  414. Any incarnation of ‘Batman’ I am delighted to do.
  415. All I know is that my fans have been really wonderful and affectionate.
  416. ‘Batman’ was a colorful and wild ride.
  417. You have to transmit to them what it’s like being in the theater. And it has to come from somewhere inside you and not by being like what somebody did last year.
  418. We’ve managed to keep a spirit of fun, I guess, of urban satire and finding new and odd interesting angles to the ways of life to put on the stage.
  419. We had a certain kind of really big prestige among, I suppose not just intellectual folk, but a sort of nice middle class intelligent folk of a very urban nature.
  420. It’s unfortunate we’ve never been just songwriters.
  421. It never became an act in the sense of an act. It was always, no matter where we worked, little revues.
  422. I had met a young lady who wanted to be in the theater. It was Judy Holliday. She had somehow fallen down the steps of the Village Vanguard, which still exists today.
  423. As a main ingredient to the show, it has to have truth, represent truth, or else it won’t last.
  424. When email and the Internet came along, I never publish an email address. I just stuck with this P.O. Box address.
  425. When I’m sitting at my drafting table in my studio, I could really be anywhere.
  426. When I started publishing my work, one of the biggest surprises to me was the recurring question about my background and why I wasn’t doing more stories about Asian-Americans.
  427. When I started creating my work for publication, I just assumed that the focus would be on the work itself and that there wouldn’t be a lot of interest in who was creating the work.
  428. When I first started drawing the earliest incarnation of ‘Optic Nerve,’ I hadn’t even been on a date; I hadn’t had a romantic relationship of any kind yet, so in a way, I was almost writing science fiction.
  429. What was a very private childhood hobby turned into a very a public, professional job, and I think that there’s a lot of inhibition that can grow from that.
  430. To me, one of the big fears of doing a big huge graphic novel is locking yourself into one style and getting halfway through it and going, ‘Oh I made the wrong choice,’ which is a recurring nightmare I have.
  431. To be perfectly honest, if it was up to me, I would be invisible as an artist.
  432. There’s never been a moment where I sat down at my drawing board and thought, ‘I’m a pro!’
  433. There’s a part of me that feels like it gets really frustrating to keep working in the manner that I made the book ‘Shortcomings,’ where everything is pretty accurate to the real world.
  434. There’s a lot of books that I’ve purchased simply because of the cover design. On the other hand, there’s certain books that, even if I’m very curious about the content, I can’t bring myself to buy if I really dislike the cover.
  435. There have been a handful of assignments over the years that I’ve had to turn down due to time constraints, and I was fairly envious when I saw the finished product, beautifully illustrated by someone else.
  436. The type of cartooning that I think is generally referred to as ‘alternative’ or ‘underground’ is usually – the distinction is usually in terms of whether it’s made by one person, the entire thing is done by one hand or more of a production line process, which is how the comics that we grew up reading were made.
  437. The story entitled ‘Good-Bye’ is probably Tatsumi’s most well-known work, and I think it’s a good representation of many of Tatsumi’s skills and stylistic tendencies.
  438. The most impactful comics that I’ve read are the ones where the artists swung for the bleachers and tried to immerse you in their world.
  439. The comics work is very slow, and it basically involves working for sometimes years in isolation and not knowing how the work is going to be received.
  440. The basic work schedule for me is whenever I’m not doing anything more important, like taking care of my kids or something. So, it’s most of the day, five days a week, most evenings and sometimes on the weekends.
  441. The art editor in charge of the covers at the ‘New Yorker’ is Francoise Mouly. She’s very familiar with the eccentricities and personalities of cartoonists, so working with her is very easy.
  442. Readers often bring a different set of criteria to the work based on the format.
  443. On a very basic, concrete level, there have been times when my work, regardless of the content, has harmed relationships because I made that work such a primary priority in my life.
  444. Ninety percent of the time when I’m working, there’s this very palpable sensation that I’m doing everything wrong and should just give up.
  445. New York is a brutally expensive place to live, and the kind of person who might have the dedication and esoteric taste to make the comics that I would really love is finding it more relaxing to live elsewhere.
  446. My responsibility is to present things in a way that is realistic and true to the multifaceted world I’ve known… This is how I think the world is, not how it should be.
  447. My early comics are really reflective of being kind of a befuddled, single loser in the Bay Area, and I think having kids has been by far the most profound impact on me as a person and as an artist.
  448. My 20s were peaceful, privileged, but still I felt the desire to write angsty dramas.
  449. Most of my work – including everything from my own comics to the covers I’ve drawn for ‘The New Yorker’ – is the result of taking some personal experience or observation and then fictionalizing it to a degree.
  450. Most normal boys, as they’re growing up, they – in order to become attractive, they might, you know, get good at sports or join a rock band or develop good social skills, and for some reason, I thought that drawing comic books might be my route.
  451. It’s absolutely chilling to think that I’ve been working on a comic-book series called ‘Optic Nerve’ since I was sixteen.
  452. It’s a strange thing to be a so-called alternative cartoonist, because in the early part of my career, I was really tethered to the superhero world.
  453. In general, daily strips were just a regular part of my childhood. So even if I wasn’t a huge fan of most of those strips, I still read them religiously every morning while I ate my cereal.
  454. If anything, I feel a bit of pressure to write about less disenfranchised people, because I’d probably sell more books that way and would’ve already had some hot property that I could’ve sold to Hollywood.
  455. I’ve always published a range of responses to my work in the letters section of my comic book.
  456. I’ve always liked the tradition of publishing work serially in the comic-book ‘pamphlet’ format and then collecting that work in book form, so I’ve just stuck with it.
  457. I’m sometimes a cartoonist, and there’s an audience for that, and I’m sometimes an illustrator, and there’s an audience for that.
  458. I’m not the kind of person who would throw himself into some exciting or dangerous situation just to get material. So I tend to go about my normal, boring life and just try to look at things a little more closely.
  459. I’m not the best person to analyze any kind of evolution in my work, but I do feel like it’s been an ongoing struggle to basically teach myself how to tell the kinds of stories that interest me in comics form.
  460. I’m an unabashed fan of ‘The New Yorker.’ I do feel proud when I see my artwork in there.
  461. I’m always a little apprehensive about ‘decoding’ fictional stories.
  462. I’m Japanese, but restaurants in my hometown served the most sanitized versions of California rolls. I grew up eating a lot of Japanese food at home that my parents or grandparents made.
  463. I would honestly be elated if I could wave a magic wand and eradicate my back catalog and then have a fresh crack at some of those ideas.
  464. I was thinking about what it was like for my parents to have a strange kid with a hobby or a pursuit that maybe they weren’t that familiar with. It must have been a strange experience – nerve-wracking, in some ways.
  465. I was just taking my sketchbook to Kinko’s and making photocopies and hand-assembling them – folding them over and stapling them.
  466. I wanted to be as invisible as possible as an artist. I wanted to differentiate between myself and who I’m writing about.
  467. I used to live in Chris Rock’s former apartment. I’ve got some junk mail for him if he wants it.
  468. I think the response I get to one ‘New Yorker’ cover outweighs five books that I publish.
  469. I think that if you are looking at a comic that’s made by one person, that there’s just a level of intimacy that I don’t really see anywhere else.
  470. I think that artists, at a certain point, can either become defiant and say that the audience is wrong, readers don’t get them, and they’re going to keep doing it their own way, or they can listen to the criticism – and not necessarily blindly follow the audience’s requests and advice.
  471. I think having kids has been the biggest influence on my work since I started publishing.
  472. I think comics can be the basis for great films, but I think the focus of such a project should be on making the film as good as possible, not on painstakingly replicating the comic.
  473. I started publishing my comic while I was still living with my parents.
  474. I started my career so early and developed in print for better or for worse, so I think there’s a sense some of my earliest readers are kind of copilots on this voyage with me.
  475. I really love New York, but I have to say, the humidity during the summer is a nightmare for a cartoonist. Not only am I sweating in my studio, my bristol board is curling up, the drafting tape is peeling off the board, my Rapidograph pens bleed the minute I put them to paper… it’s a disaster.
  476. I never really thought of myself as an Asian-American cartoonist, any more than I thought of myself as a cartoonist who wears glasses.
  477. I love the idea of trying to do the work of old-fashioned novelists of plotting and of really making you curious about what’s going to happen next and all that, but also trying to load it up with your weird thoughts and opinions.
  478. I intentionally approached each story in ‘Killing and Dying’ in a different way, and that includes the writing process.
  479. I hated ‘Dilbert.’
  480. I had relatives who would go to Japan and bring back random stuff they bought at the airport or whatever – ‘Ultraman’ and ‘Speed Racer,’ stuff like that.
  481. I had a mundane, happy childhood, without much struggle.
  482. I grew up with a very romantic, idealized vision of New York, probably because of all the books I read and the movies I watched.
  483. I enjoy getting any kind of mail. Like, for me, like, the more interesting a letter is, I just get more excited, and I know that this going to be great for my friends who are looking forward to reading that in my comic.
  484. I don’t pick up my work at all. If it’s something that’s still in progress and I have the chance to make some edits on the material or think about the order, little things like that, I’ll keep those stories at hand and go through them. But once it exists as the book, it’s locked away in a vault, and I kind of put it behind me.
  485. I do think that many Americans have a limited view of what constitutes Japanese cartooning based on what gets translated, so it’s great to see an increase in diversity.
  486. Fortunately, I’ve never had to be too critical of my own work, because the world is critical enough.
  487. For a lot of the time I was in Berkeley, I was single. I was living in a kind of collegiate apartment by myself – it was like a protracted summer vacation. So at least in hindsight, I have gloomy emotions attached to Berkeley, whereas I started coming to New York because I was dating someone, and it was very exciting and romantic.
  488. For a long time, I was very resistant to the idea of online publication or even e-books or something like that.
  489. Even though I’m usually not conscious of it, I think drawing has always served a sort of therapeutic purpose in my life. There’s something about the process of translating the messy chaos of real life into a clean, simple drawing that’s always been comforting to me.
  490. All my stories take place on the West Coast – not the beach, but smaller inland towns. I feel homesick, and I find inspiration in capturing that.
  491. A lot of the qualities in ‘Killing and Dying’ is sort of a response to work I’d done previously. I wanted to push myself in some different directions.
  492. A lot of my fears come out in my work rather than life.
  493. ‘Shortcomings’ was me figuring out who I am.
  494. ‘Peanuts’ is a life-long influence, going back to before I could even read.
  495. ‘Drawn & Quarterly’ has always given me complete editorial control over my books and comics, so any decision about what to include or exclude from the book was my own.
  496. You could say that I am the Estee Lauder woman. I’m a working mother; time is valuable to me. I want a good product; I want quality.
  497. You can’t be a major company today without paying attention to celebrities. They are the leaders in beauty and fashion.
  498. When we moved to Europe when I was a teenager, I really did not want to go. I was happy in my school, with my friends, but looking back on it, it was the best experience I’ve ever had. We traveled every weekend. I experienced incredible new cultures, museums, cities, and it really opened up my eyes.
  499. When my boys were little, I’d throw so many toys at them, but they didn’t want to play with any. Then I’d give them a truck, and they would play for hours. I believe the same thing applies to a consumer – edit their choices, and they will be more intrigued.
  500. We have a house near East Hampton, and of all the beaches I’ve been to, I think there is something so beautiful about Long Island beaches. I love them in the fall and winter.
  501. There are certain parts of the home that I think embellishment feels cozy and inviting. Then there are other environments, for example, the living room, where I don’t have a ton of items on the table.
  502. The trends that last and the trends that are relevant are the ones that make you look pretty.
  503. The biggest beauty myth is that everyone looks better without makeup. That’s not true. Makeup is important.
  504. Sunday is about relaxing and wearing anything comfortable. I love wearing a J. Crew shirt and jeans, which is a treat because I never wear these kinds of clothes during the week.
  505. Rose is the most beautiful flower – it and tuberose are my favourites.
  506. People always associated me with ‘Vogue,’ ‘Vogue Living,’ or ‘Elle Decor.’
  507. My mother taught me that it is important to be prepared for a last-minute polish.
  508. My mom has always been kind of my backbone. She keeps me strong. She is a mother, a friend. She is really everything to me.
  509. My inspiration for new products comes from moments in my life or what’s happening around me.
  510. My grandmother had a lilac bush at her home in Long Island. I always associate the scent of it with her and try to have lilacs in my home.
  511. My day typically starts with an early-morning walk through Central Park. It’s a nice moment of calm before my routine starts.
  512. My actual first summer internship was in the design department of Clinique.
  513. Luxury is anything that feels special. I mean, it can be a moment, it can be a walk on the beach, it could be a kiss from your child, or it could be a beautiful picture frame, a special fragrance. I think luxury doesn’t necessarily have to mean expensive.
  514. Looking feminine is important to me. My personal style is fairly traditional. I was definitely influenced by my mother, who always looks elegant, and by Estee’s classic style; she was always in Givenchy or Ungaro.
  515. Just because something is on trend doesn’t mean you have to embrace it. You can look at it and admire it, but that doesn’t mean you have to wear black nail polish or red lipstick.
  516. It’s my personality to be more quiet and reserved. I’m not going out every night to multiple things. I prefer to stay in and be with my children and do Spanish homework to make sure they get a good grade the next day.
  517. It’s important to always mix the past with the present. I think that makes it feel more authentic and real.
  518. In terms of pots and pans, I just use the basics – I’m not a snob like that.
  519. If you’re on a night flight or are incredibly tired from jet lag, somehow a tiny bit of bronzer and self-tanner on your face, legs, and arms just makes you feel rejuvenated and refreshed.
  520. If you feel comfortable in what you’re wearing, you’ll look your best, and I think that’s a really important idea. Sometimes, whether it’s fashion or beauty, things are on-trend, and they look beautiful on the runway, but when I apply them to myself, it doesn’t look the way it should.
  521. I’ve always loved the beauty world. Ever since I was a child, I looked at magazines and wore fragrances and tried out samples and sets.
  522. I’ve always loved flowers, as a little girl I’d collect flower objects and little flower books. Now I love flowers on my night table and on my desk.
  523. I’ve always liked simple. Growing up, I wore corduroys and Lacoste shirts, Maraolo flats, and maybe one gold bracelet.
  524. I’ve always been inspired by beautiful interiors.
  525. I’m very detail-oriented, which is good and bad. Because I will wake up in the middle of the night thinking about something or seeing a mistake, thinking about it, and I immediately send an email – I’m very focused on details.
  526. I’m the only person who’s uninspired by the Starbucks mocha peppermint whatever-it-is.
  527. I’m never without my personalised Anya Hindmarch diary – I keep my schedule online, too, but my diary is always in my bag. It’s crammed Post-its.
  528. I’m definitely living my dream.
  529. I’m a very visual person, and I love opening beautiful books on art or design and looking through them.
  530. I wash my skin with Re-Nutrive Intensive Hydrating Skin Cleanser, no toner, and follow with the range’s Re-Nutrive Intensive Age-Renewal and Eye Creme.
  531. I usually keep my personal style simple and streamlined. I like classic colors like black, white, and beige. White and black is my favorite color combination, and I like to finish up my look with an accent of gold jewelry.
  532. I used to love a well-arranged room: the furniture, the fabric, the lighting.
  533. I used to be a shopper before I had children. I’d go to Bergdorf and Barneys all the time. But now my weekends are spent differently. I go to the skating rink or the park, not the stores.
  534. I think talented people are priceless. And I think people that are knowledgeable and experienced – and I think there’s a balance of new talent and experience, which makes, I think, Estee Lauder really special.
  535. I think people love having a person behind a brand who lives it. The idea of storytelling is really important.
  536. I think it is very important to learn to say ‘No.’ I think it is sometimes important for brands or the creative director to learn to say, ‘This might be on trend, but it is not right for us.’
  537. I think every woman should be using a foundation, whether it’s liquid or compact.
  538. I stick with what I know, makeup-wise.
  539. I never wear too much jewelry. I never wear a ton of pattern. Sometimes I’ll go big, but it never feels right.
  540. I love to decorate a room – from the furniture to the objects to the books.
  541. I love market research because you really have an idea of what your consumers are looking for.
  542. I love laugh lines. It means you’ve had a good life. The most beautiful women – Audrey Hepburn, Lauren Hutton, Ali MacGraw – all embraced the aging process.
  543. I love going to museums, especially the Met, because there’s always room for discovery, or the Neue Galerie. It’s a great jewel box.
  544. I love cereals. We must have 10 to 15 boxes. But if I’m being honest, I have Fruit Loops and Lucky Charms hidden behind the healthier ones.
  545. I love both real and fake jewelry. My kids make me necklaces, and I wear those, too. Every day, I wear my gold wedding band and the Cartier watch my husband gave me.
  546. I love Pilates, I really do, and I do it three times a week because it works well for me.
  547. I like to entertain at home, to live beautifully but comfortably.
  548. I leave work by 6:30 P.M. so I can spend some time with the children. Inevitably, we’ll end up watching basketball or football. I live in a house of boys, and they’re all sports mad, so I don’t stand a chance.
  549. I inherited my love of gold jewellery from my grandmother.
  550. I have always loved beauty and fashion. Some of my earliest memories are of being surrounded by fragrances and lipstick samples.
  551. I have a lot of staples in my wardrobe. I love to pair a silk or lace blouse with a fitted black pant. This combination feels effortless yet put together.
  552. I have a lot of passion. I have a lot of pride. I think I do get that from my family. But you can be driven and be nice.
  553. I have a dual role as founder of AERIN and Image and Style Director of Estee Lauder. So work is a bit of a juggling act.
  554. I don’t use a stylist. I know what I like, so I do it myself. I rip things out from fashion magazines. It’s easy to order when the phone number is right on the page.
  555. I discovered I was passionate about the creative process, the product development, creating a concept around a fragrance or lipstick.
  556. I came from a very corporate environment, but my own style is quite approachable, warm, and very detail oriented.
  557. I am such a bath girl: we’ve gone to some of the beautiful hotels in the world, and if there’s a shower, I’m so disappointed.
  558. Growing up in New York, I loved watching my grandmother Estee put on her make-up – I always admired her sense of style.
  559. Everyone always asks, ‘Did you ever rebel? Did you dye your hair blue? Did you wear black nail polish?’ I mean, of course, there have been episodes when you wear weird-colored lipstick… But generally, I think I was pretty much the way I am now.
  560. Even though beauty is very much my heritage, my real passion is accessories and home.
  561. Estee Lauder was my grandmother. She was an iconic and powerful woman, but to us, she was just Estee. She was the first person to teach me how important it is to be passionate and proud of what you do, and always talked about ‘balance.’
  562. Do I believe in plastic surgery? Yes, if something is wrong and you can modify it. For certain people, it’s right.
  563. As a girl, my favorite toy was my dollhouse; if I could still play with it now, I would!
  564. AERIN is saturated with the qualities that have surrounded me my entire life, many of which came from my grandmother, Estee: passion, style, hard work, family, and, of course, all things beautiful.
  565. A travel-size dry shampoo is the answer to many problems.
  566. When Mohamed Morsi was elected president of Egypt in 2012, many in the country, including me, were hopeful that he would become a democratic president for all Egyptians – not only for the Muslim Brotherhood.
  567. When I was a boy in Desuq, Egypt, a city on the Rosetta branch of the Nile, about 50 miles east of Alexandria, my family lived steps away from the local landmark, a mosque named for a 13th-century Sufi sheik.
  568. What the U.S. should do consistently is to support the liberty of the Egyptian people.
  569. We must nurture creative scientists in an environment that encourages interactions and collaborations across different fields, and support research free from weighty bureaucracies.
  570. There is no ‘master plan’ on the road to the Nobel Prize. It represents a lot of hard work, a passion for that work and… being in the right place at the right time. For me, that place was Caltech.
  571. There is little doubt that an unstable Syria will destabilize the whole Middle East.
  572. The youth movement is aware that old visions can not take Egypt into the future.
  573. The vast majority of Muslims are moderates working for a better future and seeking a peaceful life.
  574. The universe at large is full of questions that we still don’t know anything about, and there will be always young people, brilliant, who are going to make new discoveries.
  575. The soft power of science has the potential to reshape global diplomacy.
  576. The so-called Arab Spring has proved that the fall of a Mubarak-like presidency does not mean the immediate rise of democracy. In spite of this, I am confident that Egypt will not return to an authoritarian governing system again, and that, with some time, it will achieve its democratic goals.
  577. The partnership between the United States and Egypt is crucial to both countries, and it can’t be predicated on political manipulation and threats of withholding aid.
  578. The mosque was the neighbourhood house of worship, but it was also the place where my high school friends and I came to study.
  579. The family’s dream was to see me receive a high degree abroad and to return to become a university professor – on the door to my study room, a sign was placed reading ‘Dr. Ahmed,’ even though I was still far from becoming a doctor.
  580. The dream of my family was for me to be an educated person.
  581. The co-existence of religious values in the lives of individuals and secular rules in the governance of the state should be clearly defined.
  582. The U.S. can still maintain research institutions, such as Caltech, that are the envy of the world, yet it would be hubristic and naive to think that this position is sustainable without investing in science education and basic research.
  583. The Muslim Brotherhood and the Salifist parties are a real force in the Egyptian society. No civil, liberal government can succeed, even after new elections, if the Islamists are forced to work underground as a foe and the country remains divided.
  584. The Muslim Brotherhood and the Salifist parties are a real force in the Egyptian society.
  585. Syria may appear to be a small country, but it is just the type of entangled conflict that can lead to a world catastrophe. It does not take much imagination to see Syria as the Sarajevo of the 21st century, leading to world war.
  586. Syria is the proud heir of an ancient civilization that has a unique spectrum of minorities that encompasses Muslims and Christians of various denominations. There are at least ten such ethnic and religious groups.
  587. Some leaders think time will solve the problem. Their hope is that Assad’s regime will ultimately fall from the heavy toll of the horrors it has spawned. From past experience with such regimes, this scenario is unlikely to happen.
  588. Some consider the removal of Dr. Mohammed Morsi a coup by the army against an elected president. Others treat it as the second revolution, or the continuation of the January 25, 2011, revolution.
  589. Shortly after Sisi was elected, his administration announced cuts of ‘subsidies’ on natural gas and energy consumption and lowered those for bread and other goods. Such action was taboo during the Mubarak and Sadat presidencies for over half a century, but Sisi was able to convince Egyptians he was taking necessary action.
  590. Secularism will not work in Egypt any more than theocracy. What will work is governance that is guided by the Islamic values of the majority with protection of the minority rights.
  591. Reading was and still is my real joy.
  592. Personally, I have been enriched by my experiences in Egypt and America, and feel fortunate to have been endowed with a true passion for knowledge.
  593. Our femtosecond snapshots can examine a molecule at discrete instants in time.
  594. Once we understand how molecules are formed, we can manipulate them. If you can manipulate molecules, you can manipulate genes and matter, you can synthesize new material – the implications are just unbelievable.
  595. On the banks of the Nile, the Rosetta branch, I lived an enjoyable childhood in the City of Disuq, which is the home of the famous mosque, Sidi Ibrahim.
  596. On Sunday August 5, 2012, I was among a group of people who witnessed the Rover landing on Mars in real time at NASA’s Caltech-managed Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.
  597. Mubarak came to power as a hero who fought bravely in Egypt’s wars and headed the nation’s air force.
  598. Molecules A and B meet, marry, and beget the species. This takes place in one-millionth of a billionth of a second. This is a fundamental process in nature, and the world was looking for a way to be able to see the process. But many brilliant people said it couldn’t be done.
  599. Like everywhere in the world, people of the Middle East aspire to liberty and justice. They wish to have a better life and a decent education for their children.
  600. Let me put it this way: There is nothing in Islam that is fundamentally against the quest for knowledge.
  601. It turns out all molecular and biological systems have speeds of the atoms move inside them; the fastest possible speeds are determined by their molecular vibrations, and this speed is about a kilometre per second.
  602. It is true that Egypt’s attempt at democracy after the 2011 revolution encountered many obstacles in governance and infrastructure.
  603. Investment in education and economic prosperity is the best way to cure fanaticism and for establishing a just peace in the Middle East.
  604. Investing in science education and curiosity-driven research is investing in the future.
  605. In today’s world, America’s soft power is commonly thought to reside in the global popularity of Hollywood movies, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Starbucks.
  606. In the Middle East, it is clear that peace will never be reached without solving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. A two-state solution must be found and enforced.
  607. In the 1970s, what I, as a young foreign student studying in the United States, found most dynamic, exciting and impressive about this country is what much of the world continues to value most about the U.S. today: its open intellectual culture, its great universities, its capacity for discovery and innovation.
  608. In the 1960s, I personally lived the resounding impact of President Nasser’s vision of constructing Aswan’s High Dam as a ‘national project’ for controlling the Nile irrigation and the production of electricity.
  609. In addition to the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel, which is crucial to U.S. interests both domestically and in the Middle East, the U.S. has had and will continue to need Egypt’s collaboration in the war on terrorism.
  610. In adapting to life in the melting pot of America, I discovered that the same soft power of science has a huge influence in building bridges between cultures and religions – and has the potential to do so with the Muslim world.
  611. In Egypt, every family is suffering from the deteriorated schooling and university system of the Mubarak regime. What families want most of all is to secure a good education for their children.
  612. I’d rather have the influence than the power, and the influence to me is to build institutions of independence and democracy, to regain for Egypt prestige in education and science and technology.
  613. I think I succeeded in getting the Egyptian people excited about the importance of science, and this is the only way Egypt can get out of this dark ages.
  614. I teach at Caltech and oversee a research laboratory there. In general, I find that the majority of young people are excited by the prospects of research, but they soon discover that in the current market, many doctorate-level scientists are holding temporary positions or are unemployed.
  615. I left Egypt in 1969 for graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania. I have been on the faculty at Caltech for 37 years and carried dual citizenship for 31. But my commitment to the country of my birth never wavered.
  616. I discovered how science is truly a universal language, one that forges new connections among individuals and opens the mind to ideas that go far beyond the classroom.
  617. I can tell you that the majority of the Egyptians I know, they think of a much wider spectrum of people than the Muslim Brotherhood.
  618. I am not one of the new media experts working all the time with my computers and the PowerPoints and things of that sort.
  619. Human resources are just tremendous in Egypt, but we need the science base; we need the correct science base.
  620. Higher education should be based on quality, not quantity; receive merit-based funding; and be free of unnecessary bureaucracy. Not the least of the benefits of educational reform is to foster the pride of achievement at national and international levels.
  621. Growing up in Egypt, I never saw the country as divided as it is today. We now have two main political groupings: the Islamist parties and the civil, or liberal, political parties.
  622. From the dawn of history, science has probed the universe of unknowns, searching for the uniting laws of nature.
  623. For years, the West supported Mubarak and gave aid for what it hoped was stability – but was actually stagnation – in the Middle East.
  624. Everybody in the world is – is ready for liberty. It’s a question of how you do it.
  625. Every effort should be made to help build the new democratic nation with reconciliation and forgiveness, for the sake of Egypt and not for the benefit of a party or a group.
  626. Egypt was the first democracy in the Middle East. Women were unveiled in the 1920s. Egypt is a country of civilization, of culture. It shouldn’t be suffering.
  627. Egypt has great potential because of the latent power of its human capital.
  628. Egypt had the first constitution in the Middle East that allowed for liberty. And it had democracy.
  629. Egypt does not possess rich natural resources. Its agricultural area is relatively small – less than 10 per cent of the total land. Its growth relies on tourism, Suez Canal tariffs, and foreign investment.
  630. Despite differences of faith or even the occasional collisions between them, Egypt is united.
  631. Curiosity – the rover and the concept – is what science is all about: the quest to reveal the unknown.
  632. Besides being a prime cause of poor economic growth, poor governance breeds corruption, which cripples investment, wastes resources, and diminishes confidence.
  633. As someone from, and directly involved with, this part of the world, I am convinced Arabs are qualified to regain their glorious past.
  634. As recently as the September 11 event, the majority of Muslims were, as the rest of the world was, against its violence. However, if despair and humiliation continue in the population of more than one billion Muslims, the world will face increasing risks of conflicts and wars.
  635. As an instructor at Alexandria University, I did research that was published in international journals. Although I left to pursue a doctorate in the United States, it was not for want of a good life.
  636. As a cultural product of both ‘East’ and ‘West’, I do not believe there is a fundamental basis for a clash of civilisations, or that the West is the cause of all problems.
  637. As a boy, it was clear that my inclinations were toward the physical sciences. Mathematics, mechanics, and chemistry were among the fields that gave me a special satisfaction.
  638. America was and still is able to make the necessary changes to maintain research institutions that are the envy of the world.
  639. Although there exist in the world today some microbes of the soul, such as discrimination and aggression, science was and still is the core of progress for humanity and the continuity of civilization.
  640. Although the Nasser revolution of 1952 was secular, the culture remained deeply religious – but it was a faith of moderation and tolerance. Women made up nearly half my class at university, and my senior academic adviser there was a woman. In Alexandria, my friends were Christians and Muslims.
  641. After World War II, scientific research in the U.S. was well supported. In the 1960s, when I came to America, the sky was the limit, and this conducive atmosphere enabled many of us to pursue esoteric research that resulted in America winning the lion’s share of Nobel Prizes.
  642. A femtosecond is comparable to one second in 32 million years. It is like watching a 32-million-year movie to see one second.
  643. When I was a teenager, the actors I was really into were Mickey Rourke and Sean Penn. I saw ‘Rumble Fish’ on my 16th birthday, and around the same time, it was ‘Falcon and the Snowman’ and ‘Bad Boys’ from Sean Penn.
  644. To start, I wasn’t really interested in acting at all, and I didn’t make much impact. The first play I was in was on for five nights and I didn’t show up for two of them and nobody noticed. But I stayed because that’s where my friends were, and after a while I found myself wanting to inhabit other people’s worlds and lives.
  645. There’s no way the writing staff of ‘Game of Thrones’ haven’t read ‘The Art of War.’ There’s definitely an influence on ‘Game of Thrones’ from this book in both a general way and on the character of Lord Baelish and his strategies.
  646. There’s a lot of ‘Game of Thrones’ stuff used in a lot of pastiches. I don’t know if I’ve seen a Lego ‘Game of Thrones’ yet, but there must be one. And there’s an animated thing that’s been going on for quite some time, and Littlefinger is a newsreader in it, and it’s great.
  647. There was a year between school and getting going as an actor when I basically just watched films. Video shops were the new thing, and there was a good one round the corner and me and my brother just watched everything, from the horror to the European art-house.
  648. The first time I played a killer, in the 1997 film ‘Mojo,’ I went to my local video shop and got out a video of real executions and a history of the Third Reich. The guy in the shop was giving me a look. I thought this would help, but I don’t think it made any difference, and I don’t want to see any more executions.
  649. So-called reality TV, which dominates British channels, is destroying what made it cherishable to me and lots of others in the first place. I loved Alan Clarke, Ken Loach and Alan Bleasdale’s work. In fact the first TV dramas I ever saw were ‘Screen Twos’ produced by David Thompson, who also produced a lot of Alan Clarke.
  650. People say ‘The Wire’s bleak, y’know, but I see it as a love letter to Baltimore, and it’s one written in a very strange and complex way.
  651. My own rapping skills are quite good, actually. You get this thing, I think it’s called Songify or AutoRap, and you talk into them, and they auto-tune it and make it into a quite interesting musical number. And I got one where it builds it into a rap.
  652. It’s nice to have a few names. I use a few names myself. I use a few different surnames. I call myself James sometimes. I actually use my mother’s name as a professional name. But if someone calls me Mr. Murphy or Mr. Gillen, I don’t like that. I don’t like being called ‘mister,’ and I don’t like being called ‘sir.’
  653. It’s always more interesting to take on someone that’s going to have hidden sides or a fatal flaw, because there’s going to be more to play with – more conflict, internally or in and around them – but it’s probably the thing of finding the positive in there.
  654. It’s always a good idea to let the audience make up their own minds.
  655. It seems to me that most characters, in anything, are flawed in some way, just like most people. You look for the good in the flawed people and vice versa, and then try and make them appealing in some way.
  656. It might take me an hour to get to feel at ease with somebody. I don’t find it easy to go into a room full of 10 people and give it all away. In the pilot season in Los Angeles I’ve done that a couple of times.
  657. In drama you can either pretend everything is OK, or you can show the world as it really is in the hope that it gets better.
  658. I’ve probably had my best time acting – or not acting, or trying to not act – on things like ‘The Low Down’ or ‘Treacle Jr.’ I’m happiest doing things like that. Not just because they’re lead roles, but because there’s more freedom in them.
  659. I’ve made a point of trying not to play the same part, and of moving between theatre and film and TV. The idea is that by the time you come back, you have been away for a year and people have forgotten you. If you like having time off, which I do, that’s a good career strategy.
  660. I’ve made a point of trying not to play the same part and of moving between theatre and film and TV. The idea is that by the time you come back, you have been away for a year, and people have forgotten you. If you like having time off, which I do, that’s a good career strategy. Or at least, it’s my strategy to keep my head together.
  661. I’ve enjoyed working on the TV series that I’ve worked on, in particular something like ‘The Wire,’ where there was so much time to tell the story and develop a character. I learned from that that it’s best not to lay all your cards on the table straight away.
  662. I’m always attracted to bold, risk-taking scripts.
  663. I’d quite like to do a musical. I’d probably have to develop that myself.
  664. I try to keep my integrity. I don’t want to be in ‘Hello!’ or on ‘Celebrity Big Brother.’
  665. I suppose there are actors who are worried about their public image. But I’ve never had any trouble playing unpleasant characters. It is only a part. Which is why you do it -because you are interested in exploring something you never could or would be.
  666. I really like coming-of-age dramas. It’s probably the most intense period in anyone’s life, those years before you become an adult. Dramatically, there’s so much to explore there. And it’s nice to be around young talent coming through.
  667. I myself started out quite young; when you’re working, professionally, even if you are in your teens, you just want to be treated the same as everybody else. You just want people to see you as an actor and not as a kid.
  668. I like the Edinburgh Film Festival, and I’ve liked what I’ve experienced of Glasgow’s Film Festival too.
  669. I hope it’s not all I’ll ever do, but I know I’ve played enigmatic characters. For me, the good characters are people who get places, are devious, are cunning and tricky and hard to pin down. Obviously, if you play one and you do an okay job of it, that’ll be on people’s minds.
  670. I heat myself up over the fact that I am never going to be as good as I want to be.
  671. I have been in control of what I’ve been doing, of the career I’ve put together.
  672. I have Googled myself, yeah, I think everybody has. I try not to make a habit of it – in fact I made a rule once never to Google myself, which made me happy.
  673. I hate it when people tell you you’re good when you know that you’re not.
  674. I find still photographs make me quite self-conscious.
  675. I don’t really differentiate between different genres: if there’s a good part going, I’ll go after it, and it’s preferable to me if it’s something I haven’t done before.
  676. I don’t like DVD extras. No. Especially when they do things like put out alternative endings? I find all of that a little bizarre, because there should only be one ending. I don’t like to be told, ‘Oh, we could have had it this way,’ for the director’s cut.
  677. I don’t do a lot of reflecting. I’m usually about getting on with it.
  678. I do what I can, but I’ll always give it a shot. You’re not going to see me playing a Welsh character any time soon, not because I wouldn’t love to. I went up to Wales once and read for a film with Rhys Ifans, and haven’t been asked back since. We did have a nice time on the train on the way back.
  679. I do consider how I spend my time off carefully because I’ve got two kids.
  680. I didn’t want to go to college or work in an office or have a nine-to-five job. I knew that quite clearly before I left school.
  681. I can read people, and if the other person doesn’t want to say anything, I’m fine with that. People say things when it’s time to say them.
  682. For me, now, working and children is it. There’s nothing more to life.
  683. Everything’s borne out of human experience, of course – rejection, humiliation, poverty, whatever. People aren’t born bad, no matter how harsh the circumstances. There is a person in there, and that person is not made of ice.
  684. Every couple of years – no, that’s every couple of weeks – I think I’m going to give up acting.
  685. Both ‘The Wire’ and ‘Queer as Folk’ had a big scope. They were panoramas, telling ambitious stories about two cities, Baltimore and Manchester, for the first time.
  686. Becoming a father has made my life a lot more interesting. It’s like everything slows down because time goes slower, and you notice that you’re actually awake for so many more hours. Your waking hours elongate because you’re doing things at a child’s pace.
  687. Because work takes up a lot of time, you have to choose your moments for really letting rip. I hang out with my friends and my family and I spend time with my kids when I’m not working. They don’t see my being an actor as exotic. For them, it’s just an everyday thing. Sometimes it’s amusing to them and other times, embarrassing.
  688. ‘You’re Ugly Too’ isn’t a comedy, but it has a lightness of touch with a hard edge. But it’s essentially a warm story tinged with a bit of melancholy in the great Irish tradition. I’m very proud of that film.
  689. ‘Heroes’, ‘Desperate Housewives’, ‘The Sopranos’ – they’re all very stylised. ‘The Wire’ is much more rooted in realism and honesty. In American television, I can’t think of anything I’d rather have been in because it has got something to say and that is the kind of thing I want to do.
  690. You can see God from anywhere if your mind is set to love and obey Him.
  691. We have learned to live with unholiness and have come to look upon it as the natural and expected thing.
  692. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum.
  693. The devil is a better theologian than any of us and is a devil still.
  694. The Word of God well understood and religiously obeyed is the shortest route to spiritual perfection. And we must not select a few favorite passages to the exclusion of others. Nothing less than a whole Bible can make a whole Christian.
  695. Salvation is from our side a choice, from the divine side it is a seizing upon, an apprehending, a conquest by the Most High God. Our ‘accepting’ and ‘willing’ are reactions rather than actions. The right of determination must always remain with God.
  696. Refuse to be average. Let your heart soar as high as it will.
  697. One hundred religious persons knit into a unity by careful organizations do not constitute a church any more than eleven dead men make a football team. The first requisite is life, always.
  698. Man appears for a little while to laugh and weep, to work and play, and then to go to make room for those who shall follow him in the never-ending cycle.
  699. In almost everything that touches our everyday life on earth, God is pleased when we’re pleased. He wills that we be as free as birds to soar and sing our maker’s praise without anxiety.
  700. If God gives you a watch, are you honoring Him more by asking Him what time it is or by simply consulting the watch?
  701. An infinite God can give all of Himself to each of His children. He does not distribute Himself that each may have a part, but to each one He gives all of Himself as fully as if there were no others.
  702. An idol of the mind is as offensive to God as an idol of the hand.
  703. ‘Let God be true but every man a liar’ is the language of true faith.
  704. You have to get under the hood and spend some quality time with someone to understand what they’re really good at.
  705. You can’t get into the trap of paying for customer acquisition.
  706. Women are thought to be more social, more interested in relationships and connections, better at multi-tasking.
  707. Women are the routers and amplifiers of the social web. And they are the rocket fuel of ecommerce.
  708. Women are going to be a huge force in developing Web and mobile companies.
  709. Why do investors seem to care about ‘billion dollar exits?’ Historically, top venture funds have driven returns from their ownership in just a few companies in a given fund of many companies.
  710. When companies are private, founders can share more about their future dreams with investors; report less; and the shares are illiquid, constraining short-term changes in valuation.
  711. When I was growing up, I had lots of smart classmates that were girls, but none of us were really pushed into math or computers or anything like that. Girls took AP history and AP English and AP European history. And boys took calculus and physics.
  712. When I go visit my mom in the retirement community where my parents live, she has a bunch of friends, and she will say, ‘These neighbors I play bridge with have a son with an idea,’ and it goes from there.
  713. What’s the word to describe the thing that all of us are trying to do, which is to found or work for or invest in a company that is the winner of all winners?
  714. What is social proof? Put simply, it’s the positive influence created when someone finds out that others are doing something. It’s also known as informational social influence.
  715. We’re in this incredible age where new brands are making people’s lives easier, more convenient, more personalized.
  716. We used to tie-dye T-shirts and sell them to classmates. We used to make egg rolls and sell them at street fairs. I worked at the mall. My parents probably spent more money on the gas driving me to different jobs than I made.
  717. Top creative and innovative talent wants to live in a vibrant, transit-friendly, global city that offers access to not only great jobs but also great food, entertainment and culture.
  718. There’s an opportunity to make your board – and your company – smarter by adding diversity, especially of gender.
  719. There needs to be more deliberate effort on the part of folks at VC firms to bring in a more diverse team of talent. You have to make a more concerted effort to bring in people who are different and who may not be in your network.
  720. There is very little diversity among founders in the Unicorn Club.
  721. There are so many people who try so hard and have such big dreams, and it doesn’t happen for them.
  722. There are not many people from top-tier venture capital firms who are focused on the seed stage.
  723. There are a lot of benefits to having a team of young people, but there are many benefits to having people who’ve made a lot of mistakes.
  724. The world is diverse, and having a professional team that mirrors the world is going to be more helpful for us.
  725. The role and importance of females in companies can make a big difference.
  726. The reality is that in a tech environment that is 90 percent to 100 percent male, it’s not super-encouraging for females to be successful. It’s just a lot of things that contribute to that: things that people do or things that people say that they may not realize have unintended consequences.
  727. The question for Dropbox is whether, when they run out of private sources for funding, they will be able to maintain that valuation when they go to public sources for funding and their valuation is set on the public markets.
  728. Super early-stage companies have a village that form around them for support.
  729. Starting a company and being a founder is really hard, and most companies fail. You really have to have a deep commitment and belief in it and be willing to see it through many ups and downs.
  730. Starbucks did this magical thing where it took a product that people didn’t really care that much about and made it this treat. It makes you feel better about your day and gives you a chance to reflect, makes you feel a little special.
  731. Spend the first six to 12 months building a great product or service that people love, rather than chasing investors. When the time comes to engage investors, you will be meeting them from a position of strength. This makes all the difference.
  732. Some investors may grumble about entrepreneurs wanting ‘unicorn valuations.’ But let’s be honest: most investors want them, too, and are supporting the massive capitalization of these companies.
  733. Some companies are worth paying for up front.
  734. Sequoia is a firm that a lot of people across tech and the Valley look to, and I think they’re setting an important example in adding new diversity to their team.
  735. Seed stage is an investment area that is really important for early stage startups. It feels like there is a need for trusted, experienced people to work with and to guide startups at this level.
  736. Savvy companies are quietly changing up their boards of directors and teams, and this is giving them better collective intelligence, more community admiration, and better financial results.
  737. Relative to all the start-ups out there, getting a valuation of $1 billion is rarely accomplished.
  738. Over the long term, there will be many more billion-dollar technology companies than there are today.
  739. My dad was a dentist; my mom managed his office.
  740. Most VC firms are looking to bring in women because of the great consumer cycle.
  741. Many entrepreneurs, and the venture investors who back them, seek to build billion-dollar companies.
  742. Male founders who come across as Type B are more likely to get the benefit of the doubt.
  743. It’s not that I am saying that women and men are completely different. But I do think that if you are one of the only people around the table who is a woman, by definition, you’re different.
  744. It’s awesome that you have a female CFO and a female GC, but if you look at the investing partners, and it’s 15 dudes, I do think those people are going to get left behind if they don’t get with where the world is going.
  745. In the future, the best retail sites will know you much better and show you things that are much more relevant.
  746. Immigrants play a huge role in the founding and value creation of today’s tech companies. We wonder how much more value could be created if it were easier to get a work visa.
  747. If you’re looking to grow your user base, is there a best way to cost-effectively attract valuable users? I’m increasingly convinced the best way is by harnessing a concept called social proof, a relatively untapped gold mine in the age of the social web.
  748. If you’re a digital startup, building and highlighting your social proof is the best way for new users to learn about you.
  749. If someone was having some surgery that was going to put them out for three months, it’s something you should consider, with a man or a woman. What is the impact of having the C.E.O. or visionary out for three months?
  750. If a firm hasn’t hired a single female partner in its history, I don’t think it will finally happen by accident.
  751. I’ve learned that you really cannot judge a book by its cover.
  752. I’m a huge believer in power of women on the web.
  753. I’m a first-born child of a Chinese immigrant family, I grew up on the East Coast. And I have to admit, I did not grow up around technology.
  754. I work with tiny companies, so I don’t really live in unicorn world, to be honest.
  755. I was ringside for Amazon and Google.
  756. I think, from a woman’s perspective, that my interest as an investor and the way that I relate to entrepreneurs is a little bit different.
  757. I think there are many things that we can do today to make it a better work environment that is more supportive and encouraging of diversity.
  758. I think it’s embarrassing for our industry that we have such low diversity across senior-level management at all of the mainstream, top-tier venture capital firms.
  759. I really have become very interested at working with and helping entrepreneurs at the early stages of their growth.
  760. I played with different words like ‘home run,’ ‘megahit,’ and they just all sounded kind of ‘blah.’ So I put in ‘unicorn’ because they are – these are very rare companies in the sense that there are thousands of startups in tech every year, and only a handful will wind up becoming a unicorn company. They’re really rare.
  761. I have a tremendous network of friends and colleagues at other firms.
  762. I grew up in New Jersey and played sports and rode my bike around. It was a really nice time – kids didn’t have cellphones then – and you knew everyone in the town.
  763. I did not grow up thinking that I wanted to be an engineer. I had read some articles about girls becoming increasingly scientifically illiterate and that girls lacked confidence in their capabilities when it came to quantitative skills. And I just thought that was kind of wrong.
  764. I appreciate the sacrifices my dad made. I went to a great public high school.
  765. I am committed to ensuring San Francisco remains a center for tech and the innovation capital of the world.
  766. History suggests the 2010s will give rise to a super-unicorn or two that reflect the key tech wave of the decade, the mobile web.
  767. Having been a venture-backed CEO, and having an established background in working with consumer-focused companies, I’ve built a strong network of entrepreneurs and people who can help startups.
  768. From a pretty early age, I developed an interest in travel. I told my parents I wanted to live abroad, and they said, ‘Well, you have to have money to do those things.’
  769. Female users are the unsung heroines behind the most engaging, fastest growing, and most valuable consumer Internet and e-commerce companies.
  770. Especially when it comes to social and shopping, women rule the Internet.
  771. Each major wave of technology innovation has given rise to one or more super-unicorns – companies that could change your life to work at or invest in if you’re not lucky/genius enough to be a co-founder.
  772. Consider the social proof of a line of people standing behind a velvet rope, waiting to get into a club. The line makes most people walking by want to find out what’s worth the wait. The digital equivalent of the velvet rope helped build viral growth for initially invite-only launches like Gmail, Gilt Groupe, Spotify, and Turntable.fm.
  773. Comscore, Nielsen, MediaMetrix and Quantcast studies all show women are the driving force of the most important net trend of the decade, the social web.
  774. A lot of the entrepreneurs and founders have big dreams and are on a mission to build things that the world has never seen before.
  775. Writing can be a frightening, distressing business, and whatever kind of structure or buffer is available can help a lot.
  776. When language is treated beautifully and interestingly, it can feel good for the body: It’s nourishing; it’s rejuvenating.
  777. There’s a spectrum of those moments of connection and the moments we fail to connect, going from super-large successes to failures. Success would be love, I guess, and failure could still be love, but the bad side; and loss.
  778. Some creative writing programs seem evil, but my experience at Irvine was totally the opposite, where I feel like they were really good at focusing in on each writers voice and setting. When I felt like I was obligated to write a story that was more typical, no one really liked it.
  779. One thing I don’t want to feel is marketplace pressure, so I’m really glad I enjoy teaching because I can rely on that for a salary. I think it would be such a different game if I had to write a book that has to sell well.
  780. Novels are so much unrulier and more stressful to write. A short story can last two pages and then it’s over, and that’s kind of a relief. I really like balancing the two.
  781. Large meadows are lovely for picnics and romping, but they are for the lighter feelings. Meadows do not make me want to write.
  782. Language is the ticket to plot and character, after all, because both are built out of language.
  783. In terms of foods for me, I think I have more of the usual associations – foods from childhood that I associate with care and love, from relatives or special restaurants like the kind elderly man who dusted seasoning salt on French fries at the corner burger joint.
  784. I’m obsessed with adolescence. I love to write about people in their 20s. It’s such a fraught and exciting and kind of horrible time.
  785. I write on a very strict 2-hour-a-day schedule, and I really respond to structure and invented rules. So even if I’m finding out good information on a character, I will stop when I’m set to stop.
  786. I think teaching keeps me honest because if I’m up in front of a class talking about what I think is important about fiction while knowing I myself have just failed to do that hours earlier at my computer – it’s a good and humbling reminder.
  787. I really like feeling connected to people and feeling like I have a good, solid sense of empathy.
  788. I noticed, when I taught elementary school, how true the squeaky wheel thing is, and how endearing squeaky wheels can be! Because when you’re being a squeaky wheel, you’re also really letting people know who you are.
  789. I love the idea of numerology, but I don’t really believe in it. But I like thinking about what numbers convey.
  790. I love food. I’m not a great cook, but I love to cook, and I like how different it is from writing.
  791. I love all the arts – so museums, theatre, music, walks near trees or by the ocean, time with people, psychological readings.
  792. I liked Hans Christian Andersen because the tales were so dark and tragic.
  793. I like the idea of a place that is dealing with painful, messy, frightening, and very human events that is also so beautiful and ethereal.
  794. I like birthday cake. It’s so symbolic. It’s a tempting symbol to load with something more complicated than just ‘Happy birthday!’ because it’s this emblem of childhood and a happy day.
  795. I have trouble describing my own style, since it’s sort of like describing my own eye color or something.
  796. I get a little myopic in the act of doing any writing. I think I’m not as interested or not as able to write about balance, because I think there’s something I want to try to get at. I’m trying to get at something about the experience of growing up or about families.
  797. I find I can write for two lines, and then I have nothing else to say. For me, the only way to find something comes through the sentence level and sticking with the sentences that give a subtle feeling that there’s something more to say.
  798. I don’t eschew autobiographical writing, but I’m not interested in mine to be so straightforward. The things that tend to move me the most are often those that I have to figure out its meaning for myself. The human being’s ability to make a metaphor to describe a human experience is just really cool.
  799. I did plays in college, and I have half of a play. But I’m kind of stuck. I keep revisiting it so maybe it will move somewhere. There’s something about plays where you can feel that sense of artifice at any moment.
  800. Granted, I’m someone who loves words. I’ve always loved poetry – so it’s suited to me.
  801. Generally, I think most of my writing tends to have some kind of magical element to it. That’s the way I can access the emotional life of the character.
  802. For me, even in my first book, the pleasures of writing anything magical is that it has to be physical. It has to be grounded and very much in this world. Then, I get to play with all the consequences of this new thing.
  803. For me as a person, friendships are incredibly important to me, but in writing, they can distract me.
  804. At readings, audience members sometimes ask if I keep writing past the two hours if I’m on a roll, but I don’t. I figure that if I’m on a roll, it’s partially because I know I’m about to stop.
  805. As a kid, I often figured it was good to be patient to a fault.
  806. As a kid, I liked making up stories, and I wrote a story about a kangaroo and a bat with Christy Chang, and she went on to become a surgeon.
  807. You know, I think there are certain words like ‘illegitimate’ that should not be used to describe a person. And certainly, we have come far enough in our technology that our language can evolve, because it has an impact.
  808. With L’Oreal, I get to be Aimee Mullins, model. No qualifier. And that means everything to me.
  809. Whether it is your height, your weight or your skin, someone is going to pick on something and make fun of it. My legs were just a more obvious target.
  810. When I’m curious about something, I do it full on and take it as far as I go, but when I feel like I’ve really explored it, I’m OK with putting it aside and going on to something else.
  811. When I watch ‘Mad Men’ and I see the patronising attitudes to women that are so shocking for all of us to watch now, I feel that I’ve lived and see the same evolution in this regard around disability.
  812. We all bullet point our triumphs, but I am who I am because of everything you don’t see on my CV. The stuff that doesn’t work out teaches you how to trust your instincts and adapt.
  813. Walking the runway with Alexander McQueen, I really had to dig deep. You’re with Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell. I was the first person out on the runway, but I thought, ‘I have done the Olympics, I can do this.’
  814. True beauty is when someone radiates that they like themselves.
  815. The legs that I have made are far more perfect than the ones nature would have given me – my mother’s side of the family have awful legs.
  816. The idea of prosthetics is a tool. Most people’s cell phones are prosthetics. If you leave your cell phone at home, you feel impacted by not having it. It’s an important part of your daily function and what you can do in a day.
  817. The flesh and bone leg is just beautiful. It’s elegant. You know, when it’s working, it’s incredible. But if it’s not working, well, you know, your life is certainly far from over.
  818. The best beauty secret, besides sleep and plenty of water, is do whatever it is – before you go out, before you need to feel beautiful – do whatever makes you feel confident. If it’s putting on a great dance record and rocking out in your apartment, do it. If kissing someone for 10 minutes makes you feel confident, do it.
  819. The Pentagon isn’t a place that champions individuality and innovation.
  820. Sure, I’d love to have children some day. But world domination comes first.
  821. People presume my disability has to do with being an amputee, but that’s not the case; our insecurities are our disabilities, and I struggle with those as does everyone.
  822. Part of the reason I wanted to model was to push the boundaries and challenge the perceptions of what a beautiful body is supposed to look like. Why should I feel any differently about looking good than anyone else?
  823. Pamela Anderson has more prosthetic in her body than I do. Nobody calls her disabled.
  824. My varying pairs of legs can be quite practical or quite impractical, and I don’t judge them either way. Some are for getting around a 12-hour day, pounding the pavement, and some are to feel like I can transform my own body into a workable, changing piece of art.
  825. Life is about making your own happiness – and living by your own rules.
  826. Kids are naturally curious about what they don’t know, or don’t understand, or what is foreign to them. They only learn to be frightened of those differences when an adult influences them to behave that way and censors that natural curiosity.
  827. It’s society that disables an individual by not investing in enough creativity to allow for someone to show us the quality that makes them rare and valuable and capable.
  828. It’s hard enough for women to walk on high heels. And I’m on stilts!
  829. It’s factual to say I am a bilateral-below-the-knee amputee. I think it’s subjective opinion as to whether or not I am disabled because of that. That’s just me.
  830. In sports, I refused to do any interviews that were just going to become human-interest stories. Don’t turn me into a tragic heroine.
  831. In athletics, the idea of possibility is presumed. It’s not ‘if;’ it’s ‘how.’
  832. If you’re an athlete and you completely focus on the body, you’re missing other components. Similarly, if you’re trying to broaden your mind but not also being attentive to your sense of humour and your spirit, then you’re not going to grow and develop so fast.
  833. If you would ask me at 15 years old if I would have traded prosthetics for flesh and bone legs, I wouldn’t have hesitated for a second. I aspired to that kind of normalcy back then. But if you ask me today, I’m not so sure.
  834. If you watch any John Hughes film of the eighties, that was my childhood experience.
  835. If we want to discover the full potential in our humanity, we need to celebrate those heartbreaking strengths and those glorious disabilities we all have. It is our humanity and all the potential within it that makes us beautiful.
  836. I’ve said this before, but I believe more than ever that confidence is sexier than any body part.
  837. I’ve had journalists asking me, ‘What do we call you – is it handicapped, are you disabled, physically challenged?’ I said, ‘Well hopefully you could just call me Aimee. But if you have to describe it, I’m a bilateral below-the-knee amputee.’
  838. I’m not running around as a continual ray of sunshine. It’s just I don’t believe in wasting time feeling sorry for myself. Get over it.
  839. I’m not an advocate for disability issues. Human issues are what interest me. You can’t possibly speak for a diverse group of people. I don’t know what it’s like to be an arm amputee, or have even one flesh-and-bone leg, or to have cerebral palsy.
  840. I’m not an advocate for disability issues. Human issues are what interest me.
  841. I’ll be giving a speech at the randomest place, like a bank or something, and a guy in a suit will say, ‘I’m totally freaked out that I’m talking to the girl from ‘Cremaster.’ For the rest of my life, that movie will be playing in a museum somewhere. I never could have expected that huge response.
  842. I was once told that I had become too confident and that it made me less likeable. Many successful people will get this at some point, because the people who haven’t followed a similar path can be threatened by someone who has and is unabashed about it.
  843. I want to be a Bond girl. Think about it – I have metal components in my legs, so when I go through airport security, I set off the alarms. But when they realize why I’m beeping, they let me through. What if I had weapons in my legs? I could take one off and pull out an Uzi! Legs Galore – that would be me!
  844. I think that everyone has something about themselves that they feel is their weakness… their ‘disability.’ And I’m certain we all have one, because I think of a disability as being anything which undermines our belief and confidence in our own abilities.
  845. I like that Pilates compromises the mind and body. It’s not just about being able to run around the block a few times. It’s about alleviating stress and controlling breathing. It’s about being balanced.
  846. I like it now when kids stare at me, because it is a way of starting a dialogue. And it is far better than them not looking at you at all. Nothing is worse than not being seen.
  847. I haven’t had an easy life, but at some point, you have to take responsibility for yourself and shape who it is that you want to be. I have no time for moaners. I like to chase my dreams and surround myself with other people who are chasing their dreams, too.
  848. I have learned not to overlook the advantages of being me. From when I was a softball player, and I held the stolen bases record. I would slide into second with my prostheses, and the girl on the base could either step aside or meet two wooden sticks.
  849. I have found great power in taking my ‘difference’ out for a spin in a very public way. And usually, the worst, most personally embarrassing thing you imagine in your mind is often not anywhere near as bad in real life.
  850. I hate the words ‘handicapped’ and ‘disabled’. They imply that you are less than whole. I don’t see myself that way at all.
  851. I had a paper round and every night I would put the dinner on before Mum came home from work. I was capable because I had to be.
  852. I grew up in a town with a great wrestling tradition. Then I was a team sport queen in high school; I played softball, volleyball, and soccer. Oh, and I also did ski racing.
  853. I don’t know what it’s like to be an arm amputee, or have even one flesh-and-bone leg, or to have cerebral palsy. I don’t speak for such huge and diverse groups. What I’ve tried to do, what I’ve been fortunate to do, is to live my live and create my life as I’ve wanted to create it.
  854. I didn’t want to be written about as a human-interest story. I didn’t want to be a passing thing. You know, now we move on to the fat girl who had her stomach stapled. I didn’t want to become a gimmick: the disabled model.
  855. I didn’t see how wearing prosthetics was quite so different from being born with flaming red hair in a crowd of black-haired babies, or being of a different religion from that of every other child in your area.
  856. Giving up is conceding that things will never get better, and that is just not true. Ups and downs are a constant in life, and I’ve been belted into that roller coaster a thousand times.
  857. For me, I never ever felt the ownership or any identity with any community of disabilities. I didn’t grow up being told that I was a disabled child.
  858. Belief in oneself is incredibly infectious. It generates momentum, the collective force of which far outweighs any kernel of self-doubt that may creep in.
  859. Beauty is not skin-deep; it can be a means of self-affirmation, a true indicator of personality and confidence.
  860. At some point in every person’s life, you will need an assisted medical device – whether it’s your glasses, your contacts, or as you age and you have a hip replacement or a knee replacement or a pacemaker. The prosthetic generation is all around us.
  861. Adversity isn’t an obstacle that we need to get around in order to resume living our life. It’s part of our life.
  862. A lot of my life is about will – having the will to prove what my body can do.
  863. A couple of years ago, I had my DNA sequencing done, and it is all anonymous. When the results came back, my musculature type said, ‘most likely to be a sprinter.’
  864. ‘Triumph over tragedy’ – how pathetic! I think people are generally freaked out that I’m multifaceted. You don’t hear people saying, ‘Gwyneth Paltrow won an Oscar – and she’s blonde!’
  865. You rarely see women being nice to each other on television anymore.
  866. You know, it’s about getting out there and having a good time. Not about worrying – all these young books for women are like I’m 29 with a closet full of Prada shoes and I can’t get a date. Come on.
  867. You know, I read graphic novels but not encyclopedically.
  868. You can’t control where you were born, the family you were born into, what you look like; you can’t control any of those circumstances. The only thing you can control is how you react.
  869. Yes, I do get recognized in public. It’s pretty nice.
  870. Wounds turn into scars and scars make you tough.
  871. When I get old and slow down I want to look behind me and see all the fire and the wreckage and no stone left unturned.
  872. We were poor. My mother got our clothes out of the free box at the church, you know? So much of when you’re a kid is about relating about what you watch on TV. And who’s got these cooler shoes, and ‘Let’s trade lunches.’ And I was just like, ‘I don’t have a television. I have a rock and a piece of tofu.’
  873. There’s a part of every person that is entertained by the idealistic, the fantastic.
  874. There’s a clock ticking on the pregnancy thing, but not a clock ticking on adoption.
  875. The whole principle of coming out is that everyone knows someone who’s gay. The minute someone comes out, no one can be a bigot, because someone they love is gay.
  876. The only way I was going to be funny was if I was myself, and either you liked it, or you didn’t. Either you got on my train, or you didn’t. Freeing myself of this idea that I had to fit a certain mold was when I was able to be my funniest.
  877. The only concept or experience or core belief that I can attribute my other-ness to is that I just started out a weirdo and I stayed a weirdo. And it took me a long time to embrace my outsidership and see it as a strength rather than a weakness.
  878. The more people who come forward and talk about how much they love gaming, how much they talk about individuality and diversity, the more gamers of color that come out and gay gamers that come out and everybody talking about what they love – that’s what the community has in common: a love of gaming.
  879. The City gets more and more beautiful every time I come home.
  880. Sunday is like this entertainment scrum for me, because I’ve only got a day, one day of fun. So I want to have brunch, and I want to see a movie, and I want to watch ‘Game of Thrones,’ and I’m trying to watch ‘The Sopranos’ from the beginning, and I want to play four hours of video games. So, it’s, like, as regimented as my work life.
  881. Success is not the absence of failure; it’s the persistence through failure.
  882. Standup comedy is inordinately difficult. If doing something else for a living will make you equally happy, choose that instead. I’m serious. Comedy is punishing.
  883. So much of a stand-up’s life is doing live radio and having to be funny and quick on the spot with these strangers, and sort of surgical in terms of how funny I can be in three minutes.
  884. Pursuit of perfection is futile. Instead, I prioritize and often realize goals or tasks I’ve been aiming for just aren’t that important.
  885. Pop culture is great, but it can be bad, at times.
  886. Pop culture hales you and wants you to fail.
  887. People challenge my nerd cred all the time. I just show them the photo of me winning my middle-school science fair, wearing my Casio calculator watch and eyeglasses so big they look like they can see the future.
  888. One thing about creativity is, when you feel confident and respected, you’re more likely to pitch more interesting stuff because you’re not as precious with it. You feel like, ‘This is going to land, and I’m going to be supported in this.’
  889. One of the first movies my dad took me to see was the original ‘Road Warrior.’ And I was kind of raised on the action movies of that era: ‘The Terminator’ and ‘Die Hard’ and, of course, all of the ‘Star Wars’ movies.
  890. Once we decided not to get pregnant, I snapped back into work mode, and now I have just been really enjoying my career.
  891. On general principle, I boycott shows that don’t employ actors.
  892. Not only was I the only black kid and the only poor kid, but my parents were transcendental meditation devotees, and I live in an ashram for a good portion of my childhood.
  893. My parents were vegetarians. I’d show up at school, this giant black kid, with none of the cool clothes and a tofu sandwich and celery sticks.
  894. My husband and I met when I was a teenager, and I’ve been with him for more than half of my adult life.
  895. My hands are delicate and elegant, thank you very much. They’re well-kept; my nails are clean.
  896. My goal is definitely to direct features – action movies, that’s my favorite genre. So I would love to do the ‘Halo’ movie.
  897. My dad, he was a construction worker. He was a butcher. He was a deep sea fisherman.
  898. Maybe the nails are a little stubby and gnawed on, but I definitely do not have man hands.
  899. Marriage isn’t a carnival ride.
  900. Marriage is hard. I’m not gonna lie.
  901. Marriage is a mystery, and part of it is just being kind to each other, not being selfish.
  902. Marriage is a blood sport. Marriage is jousting. It’s disembowelment. It’s just terrible, terrible visceral injuries. It’s not for everybody.
  903. It’s very hard when you love someone very much to also start to realize that maybe you want different things for your lives.
  904. It’s hard because you can’t legislate creative diversity. I think it’s more that the gaming community’s more diverse, and they’re going to ask for more diverse experiences. They’re going to demand them.
  905. It’s always been the genres that fascinated me. I think great action movies and great thrillers are transformative.
  906. It’s a thrill to star with such great actors like Kevin Bacon, Kelly Preston, and Garrett Hedlund.
  907. Instead of focusing on, ‘Oh, there’s a black lady who plays videogames,’ focus on that there’s another person out there who loves the same stuff that you do.
  908. In my life and my work, I really try to be just fully myself.
  909. If you’re a game company, you want to create a singular gaming experience, and part of that is doing stuff that nobody else is doing. If you’re trying to create a game that feels different, you’re going to create a lead that feels different. It’s not going to be just another white guy.
  910. If you look at shows like ‘Def Comedy Jam’ in its heyday, there were so many really funny, talented black comics that never would have gotten on that show because they just weren’t doing comedy that fit that mold.
  911. If you have an embarrassing story, and it’s a source of shame, keeping it in just compounds the shame and turns the story into something poisonous. And if someone knows about it, then it can be used against you.
  912. If you have a secret, and it’s embarrassing to you, when you tell that story – you own it. It becomes yours, and no one can use it against you.
  913. I’ve said this before, and I’m sure there are people who disagree, but I feel like one of the reasons there aren’t a lot more women in stand-up – and there are many more now; it’s not parity, but it’s getting there – is that women are not socialized to look stupid or silly. They’re socialized to be pretty and precious.
  914. I’ve been blessed to have insanely hip parents who think of me as their little Chris Rock.
  915. I’ve always loved video games. I played ‘Ms. Pac-man’ with my dad, and I Ioved ‘Galaga’ and ‘Tempest’ and grew up on the standing arcade games. Even to this day, my dad will call me if he’s playing ‘Ms. Pac-man’ and hold the phone up to the game.
  916. I’ve always been an outsider.
  917. I’m, like, a binge gamer.
  918. I’m trying my hand at directing. I’m doing an independent movie that we haven’t started casting yet, but it’s like an edgy version of ‘Lethal Weapon’ and ’48 Hours,’ only with two women in it.
  919. I’m the kindest, most supportive friend ever, probably to my own detriment, but I hope that I am toughening up a little bit.
  920. I’m surrounded by geniuses, which is really not good for my own personal self-esteem!
  921. I’m sure you can imagine it’s pretty frustrating to have people talking about your private life who don’t know anything about it.
  922. I’m sure I had low-level scurvy all of my childhood.
  923. I’m such a geek, and have always been a real nerd.
  924. I’m just myself, so I don’t know that I think of myself as a nerd icon.
  925. I’m black, and black don’t crack. It does droop.
  926. I’m a think gamer with twitch tendencies.
  927. I’d like to provide an SAT word in everything I do.
  928. I’d be plenty happy if I could keep playing scientists and cops for the rest of my career.
  929. I won’t apologize for choosing my career over kids.
  930. I went to private school for two years, then Aptos Middle School, and I finished at McAteer. Several of my classmates at those schools are my friends today.
  931. I wasn’t mentally prepared to take care of them, I was focused on my career. And then when I got to be in my 40s and I thought about having kids, I wasn’t able to have kids naturally. I don’t regret it.
  932. I was with someone at 19, and I was married at 23, and I didn’t want kids when I was in my 20s.
  933. I was this weird little bookish giant.
  934. I was raised by a single dad. Dad’s idea of hanging out with your kid or day care was give her $20 in quarters, drop her at the arcade, and tell her not to talk to strangers.
  935. I was raised by a single dad, and I’ve always kind of liked things that are typically more guy-oriented.
  936. I was like, ‘I want us to stop using that term. I’m not a ‘girl gamer.’ I’m just a gamer.’ The reasons I love gaming are the same reasons everyone loves gaming.
  937. I was born in California, raised a vegetarian, and love science fiction, so don’t tell me how I need to be in order to fit your standards.
  938. I was always a theatrical kid.
  939. I used to worry that if I wasn’t having a dynamic life, then I wouldn’t have anything to talk about.
  940. I try to do more intelligent roles, unusual roles, and stronger women, and that’s helped me a little bit with my casting opportunities.
  941. I thought I was gonna be an attorney, so I went to Dartmouth and I was a government major and I minored in environmental policy, and I didn’t do anything academically around the arts.
  942. I think, like most gamers, I talk a good game.
  943. I think the thing I fear most in life is waking up one day and not feeling challenge – feeling ambivalent or glib about what I have to do that day.
  944. I think people sleepwalk through their lives, and for me, I wanted to embrace everything. And that meant the agonizing pain and the transcendence, and you can’t have one without the other.
  945. I think people assume that because I talk the way that I talk that I grew up with money, and then I’ve had to say, ‘No, I grew up poor.’ And then I was like, ‘Why do I have to play this game where the only black experience that’s authentic is the one where you grew up in poverty?’ I mean, it’s ridiculous.
  946. I think art comes out of meaningful experiences, and it’s hard to make art when your meaningful experience is getting into your electric car and driving from your fancy house in the Hills to your fancy job in the Valley.
  947. I tell jokes, chat with people, and make stuff.
  948. I started out being a stand up and writing my own material. That took me to ‘Talk Soup,’ where I was writing and performing for TV.
  949. I see the first ‘Bourne’ movie as really kind of a fulcrum in changing the modern action film, where things are really gritty and really character-driven. Think about how the entire Bond franchise was completely radicalized by Bourne.
  950. I remember leaving the first ‘Matrix’ movie feeling completely radicalized, completely changed. I think we all, from our ordinary lives, like to think about putting ourselves into these extraordinary situations and wonder how we’d respond.
  951. I really try to make smart choices about my fashion and really live a life on the carpet that’s the same as the life I live normally.
  952. I really only play shooters, which is a nice way to restrict the amount of gameplay in the house.
  953. I really love being busy because I am – feel like I am at my best when I am busy.
  954. I really do know football.
  955. I might not agree with myself in a year.
  956. I married my husband because I loved him, and I don’t feel like there’s anybody missing from our marriage, but when you think about this person that you love, and you think about what a wonderful thing it would be to bring another person like that into this world, I think that’s the hardest part about all of it.
  957. I married my college boyfriend, so I’ve been with him since I was a kid.
  958. I love women, and I have a lot of really close girlfriends, but I’m not one of those women who’s like, ‘Ew – that’s boy stuff.’
  959. I love fashion, and I love how it makes me feel, but it doesn’t rule my life.
  960. I love Toronto. I love it. I love Toronto. I love Canada. I can’t wait to get back. Can’t wait to have some Timbits.
  961. I love New Orleans. I did a movie there right before Katrina.
  962. I like grown up comedy.
  963. I have this insane and unabated longing for San Francisco. I come up there every chance that I get.
  964. I have a whole ‘Halo’ corner in my house. One time, when I went to Bungie, they gave me this awesome ‘Halo: Reach’ backpack. Usually, when you get stuff like that, it either ends up in the garage or going to charity. But I walk around with that ‘Halo: Reach’ backpack all the time, and I drink out of my ‘Halo: Reach’ bottle every day.
  965. I have a lot of good girlfriends that I really love, but you know, most of my close friends are men.
  966. I hated, when I was a kid, being told that ‘Black people don’t do that.’ And the white kids at school didn’t accept me because I was black, and the black kids in my neighborhood didn’t accept me because they thought I thought I was white.
  967. I grew up on the back of a motorcycle – my dad didn’t have a car until I was a teenager.
  968. I feel if you believe in equality, you have to believe in it for everybody. And that’s the way I’ve always lived my life.
  969. I don’t think of myself as a role model, but I do feel like, for women out there who are trying to figure out who they are, the most important choice to make is to live a life that’s true to who you are inside. And let your ideas and your heart and your mind drive your fashion choices.
  970. I don’t believe in superheroes but I love Batman movies. There’s a part of every person that is entertained by the idealistic, the fantastic.
  971. I didn’t mind being in a school with a small African-American population. The African-American-community was very tight, and that was great. But I also wanted to interact with other types of folks.
  972. I can’t say that there’s been some big change during my career where all of a sudden everything’s totally colorblind.
  973. I can’t control what’s fair and unfair. I can’t control the nature of the business or the nature of society or the nature of the world, but what I can control is how I choose to see the world and what I choose to put back into it.
  974. I can tell you this: Stand-up is not glamorous.
  975. I believe that the essence of marriage is choosing someone who loves you for who you are, embraces everything about you, and building a life with that person. Whether that life is with children or without children – it’s honestly immaterial to building a life with someone that you love fully.
  976. I believe in hard work. I think that everything flows out of that.
  977. I am constantly re-evaluating my goals and trying to strike items from my to-do list that aren’t critical.
  978. I am black, and there’s no getting around that, but being black doesn’t define every aspect of my life.
  979. I am absolutely a Giants fan and I’m a Dynasty baby so I was a 49ers fan for a long time.
  980. I acted out a lot. I was very nerdy. I was very isolated, which I made up for by kind of talking and trying to entertain people and get them to like me, so I did theatre and improv in high school and college, but always as a hobby.
  981. God, I mean I had so many people tell me, ‘What you’re doing doesn’t work.’ I used to have to get on stage and apologize for talking the way that I speak.
  982. For the record, I’m a clinical workaholic.
  983. For someone to say that marriage is only about procreation is a joke. I didn’t marry my husband to have children. I married my husband because I love my husband.
  984. For a little while, my mom was a school teacher. And I went to the school that she taught.
  985. Everybody has those stories that make them wince when they think about them silently. But as soon as you tell that story, it becomes a little bit less cringe-inducing.
  986. Every culture is very important. Dartmouth has always been dedicated to diversity of culture.
  987. Dartmouth represented a great opportunity. I wanted to go to the best possible school I could go to.
  988. Dartmouth is a small school with high-caliber teaching. Our classes were all taught by professors, not teaching assistants. I felt like that was a school where I could make a big splash. The opportunities would be grander and more robust for me there than at a school with 40,000 students.
  989. Comedy’s really about not being afraid to look terrible, look ugly, look silly, make fun of yourself. And that’s something that women are just not socialized to do. But more women are doing it, and more women have examples of women doing it brilliantly.
  990. Comedy is ugly. It’s honest, it’s raw.
  991. Chris Parnell’s a genius, so he’d be amazing on ‘Who’s Line.’
  992. But I love stand-up, and it’s where I came from creatively, so it’s something I never want to walk away from.
  993. Bravery is the engine of change.
  994. As a comedian, it really gelled when I started doing standup. Because standup is so much about bravery, especially in the early days. There is no doubt that it is going to go terribly for you over and over and over again. But you cannot get funny without bombing.
  995. And I was the only black kid in my school for almost all of my childhood, until I was a teenager. So imagine, if you will, being 6 feet tall by third grade, so essentially being a living maypole.
  996. Am I going to complain about being typecast as smart? I don’t think so.
  997. After 40, your chances of getting pregnant are between two and eight percent, and in my particular case, they were less than five percent.
  998. A lot of people try to control how you access gaming. You know, they’re trying to prevent people from buying games.
  999. With each film, I get more and more involved and it’s more and more time-consuming. Also, I like to break myths and people’s preconceived ideas. My characters have always stood for something, have always had an opinion, although they’ve never really rebelled.
  1000. What’s blessed about my life is that I have been able to connect with the global audience on a regular basis. I am thankful for everybody’s love, and I reciprocate that, but I also have to deliver on every occasion.
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