FindsGood

Articles Page 22

Articles Page 22

  1. Weight gain can happen at any point in time, and it is something that you are dealing with anyway, and it is OK. It is ridiculous to have this dictate your very being because I have always said that it is not the outside that defines who you are.
  2. The more you are blessed with experience, the fuller and the more enriched you are in your craft.
  3. The larger the audience the better. The more pockets in the world, the more interesting and exciting because it just makes it that much more liberating. This makes it that much more liberating for the various facets of creativity to be explored.
  4. Strangely, nothing makes me feel tired, fatigued, at all. I’ve gone days and nights without sleep, and still the mind is in such a positive space it just doesn’t make you feel fatigued.
  5. Sexy in India is not considered positive. But, with today’s crop of fresh faces in the modelling arena, being sexy is an asset.
  6. Right now, I’m following the Buddhist principle: Smile as abuse is hurled your way and this too shall pass.
  7. My family is my strength and my weakness.
  8. My experience of being on the public platform got more multi-faceted, multi-dimensional, and my place in the public eye, I think, has always been a little more than just what is going on in that time in my life.
  9. Life will take its toll on all of us. We get injured, we get old. It’s really sad to try to run away from these harsh realities of life. Looks are not everything. I am not going to look beautiful all the time.
  10. It’s unbelievable that people have the time and inclination to be as negative as they are on a public platform about people who accomplish whatever they do in the public eye.
  11. In terms of finding that first international recognition of my work, coming back to Cannes is such a milestone in my life because it began actually with ‘Devdas’.
  12. I’m not the type who’ll yell about my achievements from the rooftops.
  13. I’m just an average woman with average concerns.
  14. I’m a student. I want to do better, and I want directors who can find the actress in me and be my teachers. I’m interested in the whole process of editing, post-production and direction.
  15. I was studying to be an architect, I wasn’t plotting to join the movies. Films were just another career option. I took acting up with the same schoolgirl enthusiasm I had for examinations. Acting is a job and I take it very seriously.
  16. I was more excited than scared, at the opportunity to work in an English movie.
  17. I really don’t work to a plan, but I just do what interests me and what I like to do.
  18. I like to be human and not lose myself in becoming a mannequin, which people in showbiz are accused of.
  19. I know for a fact that if there’s a role which I am suited for, I’ll be signed on. I’ll never go begging.
  20. I just take on what I can commit to completely at that point in time, and that way you’ll be able to give your best.
  21. I have always been a person who is extremely comfortable in my skin. I have always just been myself in all these years on the public platform.
  22. I have a great story to tell… and I tell it well. No holds barred.
  23. I don’t know about changing my perspective, because motherhood is such a glorious blessing and I am very thankful for that. It’s such a beautiful experience. I so strongly recommend it. It’s bliss, love and fulfillment of another level.
  24. I am really OK with the way I look. It’s fine. All this is transient. I mean, it’s really, you know, it changes with time, and that’s the external.
  25. I always knew I would be successful. So there was no element of surprise.
  26. I always believed that my silence on several topics will be an advantage in the long run.
  27. For me, it’s not about breaking big in Hollywood, but having interesting experiences.
  28. Even prior to marriage and motherhood, it’s always been about prioritising and focusing on what you can commit to. That’s been my approach to every aspect of my life, be it my relationships or my professional commitments.
  29. Even in Indian cinema, there is so much work that I have accepted because I’m comfortable and so much I have declined because I haven’t been comfortable.
  30. Even in India the Hindi film industry might be the best known but there are movies made in other regional languages in India, be it Tamil or Bengali. Those experiences too are different from the ones in Bombay.
  31. Do we recognize the platform that Indian cinema has been given? Of course. And typically India of us, we gracefully acknowledge our host’s grace and we thank you for celebrating us and our cinema.
  32. Despite being in showbiz, I have a very real approach to my life. It plays off with my social life.
  33. Comedy is difficult for an actor. But I think I have a good sense of humor and manage to make people laugh and make them happy.
  34. By virtue of my job, I’m traveling. You get to spend very little time with your family. We hardly get to meet each other except on the one odd day we really get to spend time, have dinner together. And that’s rare, and we cherish it.
  35. Aishwarya, my parent’s daughter, has been brought up with enough values inculcated where I will use my discretion in my choices. At the same time, I recognize I am an actor, I am an artist, and if I feel the need to be liberated and do the kind of work I need to do, I will.
  36. When you see me on TV against one of the other girls, they look 10 times better than me, and I’m OK with that. I make a conscious effort not to wear that much makeup and not have my hair so perfectly groomed. That’s just not me. I’m not going to be perfect.
  37. When I was really little, I wanted to be a wrestler so I could be like the girls I looked up to. My brother then told me that ‘You don’t want to be like your idols; you want to grow up and be better than them.’ To this day, that’s the best piece of advice I’ve ever gotten.
  38. When I was diagnosed, I believed my illness would be my great, lifelong weakness. Bipolar disorder was to be my impenetrable prison, and I would be locked up with it in a castle Princess Toadstool style. Thinking there was no way out, I let it consume me.
  39. When I harnessed its seemingly uncontrollable might, I realized bipolar disorder’s powers could be used for good. My diagnosis didn’t have to be an affliction. It could simply be the gift of extraordinary emotions.
  40. To this day, I like the version of movies that don’t have the curse words. I’m very reserved that way.
  41. There’s definitely a list of things I’d like to do. But there’s been a lot of things I hadn’t even thought would have been possible to do that I’d been able to do, so I think I’ll surprise myself and keep breaking that glass ceiling to see what’s next. Hopefully people get surprised – that’s my main goal.
  42. The trick is for Divas to find what works for them. I’ve done some ridiculous stuff in my career, but there’s still nothing that’s gotten a reaction as big as me skipping around the ring.
  43. The key is to be a personality outside of the ring and then bring that personality with you inside the ring.
  44. Side note: When I dressed up like Harley Quinn on TV a long time ago, everyone was like, ‘Who is that?’ And now she’s got an entire merchandise line.
  45. Never trust anyone who doesn’t drink coffee.
  46. My only window into the Internet is Twitter because I am afraid of the Internet. I need my mom to hold my hand if I’m going to read anything about me.
  47. My least favorite aspect of shopping is shopping.
  48. Know what is in your heart. But definitely go to school and learn as much as you can, and if wrestling is still what you want, find a good wrestling school and kind of learn as much information about it as you can. If I did it, this tiny thing, anyone can do it.
  49. It’s the most gratifying thing to have young girls telling me, ‘I love that you do a photo shoot in pants and a button up shirt, and you still look cool.’
  50. It’s funny because there’s a part of me that, if something is popular, I sort of become a defiant teenager about it. Like, ‘Oh, I’m not gonna like that because everybody likes it.’
  51. It’s funny because I remember playing ‘Grand Turismo,’ and I would get yelled at by my brother for moving the controller as if it was a wheel. He was, ‘It’s not gonna help you.’ Now you have a Wii, and you could actually move and control it.
  52. It wasn’t cool that I didn’t comb my hair and had books and wore glasses. It was never cool be a nerd and tomboy, and these days, it really is. And I’m like, ‘You guys have no idea what I went through.’ How many times my mother yelled at me to comb my hair.
  53. I’ve lived in so many different towns – Guttenberg, Union City, West New York, Jersey City. We didn’t have a lot of money, and we’d get kicked out of places a lot.
  54. I’ve been a rescue dog mom several times and occasionally found comfort in scrolling through pictures of animals on various adoption center websites, just to fantasize about adding to the family.
  55. I’ve always wanted to entertain people, and when I was in school, I was interested in creative writing, but wrestling was always there. When I ran into financial problems, I just figured when life gives you lemons, you have to make lemonade.
  56. I’m very grateful that I don’t have to wear heels, because I can barely walk in heels. If I were to skip, it would be deadly.
  57. I’m not the sexy girl. I’m more youthful and innocent, the girl who wears jeans and T-shirts and sneakers. But fans have accepted that I’m a tomboy. There’s a different group of people who find that attractive.
  58. I’m not the coolest person in the world. I’m not the sexiest Diva or the strongest Diva. I know who I am. I’m not the most popular person, and I’m kind of dorky, and I’m someone you can see at your school or as your neighbor, and I think people like that.
  59. I’m not interested in being famous. I’m interested in doing my job and doing it well, and that’s wrestling, and that’s what I love.
  60. I’d like to challenge Ryback to a match – in real life – just to see. I think I could take him, but I wonder how Ryback would react to getting slapped.
  61. I was thin and didn’t realize how small I was – I was, like, 96 pounds when I got signed. You don’t want to be 96 pounds. It’s not attractive. I didn’t know how to do my hair and makeup. I was such a tomboy.
  62. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder when I was barely out of my teens. Like our olive skin tone and caterpillar eyebrows, I guess it just runs in the family.
  63. I want to be known for this character on TV two nights a week, and then I want to go away and live my life in private.
  64. I want people to know where I come from. I think I have come really far from that, and I did it on my own. It’s sort of the American dream to come from absolutely nothing and to succeed while still doing something that you love. Not compromising yourself in any way. I hope I’m making Jersey proud in that way.
  65. I used to be naive. I didn’t realize the value of being a whole performer… People start to care about you when they know more about you and see different aspects of your personality.
  66. I think trying to be flashy and doing things that are out of your realm of comfort is the problem with the Divas.
  67. I think the important thing is that I’ve never tried to be someone I’m not. People can read right through that.
  68. I think that it’s interesting how shows like ‘Walking Dead’ or even ‘Game of Thrones,’ with all its fantasy elements, have become so popular. Sometimes, though, I get a little bit annoyed because the whole nerd thing taking over and is now cool, and it wasn’t cool when I was younger.
  69. I think everything I’ve tried to do, whether or not it’s come off that way immediately, is for the greater good. I’ll take the jabs I need to in order to help us all in the long run.
  70. I say it often, that I feel like I’m just living out the Story Mode in ‘Smackdown vs. RAW’ that I always used to play.
  71. I remember when I was that girl crying because I was so excited to finally meet Lita. To have girls crying over me is surreal.
  72. I play my Xbox and PlayStation at home. Then, when I’m on the road, I’ll bring my Vita with me to play games like ‘Snake Eater.’
  73. I lift pretty heavy for my body weight, and I don’t do any of that girly stuff like cardio or any light weights. I go really heavy, and that intimidates some guys. I enjoy that.
  74. I have an older brother and older sister. My older sister is the girliest girl on the planet, so I just hated everything about that. I did anything my brother did. He actually got me into wrestling. I watched it because he did, and I played video games because he did.
  75. I have a very distinct memory of ‘ExciteBike’ and making my own courses. I had an obsession with that game.
  76. I feel like an old person. I feel like, ‘What is this technology?’ I think there’s some seven-year-olds who are more advanced than I am right now.
  77. I didn’t have the easiest time growing up; it’s no secret. We were just poor.
  78. I could be anywhere in the country, and people will ask, ‘Are you from Jersey?’ I’m proud of that. We’re a weird breed.
  79. I am bipolar, and I am proud. And that is why I wanted to write a book. To shine a light on mental illness, to be vulnerable about the days I let it take control and paid dearly for it, and to tell anyone fighting a similar battle: You are not alone. You are not broken.
  80. I actually went to NYU for six months, had some family issues that kind of set me back, and I couldn’t afford to go anymore. That was the theme going on in my whole life, you know: money stopping me from whatever I wanted to do.
  81. From a young age, I felt like I was supposed to be the sort of female who is doing something strong.
  82. For me, Jersey represents going through what you can go through and still surviving. That’s the cool thing about people from the Tri-State area. We’re fighters. We’re survivors, and we’re edgier than anyone else on Earth.
  83. Everything I was told should be my greatest insecurities and weaknesses, everything that I’ve been labeled – short, nerdy, skinny, weak, impulsive, ugly, tomboy, poor, rebel, loud, freak, crazy – turned out to be my greatest strengths. I didn’t become successful in spite of them. I became successful because of them.
  84. Chucks are cooler when they’re dirty. I actually stepped on somebody’s the other day because they were too clean.
  85. Your artistry is a muscle that needs to be exercised, so if all you are doing is auditioning, you’ll never get the satisfaction of fulfilling the need to play the part.
  86. You don’t know what’s gonna happen, so you can’t really plan: you can only go with it.
  87. Words can’t describe how one would feel in that moment after doing a test for something you really want but in your heart you don’t think you have a chance of getting.
  88. When you do a play, you have all this time to rehearse and grow into the character. In television, even though you’re waiting and waiting and waiting, once you’re actually on set engaging in the scene with another actor, time is of the essence.
  89. When I was younger, my mother tried to get me an agent because I was always singing and dancing, but whenever she took me to an audition, I would just shut down.
  90. When I was younger, it was harder for me to find a black eyeliner that would actually show up on my skin. Being a dark-skinned woman, when you find something that actually shows up on your face, you love it even more.
  91. We all have our family issues from time to time.
  92. To relax, I love sitting back and turning my brain off and watching TV.
  93. To meet someone who wants to fight to just tell the truth about what’s happening in government… this is a real life superhero right here.
  94. There are people who do what they believe is right, but as they say, ‘The road to hell is paved with good intentions.’
  95. The problem of sexism is getting better, but I don’t know if it’s getting better fast enough. We see more roles for women that don’t entirely revolve around the way in which they function in a man’s life, but typically those women are almost always white, and even then, there are only a few of them.
  96. The advice that I was always given when asking for advice about acting was that if I could imagine myself doing anything else, anything else at all, then go do that.
  97. Television has embraced so much in terms of storytelling and in terms of a wide array of characters conveying stories from different points of view.
  98. TV is such a great medium in what it can do in terms of enlightening an audience. We can really inspire and teach people about other people. That’s a powerful tool, and that’s something that the arts has always been capable of doing.
  99. Studying acting has been personally enriching because it has taught me to take the time to imagine what someone else’s life experience might be like. To look deeply at how our pasts and the circumstances of our early childhoods mold us as people.
  100. Strength doesn’t mean an absence of pain.
  101. Sometimes people just need to feel heard, and being an actor has taught me to really listen.
  102. Sometimes as human beings, we’re so contradictory – we may say something or do something and completely contradict ourselves. That’s what I’m learning to embrace in television – not knowing what’s going to happen.
  103. Not to say there’s not good TV out there, but I think TV is better when it accurately reflects the world as it is.
  104. Not everyone’s high standards have to be the same thing.
  105. My ideal date would involve a park or rowing in those little boats on a lake.
  106. My hair routine is to let someone else do it.
  107. My favorite spot to hang out is my home.
  108. Love is a complicated emotion because you can learn something or hear something that goes against what you have come to know personally. It can be very challenging to what you believe.
  109. It’s such a big deal, the notion that these enslaved Africans had marriages and children… because therein lies our humanity, our capacity for love.
  110. It was a given at UCSB that if there was a role that called for a person of color, it was going to be handed to me. There were certain times when maybe I didn’t try as hard. Going to Yale was a way more diverse experience.
  111. It gets a little crazy at Disneyland. It’s a little bit more hardcore then people think.
  112. In this day and age, when there are so many people creating work online and writing their own shows, I wouldn’t tell another actor, ‘If you can do anything else go do that.’ I would tell them to figure out the story they want to tell, to figure out what artists inspire you and why, and then figure out a way you can create that for yourself.
  113. If you ask two people to remember a specific event, the stories are going to vary wildly because we always make ourselves out to be the hero.
  114. If all we remember are good things, then happiness is our baseline, and there’s no longer happiness. We need other feelings in order to appreciate others.
  115. If I had a free afternoon, I would play music, sit in my backyard, and drink coffee.
  116. I’ve never given my phone number to someone on the street, but when someone is a gentleman, I appreciate the compliments.
  117. I’ve been trying to eat healthier, but sometimes it doesn’t work out when you’re sitting in front of the TV drinking wine, and you realize you really need ice cream to go along with it.
  118. I’ve been performing since I was a child; my mother would have to pull me aside and tell me that I wasn’t onstage. I was a cheerleader, president of choir, and in the school play.
  119. I’m obsessed with eyeliner – the darker and kohl-ier, the better.
  120. I’m at a place where I want to have fun. I want to be challenged. I want to love the people I work with and continue to appreciate being in the position to work and play and explore.
  121. I’m a little bit of a control freak, so it’s been nice to learn to let go and just trust others.
  122. I was getting in my own way. I would quit jobs and step out on hope and faith, and pray to God that I would book something that would allow me to just continue to act.
  123. I want to write. I want to direct. I want to produce – I want to inhabit what I think it means to fully be an artist.
  124. I use Pureology Shampoo and Conditioner, and after shampooing, I’ll put the conditioner on, go watch a movie, and wash it out later. When you have black girl hair, once we wash, we’ve gotta do the whole press and get in the edges and everything. That’s a lot of heat to go back to straight on a daily basis.
  125. I thought I was going to be on Broadway. I thought, ‘I’m going to do theater.’
  126. I think it’s well-known that I love all things ABC and Shonda Rhimes – I’m a huge ‘Scandal’ and ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ fan.
  127. I saw ‘Birth’ at the Sundance Film Festival with a thousand other strangers, and I couldn’t believe that was me in the film. I didn’t recognize myself.
  128. I really care about people, and I would need someone to also genuinely value other human beings and want to be connected with people in the world and to know about other cultures. That might not be a high standard for someone else, but for me, it’s really important to try and stick to that.
  129. I really appreciate that: to walk into an environment where everyone is serious and dedicated to creating the best performance possible and challenging themselves to figure out the most interesting way to approach the work.
  130. I majored in theater, so I’d love to get back on a stage.
  131. I love thigh highs, heels, shorts, or a skirt.
  132. I love the powerful woman who’s complicated. There’s no push to be one thing or another thing. It’s all human. That’s what you look for as an actor: characters written and portrayed in the most human way possible.
  133. I love Haagen Daaz Caramel Cone, or the Ben and Jerry’s Strawberry Cheesecake. Pairs well with anything.
  134. I have a lovely light blue Kate Spade wallet. It has pockets for many credit cards, business cards, health insurance cards, and a Burke Williams card for when I want to go to the spa!
  135. I have a girl crush on Olivia Munn so much, especially on ‘Newsroom.’ And Cara Delevingne, but who doesn’t love her face? Viola Davis is my acting crush.
  136. I do everything on my phone!
  137. I come from a family of storytellers. Growing up, my father would make up these stories about how he and my mother met and fell in love, and my mother would tell me these elaborately visual stories of growing up as a kid in New York, and I was always so enrapt.
  138. I can be just a touch controlling!
  139. I always think – when I get mad, and people say, ‘Don’t be the angry black woman’ – it’s like, well, why not? There’s so much to be angry about.
  140. Diversity is such an interesting word. I feel like when people hear the word ‘diversity,’ they think that it means only people of color, when in reality, diversity is all-inclusive; it means everyone.
  141. Create something for yourself that you feel proud of, that you are in control of, that gives you a better understanding of the type of artist you want to be.
  142. By high school, I was telling everyone, ‘Oh, I’m going to be a doctor when I grow up,’ because my dad was always saying to me, ‘Pick a career path where you’re always going to be necessary.’ But by junior year, I was president of choir, I was the lead in the school play, and I just loved being onstage performing.
  143. Being on a show with a female lead is amazing for me. I love that.
  144. Back when people couldn’t read, other people would take newspapers and turn them into theater so that people would know what was going on in the world. That is a powerful thing.
  145. As artists, we thrive when we can express our comfort and our discomfort. If a certain scene is really challenging for us, if we’re in an environment where we feel safe, we’re able to do our work.
  146. A man should be well groomed. If you’re going to have facial hair, it should be a choice, not an accident.
  147. A man can get my attention by smiling at me and then coming over and talking to me. The best way to get a girl’s attention is to start a conversation.
  148. When virtue and modesty enlighten her charms, the lustre of a beautiful woman is brighter than the stars of heaven, and the influence of her power it is in vain to resist.
  149. True wisdom is less presuming than folly. The wise man doubteth often, and changeth his mind; the fool is obstinate, and doubteth not; he knoweth all things but his own ignorance.
  150. To be satisfied with a little, is the greatest wisdom; and he that increaseth his riches, increaseth his cares; but a contented mind is a hidden treasure, and trouble findeth it not.
  151. Those who gave thee a body, furnished it with weakness; but He who gave thee Soul, armed thee with resolution. Employ it, and thou art wise; be wise and thou art happy.
  152. The lips of the wise are as the doors of a cabinet; no sooner are they opened, but treasures are poured out before thee.
  153. Say not that honor is the child of boldness, nor believe thou that the hazard of life alone can pay the price of it: it is not to the action that it is due, but to the manner of performing it.
  154. Indulge not thyself in the passion of anger; it is whetting a sword to wound thine own breast, or murder thy friend.
  155. Honor is the inner garment of the Soul; the first thing put on by it with the flesh, and the last it layeth down at its separation from it.
  156. Hear the words of prudence, give heed unto her counsels, and store them in thine heart; her maxims are universal, and all the virtues lean upon her; she is the guide and the mistress of human life.
  157. Be thou incapable of change in that which is right, and men will rely upon thee. Establish unto thyself principles of action; and see that thou ever act according to them. First know that thy principles are just, and then be thou.
  158. You don’t need any indictment in order to arrest someone; probable cause is sufficient to arrest civilians, so it must be enough to arrest police.
  159. Who defines terrorists? Today’s terrorist is tomorrow’s friend.
  160. When you loot or behave violently, you give grounds to those that try to justify illegal police abuse. You become the poster child for them to say, ‘See, we have no choice but to shoot and kill, or use a chokehold, because just look at the way they behave.’
  161. When we look at the situation in Ferguson, Missouri and the tragic death of Michael Brown, we are reminded of the importance of who we elect to our city councils, who sits on our local board of education committees, who we pick to represent us in Congress, in the Senate and more.
  162. When the culture of police departments is sometimes infused with bias or preconceived ideas against certain groups, there needs to be reform and retraining throughout. And unfortunately, we cannot rely on local departments to police themselves; we need intervention from the top.
  163. When people discuss the 1960s and the great Civil Rights Era, they often speak in romantic terms as if there wasn’t immense work put in, and as if there wasn’t immense sacrifice that took place. But none of those battles were easily fought and won; there were sustained movements behind them.
  164. We’re not willing to give black leaders second chances because, in most cases, we’re not willing to give them first chances.
  165. We’re not anti-police… we’re anti-police brutality.
  166. We need an amendment that gives us the right to vote protected by the federal government and the Constitution.
  167. We have defeated Jim Crow, but now we have to deal with his son, James Crow Jr., esquire.
  168. We cannot reform institutional racism or systemic policies if we are not actively engaged. It’s not enough to simply complain about injustice; the only way to prevent future injustice is to create the society we would like to see, one where we are all equal under the law.
  169. We are engaged in immediate conversations with the White House on deliberations over a successor whom we hope will continue in the general direction of Attorney General Holder.
  170. Throughout my years championing for civil rights, analyzing politics and advocating on behalf of the voiceless, I am disturbed the most when harmless children suffer because of politics or detrimental policies.
  171. There’s no reason why children in inner cities or rural areas do not receive the same quality education or opportunities as those in suburbs or wealthy neighborhoods. If we truly believe in giving all citizens a chance to pursue happiness and pursue their goals, then we cannot continue to marginalize entire groups of people.
  172. The right wing always mobilizes around constitutional amendments: the right to bear arms, school prayer.
  173. The resignation of Attorney General Eric Holder is met with both pride and disappointment by the Civil Rights community. We are proud that he has been the best Attorney General on Civil Rights in U.S. history and disappointed because he leaves at a critical time when we need his continued diligence most.
  174. The horrific cases in Ferguson, in Staten Island with the death of Eric Garner, and all across the country serve as stark reminders that we must have a say in who polices us, and how that policing is done. We must, we must, let our voices be heard on Election Day.
  175. The dream was not to put one black family in the White House, the dream was to make everything equal in everybody’s house.
  176. The boxing world is full of all kinds of corruption.
  177. The United States isn’t a dictatorship ruling with a brutal army and an iron fist, so our police departments must understand that they are there to serve and protect us – all of us. And when they do commit crimes, they must be arrested and prosecuted like anyone else, bottom line.
  178. The United States has got to adopt a policy of befriending and creating allies around the world.
  179. The United States government has the obligation to educate all young people in this country.
  180. One of the reasons I get so much joy out of my own children’s childhoods is that I’m having my first childhood myself.
  181. Not graduating high school on time leads to fewer chances of attending college and obtaining good paying jobs, and creates instead higher chances of incarceration and unemployment.
  182. National Action Network, the group I founded, has affiliates or chapters in over 40 cities around the country.
  183. My organization, National Action Network (NAN), was on the ground talking and meeting with people in Ferguson, just as we did in Staten Island following Eric Garner’s death.
  184. My ordination in the Church of God in Christ was at age 9, and I later became a Baptist minister, which I am today.
  185. My ministry’s always been one of social activism. I think a responsible minister must be at some levels involved in the social order.
  186. My message to everyone: the next time you hear about migrant children near the border, just picture them as your own. Then think what you would want our government to do.
  187. Local prosecutors work alongside local police officers on a regular basis and are therefore conflicted when it comes to prosecuting those same officers. They are under extreme pressure from local police unions and from rank-and-file cops.
  188. Like myself, President Obama is the father of two daughters. He understands the obstacles that they face as women, but he also understands the emergency of the state of young black men in America.
  189. Let me be clear: as I have said repeatedly, I do not believe that all police officers are bad, nor do I believe that most are bad. But there must be a transparent, impartial and fair system to judge those that engage in criminal or unethical acts.
  190. James Brown became my father. He would talk to me the way a father talked to a son. He became the father I never had.
  191. It seems some have chosen to ignore or have simply forgotten the big-picture vision promoted by Dr. King and his kin.
  192. It is up to us to change laws on the books like ‘Stand Your Ground’ laws and push elected officials to enact regulations that hold police officers to the same standards as the rest of society. This is why we vote.
  193. In order to establish peace, you must have fair justice for everyone.
  194. In every era going back to Lincoln with Frederick Douglass, presidents talk to those that were leading at that time.
  195. In Staten Island, when you have video showing the alleged chokehold used on Eric Garner, why not go to trial and have the officer(s) explain the tape, and then this jury can determine guilt or innocence? The tape should guarantee that there should be a trial.
  196. In New York, you are competing with Times Square lights and all of that, so you’ve got to be 300 pounds and crazy to get anyone’s attention. Then, you can refine yourself. I always knew under those 300 pounds and tracksuits was a refined, slim, dignified man.
  197. In Ferguson, there are witnesses who say Brown had his hands up when he was shot. That should be enough probable cause to go to trial to then determine if Officer Wilson is guilty or not. It is at trial that he can then defend himself and his attorneys can present their own witnesses and their own defense.
  198. In 1999, I was in St. Louis with Martin Luther King III as we led protests against the state’s failure to hire minority contractors for highway construction projects. We went at dawn on a summer day with over a thousand people and performed acts of civil disobedience.
  199. If you play the theatrics too much, you get in the way of your own cause.
  200. If you can get the proper definition of trouble, then we can find out who the real troublemakers are.
  201. If the black vote does not come out in big numbers in the age of Ferguson and voter ID, it will empower our adversaries and enhance our marginalization.
  202. If it weren’t for the mentorship and guidance from people like my mother, James Brown and others, I wouldn’t have been able to make something of my life.
  203. If companies can refuse to provide coverage for women, what other objections to the Affordable Care Act will we see based on ‘religious grounds’? For that matter, will ‘religious freedom’ be used as an excuse to discriminate against other minorities and disenfranchised groups across the board? Where will it end?
  204. If O.J. had been accused of killing his black wife, you would not have seen the same passion stirred up.
  205. If Charlton Heston can have a constitutional right carry a rifle, why can’t grandma have a constitutional right to health care?
  206. I’ve seen too much in life to give up.
  207. I’ve seen enough things to know that if you just keep on going, if you turn the corner, the sun will be shining.
  208. I’ve never done anything else in my life other than preach and be an activist. Way before I was known.
  209. I’ve learned how to measure what I say. Al Sharpton in 1986 was trying to be heard. I was a local guy and was like, ‘Y’all are ignoring us.’
  210. I’ve gone from, you know, being too close to politicians, to being too close to entertainers, and people’s father that I’m not.
  211. I’ve been able to reach from the streets to the suites.
  212. I’m never going to be fat – never again. I’m going to make it easy on my pallbearers.
  213. I’m a patriot in the truest sense of the word.
  214. I won vice president of my student body in high school. That doesn’t mean anything.
  215. I was there during the first elections in South Africa. I watched them take down the apartheid flag and raise the new flag.
  216. I was the first candidate to come out against this war, spoke at every anti-war march.
  217. I was raised by a single mother who made a way for me. She used to scrub floors as a domestic worker, put a cleaning rag in her pocketbook and ride the subways in Brooklyn so I would have food on the table. But she taught me as I walked her to the subway that life is about not where you start, but where you’re going. That’s family values.
  218. I very rarely read any fiction. I love biographies; I read about all kinds of people. I love theology and some philosophy.
  219. I knew from the age of four that I wanted to preach. I didn’t even consider it strange that grown people were listening to this kid preaching until I was around thirteen. I have never believed in limitations.
  220. I grew up in the 1950s and ’60s, when it was almost a holiday when a black act would go on Ed Sullivan.
  221. I do believe the Democratic party has moved far to the right. I do believe that the party has a bunch of elephants running around in donkey clothes.
  222. I could take all the cartoons in the tabloid newspapers, but I couldn’t take my daughter punching me in the belly and asking why I was so fat. That was my inspiration to lose the weight. And probably the last time anyone hurt my feelings.
  223. I could have easily been a statistic. Growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y., it was easy – a little too easy – to get into trouble. Surrounded by poor schools, lack of resources, high unemployment rates, poverty, gangs and more, I watched as many of my peers fell victim to a vicious cycle of diminished opportunities and imprisonment.
  224. I can call a march, and thousands come out, and I happen to have access to the White House at the same time.
  225. I always beat the sun up in the morning. It’s the secret to why I’m double trouble.
  226. I actually lost more weight than I am!
  227. How do you make things fair?
  228. From racial profiling and being pulled over just for ‘driving while black’ to this new phenomenon of killing unarmed people out of some preconceived idea of fear, our lives and our children’s lives are not being valued.
  229. Following Michael Brown’s death, I went to Ferguson and met with his parents. I stood with them as they tried to hold their heads high and deal with both their immense loss and the larger issues of police-community relations.
  230. Everything from who sits on your local board of education to the prosecutors and judicial appointments in your area and much more are all impacted by who holds political office.
  231. Evangelicals catapulted George W. Bush back to the White House.
  232. Either we need to redefine what probable cause means and say that police are not subject to it, or we arrest officers right away just as we would with any other person accused of committing a crime. Either we write new laws or enforce existing ones; we cannot have it both ways.
  233. During my 2004 presidential campaign, I was fond of saying that it was high time for the Christian right to meet the right Christians.
  234. Dr. King’s general principles are universal. But the things he confronted took place in another era.
  235. Dr. King used Gandhi’s commitment to non-violence and to passive resistance.
  236. Demonstrations must be dignified and nonviolent, as the overwhelming protests in Ferguson and Staten Island have been. Do not confuse anarchists who don’t want the system to work and thugs who want to exploit a situation with the majority who from day one have operated with impeccable nonviolence and clear goals.
  237. Countries around the world have their own immigration laws and methods of dealing with a recurring theme: desperate people searching for peace from volatile parts of the world. And nations everywhere thrive and prosper from the contributions of immigrants and the children of immigrants – including right here in the U.S.
  238. Civilians are arrested every single day – including innocent ones – and they must wait until their day in court in order to argue their side of the story. Police officers must be subjected to the same rules.
  239. Bill Clinton strikes me as the kind of guy who goes wherever the polls lead him, rather than leading the polls.
  240. As a preacher who has spent significant time in churches and houses of worship all across the country, I can tell you firsthand that religious liberty and freedom are principles that can never be infringed upon.
  241. As a kid who grew up chubby, I just marveled at the fact that I could be thin.
  242. As I stood and gave the eulogy for young Michael Brown last week, I kept thinking about the fact that this child should have been in college instead of laying in a coffin.
  243. As I often say, we have come a long way from the days of slavery, but in 2014, discrimination and inequality still saturate our society in modern ways. Though racism may be less blatant now in many cases, its existence is undeniable.
  244. All women, regardless of her economic status or racial background, have a right to vote, and no politician or regressive law should prevent her from doing so.
  245. You take the best ingredients – the best cocoa beans – and you process them in the best traditional way, and you have the best chocolate.
  246. You need a good gardener and a good fisherman. The cook is not required.
  247. With cooking, there’s always the tangible and the intangible: that which is in the domain of sentiment, of the individual.
  248. When you grow up close to poultry and fields and gardens and open-air markets, you can’t help but develop an instinct for quality food.
  249. When I’m in Paris, my favorite market is the Marche Raspail on the Left Bank.
  250. When I was younger, I behaved a bit strangely sometimes – lost my temper, did silly things – but little by little, I’ve gotten better. As a chef, I think you need to do a lot of work on yourself and your temperament.
  251. When I started cooking the meal at home, after I had started cooking in restaurants, I usually would prepare bay scallops or lobster.
  252. When I arrived, I didn’t understand London customers perfectly, but we’ve developed the right style with the right price, and step by step, I’m in harmony with London.
  253. What they’ve found so far in the Amazon is 5 percent of what there is yet to discover to eat in the Amazon because it’s completely unknown. I’ve eaten things I’ve never eaten before over there.
  254. To make my meal, I go to the market and to the garden, and then I decide what I’m going to do. That’s a great pleasure.
  255. There are so many impassioned winemakers. I think there are more impassioned winemakers than chefs.
  256. The world of wine is more creative than the world of cooking.
  257. The world forgets about people who are not useful.
  258. The restaurants express the spirit of the chef, the spirit of the city, the country.
  259. The relentless pursuit of being different is very French.
  260. The real evolution is to learn something new every day – it’s very important for chefs to share what they have discovered.
  261. The proportion of ingredients is important, but the final result is also a matter of how you put them together. Equilibrium is key.
  262. The planet’s resources are rare; we must consume more ethically and equitably.
  263. The most classic French dessert around the holidays is the Christmas log, with butter cream. Two flavors. Chocolate and coconut. My first job in the kitchen when I was a boy was to make these Christmas logs.
  264. The Mediterranean is in my DNA. I’m fine inland for about a week, but then I yearn for a limitless view of the sea, for the colours and smells of the Italian and French Riviera.
  265. The Asian airlines have the best wine programs.
  266. TV is a deformed vision, an excessive caricature. A chef has to stay an artisan, not become a star.
  267. Our milk chocolate is very chocolaty. In fact, we don’t call it milk chocolate – we call it milky chocolate.
  268. My wife Gwenaelle prepares an ‘energy shot’ for me for breakfast. It’s a mix of linseed, cereal, and raisins, with fresh fruit like kiwi. She also adds yogurt for added texture and some pollen and honey for an energy booster.
  269. My son, Arzhel, is two, and he eats vegetables twice a day. We have a vegetable garden on our farm in the Southwest, and he gets two baskets, one over each arm, and says, ‘Garden, Papa!’ and then he eats what he picks.
  270. My grandmother did all the cooking at Christmas. We ate fattened chicken. We would feed it even more so it would be big and fat.
  271. London is the most important city in the world for restaurants.
  272. It’s striking and unique in London how you know to create this alchemy between the concept, the food, the music, the staff. From the beginning to the end, with all these different elements, it tells a full story that you know very well how to develop and cultivate.
  273. It’s not easy to have success with restaurants in different cities, but I like the challenge.
  274. It is impossible to remain indifferent to Japanese culture. It is a different civilisation where all you have learnt must be forgotten. It is a great intellectual challenge and a gorgeous sensual experience.
  275. In each restaurant, I develop a different culinary sensibility. In Paris, I’m more classic, because that’s what customers like. In Monaco, it’s classic Mediterranean haute cuisine. In London, it’s a contemporary French restaurant that I’ve developed with a U.K. influence and my French know-how.
  276. In Paris we have bistros, then we have fine dining. In London, you have a very contemporary scene with mixed influences.
  277. In London, there is no need for 25 high-end gastronomic restaurants. That would be too much.
  278. In France, I am the fifth artisan to produce his own chocolate, and the others have been doing it for a long time.
  279. In France, Christmas is a family holiday. You stay home. New Year’s Eve is when you go out.
  280. If you don’t treat an ingredient and its flavors with respect – if you drown it in oil, for instance – you’ll spoil it.
  281. If my cuisine were to be defined by just one taste, it would be that of subtle, aromatic, extra-virgin olive oil.
  282. If I’m a great artisan of the kitchen, it’s because I don’t buy my sauces.
  283. If I had the choice to travel to two places in Europe, it would be Paris and London.
  284. If I am going somewhere exotic, I take an empty suitcase with me to bring back the objects I fall in love with.
  285. I’m surprised by the talent I find all over. There are always new chefs who propose many interesting new ideas, new ways of looking at ingredients.
  286. I’m in love with the markets of the world. It’s a photograph of a city, a culture.
  287. I’m anti-globalisation. There is nothing more enriching than to go out into the world and meet people different to you. We must fight the spread of a singular way of thinking and preserve cultural differences.I’m anti-globalisation. There is nothing more enriching than to go out into the world and meet people different to you. We must fight the spread of a singular way of thinking and preserve cultural differences.
  288. I would never be able to lead the insane lifestyle I do, traveling all over the world, if I wasn’t eating food that was simple and healthy.
  289. I was brought up on a farm in Southwest France, eating farm-fresh produce three times a day. It was paradise on Earth, and it shaped my eating habits and my sense of taste.
  290. I travel the world, and I can see in Toronto the cooking is very personal. These people cook with their hearts.
  291. I think the French and the Japanese are both obsessed by seasons, small producers, freshness.
  292. I prefer to be able to identify what I’m eating. I have to know.
  293. I only get fat when I eat food cooked by other chefs. At home, my wife does all the cooking. She makes simple things like soups and salads. We both like steamed tofu.
  294. I love to pick tomatoes at the end of the day, when they’re still warm from the sun.
  295. I love any excuse to work with a mortar and pestle.
  296. I live in Paris, yet Monaco, where I spend a lot of time, holds a very special place in my heart.
  297. I have restaurants, bookshops… but it’s not an empire, more… a puzzle. If it were an empire, all my restaurants would be the same.
  298. I have an obsession for quality. I work for my guests, not to obtain Michelin stars.
  299. I have a very nice garden and extraordinary markets, where there are products from the earth and the sea, in the French Basque country.
  300. I have a passion for luggage – trunks and so on. I have a collection of them, but I can never resist buying another piece.
  301. I don’t think the rating system places too much pressure on chefs. I prefer to put the pressure on my chefs to perform to the top standards.
  302. I don’t like being disappointed by somebody I trust. Fortunately, it rarely happens.
  303. I don’t like being a celebrity.
  304. I don’t do the same food in Tokyo that I do in Vegas and vice versa. If I did that, two weeks later I would have no customers.
  305. I do most of the cooking in my head.
  306. I didn’t want to become a chocolatier among others, buying ready-to-use couverture. I wanted to take the same approach I follow in my cuisine: putting the product first, revealing the authentic taste of the products.
  307. I concentrate in my work on preserving and displaying the original flavor from each ingredient in a dish.
  308. I am overfed, so when I am at home, I stop eating.
  309. I am a very eco-friendly chef but a guilty air traveller.
  310. Given the number of restaurants I have, I could easily travel all the time – but I try not to.
  311. Gastronomy is my hobby. I’m simply the casting director. Once I’ve brought all the right people together, it is they who must work together to tell a story.
  312. For me, the most luxurious place is somewhere that allows you to feel emotions and pleasures.
  313. For me, going to markets is the best way to understand the soul of a place.
  314. Food is one part of the experience. And it has to be somewhere between 50 to 60 percent of the dining experience. But the rest counts as well: The mood, the atmosphere, the music, the feeling, the design, the harmony between what you have on the plate and what surrounds the plate.
  315. Failure is enriching. It’s also important to accept that you’ll make mistakes – it’s how you build your expertise. The trick is to learn a positive lesson from all of life’s negative moments.
  316. Everywhere in the world there are tensions – economic, political, religious. So we need chocolate.
  317. Everything that pushes up out of the earth I love. Everything under the earth, root vegetables, I love to cook.
  318. Classical cooking and molecular gastronomy should remain separate. You can mix two styles and get fusion; any more, and you just get confusion.
  319. Chefs don’t become chefs just to earn stars – that’s not the goal.
  320. Believe me, I did not come to London to cook farmed fish. All my fish are wild.
  321. At my home in the southwest of France, I grow oak, hazel, and lemon trees in my backyard.
  322. You hit a certain age, and you haven’t died yet, and you become an elder statesman. I think I get a lot of applause because I’m not keeling over.
  323. You have to think of your career the way you look at the ocean, deciding which wave you’re gonna take and which waves you’re not gonna take. Some of the waves are going to be big, some are gonna be small, sometimes the sea is going to be calm. Your career is not going to be one steady march upward to glory.
  324. What I look for these days is that I don’t have long speeches, the characters gets to sit down a lot, I don’t have to learn any foreign languages, and it doesn’t shoot in Minneapolis in February. That’s mainly what I look for.
  325. Unless you’re doing Shakespeare or Chekhov… the written word is not sacrosanct.
  326. Things have got to add up to 100 points. The script is part of it, the character is part of it, the people I’m working with is the third part of it – and any combination of the three has got to add up to 100 points.
  327. There have been times when I’ve been broke, and a job came along, and I’ve said, ‘Yeah! Let’s do it!’ But I will never do something without having a feeling of knowing how to play it. I’ve been in projects that I felt terrible about afterwards, but I’ve always had something that sparked me while I was doing it.
  328. The years I spent paying my dues are in the background, and so are my concerns about whether my performance is good or bad.
  329. The last time I heard real screaming in the theatre was when I went to see a movie I did years ago, called ‘Wait Until Dark.’ Now, my mother was the least emotional person on the planet, but when I got killed in the movie, she stood up and screamed, ‘That’s my son!’ At Radio City Music Hall in New York!
  330. That’s the privilege of old age: You don’t have to remember.
  331. TV has taken reflection out of the human condition. People didn’t use to have a ready answer for everything, whether they knew something about it or not. People think they have to have an answer for everything because the guys on TV have an answer for everything.
  332. Success has nothing to do with box office as far as I’m concerned. Success has to do with achieving your goals, your internal goals, and growing as a person. It would have been nice to have been connected with a couple more box office hits, but in the long run, I don’t think it makes you happier.
  333. Something I miss terribly from the ’60s – the most important phrase in the English language was, ‘I got hung up.’ Somebody says they got hung up, it’s unassailable, you know? You don’t go near that. Whoa! I know what that can be like.
  334. People think that the people in Hollywood have some master plan. They just make the movies that people go to see. I think it’s that simple. I promise you if people were lining up around the block to see a Bible movie, they’d make Bible movies from now to the end of time.
  335. Over the years, I played with a couple of spectacular guitar players, and playing with them has made me play better than I knew how to play. I hope the same thing is true with acting.
  336. No matter what you do or where you are, you’re going to be missing out on something.
  337. No matter how much time you spend reading books or following your intuition, you’re gonna screw it up. Fifty times. You can’t do parenting right.
  338. NI love watching science fiction because I feel like when it’s done well, it’s not just monsters, but philosophy. Really good science fiction like, ‘2001,’ for example, or the first ‘Matrix.’ But it takes someone who’s got a brain and thinks in order to do really good science fiction.
  339. My favorite thing is to be working with people I enjoy working with. I’ve reached the point where, emotionally, I don’t need to act any more. Financially, I do. But emotionally, it wouldn’t matter to me if I never acted again.
  340. My favorite thing about making movies is that it’s the only area of human life that I’ve ever discovered where I can walk away from somebody in the middle of a conversation with somebody and they won’t be offended.
  341. My father was a painter. There was a lot of singing. We hung around with a lot of folk musicians. My family knew a lot of great folk musicians of the time, like Woody Guthrie, Paul Robeson, Leadbelly. They were all people we knew.
  342. Marriage requires searing honesty at all costs. I learned that from my third wife.
  343. It’s not that there is a terrible morality in Hollywood. I think there isn’t any. There isn’t any, by and large.
  344. It’s murder to doubt yourself in life. It took until I was 45 to get to that point. As hard as it is in your work, it’s harder in your life. But it can be done.
  345. It’s – everybody’s looking at the bottom line all the time, and failure doesn’t look good on the bottom line, and yet you don’t learn anything without failing.
  346. If you’re playing a negative character, sooner or later it rubs off on you. Some people don’t mind living in that state, but I don’t want to be there anymore. I don’t want to live in a state of depression.
  347. If you want to be an actor and you love acting, you can do it whether you’re doing something else or not. You can be connected with community theater or make your own little movies. But if you want to be a movie star, you’ve got a tough road ahead of you.
  348. I’ve always been an improviser. I was one before I knew even what the word was… And acting, that I’ve been doing since I was 5.
  349. I’m very old. I haven’t got time to be charming.
  350. I’m used to changing a lot of the dialogue. But if I feel like the script is working, I don’t want to mess with it.
  351. I’m not sure if I’ve learned anything from show business. Life in general has taught me if you’re kind to people, everything gets easier. Being a decent person really smoothes the way for you and everyone else.
  352. I’m as old as I am, and I don’t try to hide it. It’s not a big deal.
  353. I’m an actor. My life as an actor depends on who sends me what. I’m just taking the best stuff that I can find that’s sent my way, regardless of how big or little the paycheck is.
  354. I’d have to say that my favorite kind of film is serious comedy. Comedy with serious underpinning. ‘Little Miss Sunshine’ is like that. That’s my fave genre, if I had to pick one.
  355. I wrote my epitaph: He started out a particle and ended up a wave.
  356. I would rather die than do a play – 10 years in solitary instead.
  357. I would like to have a movie under my own control sometime, and see what could be done with it. Who knows? Maybe Hollywood will make an improvisational movie someday.
  358. I was terrified of being on stage, and I had to work very hard at a craft to get past that.
  359. I was a stoopball fan. I played stoopball all the time.
  360. I wanted to make it in New York. I thought if I went out to the Midwest, I’d be burying myself. But I was wrong.
  361. I want to feel like I’m doing something creative and trying different things, putting different hats on and playing. I don’t know what’s the point otherwise; otherwise, it’s just a job. You punch a time clock.
  362. I used to watch the world as if it was a performance and I would realize that certain things that people did moved me, and certain things didn’t move me, and I tried to analyze, even at that age, six and seven and eight, why I was moved by certain things they did.
  363. I used to have a lot of philosophies of acting; they all fell apart over the years.
  364. I never had a better role than I had in ‘Little Miss Sunshine.’ That was one of my favorite roles ever.
  365. I love working if it’s with people who are capable of having a good time. People with a little bit of enjoyment of what they do. If it’s enormous pressure, and people feel that their lives are at stake, then it’s agony. So I try to pick projects where I feel like I’m going to avoid those traps.
  366. I love insane, stupid comedy, but I can only make it work if it’s a character I can give some history to and make real. Like the guy I played in ‘Little Miss Sunshine.’ He’s a maniac, but to me he was absolutely believable.
  367. I love doing kids’ shows, and I love working with kids. I’ve done a lot of it. A lot of people don’t like working with children, but I love it.
  368. I know that if I can’t move people, then I have no business being an actor.
  369. I had to jump around in the arts for a while just to survive. I earned a little money here and there, playing the guitar at union meetings, functions. I sold some science-fiction stories. I knew there was absolutely no question of me not being connected with the arts, but I couldn’t find any acting jobs.
  370. I had a hard time treating my field as if it’s horse racing, putting actors in competition against each other. I see how the industry and the studios feel it’s important, but I don’t really have a feeling for being in competition. I want to feel sympathetic and close to others, not opposed to them.
  371. I gotta make a living. I make no bones about that. Most actors do. But within that context, I’ve never not tried to make something as fresh and alive as I possibly could make it.
  372. I gotta keep busy. I’m not happy unless I’m working on two, three things.
  373. I get a little upset, yeah, if a year goes by and I don’t get a script. Thank God I have other interests that keep me from becoming a nervous wreck.
  374. I don’t sense that I am someone’s hero, though I’m happy when people like my work. I’ve learned how to be gracious about it, but I try to let it go by. I’ve seen how, if people start taking on those accolades, it can ruin them completely.
  375. I don’t mind watching plays once in a while, but as long as I don’t have to be in them.
  376. I don’t live in L.A. on purpose because I don’t wanna be immersed in that. I have to have a real life, with real people, in order to inform what I’m doing; otherwise, it just becomes the snake eating its own tail. Vampirism.
  377. I don’t like improvising on camera, particularly, but very often, a scene will not be working, and you rehearse it once or twice, and you realize something’s missing. So I’ll play with it until it makes sense.
  378. I don’t know why we have to put things in boxes of superlatives. That isolates them. Life is fluid, and the minute you start trying to put a line around something, it will deceive you and go away.
  379. I don’t know what I’m proudest of. The fact that my kids still talk to me.
  380. I don’t care about names attached to the script. That doesn’t matter to me. All things being equal, I would like to work with a good script with a good director, and the part I play is of less important than those two factors.
  381. I don’t believe there’s anything in life you can’t go back and fix. The ancient Vedas – the oldest Hindu philosophy – and modern science agree that time is an illusion. If that’s true, there’s no such thing as a past or a future – it’s all one huge now. So what you fix now affects the past and the future.
  382. I don’t believe in competitions between artists. This is insane. Who has the authority to say someone is better?
  383. I did a couple of movies in Brazil, and the actors were incredibly congenial and hung out together a lot. Even the biggest stars would do radio commercials – they’re not put on a pedestal like they are in the United States.
  384. I can’t even pretend to play golf.
  385. For everybody, the tide comes in, the tide goes out – if you’re an actor, particularly.
  386. Filmmakers, they tell me they want to make movies. I say, ‘Good, go out, buy a $500 camera, get some friends and make a movie. Don’t go to Hollywood. Stay wherever you are.’
  387. Everybody’s career has ups and downs. I like to take chances; I don’t like to stand still. And I don’t give a damn what the market is interested in; I want to try things.
  388. Every physicist knows that things connect with each other. To isolate things is not the way the universe works – winning best actor is arbitrary.
  389. Education does not mean jamming information into somebody’s head. Rather, it’s that ancient idea that all knowledge is within us; to teach is to help somebody pull it out of themselves.
  390. But one of the things I learned from improvising is that all of life is an improvisation, whether you like it or not. Some of the greatest scientific discoveries of the 20th century came out of people dropping things.
  391. All I can say is if the part doesn’t delight me in some way, or I can’t feel any compassion for it, I just can’t do it.
  392. A product is most easily sold when it has an identity. So they wrap you all up and put a label on you. And then that’s what you have to be. But what I’m looking for is the opportunity to explore what I can do, probing the limits, learning.
  393. A director without a vision is a catastrophe.
  394. ‘Catch-22’ was a huge failure, and it rubbed off on everybody connected to it. I had a bunch of lean years where I had to do things, a lot of which I wasn’t wildly enthusiastic about.
  395. You know, I’m gay and I grew up being aware of that at a very early age, in a fairly repressed family.
  396. You cannot hold a child accountable to the same standards that you hold an adult accountable to.
  397. When I go home, the last thing I want to do is read about the popular lore of vampires.
  398. Well, here’s the thing with relationships on ‘True Blood’: Once they happen then you have to throw a monkey-wrench into them, because to have people be happy is not that exciting.
  399. We live in a time where there’s an alienation factor. There’s a certain disconnection. We don’t have any real sense of community anymore.
  400. We live in a patriarchal culture. It’s okay for women to be objectified but not for men.
  401. Vampires are total sexual metaphors; there’s just no way around that.
  402. Ultimately, physical resemblance isn’t as important as whether this person can bring this character to life in a way that’s compelling and makes me care about what happens to them.
  403. There is a fetishization of victimization in our culture. And I just am not interested in victimhood.
  404. There are times when I am directing, and there are a couple of moments I didn’t get the way I wanted, but I know I still have other angles to shoot and I have to be done by noon; I move on.
  405. The ego is kind of a big, unwieldy thing. It’s not so easily tamed or subdued.
  406. The difference between film and TV is the pace. You don’t have the leisure of time in television.
  407. Television viewing has become for me a completely different experience, because I don’t watch shows on a weekly basis. I wait until the DVD or I TiVo everything and wait until the end of a season and watch it all over a weekend. For me that’s a really satisfying experience, like reading a book.
  408. Somebody asked me, ‘Why do people like vampires so much?’ This was right after Obama had been elected and I said, ‘Because we just spent eight years being sucked dry by one.’
  409. Racism is ridiculous no matter where it’s coming from.
  410. Obviously death is a theme I’m fascinated by.
  411. Not everything is going to be successful. To strive for that is really naive. You just do the best you can do.
  412. My own belief is that people can come back from anything. It doesn’t mean that it won’t come at a huge cost.
  413. Most of us live in artificial environments and then we go to work in artificial environments and the world becomes something that you see through a window.
  414. Life is too mysterious to try to map it out. I’ve certainly lived long enough to know it will take you places you never thought it would take you – and some of those places are kind of wonderful.
  415. Life is infinitely complex, and I feel like we live in a culture that really seems to want to simplify it into sound bites and bromides, and that does not work.
  416. It’s hard for me to get interested in stories that ignore death, which is what American marketing culture would like to do: pretend that death doesn’t exist, that you can buy immortality; just buy these products, and you’ll be forever young and happy.
  417. It’s easy to look at the vampires as a metaphor for any feared or misunderstood group. It’s also easy to look at them as a metaphor for a shadow organization that says one thing and has a completely different agenda on their mind, and anybody who gets in their way, they just get rid of them. Does that sound familiar?
  418. It’s a lot harder to find fault with the mundane details of daily existence when you really, really know on a cellular level that you’re going to go, and that this moment, right now, is life. Life isn’t what happens to you in 20 years. This moment, right now, is your life.
  419. In my own life, I think legends of supernatural, mythic things are really just a manifestation of the collective unconscious. So I don’t really get freaked out. I mean certainly, you read about things people did to each other in the pursuit of some mystical or occult goal, and it’s horrifying. But that’s just human nature.
  420. If a scene is longer than three pages, it better be for a good reason.
  421. I’m used to American actors who have a movie career thinking television acting is beneath them.
  422. I’m not saying that being gay is what defines me, but at the same time, if you feel like you have to hide it, then it becomes what defines you. You keep it hidden, and the secret becomes you.
  423. I’m not like J.K. Rowling, where I know there’s going to be this number of seasons, and I know exactly what’s going to happen. I would be so bored if that was the case. There would be no journey. There would be nothing to discover.
  424. I’m from the South, so while I personally find it impossible to live there, I still have a fondness for it as a geographical region.
  425. I’m aware of ‘Twilight,’ but I’ve never seen the movies or read any of the books. Frankly, the story leaves me cold – why do a vampire story about abstinence?
  426. I’m at the point in my life where I don’t want to work as hard. Actually, I’ve had to take a good hard look at workaholism and it’s effect on one’s mental health.
  427. I’m a huge freak, and always have been. I spent the first part of my life trying really desperately not to be one, and it was just a waste of time.
  428. I’m a Buddhist, so one of my biggest beliefs is, ‘Everything changes, don’t take it personally.’
  429. I’m 53. I don’t care about high school students. I find them irritating and uninformed.
  430. I’d seen ‘Interview with A Vampire’ and saw Dracula movies growing up, but I never thought, ‘I love vampires; I have to do a show about vampires.’
  431. I would say try to tell stories that you care about as opposed to stories that you think will sell.
  432. I will say that the environment I grew up in was not the most progressive.
  433. I was conveniently bisexual for a long time, and then I went, ‘Come on, who am I kidding?’ And I have to say, it was the single biggest step I took toward emotional well-being, to stop feeling like I had to hide who I am.
  434. I try to tell the best story, and the story that has some heart and some genuine terror and some social commentary and some comedy and some romance and some sex and some violence.
  435. I think vampires are a timeless powerful archetype that can tap into people’s psyches.
  436. I think there’s a lot of interesting stuff on TV. I feel much more optimistic about TV than I do about movies. There will always be good movies but I think, for the most part, it’s always going to be a huge fight to get those movies made. TV is the best place to be as a writer, I think.
  437. I think the world is a place for oddballs and freaks. I’m only interested in oddballs and freaks as characters.
  438. I think sexuality is a window into someone’s soul.
  439. I think it’s very difficult, and it requires a tremendous amount of spiritual integrity and discipline, to not be a narcissist in a culture that encourages it every step of the way.
  440. I think all writers are armchair psychologists to some degree or another, and I think a character’s sexuality is fascinating. It’s a great way to really get at the root of their identity, because it’s such a personal thing.
  441. I really love storytelling, and I love the stories as they reveal themselves. It’s an incredibly nourishing process; it’s probably the closest I come to having a religion.
  442. I really feel like my goal, and I don’t always achieve it, is to do the best work I can do, and stay out of the results. Because ultimately, the result is not what the work is about. There are other people whose jobs are to focus on those results and maximize them, and that’s great. Let them do their job.
  443. I need to feel like the work I’m doing is not necessarily important, but meaningful, at least to me, because otherwise it just becomes a day job. It just becomes factory work and I get really frustrated.
  444. I love to direct! I get really jazzed by directing, but directing is not the same kind of personal expression, the same kind of personal intimate expression that writing is. Because when you’re directing, you’re basically managing, basically getting out of people doing their job, except when you see them going astray.
  445. I know a lot of shows are like, ‘Here’s the pages,’ right before they start filming. I’d have a heart attack. The anxiety would be way too much for me. I don’t have as strong a backbone as those other show writers.
  446. I guess in America we’re so sold on this ideal of the perfect, well-adjusted family that is able to confront any conflict and, with true love and understanding, work things through. I’m sure they do exist, but I never knew any of them.
  447. I don’t really know what it is about vampires that makes them such a powerful symbol, metaphor, whatever in people’s consciousness. But I do know they’re tremendously powerful. I mean, there’s a vampire on ‘Sesame Street.’ And Count Chocula. I don’t know why it’s so powerful.
  448. I don’t believe in any particular definition of the afterlife, but I do believe we’re spiritual creatures and more than our biology and that energy cannot be destroyed, but can change. I don’t know what the afterlife is going to be, but I’m not afraid of it.
  449. I definitely see the good in people. Certainly in my own life I strive to be somebody who is functional and well adjusted and can face conflict in a non-emotional and non-destructive way, and those are the people I try to surround myself with in my life. But as characters, they bore me.
  450. I certainly feel fortunate in my career to have been able to continue to work in different mediums. I don’t ever want to be the guy who gets really good at one thing and just does that over and over and over again.
  451. I certainly believe that what we perceive as humans is just the tip of the iceberg. I don’t necessarily believe in vampires or werewolves or that kind of thing, but I believe there is definitely a realm we don’t necessarily have access to.
  452. I believe forgiveness is possible for everybody, for everything, but I’m a Buddhist.
  453. I am so spoiled. I cannot watch a show where it gets interrupted for ads. I have to TiVo it and skip through the ads, because the culture of advertising is so false and phony that I just… ugh, you know?
  454. I am a little suspicious of industry paradigms. I feel like so many movies and TV shows feel so familiar because of over-reliance on these paradigms.
  455. I always choose to look, as much as one can, at the supernatural not being something that exists outside of nature, but a deeper, fundamental heart of nature that perhaps humans… have lost touch with. It’s a more primal thing than perhaps we are attuned to in our modern, self-aware way of life.
  456. Happy relationships are boring. We all want them in our own life. But I don’t want to watch them on TV.
  457. Directing is physically exciting because there’s a ticking clock, you’re working with people, it’s very social, it’s very enjoyable.
  458. Depending on what happens with my directing career, I don’t think I’ll stop writing, even if I crash and burn in movies and TV. I’ll go back to plays. Even if I crash and burn there, I’ll write a novel. That’s the great thing about writing is that you don’t have to wait for people to give you permission to do it.
  459. Death showed up in my life very early on, so I’m aware of it. If you look at most of the things I write there’s a sort of contemplation of mortality – although ‘True Blood’ doesn’t fall into that. Even though there’s such a ridiculously high body count!
  460. Death is a companion for all of us, whether we acknowledge it or not, whether we’re aware of it or not, and it’s not necessarily a terrible thing.
  461. Beauty is in the strangest places. A piece of garbage floating in the wind. And that beauty exists in America. It exists everywhere. You have to develop an eye for it and be able to see it.
  462. As a writer, it’s fun to create. And once you get into a long-running show with very established characters and a very established tone and format, after a while it’s a really great job, but that’s what it is – a job.
  463. As a culture, we are not comfortable with mortality. We do not accept it the way other cultures do. We cling to youth, and we don’t want to die. It’s like, ‘Well, too bad, we do.’
  464. And as I stumbled onto Eastern philosophy and Buddhism, it was the first time I had ever read any sort of philosophy that really made a tremendous amount of sense. What I liked that was missing from my experience of Christianity growing up was a sort of acceptance, a sort of being OK with being imperfect and not focusing on the sin.
  465. A lot of times, the choice of the right song will save a scene. Or there will be a scene that’s a little flat and you put in the right song and somehow it just comes alive.
  466. ‘True Blood’ differs from ‘Six Feet Under’ in that there are way more characters and plot-lines, but fundamentally it’s still about the characters and their emotions.
  467. ‘Six Feet Under’ was about repressing our deepest, most primal impulses, and ‘True Blood’ is about giving full sway to them all the time. In a way they are like yin and yang.
  468. You will find truth more quickly through delight than gravity. Let out a little more string on your kite.
  469. You can only see in someone else what you see in yourself.
  470. You can always tell what you believe by what you are getting.
  471. You are in integrity when the life you are living on the outside matches who you are on the inside.
  472. You are doing better than you think you are.
  473. What are you accepting that would not be a part of your ideal day?
  474. To love yourself right now, just as you are, is to give yourself heaven. Don’t wait until you die. If you wait, you die now. If you love, you live now.
  475. The same Source that gave you the idea, will give you the means to see it through.
  476. Our history is not our destiny.
  477. Joy is not the result of getting what you want; it is the way to get what you want. In the deepest sense, joy is what you want.
  478. It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power.
  479. If you sense there must be more, there is more.
  480. Guilt: punishing yourself before God doesn’t.
  481. Great masters neither want nor need your worship. Your greatest gift to them and yourself is to emulate their divinity by claiming it as your own.
  482. God is a frequency. Stay tuned.
  483. Everything will line up perfectly when knowing and living the truth becomes more important than looking good.
  484. Everyone and everything that shows up in our life is a reflection of something that is happening inside of us.
  485. Appreciation is the highest form of prayer, for it acknowledges the presence of good wherever you shine the light of your thankful thoughts.
  486. You’ll see Dame Judi Dench in a Bond film, in Shakespeare and then starring in her own sitcom. You never see that here with Meryl Streep.
  487. You do get really exhausted doing films. You work such long hours, and after a while, things can get out of perspective, just like if anyone’s tired, things get on top of them.
  488. With ‘Urban Secrets,’ I just really liked the idea of wandering around chatting to people.
  489. When you’re on TV, you come into people’s homes. In theater and film, they go to you – to the temple of the cinema or theater. And it’s very different.
  490. When there’s an adult person who’s scaring you, you grow up pretty quickly.
  491. There are some days when you don’t feel like being Alan Cumming.
  492. The thing with film and theater is that you always know the story so you can play certain cues in each scene with the knowledge that you know where the story’s going to end and how it’s going to go. But on television nobody knows what’s going to happen, even the writers.
  493. Sometimes with people I know, they’re playing the hunky action guy and there’s resistance to them coming out because it’s so connected to straight masculinity. There’s a plastic kind of movie star who has a very short shelf with very small kind of ambition. I see that but I still don’t agree with it.
  494. Sometimes people get really sniffy about the films you choose if you’ve done more dramatic projects or you’re classically trained.
  495. So the experts think we could have an AIDS-free generation in Africa by 2015, even if the mothers are positive.
  496. Romeo is the most misunderstood character in literature, I think. He’s hardcore to play because he’s displaying the characteristics of Hamlet at the beginning, and, well, then everything else happens.
  497. Performing a one-man Macbeth feels like the greatest challenge.
  498. Pantomime is a big thing in the cultural calendar of my country, you know. So subtlety’s not my forte.
  499. Once in a while it’s good to challenge yourself in a way that’s really daunting.
  500. Nowadays people don’t know how to handle it if all the ends aren’t tied up and they’re not told what to think in films. And if they’re challenged, they think it’s something wrong with the film.
  501. My mum always told me I was precious, while my dad always told me I was worthless. I think that’s a good grounding for a balanced life.
  502. My feeling about work is it’s much more about the experience of doing it than the end product. Sometimes things that are really great and make lots of money are miserable to make, and vice versa.My feeling about work is it’s much more about the experience of doing it than the end product. Sometimes things that are really great and make lots of money are miserable to make, and vice versa.
  503. Macbeth was the first play I ever read.
  504. Kids are more genuine. When they come up and want to talk to you, they don’t have an agenda. It’s more endearing and less piercing to your aura.
  505. It’s really rare for film directors to be that interested in things other than themselves.
  506. It’s about how you exist as a person in the world, and the idea that your work is more important than you as a person is a horrible, horrible message. I always think about a little gay boy in Wisconsin or a little lesbian in Arkansas seeing someone like me, and if I cannot be open in my life, how on earth can they?
  507. It is not hard to feel like an outsider. I think we have all felt like that at one time or another.
  508. In my first year at drama school, I did this kids’ show called ‘Let’s See.’v
  509. I’m quite good, though I say it myself, at making strangers feel at ease.
  510. I’m not a fan of Twitter.
  511. I’m Scottish first, and it’s odd to hear that I’m a Scottish-American.
  512. I was so scared of going back to the theatre after ‘Hamlet.’ I didn’t know if I’d do a play again because I was afraid of the power of it.
  513. I was horrified when Richard Chamberlain and Rupert Everett said gay actors should stay in the closet. They were saying to people that they should live a lie and not be liberated, to live in fear of being found out.
  514. I usually can find a way to do a character to make it real and work. But sometimes it’s a struggle sustaining that, because there’s such a level of personal involvement and personal, physical, and emotional distraughtness.
  515. I think you can be as big as you like as long as you mean it. I really do.
  516. I think directing in a team is a really good idea because it stops the cult of the director as God straight away, and also you’re discussing things on set so it opens it out to everyone and it becomes a totally collaborative thing. And you have someone who supports you when you’re feeling a bit insecure.
  517. I think American actors are much more intimidated by Shakespeare.
  518. I started to itch to do a play again and ‘Macbeth’ came to the surface in my mind. I never thought I would do it in a conventional way. A sweaty Macbeth with blood on his arms coming in fresh from the battle doesn’t interest me.
  519. I love a film where I get squished by two dumpsters or I fly through the air.
  520. I like working on things that are very different and that involve different disguises.
  521. I like the tragedies way more than the comedies because they’re so universal.
  522. I had to be a grown-up when I should have been a little boy, and now that I’m a grown-up my little-boyness has exploded out of me. I’ve lived my life backwards.
  523. I don’t feel I’m a compulsive person. I multitask. I’m really well-organised, and I have lots of people to help me.
  524. I don’t avoid anyone but I always think some people hate me.
  525. I come more to Scotland than I ever used to, so I feel more connected to it, more part of the zeitgeist. You know when you realize you have a choice and I’m choosing my homeland. It’s funny: when you get older these things creep up to you.
  526. For example, Americans seem reluctant to take on Shakespeare because you don’t think you’re very good at it – which is rubbish. You’re missing out here.
  527. Actually I like working kind of fast, because if you got it, why bother doing it over and over?
  528. Actors aren’t stupid, mostly, and if there’s a sensibility and an aesthetic that a director’s going for, if you’re aware of that too, you can do things to help that.
  529. A sweaty Macbeth with blood on his arms coming in fresh from the battle doesn’t interest me.
  530. ‘Macbeth’ was the first play I ever read. In fact, I remember my brother Tom, who is six years older than me, coming home from school and telling me about it. He was the one that really got me going.
  531. You write a lot of books; you hope you get better.
  532. You have to have heart’s passion to write a novel.
  533. You could be a victim, you could be a hero, you could be a villain, or you could be a fugitive. But you could not just stand by. If you were in Europe between 1933 and 1945, you had to be something.
  534. You can’t make accommodations in crucial situations and be heroic.
  535. Yes, I’m a reasonably good self-taught historian of the 1930s and ’40s. I’ve never wanted to write about another time or place. I wouldn’t know what to say about contemporary society.
  536. Women take great care of themselves in France. It’s a culture dedicated to making women beautiful and to manners.
  537. Whether you like it or not, Paris is the beating heart of Western civilisation. It’s where it all began and ended.
  538. When you move a border, suddenly life changes violently. I write about nationality.
  539. When I went to prep school in New York City, I had to ride the subway and learned how to do homework on the train. I can work and read through anything.
  540. When I read period material – and it ain’t on Google – I am always alert for that one incredible detail. I’ll read a whole book and get three words out of it, but they’ll be three really good words.
  541. When I get asked about novelists I like, they tend to be white, male, and British, like Graham Greene. They write the kind of declarative sentences I like. I don’t like to be deflected by acrobatics.
  542. What you get in the Cold War is ‘the wilderness of mirrors’ where you have to figure out what’s good and what’s evil. That’s good for John le Carre, but not me.
  543. What I discovered is I don’t like to repeat lead characters because one of the most pleasurable things in a book to me is learning about the lead.
  544. We’re the roughest people in the way we play and live, and that is because Americans come from people who all got up one morning and went 5,000 miles, and that was a time in the 19th century when it wasn’t so easy to do.
  545. Venice has always fascinated me. Every country in Europe then was run by kings and the Vatican except Venice, which was basically run by councils. I’ve always wondered why.
  546. The way I work: I pick a country. I learn the political history – I mean I really learn it; I read until it sinks in. Once I read the political history, I can project and find the clandestine history. And then I people it with the characters.
  547. The only way you can handle big kinds of questions is to simply state briefly what the truth was. What am I going to tell you about the Holocaust? Would you like three pages about it? I don’t think you would… I don’t think anything different than you think – it was horrible.
  548. The idea that someone is going to write me, and I’m not going to answer – I was just raised not to do that. We are the result of our upbringing, and my upbringing was very much to meet obligations… You just didn’t let things go.
  549. The brutalization of humans by other humans never fails to get to me in some angry-making way. It shot up in me like an explosion.
  550. The best Paris I know now is in my head.
  551. The 1930s was a funny time. People knew they might not live for another six months, so if they were attracted to one another, there was no time to dawdle.
  552. Struggling writers are often advised to pick a simple genre, but it doesn’t work that way.
  553. Spy novels are traditionally about lone wolves, but how many people actually live like that?
  554. Seattle’s support system got me through those early, difficult years. It was a very funky, very friendly, very relaxed place that had it all for a writer.
  555. Romantic love, or sex, is the only good thing in a life that is being lived in a dark way.
  556. Robert Ludlum, all of them, write the absolute best they can. You can’t tone it down. You just do what you do, and if it comes out literary, so be it.
  557. Poland is a wildly dramatic and tragic story. It’s just unbelievable what went on with those people. How they survive, I don’t really know. The Germans had a particular hatred for the Poles; they really considered them subhuman Slavs, and they were very brutal to them.
  558. People know accuracy when they read it; they can feel it.
  559. Once you have your characters, they tell you what to write, you don’t tell them.
  560. My theory is that sometimes writers write books because they want to read them, and they aren’t there to be read. And I think that was true of me.
  561. My novels are about the European reality, not about chases. You want chases, get somebody else’s books.
  562. My grandmother, whom I adored, and who partly raised me, loved Liberace, and she watched Liberace every afternoon, and when she watched Liberace, she’d get dressed up and put on makeup because I think she thought if she could see Liberace, Liberace could see her.
  563. My father died when I was young, and my mother, Ruth, went to work in an office selling theater and movie parties. She put me through private school, Horace Mann, in Riverdale. She sent me to camp so that I would learn to compete. She was a lioness, and I was her cub.
  564. Moscow had this incredible, intense atmosphere of intrigue and darkness and secrecy.
  565. Let me put it this way: I don’t plan to retire. What would I do, become a brain surgeon? I mean, a brain surgeon can retire and write novels, but a novelist can’t retire and do brain surgery – or at least he better not.
  566. Le Carre’s voice – patrician, cold, brilliant and amused – was perfect for the wilderness-of-mirrors undertow of the Cold War, and George Smiley is the all-time harassed bureaucrat of spy fiction.
  567. It takes me three months of research and nine months of work to produce a book. When I start writing, I do two pages a day; if I’m gonna do 320, that’s 160 days.
  568. In the 1930s, there were so many different conflicts going on between the British, the French, the Russians, the Germans, the Spaniards, the Romanians and so on.
  569. If you’re a writer, you’re always working.
  570. If you read the history of the national Socialist party, they’re all people who felt like life should have been better to them. They’re disappointed, vengeful, angry.
  571. If you can live in Paris, maybe you should.
  572. If I’m a genre writer, I’m at the edge. In the end, they do work like genre fiction. You have a hero, there’s a love interest, there’s always a chase, there’s fighting of some kind. You don’t have to do that in a novel. But you do in a genre novel.
  573. I’ve never lived in Eastern Europe, although both my wife and I have ancestors in Poland and Russia – but I can see the scenes I create.
  574. I’ve evolved in my writing to tell a more emotional story – my publisher, Random House, has urged that.
  575. I’ve always liked lost, old New York.
  576. I’m not really a mass market writer.
  577. I’m basically an Upper West Side Jewish writer.
  578. I’d never been in a police state. I didn’t know what it was. I knew that it was, in the general way that people know that two and two is four, but it had no emotional value for me until I found myself in the middle of it.
  579. I wrote three mysteries and then a contemporary spy novel that was unbelievably derivative – completely based on ‘The Conversation,’ the movie with Gene Hackman. Amazingly, the character in the book looks exactly like… Gene Hackman.
  580. I wrote out little mysteries in longhand, and my mother typed them out on an old Remington.
  581. I write what I call ‘novels of consolation’ for people who are bright and sophisticated.
  582. I write about the period 1933-42, and I read books written during those years: books by foreign correspondents of the time, histories of the time written contemporaneously or just afterwards, autobiographies and biographies of people who were there, present-day histories of the period, and novels written during those times.
  583. I would have loved to have another 10 Eric Ambler books.
  584. I was raised on John D. MacDonald’s Travis McGee series. Something about this genre – hard-boiled-private-eye-with-heart-of-gold – never failed to take me away from whatever difficulties haunted my daily world to a wonderful land where I was no more than an enthralled spectator.I was raised on John D. MacDonald’s Travis McGee series. Something about this genre – hard-boiled-private-eye-with-heart-of-gold – never failed to take me away from whatever difficulties haunted my daily world to a wonderful land where I was no more than an enthralled spectator.
  585. I was going to be the best failed novelist in Paris. That was certainly not the worst thing in the world that one could be.
  586. I think I honestly invented my own genre, the historical spy novel.
  587. I started writing in my 20s. I just wanted to write, but I didn’t have anything to write about, so in the beginning, I wrote entertainments – mainly murder mysteries.
  588. I started out when I was 29 – too young to write novels. I was broke. I was on unemployment insurance. I was supposed to be writing a Ph.D. dissertation, so I had a typewriter and a lot of paper.
  589. I spend my life writing fiction, so reading fiction isn’t much of an escape. That’s not always true, but I don’t read much contemporary fiction.
  590. I read very little contemporary anything… I don’t think I read what other people read, but then why would I, considering what I do?
  591. I read very little contemporary anything.
  592. I never wanted to be a Cold War novelist.
  593. I never got any training in how to write novels as an English major at Oberlin, but I got some great training for writing novels from anthropology and from Margaret Mead.
  594. I love the gray areas, but I like the gray areas as considered by bright, educated, courageous people.
  595. I love the combination of the words ‘spies’ and ‘Balkans.’ It’s like meat and potatoes.
  596. I love Paris for the million reasons that everybody loves the city. It’s an incredibly romantic and beautiful place.
  597. I look for the dark story, where something secret was done. I read and read and pick up the trail of a true story. I use nothing but true stories. They are so much better than phony ones.
  598. I like to say I sit alone in my room, and I fight the language. I am wildly obsessive. I can’t let something go if I think it’s wrong.
  599. I knew I was a writer; I wanted to be a writer, but I didn’t know what to write.
  600. I just became what I call an ‘anti-fascist novelist.’ There is no word that covers both the fascists and the Communists, which mean different things to people, but of course they’re the same: they’re tyranny states.
  601. I invented the historical spy novel.
  602. I have a very serious censorship office inside my head; it censors things that I could tell you that you would never forget, and I don’t want to be the person to stick that in your brain.
  603. I had the experience of a monk copying documents, applying myself assiduously to my work. And I thought whatever happened, happened – this is just what I do in my life.
  604. I had a publishing history of murder mysteries.
  605. I grew up reading genre writers, and to the degree that Eric Ambler and Graham Greene are genre writers, I’m a genre writer.
  606. I figured I would always be a candidate for man of the year in the virtue-is-its-own-reward category. What that did was force me to concentrate on the work.
  607. I expect that my readers have been to Europe, I expect them to have some feeling for a foreign language, I expect them to have read books – there are a lot of people like that! That’s my audience.
  608. I don’t work Sunday any more… The Sabbath is a very reasonable idea. Otherwise, you work yourself to death.
  609. I don’t really write plots. I use history as the engine that drives everything.
  610. I don’t just want my books to be about the ’30s and ’40s. I want them to read as if they had been written then. I think of them as ’40s novels, written in the conservative narrative past.
  611. I don’t inflict horrors on readers. In my research, I’ve uncovered truly terrible documentations of cruelty and torture, but I leave that offstage. I always pull back and let the reader imagine the details. We all know to one degree or another the horrors of war.
  612. I could not spend the rest of my life sitting in Brazil writing down who called whom uncle and aunt.
  613. I chose a time in the century which had the greatest moments for novels – the late ’30s and World War II.
  614. I basically wrote five books with ‘Night Soldiers,’ called them novellas, and came in with a 600-page manuscript.
  615. I am there to entertain. I call my work high escape fiction; it’s high, it’s good – but it’s escape, and I have no delusions about that. I have no ambition to be a serious writer, whatever that means.
  616. I am a historian. I do a lot of research, and I try to get it right.
  617. Graham Greene’s work must be included in any survey of top-rank spy novels, and ‘Our Man in Havana’ may be his best.
  618. Good people don’t spend their time being good. Good people want to spend their time mowing the lawn and playing with the dog. But bad people spend all their time being bad. It is all they think about.
  619. French women will always look up at a man, even if he is four inches shorter than she is.
  620. For something that’s supposed to be secret, there is a lot of intelligence history. Every time I read one book, two more are published.
  621. For me, Anthony Powell is a religion. I read ‘A Dance to the Music of Time’ every few years.
  622. For John le Carre, it was always who’s betraying who: the hall-of-mirrors kind of thing. When you go back to the ’30s, it’s a case of good vs. evil, and no kidding. When I have a hero who believes France and Britain are on the right side, a reader is not going to question that.
  623. Fast-paced from start to finish, ‘The Honourable Schoolboy’ is fired by le Carre’s conviction regarding evil done and its consequences.
  624. Anthony Powell taught me to write; he has such brilliant control of the mechanics of the novel.
  625. A book must have moral purpose to be any good. Why, I don’t know.
  626. ‘The Levanter’ features some of the strongest action scenes to be found in Ambler – who can, in some of his fiction, stay in one place for a whole novel.
  627. You only live once, except for Shirley MacLaine.
  628. You do live longer with bran, but you spend the last fifteen years on the toilet.
  629. When I was in the hospital they gave me apple juice every morning, even after I told them I didn’t like it. I had to get even. One morning, I poured the apple juice into the specimen tube. The nurse held it up and said, ‘It’s a little cloudy.’ I took the tube from her and said, ‘Let me run it through again,’ and drank it. The nurse fainted.
  630. When I was a kid, I used to send away for those ventriloquist kits on the back of comic books.
  631. When I read Dickens for the first time, I thought he was Jewish, because he wrote about oppression and bigotry, all the things that my father talked about.
  632. When I get up in the morning, I have to decide what I’m going to have for dinner or I can’t get through the day.
  633. We get the worrywart, the hypochondriac, the money-grubbing miser, the intractable negotiator… Some would say certain of these refer to the stereotypical, or ‘stage’ Jew. But objectively speaking, the only crime in humor is an unfunny joke.
  634. There’s nobody to believe in anymore, nobody to trust.
  635. There’s a charm, there’s a rhythm, there’s a soul to Jewish humor. When I first saw Richard Pryor perform, I told him, ‘You’re doing a Jewish act.’
  636. The world is full of little dictators trying to run your life.
  637. The ability to absorb a book and make someone else’s words and story your own was exactly was I was doing on stage.
  638. That’s the great thing about New Year’s, you get to be a year older. For me, that wasn’t such a joke, because my birthday was always around this time. When I was a kid, my father used to tell me that everybody was celebrating my birthday. That’s what the trees are all about.
  639. Smoked salmon is for dinner. Belly lox is for breakfast. Don’t get that mixed up.
  640. Right when I started in show… Milton Berle was my first idol. When I was a kid, I went to see Milton at Lowe’s State, and I never laughed so much, and I said, ‘That’s who I want to be; that’s what I want to be.’
  641. Performing is just standing up there and doing something. Performance takes on an edge to it. It has a more dramatic context.
  642. One thing I’ve never said in my whole life is, ‘Let’s have dinner at a Japanese restaurant.’
  643. My wife is a very attractive woman, and she’s always worried about her diet. But she doesn’t pay attention to me, and I don’t pay attention to her. She’s a vegetarian, and it drives me crazy.
  644. My son says I never tell stories about anyone who’s living.
  645. My mother’s sister was killed in a trolley car accident, so I was raised as one of eight with my sister and six male cousins.
  646. My mother kept the house clean and we ate good. I didn’t know we were poor until I started giving interviews.
  647. My favorite way to spend Saturday is in and out of bed, watching sports on TV and eating.
  648. My father was a dreamer – my hero. He was a smart, tough guy from Poland, a cutter of lady’s handbags, an old socialist-unionist who always considered himself a failure. His big line was: ‘Don’t end up like me.’
  649. My father helped me leave. He said, ‘It’s all out there, it’s not here.’
  650. My brother is the youngest member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. And I wouldn’t let him cut my nails.
  651. Museums are good things, places to look and absorb and learn.
  652. Modesty is not one of my virtues.
  653. Milton took vaudeville, which, if you look up ‘vaudeville’ in the dictionary, right alongside of it, it says ‘Milton Berle’ – and he made it just a tremendous party.
  654. Marriage is nature’s way of keeping us from fighting with strangers.
  655. Let’s face it: It’s difficult enough to be funny without worrying about what is going to offend whom.
  656. Larry David finds a way to make jokes about the Holocaust. It would never have occurred to me. And it was funny.
  657. It’s not easy being a father, but I’ve been allowed a comeback.
  658. If you want to read about love and marriage, you’ve got to buy two separate books.
  659. If you stop and think about it, nearly all great humor is at the expense of someone or something.
  660. If you keep yourself alive and current, funny is funny.
  661. I’m only… I’m only unhappy when the reviews are bad, but give me a good review and I’m a… I’m just screaming all over the place with joy.
  662. I won’t eat in a place that has suits of armor.
  663. I was a high school throw-out.
  664. I think one of the big things about comedy is the ability for the audience to identify.
  665. I made it, Ma – Carnegie Hall. And I didn’t have to practice.
  666. I learned to cook in self-defense. My wife doesn’t know what a kitchen is. In the first month of our marriage, she broiled lamb chops 26 nights in a row. Then I took over. I used to mind her not caring about food, but no more – as long as I can eat what I want.
  667. I just never saw my mother in any other room but the kitchen. There were always pots going.
  668. I had a sympathetic role in ‘thirtysomething,’ and in two weeks I’m going to do the role again. But in the movies, I just love the heavies. It’s much more fun. Villains are a ball. People have been laughing at me for 50 years, so I love to sit in the back of the theater and listen to them hate me.
  669. I don’t mind being 65, but nobody is gonna tell me to come in at 5:30 to have the early bird special.
  670. I can’t stay friends with anyone who doesn’t have a passion for something; and, generally speaking, artistic people, creative people carry it right into the kitchen, too. They have a zest for life; the excitement of living. All of the great eaters I’ve known are also men of great wit.
  671. Everything my mother made had to cook for 80 hours, and when she made matzoh balls she didn’t know fluffy. Everything sank.
  672. Ed Sullivan brought me to TV first in 1952, then Garry Moore’s program gave me a lot of confidence and freedom.
  673. Did you hear the one about the elderly Jew on his deathbed who sent for a priest, after declaring to his astonished relatives that ‘I want to convert.’ Asked why he would become a Catholic, after living all his life as a Jew, he answered: ‘Better one of them should die than one of us.’
  674. Comedy is an amazing calling. Once you get that first laugh, it’s hard to turn away. Then, of course, you’re hooked and you have to learn how to survive in the business.
  675. Comedy is a reflection. We create nothing. We set no styles, no standards. We’re reflections. It’s a distorted mirror in the fun house. We watch society. As society behaves, then we have the ability to make fun of it.
  676. Banks have a new image. Now you have ‘a friend,’ your friendly banker. If the banks are so friendly, how come they chain down the pens?
  677. As you get older, as you become more sensitive, feel more, it becomes harder to make jokes. You censor yourself.
  678. As a parent, I’d – I’d be a better father.
  679. And humor has always been a weapon. You want to get even on somebody? You want to attack somebody? Make fun of them.
  680. Age, style, where you come from, where you were born, it’s different every time, which, to me, is refreshing because it says that there isn’t any one thing, one formula or kind of character that makes a great comedian. Everybody has had a different approach.
  681. A summary of every Jewish holiday: They tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat!
  682. You ask yourself not if this or that is expedient, but if it is right.
  683. Who knows for what we live, and struggle, and die? Wise men write many books, in words too hard to understand. But this, the purpose of our lives, the end of all our struggle, is beyond all human wisdom.
  684. When a deep injury is done us, we never recover until we forgive.
  685. What broke in a man when he could bring himself to kill another?
  686. To give up the task of reforming society is to give up one’s responsibility as a free man.
  687. There is only one way in which one can endure man’s inhumanity to man and that is to try, in one’s own life, to exemplify man’s humanity to man.
  688. If you wrote a novel in South Africa which didn’t concern the central issues, it wouldn’t be worth publishing.
  689. I envision someday a great, peaceful South Africa in which the world will take pride, a nation in which each of many different groups will be making its own creative contribution.
  690. God forgives us… who am I not to forgive?
  691. Cry, the beloved country, for the unborn child that is the inheritor of our fear. Let him not love the earth too deeply… For fear will rob him of all if he gives too much.
  692. But the one thing that has power completely is love, because when a man loves, he seeks no power, and therefore he has power.
  693. When I started out, at the CBC in Toronto, there was so little work. It was a different world from what it is now. Now we’re blessed with so much production in so many Canadian cities.
  694. We look for opportunities to play together including basketball, tennis, swimming, riding bikes and touch football. I try to provide a loving environment where we can play. I think that’s good on so many levels – emotionally, for family interactions and, of course, physically.
  695. There’s not much that I haven’t done in my life, but there’s lots of things that I’d like to do better. The variety of my career has been the fun of it, and I can thank Canada for that.
  696. There is no doubt in my mind Bill Cosby was a bad boy.
  697. There are psychological repercussions to illness and we need a little more help to get through the effects not only on the afflicted but on the family. And I think there’s even a place for humor in that.
  698. The way I was parented did affect my parenting – probably in the reverse. My dad was pretty strict, and the next generation probably wants to be less strict.
  699. The two things I hear wherever I go, literally walking down the street, through airports, or in restaurants – it is either ‘You raised me,’ or ‘Fellow Canadian.’ Not even a paraphrase – those are the exact remarks.
  700. So we had psychiatrists and counselors and therapists around the set regularly, especially for those scenes in which Jason would be dealing with a patient to make sure we were doing it all appropriately.
  701. So there was a constant flow and a thin line there between reality and television and yes, much of what I was experiencing in my real life was also what was going on in the television show to the extent that I had to take writers’ advice and from the counselors around.
  702. People talk about, ‘Well, why don’t they bring ‘Growing Pains’ back?’ No, it belongs in the time capsule exactly where it was. It would probably look corny and dated if they tried to redo that. But I think, for its time, it was meaningful.
  703. Part of the mystique of shows like ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ is the idea that they begin with a couple of plot lines, and then a bunch of geniuses improvise dialogue. It’s not quite that unstructured and loose. It makes for a good urban myth, but everything’s a little more tightly scripted and programmed than that.
  704. One week you may be an actor, and the next week you had to be nimble enough to be a TV host. And the week after that, you might have to do some stand-up or be in an improv company or write and sing a song somewhere.
  705. On a selfish basis, I really enjoy sports and activity.
  706. My two boys were the same ages as the kids in the show. In real life or in between the breaks I was raising two kids off camera who were not unlike the two kids who were being paid to be my kids.
  707. My priority is to turn people – especially kids – on to sports and being active so they don’t even have to think about it being good for their health. If people participate for the fun of it, and believe me – it is fun, then fitness programs will be much more successful.
  708. My kids are all pretty big and tough and strong, and I don’t worry about them being bullied – the reverse, be kind to people and don’t ever be a bully yourself, and I think they’ve followed that.
  709. My advice, it’s get involved in any and every aspect of the business that affords itself to you.
  710. My advice to Robin is listen to your heart, do what you feel. Follow your heart in love and marriage as you would in careers, and you’ll be fine. Robin has a great heart. He’s a fabulous father.
  711. It’s always been said that comedy comes mostly out of the dark side anyway.
  712. In terms of social media, I try to have my voice heard loudly in the cacophony of other influences whether from television and the Internet or social media… I want my voice to be heard in terms of the standards and values that I try to pass on to my kids.
  713. In ‘The Goods,’ I’m Ed Helms’ dad, and I was known all those years as Kirk Cameron’s father, and now I’m known as Robin Thicke’s father, so I find myself playing myself a lot and, frankly, living up to expectations of what the public’s image of me is.
  714. If one tends to be a humorous person and you have a sense of humor the rest of your life then you can certainly lighten the load, I think, by bringing that to your trials and tribulations. It’s easy to have a sense of humor when everything is going well.
  715. If it is a first offense, you ground them and have a talk. The second offense would call for counseling.
  716. If I could have grown up to be Robin Thicke, I would have. But I’m glad somebody in the family did.
  717. I’ve always felt that improv looks and feels more clever when you’re there to experience it live than when you have the degree of separation that television creates. Television raises expectations.
  718. I’m not doing anything Jack Nicholson turned down. Any part that required a character distanced from myself would have been a reach. But the one thing I’ve always done well at, and I’m most devoted to, is my children.
  719. I’m not able to go in with an act that I use month to month year to year all the time. It’s constantly evolving and changing and that keeps me on my toes but certainly adds to the challenge.
  720. I’m a big proponent of having a mental health component go along with whatever the physical realities are.
  721. I’ll be on my third honeymoon, so I’m more of an authority than I care to be.
  722. I wouldn’t call myself a standup in the presence of Jerry Seinfeld or Chris Rock, but I do my share of it and it has been and remains part of my activity and I like it.
  723. I was discovered, or mentored, by Norman Lear, who plucked me from the grinder of relative obscurity.
  724. I have some realistic humility which comes from my first career as a writer. I wrote for other people for ten years. I saw some incredible egos not based on any reality. They were great when they were on top and awful when they weren’t. I learned a lot about how to treat people.
  725. I have few other characters to relate to other than myself. I have enough of a body of work now that the paternal side of Alan Thicke gets a lot of play. I do get a lot of calls to play dads.
  726. I did write a lot of TV themes – I wrote about 45 of them, and a couple of which are still reference and popular today, like ‘Diff’rent Strokes’ and ‘Facts of Life.’ But I was a limited musician.
  727. Fitness needs to be perceived as fun and games or we subconsciously avoid it.
  728. Family involvement is a valuable thing and playing together actively can be the ’90s version of it. Instead of just watching, you can do it together… something we don’t spend enough time on. We can motivate and excite each other about fitness.
  729. As a father, my first priority is to help my sons set and attain personal goals so they will develop self-confidence and individual strength. Engaging in regular fitness activities with my children helps me fulfill those responsibilities.
  730. And introduce an element of cynicism and darkness into it and just realize that we’re all vulnerable. We are humans. There is a finite end to this life and we’re all going to face it and a little silliness can help.
  731. About 100 things that your kid will do that will surprise you and break your heart and it will be a combination of fact based therapy, medically advised kinds of passages accompanied by celebrity anecdotes and just some funny stuff to lighten the load.
  732. Women try to be the best everywhere, and it’s impossible. I want my clothes to give women the freedom to just be – I want them to put on my dresses and shine.
  733. Women can dream at 9 in the morning and at 10 o’clock at night – it doesn’t matter.
  734. Why not touch things that we hate and turn them upside down and inside out?
  735. When you come into a house like Saint Laurent, or Chanel, or Lanvin, and you go into a place that existed before you were born and will exist after you die, it takes some time to get in, to get to people, and to get the energy of the place.
  736. When I’m traveling the world, I don’t ever look anymore at the geography – just enough to catch galleries and paintings.
  737. When I was either 7 or 8 years old, I did a sketch every day of my teacher and what she wore. At the end of the year, I gave her the sketchbook. For me, the sketching of dresses was about fantasy and dreams.
  738. We are being accused that some models are anorexic. But we as fashion designers cannot be blamed, because you know, when I talk to women around the world, rich and poor and young and old and intellectual and not, what they want to be is skinny. You ask them, ‘What is your dream?’ It’s to be skinny. That’s all they want.
  739. To be a fashion critic is easy because you just say, ‘I love it, I hate it,’ but life is more than love and hate.
  740. There is always a reason why, and I need to tell the stories.
  741. The worst thing that can happen is if you’re stuck within a bubble and you think that is what life is all about. It’s great to see other people and hear from people of different ages and opinions.
  742. The problem with couture is not designers; it’s what happens when the couturier will no longer be there.
  743. The nature of fashion is family.
  744. The designers, photographers and models I work with, they are really hard-working people who are devoting their lives to fashion. They’re kind of like nuns of fashion.
  745. Stay big in your work and small in your life.
  746. Run away from laziness; work hard. Touch intuition and listen to the heart, not marketing directors. Dream.
  747. Our logo for Lanvin is a mother and a daughter. I’ve always said, ‘It’s not a lion, and it’s not a horse. It’s a mother and a daughter.’ I find the logo very emotional.
  748. Our clothes are not always beautiful on the hanger, but put them on, and they fit like bathing suits.
  749. One woman told me that every time she wears Lanvin, men fall in love with her. Another told me she wore Lanvin to face her husband’s lawyer because she felt protected. If I can make men fall in love with women and if I can protect women, I think I can die peacefully.
  750. Nothing is ever enough for me. I’m always thinking what is wrong, what needs to be fixed.
  751. My job is to do. My job is to make women beautiful. What do I have to say?
  752. My father, who was a hair colourist, died when I was young, so my mother had to work very hard. But at the same time, I do believe that if you have everything, it is easy to make a dinner. When you only have flour and water and olives and potatoes, you have to be much more creative, and that’s what my mother is all about.
  753. My dream is to be a doctor. I’m almost working in a laboratory, because I’m trying new techniques, new directions and fabrics, new weaving.
  754. Mine is a job that never ends, a function where it is almost impossible to set aside time to rest or take a breather.
  755. Me, as a designer who is not exactly skinny, all I want is comfortable clothes.
  756. Many, many times I find that whatever is looking good on the screen doesn’t always look or feel good on the body. So who do we design for – do we design for the screen, or do we design for women?
  757. It’s a major job to help men and women look beautiful.
  758. In high fashion, we’re always accused of doing things that are not very relevant, not the real world. I know that it’s important sometimes to do fantasy, but I felt like touching people and going back to different women and men, especially the idea of different ages and body shapes.
  759. In fashion, the time is so short, and even with pre-collection, there are not only dresses, shoes, bags, and furs but now raincoats and T-shirts. It’s just an endless amount of work that we have to produce in no time.
  760. If you take something out of the freezer, it’s cold, but what happens when it melts? It’s a cool party, a cool person, a cool collection. What does that mean? I’m more interested in things that are uncool, things that have a certain individuality, a certain soul, a certain longevity, emotion, fragility.
  761. If you change a woman’s look, you change her persona.
  762. If I wasn’t a designer, I would love to be a doctor. That is my fantasy, my dream. A doctor will give you a tablet if you have a headache, and I will give you a dress, and we both make you feel good.
  763. If I am in a beautiful place, but I don’t like the people, I am miserable.
  764. I’ve always said fashion is like roast chicken: You don’t have to think about it to know it’s delicious.
  765. I’m not a religious person in the regular sense, but in the Bible you’re not allowed to steal, you’re not allowed to lie and you’re not allowed to feel you’re above other people.
  766. I’m not a plastic surgeon, and I cannot change the DNA of a person, but when I see a woman try on my clothes and she feels beautiful, I know I am doing my job.
  767. I’m always looking for a story.
  768. I work on fittings, mostly. You know, I sketch less and less in my work. I sketch for the show sometimes, but then it becomes more conceptual. But when I don’t sketch, it becomes more pragmatic.
  769. I was a fat child; I was asthmatic. No wonder I’m a hypochondriac.
  770. I wanted to go out of fashion, to study medicine. I thought, you know, who needs fashion? How important is it if you wear a red dress and an orange jacket? It’s not, really.
  771. I want to know where is that committee in Switzerland that sits to decide what is in and what is out. I don’t listen to the formula makers. I think maybe I have a selective hearing disorder.
  772. I used to hate L.A., but I met such a great group of people there that I fell in love with it.
  773. I thought, ‘It doesn’t matter what that woman is wearing,’ but then I realised actually it’s our job as designers to make women smile; to bring them the chocolate without the calories.
  774. I think that if you want to pass emotion, you have to write a letter. Emotions do not pass in SMS or in e-mail.
  775. I think a good designer can exist everywhere and anywhere and all the time. It’s all about being good, and I think that our job basically is to make women and men look good.
  776. I spend my time backstage at the Lanvin shows, and when I come out at the end, all I see are people’s eyes.
  777. I never think people should do things for me. I think I should do things for others. That makes me more comfortable.
  778. I love women. I get along with women more than men, and I have more women friends.
  779. I love to see old women. I love wrinkles. I love gray hair.
  780. I love and respect women. I work mostly with women.
  781. I live many lives at once.
  782. I like having the freedom to dress as I desire.
  783. I like dresses for night; I like after-party more than party. I like the mystery; I like the dream, like fantasy dresses. I think, also, that you make women dream.
  784. I hate the word ‘cool.’ It gives me a rash.
  785. I hate bridges. I’m always very insecure on bridges.
  786. I don’t think you can be a designer if you don’t care.
  787. I don’t think that you can write music if you don’t know how to play an instrument. You have to know the basics, then you can go forward.
  788. I don’t go out to parties because I’d look terrible in pictures. My escape is television – it’s like meditation to me.
  789. I do sport at the gym a few times a week, but I hate it. Work is my only remedy. I feel so twisted and horrible in the morning, but then I go to the office and I start feeling better. Work is my Tylenol. Extra-strength.
  790. I certainly can’t complain. I work six days a week, if not seven, and eighteen hours out of twenty-four – fortunately, with a great deal of pleasure. Why? Because I only do something if I want to do it; I need to feel a desire, to find pleasure in moving forward, creating, moving, inventing.
  791. I barely finish one pre-collection before I must start on another. Sales start, but I am already elsewhere creatively. The men’s show is being prepared, but we also need to think about accessories, perfumes and other items. In sum, I never stop.
  792. I am very much a people person.
  793. I am not interested in perfection, and neither are the women who wear my clothes.
  794. I am always trying to put myself inside: Every dress I do, I think, ‘If I were a woman, would I wear it?’
  795. I always wear a dinner jacket. I never have this definition of what goes for the morning or the evening or what works for the weekend.
  796. I always think, if I were an editor, and I was invited to a show, and I would have to wait for 45 minutes in the dark or in the cold or in the heat, maybe I would like to have a fresh drink or a piece of chocolate.
  797. I always say that women are very strong and men are powerful. But beauty gives you both strength and power. I never think of it. It’s just one of those natural things. It’s the only thing I know how to do.
  798. I adore women, and the one thing I want to do more than anything is to see a transformation of personality when someone puts on one of my dresses.
  799. How do you stand out as a fashion ad campaign? By using people off the street; it does generate buzz.
  800. For me, the sketching of dresses was about fantasy and dreams. In my little room at home, I felt that I was somewhere else. In Paris, for instance.
  801. For me, Lancome was more than just a brand. There was something very nostalgic about the name, about the whole story.
  802. Fashion is not enough anymore. It’s not just about what you wear. I mean, I don’t know how many women can afford to take the time to come to Paris for three fittings.
  803. Fashion is not always about what’s new, it’s also about what’s good. And I think if you need to see what’s good, you have to be there.
  804. Fashion doesn’t look good only on models; it can look good on different people of different ages and different body shapes.
  805. At Yves Saint Laurent, I felt like the son-in-law – like I was part of the family, but not quite. When I was fired, I felt like the widow.
  806. Almost every collection I do has 200 different references. I don’t have two of the same coat, two of the same dress. I have it in one color, in one fabric. I’ve tried to adapt the culture of couture, and the know-how and the heritage, but I try to update it.
  807. All I want is beautiful. I mean, I like grey hair, I love wrinkles. But this is me.
  808. A singer can quit once he or she has made ten great songs; a director can finish once he or she has made five amazing films; a writer just needs to write three great books.
  809. ‘Commercial’ is not the word that has to be said only by CEOs. It has to be something that is maybe the essence of design, because design has some sort of art in it and creation, but it’s also some object that you have to use. There is also this pragmatic end to it.
  810. When I’m introduced at invited lectures at other universities, the students place a Bobo doll by the lectern. From time to time, I have been asked to autograph one. The Bobo doll has achieved stardom in psychological circles.
  811. Very often we developed a better grasp of the subjects than the over worked teachers.
  812. There are countless studies on the negative spillover of job pressures on family life, but few on how job satisfaction enhances the quality of family life.
  813. The higher the level of people’s perceived self-efficacy, the wider the range of career options they seriously consider, the greater their interest in them, and the better they prepare themselves educationally for the occupational pursuits they choose.
  814. The content of most textbooks is perishable, but the tools of self-directedness serve one well over time.
  815. Some of the most important determinants of life paths arise through the most trivial of circumstances.
  816. Perpetrators absolve their harmful behavior as serving worthy causes.
  817. People’s beliefs about their abilities have a profound effect on those abilities. Ability is not a fixed property; there is huge variablitiy in how you perform.
  818. People who have a sense of self-efficacy bounce back from failure; they approach things in terms of how to handle them rather than worrying about what can go wrong.
  819. People who believe they have the power to exercise some measure of control over their lives are healthier, more effective and more successful than those who lack faith in their ability to effect changes in their lives.
  820. Osama bin Laden characterized his terrorist activities as ‘defensive jihad,’ provoked by ‘debauched infidels’ bent on enslaving the Muslim world. The lead industry blamed ‘ignorant parents’ for applying lead paint to juvenile furniture.
  821. Most of the images of reality on which we base our actions are really based on vicarious experience.
  822. Moral justification is a powerful disengagement mechanism. Destructive conduct is made personally and socially acceptable by portraying it in the service of moral ends. This is why most appeals against violent means usually fall on deaf ears.
  823. Learning would be exceedingly laborious, not to mention hazardous, if people had to rely solely on the effects of their own actions to inform them what to do.
  824. It’s in our ability to selectively engage and disengage our moral standards, and it helps explain how people can be barbarically cruel in one moment and compassionate the next.
  825. In the past, modeling influences were largely confined to the styles of behavior and social practices in one’s immediate community. The advent of television vastly expanded the range of models to which members of society are exposed day in and day out.
  826. In the final forms of moral disengagement, wrongdoers treat adversaries as subhuman animalistic, demonic beings. Expunging any sense of shared humanity eliminates moral restraints.
  827. In order to succeed, people need a sense of self-efficacy, to struggle together with resilience to meet the inevitable obstacles and inequities of life.
  828. I have often been struck by the fact that most parents who are experiencing positive and rewarding relationships with their pre-adolescent children are, nevertheless, waiting apprehensively and bracing themselves for the stormy adolescent period.
  829. Given appropriate social conditions, decent, ordinary people can be led to do extraordinarily cruel things.
  830. Fortunately, most human behavior is learned observationally through modeling from others.
  831. Coping with the demands of everyday life would be exceedingly trying if one could arrive at solutions to problems only by actually performing possible options and suffering the consequences.
  832. As we develop the moral aspect of our lives, we often adapt standards of right and wrong that serve as guides and deterrents for our conduct.
  833. Accomplishment is socially judged by ill defined criteria so that one has to rely on others to find out how one is doing.
  834. You never do a movie and not want it to work. You accept whatever it is. You have to, but nobody in their right mind would not want the movie to be getting talked about at the end of the year.
  835. You know, when cameras are rolling, improvisation doesn’t feel natural. The pressure is too great. You’re on a time schedule. You’ve got 60 crewmen.
  836. You know, I became a director out of necessity. I was writing comedies, and I couldn’t find anybody to deliver it correctly.
  837. You know what it is, the reason so many 18-year-olds, 19-year-olds are saying ‘Drive’ is their favorite movie is that ‘Drive’ is a 90-minute trip into what a lot of seventies filmmaking was. It encapsulates the best of a certain kind of style, and a style that a lot of people haven’t seen before, with the music and the way it’s edited.
  838. You know what I’ve always wanted to do? I’ve always wanted to put a lung in a suitcase and send it through an airport security check. In effect, the guard would be looking at an X-ray of a lung.
  839. Wouldn’t it be great if cars came equipped with screens like that thing they have in Times Square that spells out the news? You could punch out your own instant messages: ‘Will the small red car with the ugly driver please stay a little further behind?’
  840. When I went to acting school, the kids that got the best grades were the kids that could cry on cue. But it didn’t really translate into careers for any of them, because the external is the easy part.
  841. When I was younger, I wasn’t concentrating on good days. I was managing a career and trying to have a good year. It would always ‘lead’ to something, which never leads to anything except death, where everything leads to. And then as I got older, and then I had my kids and everything, I began to appreciate a great Wednesday.
  842. When I started out, I tried out all my stuff on national television. There were no comedy clubs, but even if there were, I don’t think I would have gone to them. I used to do stuff in the bathroom, and then I’d drive down to NBC and do it on ‘The Golddiggers’ with Dean Martin.
  843. When I die, if the word ‘thong’ appears in the first or second sentence of my obituary, I’ve screwed up.
  844. When I audition, I understand what it takes and the insecurities that come with it. If I do anything, I put actors at ease. I used to tell directors who weren’t actors, the best thing they could do was take an acting class for a couple of months. Just to understand.
  845. What’s interesting about books that take place in the future, even twenty years in the future, is that many of them are black or white: It’s either a utopia or it’s misery. The real truth is that there’s going to be both things in any future, just like there is now.
  846. Well, you know, with every character, if you’re going to expose yourself, you’ve got to figure out every detail that you’re going to play. So there’s no character that you can just go put on his shirt and be fully prepared.
  847. Twitter, to me, works if you’re funny. Twitter doesn’t work as a promotional tool unless you do it very, very, very occasionally.
  848. Twitter is the Devil’s playground.
  849. This is a generalization, but I think women’s brains are more accessible to ideas and differences. And they can accept stuff that’s weirder. I think there are enough intelligent men out there who get it, but women will watch behavior that’s different and process it better. In general, women are less threatened by their emotions.
  850. This getting old is something. I think I envy my dog, because my dog is sixteen, and she’s limping, and she’s still living, but she doesn’t look at me like she knows. She’s not thinking what I’m thinking. It’s a cruel trick that we all know the ending.
  851. There’ve been a few mother-daughter movies that are somewhat realistic. But the mother-son movies are more comical than realistic: ‘Throw Momma from the Train,’ ‘Stop! or My Mom Will Shoot.’ You don’t sit in the dark and go, ‘Oh my God, that’s my mother.’
  852. There’s always the standard six people you can hire that have played all these villains in Hollywood. Instinctively, when they come on screen, you know what’s going to happen. You don’t know the story, but you know what they do.
  853. There are a few giant companies that I love, and I love Amazon. Their customer service is impeccable: sometimes, just for the hell of it, I’ll sleep on a mattress for three years and return it.
  854. The people on this planet that are trying to live their life, that aren’t trying to destroy things, are in the 99.9-percent majority.
  855. The idea behind ‘Defending Your Life’: Imagine if you had to sit in a courtroom and watch your life. I don’t care who you are – if you committed a crime and you had to have all of your emails searched and made public, who on this planet could survive that? Nobody.
  856. The first act is writing, the second act is filming, the third act is releasing. If you have to partake in the third act, it hurts the first act of the next one. It’s like a prizefight. You get punched.
  857. Steven Spielberg seems to have wanted to be a director from 13. He put his dog in a certain position and made him eat at four o’clock. He liked to direct it. But, to me, directing is tedious. Especially if you’re acting in it. And I’m inherently lazy.
  858. One thing about Los Angeles is it feels like it’s not new. It feels like it’s already been built, and it’s deteriorating, except for the places they’re trying to make nicer. But in general, you drive all through the city, and the city feels like it was new a long time ago.
  859. One of the things I like about a character: I always think it’s fascinating when a character can turn on a dime and go from one emotion to another. I like watching that.
  860. Once you sign on as an actor, you know, you don’t go to the editing room, you don’t see how they cut, you don’t see how they score, you don’t see how they cast the rest of the movie.
  861. Normally movies have the same people they use over and over for everything. It’s called typecasting. They don’t like to take chances. They’ll go with the guy they had before.
  862. Nobody will leave any place unless they’re forced out. That’s the nature of humans. Once you’re there, you’re there. I’ve never seen anybody get up voluntarily and leave any place.
  863. My roots were in acting. That’s all I wanted to be. Even though my father was a radio comedian, it wasn’t cool to say, at a young age, ‘I want to be a comedian.’
  864. My mom was a professional. My dad and mom met each other in a movie called ‘New Faces of 1937.’ My mom went under the name Thelma Leeds, and she did a few movies, and she was really a great singer, and when she married my dad and started to have a family, she sang at parties.
  865. My humor is traced with dark – I’ve got dark patches all over the place.
  866. My friend Harry Nilsson used to say the definition of an artist was someone who rode way ahead of the herd and was sort of the lookout. Now you don’t have to be that, to be an artist. You can be right smack-dab in the middle of the herd. If you are, you’ll be the richest.
  867. My father was very sick around the time I was born. The doctors thought he wouldn’t live. He did recover, but I don’t remember him as very active. I do remember lots of schtick around the dinner table. Generally, he and my brothers and I were all laughing at the same thing my mother did not find funny, whatever that was.
  868. My dad played a character on the radio called ‘Parkyakarkus.’ A Greek-dialect comedian. He did Friars’ roasts and wrote material and made people laugh that way. But he wrote his own shows with other writers.
  869. My dad died right after performing at the Friars’ roast for Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. I have that tape somewhere. There’s still a lot of good jokes in there. I mean, that was 1958.
  870. My audience has lots of people between 20 and 35, but there are always a few 60-year-olds, and it makes me happier than if everyone was 22.
  871. Movies are an expensive business.
  872. Most entertainment is trying to get you. It’s tested, like toothpaste.
  873. Listen, there are some movies that are set in stone and the writer or the director does not want to change, but I’ve never worked on a movie, including my own, that didn’t take advantage of a rehearsal process.
  874. It’s interesting when you’re part of a group – the Jews, to be exact – that the world has had such problems with.
  875. It’s funny: in the middle of making ‘The Muse,’ I was offered, at the time, the first ‘Ice Age,’ the part that Ray Romano took: I was offered the elephant. And I couldn’t even stop to breathe, so I didn’t do it. They’ve made, like, six of them. And in the animation business, for a voice actor, that’s what you want. You want six, you know?
  876. It’s better to be known by six people for something you’re proud of than by 60 million for something you’re not.
  877. In the course of my movies, the financing and the releasing were always the tough part. Because I loved the creative; I loved the writing. I loved the making of it. Because, I guess, I never had the giant blockbuster, I never got that sort of ease for the next one.
  878. In my screenplays – from the very beginning I’ve always used tape. I talk my screenplays. And then have somebody transcribe them.
  879. If your last name is Christ, don’t name your son Jesus.
  880. If you’re going to act and do this for a living, you want to play something that the audience didn’t expect.
  881. If you want to be a writer, just write. There’s no magic to it.
  882. If you paint, write, do mosaics, knit – if it’s solving that part of your brain saying, ‘I need to do this,’ you’ve won.
  883. If you look at the best-seller list for American fiction, they’re all sequels to detective stories or stories about hunting serial killers. That’s what’s called American fiction these days.
  884. If you don’t succeed on your own ground, then there’s no reason to succeed. Unless, of course, you really want a boat. If you’re a person who feels that with a yacht, everything will be all right, then you should do whatever you have to and get the yacht.
  885. If we had 3 million exhibitionists and only one voyeur, nobody could make any money.
  886. If people don’t love what you’re doing, that doesn’t mean you’re wrong.
  887. If I’m going to act in someone’s movie, I want the movie to be interesting and be able to get a couple of solid doubles.
  888. If I start a film of my own, then what I eliminate is acting in other people’s movies. Because once I start, and I go raise the money, it’s about two and a half or three years, and I can’t stop. I have people hired. I can’t say, ‘Ooh there’s a good part called ‘Drive’; I’ll see you in three months.’
  889. I, sort of, got into comedy accidentally, and it got bigger than I wanted it to.
  890. I’ve heard people say, ‘There are no bad audiences,’ but that’s just not true. There are people who just shouldn’t be together in a room, who produce a really bad audience.
  891. I’ve done performances in movies that I was immensely proud of and the movies didn’t take off like a rocket at Cape Canaveral, it didn’t take off.
  892. I’ve been to many funerals of funny people, and they’re some of the funniest days you’ll ever have, because the emotions run high.
  893. I’ve been doing comedy since I was two. You know, kids who make other kids laugh. The sickness had set in! I could make my friends’ parents laugh; I had a sense of what was silly and funny.
  894. I’ve always liked to think ahead. Not stupid-far ahead. A hundred years doesn’t interest me. But 20 years interests me, and more for what happens to humans as opposed to things.
  895. I’ve always been the king of silence. I’ve always been a minimalist comedian. I’ve taken my influence from Jack Benny, who was the king of that… I’ve always done ‘less is more.’
  896. I’ve always been in the middle of making my own movies, so taking acting jobs that take me away from that has been impossible.
  897. I’m really fond of ‘Real Life’ because I think it anticipated a whole movement. And people forget, they talk about ‘Spinal Tap,’ but that wasn’t… this was a mockumentary a long time before that. It was one of the early, early sort of mockumentaries.
  898. I’m not interesting enough on my own that you’d want to see a film about me.
  899. I’m not a big fan of the post-Armageddon stories, where Denzel Washington is walking around in a torn coat.
  900. I’m not Elvis. I don’t get chased by paparazzi.
  901. I’m a strong fellow.
  902. I’m a member of the Academy, but I don’t know who all the other Academy members are. It’s not like a politician who knows who is in the Iowa caucus.
  903. I’d still like to see ‘Survivor’ minus the planned show-biz parts. That would be the purest form of show business – I want to see someone so hungry that they eat somebody else’s foot.
  904. I wrote this book, ‘2030,’ and I was careful in the book not to overdo the future because I don’t think it comes that fast.
  905. I was offered ‘Pretty Woman.’ I was offered ‘Big’ and ‘Dead Poets Society.’ But what was important to me in those years was to make movies, to make these Albert Brooks movies.
  906. I was in Kashmir last weekend. Went to visit one of my sweaters.
  907. I think anger and laughter are very close to each other, when you think about it.
  908. I think I present a different side of a male character: a side that is not John Wayne-like, a side that is, in fact, destructible. To some people, that is refreshing, and to other people, especially if they don’t know me, it may be disturbing.
  909. I take anything other than ‘you big pig!’ as a compliment.
  910. I studied acting at Carnegie Tech in Pittsburgh because I figured a good comedian certainly could act.
  911. I started on television. I had five years of network television before I ever got up on a stage. The first thing I ever did was in 1967. This guy Bill Keene had a little talk show at noon, and Gary Owens took over for a week. He knew about this dummy bit I used to do, this ventriloquist thing, and I was on ‘Keene at Noon.’
  912. I probably learned, being in ‘Taxi Driver’ before I made my first film, I would come to the set every day just to watch how that film came about. It’s like a graduate course: it’s terrific. You talk to the cinematographer during the breaks. You ask the electrician why they are doing this.
  913. I never, in anything I’ve ever done, tried to get you to like it. I was never going to succeed at that. That’s not the way most entertainment is made. Most entertainment is trying to get you. It’s tested, like toothpaste.
  914. I never wanted to be a director.
  915. I never liked going in the ocean.
  916. I made my living in comedy, but I’m not a silly person. I’ve got all these sides to me. Even in my movies that I’ve written myself, the characters sometimes border on great anger or nutsiness or other kinds of behavior. I’m not just doing fart jokes for two hours.
  917. I like to do things that I want to see myself. With ‘Defending Your Life,’ I wanted to see some aspect of death other than angels and the thing that ‘Ghost’ was about, because that didn’t make any sense to me. So that’s the reason: it fills a hole.
  918. I like the acting. It’s how I started, and I sort of feel that if I don’t give it a little shot now, and I go back, then I’m pretty much done with it. I mean, at what age am I going to do it at? Although, when you see Christopher Plummer and Max von Sydow doing it, I guess the answer is 80.
  919. I like movies about failing.
  920. I just like making people laugh, and buried in that I like to bring up topics and start discussions.
  921. I had done about 60 television shows, from ‘Ed Sullivan’ to ‘The Hollywood Palace,’ before I ever went to ‘Johnny Carson.’ At the time, that was the showcase for comics. And I couldn’t believe it.
  922. I had a very wise person tell me that he thinks marriage, when you’re younger, you keep thinking you can fix things. That’s what people do. And you can’t really fix anything. It shouldn’t be a massive difficult thing every day. Life’s difficult enough.
  923. I guess I was the class clown – with a name like Albert Einstein, you don’t hide in the back. I’d read the school bulletin to the class, and I’d add activities and make stuff up. It was good, a good 10 minutes every morning.
  924. I guess ‘The Player’ was a pretty good L.A. movie. And ‘Chinatown.’ Was there ever a better L.A. movie about a certain period in L.A.? That was terrific.
  925. I don’t want to be the one to break it to you, but the future ain’t that funny.
  926. I don’t think the goal is, ‘How big a star did you ever become?’ I think the goal is, ‘Were you able to express yourself?’ And if you’re able to say yes, in any field, you’ve won. If you paint, write, do mosaics, knit – if it’s solving that part of your brain saying, ‘I need to do this,’ you’ve won.
  927. I don’t think the goal is, ‘How big a star did you ever become?’ I think the goal is, ‘Were you able to express yourself?’
  928. I don’t see many explosions or ten-car crashes in the course of my life, so I don’t put them into my movies. I would love to live in a society where ‘My Dinner with Andre’ made $100,000,000. Then I would be in the mainstream. I could do that stuff easier than I could do ‘Meatballs.’
  929. I don’t know; I guess they’ll never make another ‘Nemo.’ I see they’re making another ‘Monsters, Inc.’ I had a wonderful idea for them. I swear to God, I think there could be a great sequel to ‘Nemo’ where the fish never will leave home. He just won’t leave. ‘Getting Rid of Nemo.’ Right, ‘You’re 30 years old! Get out of here!’
  930. I don’t know how, where, and why the idea for ‘Defending Your Life’ began; the idea had been bouncing around for a while. Stories like that sort of have to bounce. They don’t come out of nowhere. I went through my own period of life with sort of everything turning upside down, and wondering, ‘Why is it this way?’
  931. I did years of summer stock. I sort of only wanted to be an actor. And then at 19, I was funny, and I had some of these bits that I did for friends, and I immediately could get on television.
  932. I come from the place where I am thinking ‘I have put my blood on the pages.’
  933. I cast unusual people in my movies.
  934. I can’t not put humor in a book.
  935. I attempt to create a form of seriocomic entertainment to either delight, enlighten, or disgust, whichever you’d like. In terms of making motion pictures, I write and direct and act. I guess you’d say I’m a filmmaker.
  936. How many people didn’t get a part who would have been better than the person who got the part? Thousands.
  937. Even though my father was a radio comedian, it wasn’t cool to say, at a young age, ‘I want to be a comedian.’
  938. Even in my comedies, I don’t take anger as a joke. I think anger and laughter are very close to each other, when you think about it. One of the things I like about a character: I always think it’s fascinating when a character can turn on a dime and go from one emotion to another. I like watching that.
  939. Even if you didn’t see the movie, you’d see two words you’d never seen put together before – comedy and Muslim. Comedy is friendly – it’s the least offensive word in our language.
  940. By the way, movies are like sporting events in that you’re as good as the movie you’re in. You can sit in a room for 20 years and go do a movie and you can just kill in it and you move to the head of the line again. By the same token, you can do five movies a year and if they’re dreck, it’s nothing.
  941. Bullfights are hugely popular because you can sit comfortably with a hot dog and possibly watch a man die. It won’t be me, but I can sit comfortably and watch it.
  942. Be generous and you can be the best person who ever lived.
  943. Basically, I still have the privacy that all celebrities crave, except for those celebrities who feel that privacy reflects some kind of failure on their part.
  944. As an actor, if you’re just sitting and staring and you don’t know who you are in your own mind, it’s vacant. And sometimes the camera is an X-ray machine, it can pick it up.
  945. All improv turns into anger. All comedy improv basically turns into anger, because that’s all people know how to do when they’re improvising. If you notice shows that are improvising are generally people yelling at each other.
  946. ‘Finding Nemo’ has spawned so many sort of emotions over the years. I don’t even know that you could really understand exactly what parents and kids are seeing in it, but they can see a lot of different stuff.
  947. ‘Drive’ came to me because the casting director knew my manager and called and said, ‘You’ve always talked to me about Albert wanting to play the heavy. I think he should read this.’ My ears just perked up.
  948. ‘2001’ is a really interesting movie because it came out in 1968, and everybody thought that that was possible, and look how ridiculous that was. We don’t have ships like that, and you know, nobody in 1968 was going, ‘Oh, that’ll never happen!’ But of course it never happened. We’re not even close to it.
  949. Zegna has the perfect weight fabric. There are a lot of designers who make clothes that are a little too heavy. They feel heavy. They almost feel like a coat.
  950. You read some columnists in the newspapers; you have to wonder who they are really working for. You can see they have an agenda.
  951. You have actors who begin at a certain young age and there’s very little change in their technique and the depth of their performances; they’re the same 30 years later.
  952. You have a lot of optimism when you are young.
  953. When you’re with someone, you want everything to be great. And that’s the pressure that you put on, and what you just can’t do.
  954. When you lack a certain vitality in the film business, there’s no hiding it. It’s like you’ve had your limb chopped off. How do you hide the fact that you’re missing an arm?
  955. When I’m not working, I dress like a surfer. I look like I’m going to come into your house and clean your pool.
  956. When I told my parents, ‘I’m going to be an actor,’ they screamed and wept and freaked out.
  957. When I get onstage in a play, I feel very safe, very protected, very fulfilled.
  958. We need more participation, so when I see someone like Trump, I go, ‘You know something? Good for him’. I may not support him, but let him run.
  959. We all have that moment when we think, ‘Hand me that Oscar now – you don’t even have to have the ceremony’.
  960. Ultraconservatism is, to me, so illogical. Everywhere you go, conservatives want to cut, cut, cut, cut – cut money for powerless people. So, that’s the biggest problem I have with them.
  961. Twitter and Tumblr and Vine and Instagram and Facebook and Myspace, all these things are social media tools that we were all told we had to have, and what we’re realizing is that, no you don’t! No you don’t.
  962. To be in this business and have tremendous integrity and only make distinguished choices is very tough.
  963. There’s three things: there’s masculinity, there’s intelligence, there’s sensitivity. You’ve got to bring those three things to a leading man’s role: masculinity, sensitivity, intelligence. In some people, there’s a little too much in the mix of one or the other.
  964. There’s less critical thinking going on in this country on a Main Street level – forget about the media – than ever before. We’ve never needed people to think more critically than now, and they’ve taken a big nap.
  965. There’s almost no popular music I listen to now. I’ll hear it because it’s everywhere… Music is ubiquitous now.
  966. There’s a way I could have done things differently. I know that. If I offended anyone along the way, I do apologize.
  967. There are women who get divorced in order to punish. Out of this bitter, bitter hatred that some of these women have for their ex-husbands, they turn their children against them.
  968. There are some times when you make films and you travel places, and the take that people in the business have is that the worst way to see a city is to shoot there, because you work these long 12, 13 and 14-hour days, and you go home to the hotel, you eat, and you pass out.
  969. There are shows that are monolithic successes on TV that nobody in the business ever watches one episode of.
  970. There are people who would rather choke than go see my movies. They write me letters all the time.
  971. The wealthy don’t have any sense of humor. It’s not like the English, where the theater is perhaps the one place where they have a sense of humor about themselves.
  972. The way we produce food is killing the land and water.
  973. The way we divorce in this country hurts people on the deepest level. The ripple effect and resonance of it is remarkable, vast – vast – and if I ever went into Parliament, I would become very involved in that.
  974. The harshest thing I can say is I was married to someone for whom all dissent was abuse. If you had your own opinion, you were abusive.
  975. The campaign finance scandal in America is the global warming of American political life – with cash substituting for deadly solar radiation.
  976. The Trump name is now going to mean something else.
  977. Success begets success. I’ve been offered a lot of movies now that ’30 Rock’ has been successful.
  978. Some days you’re the kid with the stick, some days you’re the pinata.
  979. Soaps are the best. They really are. If you can do a soap, well, you can do anything. You have to learn pages of dialogue very quickly.
  980. So Colleen Atwood introduced me to Armani for the fabric and the dyes – what made Armani, Armani, beyond his motion-picture credentials. It was Cerruti after that. And then Zegna.
  981. Remember, sex is like a Chinese dinner. It ain’t over ’til you both get your cookie.
  982. People don’t understand this: if you want to have a really good shot at succeeding, there are doors you have to slam in people’s faces and say, ‘This is my priority, and you can’t depend on me to help you.’ I was never good at that.
  983. On a television show, precise acting isn’t the order of the day.
  984. Often in films, you have no idea where you’re going to be six months from now. And I grew very weary of that. And television, although it wasn’t necessarily as creatively diverse as filmmaking can be, it was the lifestyle choice that I needed to make.
  985. Nobody cares about your autograph. There are cameras everywhere, and there are media outlets for them to ‘file their story’.
  986. New York… where people come for their Ph.D. in corruption.
  987. My wife is the greatest person I have ever known. She is just a living doll; she is great person and a great mom. We have a girl and a boy, and we are going to have another boy.
  988. My whole life is classical now. Except my wife. I don’t have a classical wife. I have a classy wife, but I don’t have a classical wife.
  989. My life, in some ways, has been a half-measure. I didn’t commit myself all the way to my marriage and family, because I would have given up more. And I didn’t go all the way with just being completely selfish. I always wonder where my career would be if I was more selfish.
  990. My goal was always to take a talk show to the network. I never wanted to be on MSNBC.
  991. My father would chaperone at high-school dances, and the toughest guy in the high school used to want to fight my father. My father broke his hand on a guy’s head once in school.
  992. My children are the only thing in my life that makes me happy.
  993. My brothers were funny, and there was a lot of shtick and comedy and nastiness and violence and fighting and sports.
  994. My brothers and I grew up in a time where talking, storytelling, telling jokes was sometimes all you had. It wasn’t like today, with so many options and portability.
  995. Morning Joe was boring. Scarborough is neither eloquent nor funny.
  996. Men are literally lying in bed with their wives when the marriage is essentially over, thinking, ‘I’ve got to get the hell out of here’, and have a fantasy woman in mind. Then you get divorced, meet a woman, marry her, and by the time all that goes by, you’ve aged a few years and are ready to go back to your ex-wife.
  997. Manhattan is like Beverly Hills. And the soul of New York has moved to Brooklyn, where everything new and exciting seems to be.
  998. Look at the shows that are really successful on Broadway. They’re musicals. They’re things that a woman will pick out the tickets for, or a man will buy the tickets with a woman in mind. It’s a date. It’s boyfriend-girlfriend, husband-wife. That’s what the theater in New York has become.
  999. Let’s face facts, this is visual medium, there’s a very high premium put on people who are good-looking. But the minute you rely on that you get yourself in trouble. You certainly don’t make a career out of that anymore as an actor.
  1000. John McTiernan, the director, is not Ingmar Bergman. He does action-adventure movies.
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