FindsGood

Articles Page 23

Articles Page 23

  1. It’s good-bye to public life in the way that you try to communicate with an audience playfully, like we’re friends, beyond the work you are actually paid for.
  2. In the theater, you act more of the time. In the movies, you get to act maybe 20 or 30 minutes of the day. I love acting in movies. It’s just different.
  3. In the film business, when you’re young, you just want to work. But when you’re older, it has more to do with who’s involved with the project – who you’re going to get in the boat with.
  4. If you’re going to have someone defend you, it doesn’t get any better than Kristen Stewart.
  5. If MSNBC went off the air tomorrow, what difference would it make? If the ‘Huffington Post’ went out of business tomorrow, what difference would it make?
  6. If I won the lottery tomorrow, I probably would never work again.
  7. If Hank Williams Jr. wasn’t such a pathetic, wheezing fossil, I’d have a talk with him.
  8. I’ve had a relatively charmed life. I loved to be out in the city. New York was my town. I’ve had people come up to me and say, ‘You’re a great New Yorker. You’ve given your time and money to so many New York charities. You’re a great supporter of the arts. I like some of your movies – and some of your movies suck, actually.’
  9. I’m the kind of person who does not want to be anywhere that I’m not wanted.
  10. I’m not interested in offending anyone. If homosexuality was an issue for me, I would have moved out of New York years ago. I find that laughable.
  11. I’m not an impressionist, per se, but if you do any kind of comedy – and they ask you to do that, most of the time – there’s some degree of appreciation, I think, involving somebody you like.
  12. I’m not an awards-driven person in anything. Anytime you do get caught up in that, you usually end up getting whacked.
  13. I’m going to stop giving too much money to charity – the charity is going to become my family. I’m only half-kidding.
  14. I’m doing ‘Rock of Ages’ one day, making out with Russell Brand. Soon after that, I’m advocating with Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Cynthia Nixon for marriage equality.
  15. I’m a pretty loyal person.
  16. I’d rather live my life off screen and give only a certain amount of energy to the work.
  17. I’d do anything to have more kids. But that’s probably not gonna happen now.
  18. I worked all the time. Every moment I wasn’t working, I was home with my family. I got divorced. And now I’m doing it all over again, and I’ve learned that the key is, I’ve got to work less.
  19. I won every award you could win in television. I got paid well. And people loved ’30 Rock’. And I loved ’30 Rock’. I mean, sometimes you do a show that’s a hit show, and you hate it.
  20. I wish I could play the lead role in one movie, one great movie.
  21. I went to Jimmy Gandolfini’s funeral, and when I was there, I realized Jimmy Gandolfini didn’t have Twitter.
  22. I wear a Zegna suit and tie every day, pretty much.
  23. I was in college in Washington, D.C. I did three years full-time. I did all my requirements, and my senior year was really a gut year. And I said, ‘Law school will always be there.’ I was in no hurry to get right into that.
  24. I wanted to work with Cate Blanchett. She is one of the five greatest movie actresses of her generation.
  25. I wanted to be president of the United States. I really did. The older I get, the less preposterous the idea seems.
  26. I want to go make a movie and be very present for that and give it everything I have, and after we’re done, then the rest of the time is mine.
  27. I want my weekends back so I can be with my kids.
  28. I turned popular music on the radio, and I never listened to it again after that, in about 1985. That’s when I switched over to classical music, and I pretty much stayed with that since then.
  29. I think my exact comment was that if Bush won it would be a good time to leave the United States. I’m not necessarily going to leave the United States.
  30. I think about how much I used to work and how much I used to make that the priority.
  31. I think Rachel Maddow is quite good at what she does. I also think she’s a phony who doesn’t have the same passion for the truth off-camera that she seems to have on the air.
  32. I think Jerry Lee is sad. As a musician, he was far more talented than Elvis Presley. Everybody down in Memphis knows that. Elvis became a movie star because he was beautiful. Not that Elvis wasn’t talented, but Jerry Lee Lewis was incomprehensibly talented as a musician.
  33. I think I’m just like a lot of people who had nothing. We had to amuse ourselves, so we had to become amusing.
  34. I think I’m just like a lot of people who had nothing.
  35. I think I do want to go into politics. I really, really do. And I don’t know if I will.
  36. I started out as an actor, where you seek to understand yourself using the words of great writers and collaborating with other creative people. Then I slid into show business, where you seek only an audience’s approval whether you deserve it or not.
  37. I remember during my lifetime I would meet women, and it was almost like God would say to me, ‘Now, this woman here is not the one you are going to end up with, but she is going to be a lot like this woman; look at this woman, study this woman.’ And when my wife showed up, He was like, ‘You recognize her now?’
  38. I never thought of myself as a wealthy person. I’ve thought of myself as a person who has had a lot of luck. I don’t have the same stress that other people have, but there are too many things I could have done differently if wealth was what I was after. If I was all about money, I would have lived in L.A.
  39. I need to be home more. That’s the goal now. I have a steady flow of things people want me to do.
  40. I loathe and despise the media in a way I did not think possible.
  41. I know women that act queeny, I know men that are straight that act queeny, and I know gay men that act queeny… To me, those are people who think the rules don’t apply to them.
  42. I know there’s an impression that I’m someone who seeks to have violent confrontations with people. I don’t. Do I regret screaming at some guy who practically clipped my kid in the head with the lens of a camera? Yeah, I probably do, because it’s only caused me problems.
  43. I know some people who live this much more insulated life in Los Angeles, where their feet never touch public ground. They walk out of their bathroom, their living room, they get into their garage, their car, and the next thing you know, they’re at the valet parking of the restaurant or the store or the office. They’re in a bubble the whole time.
  44. I just love Rome. It really does cast a spell on you.
  45. I just can’t live in New York anymore.
  46. I hope people will learn more about agriculture in America. About locally grown farming and about water conservation. About how much pollution results from beef and pig farming.
  47. I haven’t changed, but public life has. It used to be you’d go into a restaurant, and the owner would say, ‘Do you mind if I take a picture of you and put it on my wall?’ Sweet and simple. Now, everyone has a camera in their pocket.
  48. I have no desire to run for public office.
  49. I have my older daughter Ireland and my wife Hilaria, and I have Carmen and Rafael.
  50. I have dear friends of mine who represent real Republicans. Goldwater Republicans. Strong on defense. Tough on immigration. Fiscal conservatives.
  51. I have been driven to the edge by parental alienation for many years now. You have to go through this to understand.
  52. I have always wanted to do a show where I could stay home. When you make movies, you might as well take a dart and throw it at a map.
  53. I had a marriage that I came to in the same way everybody else comes to a marriage. We all take chances when we get married.
  54. I find myself bitter, defensive, and more misanthropic than I care to admit.
  55. I feel I’m two people: I have my interest in acting and I have a lot of other political interests I’d like to pursue.
  56. I don’t want to be throwing the football on the front yard when I’m 75. I mean, I’m not opposed to men doing that. But I don’t think it’s gonna work for me.
  57. I don’t try to communicate with my ‘audience’. I don’t bother with that any more. I used to try to have conversations with people, but it’s futile.
  58. I don’t think acting is addictive. If I stopped acting tomorrow, I really wouldn’t care. If you told me that I would have to sell real estate in New York City to look after my family, that would be fine with me.
  59. I don’t think I really have a talent for movie acting.
  60. I don’t need to be married to Georgia O’Keeffe or Lillian Hellman, but I like being with a woman I can look up to.
  61. I don’t hate Trump, but he’s not somebody I admire.
  62. I don’t get acting jobs because of my looks.
  63. I did not have a happy family life a few years ago. I was divorced, and I was very alienated from my daughter, and I was out there cutting every ribbon and running around New York hosting events for different causes to supplant my loss because I didn’t have a family to go home to. Now I don’t want to be Mr. Show Business anymore.
  64. I consider myself a pretty good conversationalist, but you wind up being downgraded to idiot status when you don’t speak the language!
  65. I collect travel alarm clocks. I was in a flea market in France once, in 1994, and I opened up this beautiful Jaeger-LeCoultre folding eight-day winding clock folded into a beautiful case, and I went, ‘Wow, man.’ And I’ve been collecting travel alarm clocks since 1994.
  66. Hollywood studios bury that stuff – actors who punch directors in the face and try to run producers over with cars – insanity, criminal behavior. But the studios are invested in that star, they can’t have that person’s name dirtied up.
  67. Hollywood does draw some very strange characters, and then the power of Hollywood and what they can do with it becomes like a blood sport to them.
  68. Have I thought about having more kids? Oh sure, that would be great; that would be heaven. That would be fantastic.
  69. Grown-ups yell. I don’t know why, but they do.
  70. Getting older is hard.
  71. For better or ill, I was very heavily influenced by men I knew who always dressed formally.
  72. Everything that Bush touches turns to manure in public policy.
  73. Everything I hated about L.A. I’m beginning to crave. L.A. is a place where you live behind a gate, you get in a car, your interaction with the public is minimal. I used to hate that.
  74. Everything I do is about my kids and wife and how we can all be together.
  75. Everybody has their own taste, and I allow for that, but personally, I don’t like a striped tie on a striped shirt. I don’t like brown shoes with a blue suit. Cordovan maybe, but not brown.
  76. Everybody had posters in their room; everybody had the four symbols of Zeppelin on the wall and all that.
  77. Everybody I’ve ever worked with – 99.9 percent of the time, I’ve had a successful or very agreeable experience with.
  78. Down with Dukes of Hazzard!
  79. Doing these parts is not fun. It’s challenging, but no fun. It’s creepy. I would rather play the guy that throws the touchdown pass and gets carried off the field.
  80. Cheney is a terrorist. He terrorizes our enemies abroad and innocent citizens here at home indiscriminately.
  81. Bush wasn’t elected, he was selected – selected by five judges up in Washington who voted along party lines.
  82. Being able to stay home with my children is what I prefer.
  83. As my friend said to me, when you have children, typically in a second marriage, when you’re older and you get married again to a woman who would have children, you must always remember that you make sure the children attend a college where the commencement ceremonies are held in a facility with a wheelchair accessible ramp.
  84. As a lifelong Democrat, I never thought I’d lead an effort to defend the symbol of the Republican Party. But when I saw the cruelty that Ringling inflicts on elephants every day across the country, I had to speak up.
  85. Am I a homophobe? Look, I work in show business. I am awash in gay people, as colleagues and as friends.
  86. All actors have a significant amount of vanity about work, and necessarily so. Things they will do and won’t do, and I’ve completely lost all of that. I don’t care.
  87. Acting in the theatre is fun; acting in film is work.
  88. A lot of people want to not wear a tie when they go to a restaurant. They feel they don’t have to wear a tie. I think it’s kind of a statement they’re making. I don’t know what that statement is. I haven’t quite figured that out yet.
  89. ‘The Apprentice’ was a huge success, and Trump was a huge television star who managed to trick people into thinking he was the guy from the show.
  90. America is competitive. We compete with each other every day.
  91. You’ve got to make yourself happy. I’m a happy person naturally.
  92. You could fancy what you’d like, but as a woman, my mother always raised us to believe in ourselves. I am very grateful that my mother brought me up that way.
  93. You can feel very strongly that someone doesn’t like you. I think any model who didn’t have the same sort of upbringing as me would find that very difficult. But I absolutely knew I was entitled. I never thought I was ugly – it never crossed my mind.
  94. Whenever I feel I am going through my own ‘little’ challenging moment, I just think about my mom.
  95. When you give, you receive.
  96. When the militias came to Wau, they would blast out ‘Thriller’ as they moved down the dirt streets.
  97. When my friends talk about childhood, I’ve never heard of any cartoons or TV they remember. The only thing we share is Michael Jackson. That’s how far his music travelled – to a remote village on the other side of the world.
  98. When I was working, there was no digital. We actually worked; we used Polaroids.
  99. When I was growing up, my mother taught me and my sisters to celebrate each other – there was no room in our household for negativity. She taught us to embrace each other, and this was empowering for us. She also taught us the value of celebrating our differences.
  100. When I was a girl, civil war in Sudan forced me to flee my home town of Wau.
  101. When I was 14, I came to school in London. I remember it was very cold, but also having to adjust and become fluent in English.
  102. When I was 10 years old, I fled my homeland amid the bomb blasts of civil war in Sudan.
  103. When I think of ‘Instagram models,’ I say you have to take baby steps. You cannot just walk straight onto the runway.
  104. When I talk, it shouldn’t just be black girls listening.
  105. When I started, I’d hear other people saying, ‘God, she’s so bizarre-looking,’ because I didn’t look like the girl next door. But I was just normal. I was the girl next door. There were people in high fashion I could better relate to who were doing something more interesting and not talking this sort of rubbish.
  106. When I started modeling, it was like, ‘Oh, she’s too dark,’ and I kind of looked at them like, ‘You’re too daft.’
  107. When I first started working with World Vision, I would sit down and talk with them about issues that concern any part of the world. MSF told me about what was going on in North Korea. I also support AIDS and breast cancer charities.
  108. When I first started modeling, I realised I was very different from many of my colleagues, but I welcomed the opportunities my career in fashion offered me and the support from many inspiring individuals in the fashion industry.
  109. We survived on natural resources, so we should take care of the earth. When I leave home, I do things like switching off the heat and lights.
  110. We need to do everything we can to protect the health and welfare of children around the world, but fortunately, it’s getting easier to provide things like medication and care.
  111. We eat to live.
  112. War tore my family apart.
  113. True beauty is born through our actions and aspirations and in the kindness we offer to others.
  114. There’s one thing we all share: We eat to nurture ourselves, to feel stronger.
  115. There’s never too much you can do.
  116. There was no concept of fashion and catwalk shows where I came from.
  117. There are tons of black girls modeling, and each one is special.
  118. There are people who can look out for other human beings; there are people who can speak up when something is not right and say, ‘This is wrong, and something should be done.’
  119. There are mothers who sew for six months to make a fashion collection – someone’s grandmother, someone’s sister. We come in and get paid to walk for 10 minutes at the end. Whenever I think about that, I realise it’s not about me. I was just the one chosen to represent those women and sell the clothes.
  120. The most beautiful things are not associated with money; they are memories and moments. If you don’t celebrate those, they can pass you by.
  121. The fact that designers like Lagerfeld, Gaultier, Galliano and Dior could believe in Alek made me believe in myself, too.
  122. The day you stop enjoying something is the day you should quit, if you can afford to.
  123. The beauty of reading is that it lets you travel in a way you could never know.
  124. Starting modeling in the ’90s, it was quite surreal. They were like, ‘You’re so different! So weird! So bizarre!’ And I’m like, ‘I’m so normal. What are you talking about?’
  125. South Sudanese people are rich like the soil; they just need a little water, and they will grow.
  126. Restaurants serve huge portions on even huger platters, and people are tempted to eat too much.
  127. My mother has always instilled in us that we should carry ourselves with dignity despite the horror that came with the civil war. She also taught us that where you come from is very important because that’s what makes you who you are. So for me, whatever I’ve gone through had profoundly shaped me; it has given me strength and unwavering faith.
  128. My mother always has embedded in us that you guys rock in different ways, and to be able to celebrate that with each other is just beautiful.
  129. My life was filled with family in South Sudan. I am the seventh of nine children, and we grew up in what would be considered a middle-class family. We did not have a lot, but we did have more than a lot of other people.
  130. My father made sure of discipline, but my mum, she was serious business.
  131. My family is the most important thing to me.
  132. My experience as a refugee had made me strong; I could survive anything, even the world of fashion.
  133. My commitment to refugees comes from a very personal place.
  134. Many live to eat, instead of the other way around.
  135. London is like my second home. I’ve still got friends there from school and from when I first started in the modelling business – people such as Karen Elson, Jasmine Guinness, Jade Parfitt.
  136. Leaving southern Sudan as a child was terrifying. It was 1985, and my family and I were trying to escape to Khartoum, the capital in the North, to safety.
  137. It’s sometimes tiring to get off a long-haul flight and go straight to the studio for a shoot, but if you really plan everything well, you can get so much out of combining travel with work.
  138. It’s an awful feeling, being hungry.
  139. It’s a small world when you’re from South Sudan.
  140. It was the most exciting thing to leave secondary school and go to college, to have that freedom to study whatever I wanted.
  141. In restaurants in my Brooklyn neighborhood, I always ask for a doggie bag to bring the leftovers home.
  142. If my mother hadn’t encouraged me, I would be nervous and feeling like I’m doing something wrong.
  143. I’ve seen mothers and children really being vulnerable in the refugee camps; it’s supposed to be temporary, but they end up having children who have grown up in refugee camps.
  144. I’ve eight brothers and sisters – five girls, four boys. I am the seventh.
  145. I’ve always loved to paint – I was studying to do an art degree when I was approached to become a model – and I’ve being doing some design work as well. I also love just having a quiet time, sitting in my little library at home in Brooklyn and reading or watching documentaries or listening to music.
  146. I’m an artist at heart.
  147. I would love to continue to model but also have a family.
  148. I was working part-time as a cleaner while I was going to college and then babysitting after school.
  149. I used to have nightmares about the civil war when I got to England at ages 14 to 15. It took me some years to get over that.
  150. I use Johnson & Johnson! I use their baby oil gel.
  151. I think the fashion industry has gotten to a place where it is embarrassing.
  152. I think beauty is not just about what we put on our heads or on our faces or what we wear: it’s deeper than that, and if we can celebrate that, celebrate the women, not just the superficiality… I think it would be really gorgeous.
  153. I still have dreams in which someone is coming to the door.
  154. I never thought I would see a free South Sudan.
  155. I meet and talk to women from every corner of this planet, and I can find beauty in each and every one of them.
  156. I love cooking. I love having friends around.
  157. I like unique little boutique hotels, such as Blakes in London.
  158. I like to accept it all, the negative and the positive.
  159. I know how it feels to go hungry.
  160. I have short hair. It doesn’t make me more unattractive than a woman or my sisters that have more longer hair and a bit lighter.
  161. I have eight brothers and sisters, so I’d like to have a few children.
  162. I had serious psoriasis as a child – it’s strange that I make my living off my looks after years of looking like a monster.
  163. I had jobs from the age of 14, when I arrived in London as a refugee. Aged 17, I’d get up at 4 A.M. to work as a cleaner before school. It wasn’t pleasant.
  164. I grew up in southern Sudan, one of nine children. Our life was simple but very happy.
  165. I grew up in a small town in Sudan. There weren’t many cars, so we did things in the countryside near where we lived.
  166. I feel, in 2015, when we see human beings and children dying to cross the ocean, trying to find safety, something more must be done to help them because refugees are just like me and you.
  167. I don’t understand when people are being greedy or mean, when they say who should get what, when they get control of someone else’s life.
  168. I don’t even know where to start in terms of people having such an issue about color, especially being dark. I just think on different levels it’s ignorance; it’s no belief, no confidence, it’s insecurity, so you want to inflict it on somebody else.
  169. I could never understand why other kids wanted to truant – my education here gave me everything. It’s the place where I really got to flourish.
  170. I believe we should utilise any power we have for important issues that are bigger and beyond us. Whether it’s with refugees or working to educate kids. I don’t think you need to have gone through a civil war to do something. I believe as human beings, we can look out for each other.
  171. I am so impressed by UNHCR staff who live and work side by side with the refugees. It’s really remarkable.
  172. I am not really into buying a lot of expensive things.
  173. Having arrived in London to seek refuge during the civil war in Sudan, where I was born, the thing I’m most proud of is having totally evolved. I came here not knowing how to speak English, but I went to school and learned; I adapted to this new culture.
  174. Going on safari in South Africa was hardcore but a lot of fun – though my friend Maura was absolutely freaking out about all the bugs in her hair and having to pee in the sand.
  175. Going back to South Sudan after the independence took place was deeply emotional for me because I had gone through the civil war with my family just before going to seek refuge in London.
  176. From nine years old, I lived with fear. I saw our neighbours disappearing. I was scared that I would come home from school and my parents would not be there.
  177. For me, you have to have some kind of modesty.
  178. For me, it always goes back to what my mother taught me and my sisters. That all women are beautiful, and we should embrace each other.
  179. Everything has to do with education: If you educate the girls, you educate the family, the community, and society, in general.
  180. Education is the key to the future.
  181. Don’t focus on negative things; focus on the positive, and you will flourish.
  182. Bones inside clothes. That was war to me.
  183. Black girls, I feel, rock, in so many ways, especially coming from five girls.
  184. Beauty should not be culturally relevant; it should be universal.
  185. Beauty is subjective and should not be limited to only what we see on the outside.
  186. Beauty does not mean one thing but not something else.
  187. At times, we take freedom for granted. We really don’t know how to cherish the freedom we have until it’s taken from us.
  188. All the exhausting aspects of my job are made worthwhile because I get to experience so many different cultures. It makes you really appreciate the memories.
  189. You must go deeper into Russia – 150 kilometres from Moscow or more, and look there. The kids are fed with cattle feed – people don’t get paid for half a year.
  190. There is no reason why I should call myself a democrat.
  191. In order to build basic democracy here we’ll need lives of two generations – at least forty years.
  192. I mean that at least 80% of the Russian people feel destitute. It’s the people who had their past and future taken from them – they don’t get paid – many of them face a wall. They have nowhere to go.
  193. I have equal contempt for both left and right radicals.
  194. I counted on sixty days only, but I held out for 133. I didn’t go into power, but to get power I borrowed some power from the President and made him sign a number of decrees and give me enough power to create a system capable of handling crisis situations.
  195. I am a Soviet man, and Yeltsin is a Soviet man – maybe our grandchildren will be different.
  196. For 73 years a totalitarian regime ruled the country. Totalitarian regime.
  197. First of all I would make about 80% of the people law-abiding citizens again. The policy which is carried out now makes every entrepreneur and businessman a thief against his own will.
  198. As I understand I took most so-called democratic states about 200 years on average to build their democracies. That is why, when we go to sleep under totalitarian rule and wake up in a democracy, it makes me laugh.
  199. And this system sorted out the Chechen war in just 20 days. This way, I used the President’s power, he didn’t use me. It wasn’t hard for me to leave – it isn’t my scene. I have nothing to do there.
  200. To bare our souls is all we ask, to give all we have to life and the beings surrounding us. Here the nature spirits are intense and we appreciate them, make offerings to them – these nature spirits who call us here – sealing our fate with each other, celebrating our love.
  201. The web of life, love, suffering and death unites all beings.
  202. The infinite vibratory levels, the dimensions of interconnectedness are without end. There is nothing independent. All beings and things are residents in your awareness.
  203. The creative principle is less about dogma and more about opening ourselves to the evolution of consciousness.
  204. Spiritual teachers and artists that have opened the eye of wisdom for the world, and visionary community builders, have influenced my work.
  205. My father was a professional artist all his life who encouraged my path as an artist.
  206. My art has always been in response to visions. Rather than confine my subject to representations of the outer worlds, I include portrayals of the multi-dimensional imaginal realms that pull us toward consciousness evolution.
  207. It was 1975. I had spent the year at the Boston Museum School doing some very bizarre performance works. The last one included going to the North Magnetic Pole and spending all of my money.
  208. It is the prayer of my innermost being to realize my supreme identity in the liberated play of consciousness, the Vast Expanse. Now is the moment, Here is the place of Liberation.
  209. In a society that tries to standardize thinking, individuality is not highly prized.
  210. I use a lot of different words for God – infinite intelligence, primordial, perfection or universal creativity. All of these, to me, are God. And ‘God’ is a word, I think, that some people feel uncomfortable with, so they can use another word, you know? It’s the great mystery.
  211. I think that that’s why artists make art – it is difficult to put into words unless you are a poet. What it takes is being open to the flow of universal creativity. The Zen artists knew this.
  212. I became really interested in the study of consciousness.
  213. I acknowledge the privilege of being alive in a human body at this moment, endowed with senses, memories, emotions, thoughts, and the space of mind in its wisdom aspect.
  214. You have to be disciplined about being in the kitchen.
  215. You have a shelf-life on TV.
  216. Who doesn’t love a stuffed cherry tomato?
  217. When we talk about chefs, we often talk about their love of food or their passion for it, but cooking is also about making a living; it’s a job.
  218. When we eat something at a restaurant, however simple it may look, there’s something in it that makes you think, ‘Well, I couldn’t quite do this from home.’
  219. We have to get out there and explain that imperfect tastes just as good.
  220. Walnuts are so rich. I also love that you can chew them for five minutes. Then I eat a couple of golden raisins as a palate cleanser because they are really tart, and then more walnuts. It’s a great snack for me.
  221. Understand that nutrition plays a huge role in athletes’ lives, and one of the most nutritious ways to eat is to cook your own food.
  222. To me, ‘Chopped’ is a great platform for championing great causes.
  223. To make fluffy scrambled eggs, the best trick is to whisk in a splash of water and nothing else. Cream, milk, and other liquids drag the eggs down!
  224. There’s not enough time in each day to really focus enough attention on any one thing, but I’m doing my best. I have a great group of people who support me, and I don’t sleep a lot. It’s like I’m on a constantly spinning merry-go-round, and every day, I’m wondering when it will stop so I can get off. I love what I do, so that helps a lot.
  225. There’s a freshness to the approach of teen chefs. They’re lighthearted, and they’re not afraid to take risks.
  226. The longer I look at something, the more my imagination churns and I can find somewhere to put it.
  227. The hardest thing for me is restraint. I see fresh beans and ramps, and I start to quiver.
  228. The best place to use vanilla beans is anywhere where they won’t be mixed in with a million other flavors. Anything with dairy, yogurt, milk, cream, or eggs – any custard or flan – how can it be bad?
  229. Stuffed cherry tomatoes are satisfying without being filling and make a great alternative to bread-based starters. You can assemble these appetizers ahead of time and refrigerate them until you’re ready to serve.
  230. Sometimes I look up a recipe for chicken and tomatoes and end up cooking pork. The inspiration gets lost in translation.
  231. Short ribs in the middle of a hamburger? That was pretty groundbreaking.
  232. Scrambled eggs are so simple, but they don’t wait or taste better cold!
  233. Repeatedly opening the oven – or worse, taking out the turkey to baste it – slows down the momentum of cooking.
  234. Red wine vinegar has some personality as well acidity.
  235. People in professional kitchens may love what they do, but sometimes it’s just something that puts food on the table.
  236. People don’t take enough advantage of the refrigerator door.
  237. Part of health is variety!
  238. One of the most practical utensils I can’t live without is my ‘Joyce Chen’ Scissors. They cut with precision.
  239. Once you make a cookbook, you live with it as your own for the rest of your life, like a yearbook.
  240. My most memorable meal was with my parents at Joel Robuchon’s Restaurant Jamin in Paris. It was Christmas 1982, and the flavors – from cauliflower and caviar to crab and tomato – astounded me. It was the first time I remember thinking that I would like to really learn how to cook.
  241. My mom, ever the Italian, made braised chicken with tomato.
  242. My mom is a self-taught home cook, so books that offer guidelines on how to organize menus are critical to ‘cook from the book’ people like her.
  243. My last meal on Earth? The obvious answer is a plate of my mother’s scrambled eggs.
  244. Mashed potatoes with stuff in it? That’s ’90s.
  245. Make dinner with the goal of stretching it out for lunch in the back of your mind. Making more of one thing is cheaper than buying more varied ingredients for each meal.
  246. Make a stir-fried rice dish with some cut-up chicken and any vegetables folded into the rice for a ‘one pot’ meal lunch that has it all – protein, starch and vegetables.
  247. It’s essential to make sure you have proper kitchen tools for food storage – like cling wrap, bags, and containers – because they help keep food fresher longer.
  248. It’s amazing how meaty cauliflower can be.
  249. It stuns me how effective children can be in their messaging, and I believe that every child should enjoy that basic right to become an adult. Getting rid of childhood cancers is one effective way to reach that goal.
  250. If you’re making a salad of any kind, cut the herbs, stems and all, and toss them into your mixed greens salad, a Romaine salad, iceberg, Bibb – it just adds a special touch.
  251. If you want to have a relationship, at some point you have to let yourself get caught.
  252. If it’s not messy and it doesn’t drip over the sides, it’s not a holiday hot chocolate -it’s just an average hot chocolate.
  253. If I am making a spice rub or a spice mix for a braise or even just to crust a piece of fish, I’ll use mustard seeds. If you soak them in a little bit of vinegar and let them get plumped and soft and then you puree them, they’re delicious.
  254. I’ve thrown vanilla beans into mustard. Nothing crazy or grainy, just normal dijon. It’s great for duck. Smear some of that right on the duck, coupled with some roast plums, and it all comes together in that savory over sweet over savory over sweet way we all love.
  255. I’ve roasted a somewhat frozen turkey, and it’s come out just fine.
  256. I’ve had the privilege of having a lot of amazing people cook for me.
  257. I’ve always been a great collector and lover of cookbooks.
  258. I’m interested in food and sharing my passion with a community of like-minded people. All of the celebrity stuff that comes along with that is just an incidental byproduct of being able to do what I love for a living.
  259. I wouldn’t call being a chef gratifying in a lot of ways. It’s an act of love.
  260. I watched ‘Iron Chef ‘ for years, and I thought, ‘That’s playing for the New York Yankees.’ I made that my version of being Derek Jeter, and I worked really, really hard to win that.
  261. I used to run track in high school and was unexceptional in every way.
  262. I try to sit still for about 15 minutes each morning without making lists or running in overdrive.
  263. I think unadulterated products and smaller portion sizes mean consumption of less food overall. Portion is everything. The first time I bought a scoop of ice cream in Paris, they weighed the ice cream on a scale before putting it on the cone. It was so small, it fell into the cone as she handed it to me.
  264. I think that cakes should have touches of candy bar in order for it really to hit all those childhood notes on the keyboard.
  265. I think that ‘celebrity’ and ‘chef’ should be a permanent oxymoron.
  266. I think no one would dispute that ‘Chopped’ is a highly athletic television show.
  267. I think I will never stop having mentors.
  268. I shop at the market, and that informs what I make.
  269. I really love muscle cars. I don’t think people might realize that about me. I really want to go to an auto auction and blow my life savings on a Camaro. They have such design around them, such panache.
  270. I really cringe at the sight of pattypan squash. So pretty and cute and having no taste or exciting texture. Dull.
  271. I love watching a single pork chop seasoned with garlic and shallots cook and see the fat bubble around it.
  272. I love using hummus as centerpiece and then making different containers of vegetables for fun dipping.
  273. I love to eat. I could make a professional sport out of it.
  274. I love the whole process of making, serving, and eating hearty soups like lentil, potato leek and carrot, to name a few.
  275. I love roasted beets with goat cheese. I am also a fruit addict.
  276. I love it when a few simple ingredients come together on a plate, and I think, ‘Wow, that’s a dish.’
  277. I love ‘The Gourmet Cooking School Cookbook’ by Dione Lucas. A huge source of information and inspiration. The book is organized by menu, and the recipes are unusual and exciting.
  278. I like to take a day off and enjoy fast food for what it is. I have to say that in New York, I’m really partial about taco trucks. I mean, I really can’t handle it. There is something about catching all those ingredients piled on top of each other: it puts me in a tizzy. I love it. I’m kind of a taco truck junkie.
  279. I like food to be really simple but have a lot of technique all the same.
  280. I like all of McClure’s pickles, but my personal favorites are the spicy ones.
  281. I like Bobby Flay’s attitude and his approach towards food. I think he’s just passionate and very honest. I find him very honest about food and cooking and ingredients and I admire that because I think that it’s easy to get away from that for various reasons.
  282. I learned so much from ‘Iron Chef’ about ingredients, about the courage to put yourself out there.
  283. I know that some people use lavender, incense, and cake as sedatives, but for me, a ‘nose bath’ in an old book just does something.
  284. I have to be honest and say that I never really feel like there’s one person that I really want to cook for. I just want my food to always get better and always be evolving and for there to always be movement in what I make. I would say I strive for that more than anything else.
  285. I have a daughter who has taught me a lot along the way.
  286. I grew up in a house where I was a spectator to the sport of cooking. In that way, I just learned so much about what it really takes to make food.
  287. I grew up in Midtown Manhattan.
  288. I feel very passionate about maintaining the same level of standard and respect for the food as an Iron Chef myself.
  289. I feel like a princess with a knife. I’ve wanted to be an Iron Chef forever.
  290. I exercise at a great gym and do dance classes mixed with some calisthenics. I really enjoy that because it reminds me of ’80s aerobics. It’s fun! I also bike ride, or sometimes I swim. Because I stand a lot, I don’t really like to walk long distances. Running or jogging is out of the question.
  291. I don’t show just anyone how to crust a sea bass. That’s sacred information.
  292. I don’t know anyone who hasn’t overcooked at least one turkey, myself included. It’s easy to do.
  293. I didn’t want to write a cheffy cookbook with dehydrated ham chips.
  294. I didn’t harbor a huge desire to become a chef until I graduated from college.
  295. I didn’t cook that much as a kid. My mother was cooking, and I was her helper. We made dishes together.
  296. I bent my head over a stove in my early 20s and picked it up in my 30s.
  297. I baked the coffee cake recipe from ‘The Joy of Cooking’ over and over again when I was a kid.
  298. I am driven by ingredients. My Italian heritage and French training inevitably poke through as well, guiding my techniques.
  299. Having students was so inspiring.
  300. Ganache is a mix of chocolate and cream. Warm cream, warm chocolate, they want to get to know each other – they’re happy.
  301. Fresh herbs really belong anywhere you put them.
  302. Freeze herbs by stem and all – don’t just freeze the leaves. It’s better to keep them sturdier. Put the stems and the leaves together into a plastic bag, and just wrap it up and freeze it like that.
  303. Every time I feel like something is missing from a dish, I think, ‘Oh, I know, I’ll add a pinch of dry ginger.’ If it’s not salt and it’s not vinegar, it’s probably missing dry ginger.
  304. Every once in a while, I want to get up and cook.
  305. Easter is an arts and crafts moment where your whole family and friends can get involved.
  306. Don’t be so hard on yourself. Make something simple a few times until you ‘master’ it and move on to the next thing. Take a cooking class! Buy a cookbook that specializes in foods or a cuisine you enjoy.
  307. Dione Lucas has been obscured by larger-than-life personalities like Julia Child, but she had it going on. She is like the horse that came in second place, whose name we can’t remember. It takes more than just one horse to make a race.
  308. Buying food from farmers and people that I know adds that human element that I love.
  309. As a chef, a mom, and a member of Team No Kid Hungry, I believe that every child deserves three meals a day, every day.
  310. Americans will not buy irregular-looking or oddly shaped vegetables!
  311. A splash of red wine vinegar can pull things together like a pinch of salt.
  312. A homemade hamburger can be a real treat.
  313. ‘Iron Chef America’ is so real. Imagine putting on television the whole process of making that food, the technique. It’s all about technique. It doesn’t even matter if you show the faces sometimes.
  314. When you start about family, about lineage and ancestry, you are talking about every person on earth.
  315. Roots is not just a saga of my family. It is the symbolic saga of a people.
  316. Racism is taught in our society, it is not automatic. It is learned behavior toward persons with dissimilar physical characteristics.
  317. Nobody can do for little children what grandparents do. Grandparents sort of sprinkle stardust over the lives of little children.
  318. My fondest hope is that ‘Roots’ may start black, white, brown, red, yellow people digging back for their own roots. Man, that would make me feel 90 feet tall.
  319. In my writing, as much as I could, I tried to find the good, and praise it.
  320. In every conceivable manner, the family is link to our past, bridge to our future.
  321. I look at my books the way parents look at their children. The fact that one becomes more successful than the others doesn’t make me love the less successful one any less.
  322. Either you deal with what is the reality, or you can be sure that the reality is going to deal with you.
  323. Anytime you see a turtle up on top of a fence post, you know he had some help.
  324. Winning and losing isn’t everything; sometimes, the journey is just as important as the outcome.
  325. When people say, ‘You run like a girl; you play like a girl,’ it’s not what it used to be. That shouldn’t be negative. You should be proud to play like a girl.
  326. When I leave the game, I want to go out on top.
  327. To force a change, sometimes you need to stand up. You know what you’re worth – rather than what your employer is paying you.
  328. There’s really no secret to success. You make your own success.
  329. The head-banging music gives me a headache. Katy Perry is fun, Rihanna, old-school ’90s hip-hop. Salt-N-Pepa. I like listening to that. Get the nerves out before the games.
  330. Sportsmanship is definitely an important thing in all sports. In soccer, we all respect each other on such a high level, between Sweden and Brazil and Japan or whatever team it is.
  331. Pregame, I eat pancakes for a meal. I always do mental visualization before the game to prepare myself. Postgame, I typically take ice baths.
  332. Ninety percent of the time, when I put on my headphones, I forget to turn on my music. Literally 10 minutes will go by before I realize that there’s no music.
  333. My goal is to show girls that I’m fighting so they don’t have to, so they don’t have to fight the same battles, so they don’t have to fight for wage equality or whatever it may be.
  334. My favorite goals are the ones when there’s so much pressure. I focus more when the game is on the line.
  335. It’s so easy to lose your fitness and so hard to gain it back.
  336. It’s great to see women standing up in their own line of work and fighting for fair value.
  337. I’m not gonna sugarcoat it: It sucks to lose sometimes.
  338. I would like to win the Ballon d’Or for women. But every top professional should have that ambition.
  339. I want young girls to dream about being professional soccer players instead of just watching the boys go out and play.
  340. I think it’s important to keep things positive. Sometimes you don’t win, and that sucks, and you work on improving.
  341. I think it’s huge, especially in team sports, for players to be able to rely on each other and to really trust in each other.
  342. I played volleyball, basketball, softball, and I started to love soccer the most around 7-8 years old because it was a physical game. I could use my speed and strength to my advantage.
  343. I have experienced sexism multiple times, and I’m sure I will a lot more.
  344. I grew up always having dessert after dinner. Always. It’s such a hard habit for me to break. It’s fine to have dessert every once in a while, but not seven days a week!
  345. I feel the most confident when I’m comfortable in workout clothes with my hair up in a ponytail.
  346. I don’t think the entire world respects women in sport. But if FIFA start respecting the women’s game more, others will follow.
  347. I am hugely honored to represent my country in the Olympics and in World Cups, and I’m grateful for all the advantages being a professional soccer player brings my way – the opportunities to see the world, the camaraderie and friendships, and more.
  348. I always map out how to get a good eight or nine hours of sleep before I even start my day. And my rule is to put my phone on silent when I go to bed; that way, no texts or emails can disturb me.
  349. After I got my gold medal, I thought, ‘This isn’t just me. It belongs to my team, my friends, my family, the fans, everybody who’s impacted my life – this is our gold medal.’ So when someone asks to try it on, I’m like, ‘Sure, why not?’ I might be a little too relaxed about it, but why would I keep it to myself?
  350. You should never be afraid of looking athletic or building too much muscle.
  351. With me and Portland, it wasn’t moving anywhere. I wasn’t given a bigger role as I played more and more with the club. I felt I could have been utilized in a bigger way.
  352. Whenever people say ‘women’s soccer,’ I want to correct them to say ‘soccer.’ Every girl has had their sport diminished because they’re girls.
  353. When I prepare for a match, it’s like work, even the way I have to shower and put on my makeup.
  354. When I play on grass, my body doesn’t ache. It can get sore, but it doesn’t pulse, and my legs don’t ache. When I play on turf, my legs can pulse and ache for up to 24 hours, and it could take 3-5 days to recover, whereas grass, after 24 hours, I’m ready to play again.
  355. What I really appreciate is the people who come up and say, ‘Thank you for representing our country.’
  356. There’s those young girls that I once was, looking up to Mia Hamm, Christine Lilly, all those players, and I know how much of an effect they had on me. Knowing that, I feel like I’m in a position where I can really help be a positive influence in girls’ lives.
  357. Social media has come a long way. With the good has come some bad, and you always have a lot of people hiding behind their computers and being very critical of what you do on and off the field, of what you tweet, of what you say, of everything you do.
  358. Scoring a goal in a World Cup was my dream as a little girl. I didn’t really dream of being in ‘Maxim’ when I was 5.
  359. People know there’s more than one side to me. You can have beauty and brains and athletic ability. You can switch up the cleats for heels once in a while. You can do both.
  360. One thing I’m proud to do like a girl is represent my country in the Olympics and at the highest level, at the highest platform that I can.
  361. Once I got to college, I realized that practicing 3-6 days wasn’t going to be enough for me to get where I wanted.
  362. My workouts are mostly interval-based, so I’m never running at a constant speed. I’m always switching it up because I don’t want my body getting used to one thing in particular.
  363. My off-pitch style is probably girly and comfortable. I like a lot of loose-fitting material on top and more tight-fitting material on the bottom.
  364. My goal against Italy in the World Cup qualifier was probably my most memorable: we had to go to Italy and had to win, or we wouldn’t go to the World Cup, and I scored in stoppage time.
  365. My dad has been to every soccer game that I’ve played in, both at the amateur level and at the professional level, and he always had great things to say whether we won or we lost, whether I felt great or not so great.
  366. Music is so huge to soccer, to my life, to working out. I usually have headphones when I’m cleaning the house or making dinner.
  367. It’s important to accept your body for what God gave you.
  368. It’s an obstacle being a girl when you move all over and don’t have half the things you need. It’s like everything is wrinkled in your life.
  369. It wasn’t until 1999 when my idols Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly took home the women’s World Cup trophy at the Rose Bowl in front of 40 million TV viewers that I remember thinking how rare it was to see women play sports on TV.
  370. In the 123rd minute of the semifinal game at the Olympics against Canada, I scored the game-winning goal that brought us to the finals. You can’t replicate those do-or-die moments in practice or a friendly game.
  371. I’ve been a big Chapstick fan since I was a kid. I love lathering it on. I probably use a bit more Chapstick than necessary.
  372. I’ve always wanted to skydive.
  373. I’ve always wanted to become a professional soccer player.
  374. I’m never just on the couch. Being busy is part of who I am. But it’s hard juggling my family, my husband, balancing that time.
  375. I’m a big advocate of starting soccer young and always having the ball at your foot, but that’s because I didn’t do that. If I’d focused more on that when I was a kid, it would’ve been so helpful. It took me, like, halfway through college to feel comfortable with the ball.
  376. I went from never doing interviews to doing 10 in one day and standing in front of 60,000 fans. Now people look up to me, and I’m seeing little girls wearing my jersey.
  377. I wasn’t the most technical player. But I was fast, and if I push the ball past a player, I can get there. Everyone always made fun of me in a good way for that.
  378. I was the biggest tomboy growing up. Now I love playing with a full face of makeup.
  379. I want to know I made women’s soccer better than it was when I came into it.
  380. I try to push myself a little every day. For me, it’s doing 10 more seconds of whatever I’m working on. So if I’m on the treadmill sprinting my butt off or doing a grueling core workout, I think to myself, ‘You can do 10 more seconds, and you’ll be that much mentally stronger.’ After a while, those 10 seconds add up!
  381. I think players need to get paid for what they’re worth, for what they put up on the field.
  382. I started off playing sports when I was five years old. I played three or four sports all throughout the year.
  383. I start warming up before training an hour before at the hotel. That’s not because I feel old and my body needs it. It’s because it’s prehab. It’s preventing those injuries.
  384. I remember every goal I’ve scored!
  385. I really try to take a step back from the soccer world and going a thousand miles an hour every day. I like to do some sort of either meditation or mental visualization or breathing exercises – something to calm my mind down because a lot of times, it’s just going faster than it should.
  386. I really started to enjoy Instagram more recently because it’s something that shows people what I’m doing and what I’m going through, but it’s so simple. I don’t have to come up with something witty; it’s just a funny photo, and you can be as artistic or as plain Jane as you want.
  387. I really like my legs because I’ve worked hard for them. With soccer, that’s the one thing you’re working all the time.
  388. I rarely felt or noticed any real divide between girls and boys when I was growing up. Maybe it was because I was so involved in sports and competed with the boys. Maybe it was my mom and dad, who constantly instilled confidence in me and never made me feel as though there were boy activities and girl activities.
  389. I never look at the goalkeeper’s eyes.
  390. I love yoga. There’s a lot of stretching involved, which helps with my flexibility and injury prevention. Vinyasa is my favorite as a recovery tool and for me to continue having my legs feel good.
  391. I know the trend I would love to bring back is floral. I think that it’s just so much fun, whether it’s with shoes or outfits or even pants.
  392. I have to look at myself in the mirror and tell myself that I’m beautiful, even if I don’t necessarily believe it.
  393. I have done ‘Sports Illustrated,’ but I don’t regret it because it portrayed me in a positive way – as an athlete.
  394. I have a couple of go-to sneakers off the pitch. I like to have shoes that I can slip on and wear with anything. I travel often, so it’s about finding those two or three pairs of shoes that can go with any outfit, whether they go with leggings or a skirt or a dress or jeans.
  395. I hate being recognized; I hate it, hate it.
  396. I find my motivation from everyone who looks up to me and my teammates. From the little girls that look up to me and tell me they want to be like me when they grow up.
  397. I feel like you have to use the platform you’re given to voice concerns and also to praise things when they need to be praised.
  398. I feel like when there’s more on the line and there’s more risks, that means there’s more reward.
  399. I feel like I’m always looking to continue improving myself. I’m always looking to win. I’m super competitive, so going into the Olympics, I feel like that’s nothing different.
  400. I don’t want to say names, but there are certain companies I won’t work with because of previous people they’ve worked with. I don’t want to be put in the same category as another athlete that I don’t necessarily think is a good role model.
  401. I don’t really have many regrets. I did miss a lot of the events in the days leading up to my sister’s wedding because I was at a U17 camp. There were moments like that growing up when I felt like I focused too much on soccer. But that’s probably the reason I am where I am today.
  402. I could be a model for one night. But I’m also a professional soccer player, and I like to be taken seriously on the field.
  403. I could always score goals. I loved that feeling of having your team look to you, that feeling of leadership.
  404. I certainly don’t feel like I have the perfect body type… It’s through your own eyes. And for every female, you’re going to see flaws in that; you’re going to see flaws regardless. So for me, it’s just important to have that confidence and self-esteem no matter what body type you have.
  405. I always, always decide where I’m going with the ball before I take a penalty shot, stare at the ball, follow through, and never look at the place that I’m going to shoot.
  406. Honestly, with stats and things like that, I try not to think about them. I just find that the more you think about goals and assists – what you need to do and accomplish – the more you tend to fall short. When you hope for something and you want something, it comes to you.
  407. Every time you step onto the field, you have to set goals. My goals are to either score a goal, to have an assist, or to play well.
  408. Even when I’m training alone, I always prefer doing soccer-related stuff. On my own, I’ll run through cones or do some shooting exercises or pass the ball against the wall.
  409. At the FIFA World Player of the Year event, FIFA executives and FIFA president Sepp Blatter didn’t know who I was. And I was being honored as top three in the world. That was pretty shocking.
  410. At home, my mom and my dad shared equally in the responsibilities of the family and our home and always demonstrated the importance of men and women having an equal role.
  411. As a professional soccer player, I need to get touches on the ball every day, and obviously it’s a lot easier to do that with a team than to motivate yourself to do it by yourself.
  412. Around the age of 14, I was very discouraged from a coach. It was my first youth club team while playing soccer. She told me at the time that I wasn’t good enough to play on the team, that I would never get into the game.
  413. You don’t change the world by hiding in the woods, wearing a hair shirt, or buying indulgences in the form of ‘Save the Earth’ bumper stickers. You do it by articulating a vision for the future and pursuing it with all the ingenuity humanity can muster.
  414. When the Internet really first started to hit, people felt this would be the death blow: after suburbs and long commutes and television and the death of the family dinner, this would be the last straw that would totally break society.
  415. What makes creative people tingle are interesting problems, the chance to impress their friends, and caffeine.
  416. We’re not going to persuade people in the developing world to go without, but neither can we afford a planet on which everyone lives like an American. Billions more people living in suburbs and driving SUVs to shopping malls is a recipe for planetary suicide. We can’t even afford to continue that way of life ourselves.
  417. We’re becoming a planet of a thousand new major cities. The economy of the 21st century is a city-building economy. It’s within our power to make it a carbon zero one, too; and to be blunt, civilization depends on our success.
  418. We unfortunately already live on a planet where the climate has changed and will continue to change no matter what we do now. We’re playing a game of making the problem less bad rather than preventing it.
  419. We get so little news about the developing world that we often forget that there are literally millions of people out there struggling to change things to be fairer, freer, more democratic, less corrupt.
  420. We don’t need more recycling, we need a completely different system of closed-loop manufacturing, and no matter how many cans I crush, my personal actions at the consumer level are of very little importance in getting us there.
  421. We don’t need a War on Carbon. We need a new prosperity that can be shared by all while still respecting a multitude of real ecological limits – not just atmospheric gas concentrations, but topsoil depth, water supplies, toxic chemical concentrations, and the health of ecosystems, including the diversity of life they depend upon.
  422. We don’t know yet how to build a society which is environmentally sustainable, which is shareable with everybody on the planet, which promotes stability and democracy and human rights, and which is achievable in the time-frame necessary to make it through the challenges we face.
  423. We already have many of the technologies and tools that we need to build a sustainable future. What we don’t have is a new way of thinking, and that’s really the hardest part.
  424. There’s no really rosy scenario ahead, where climate change just doesn’t happen, but I believe we don’t have the ethical right to throw our hands up in the air and say, ‘Game over.’ Whatever pathway we choose, our descendants will be dealing with that reality for centuries to come.
  425. There’s no law of physics that says we have to be an unsustainable society – in fact, quite the opposite. The planet’s ready to work with us if we’re ready to think differently, but we do have to make that jump and start to do things in new ways.
  426. There’s a lot of evidence that shows that if we push as hard as we need to for net-zero emissions, we’ll find ourselves with cities that are more secure, healthier, and have more economic opportunity – are frankly better cities to live in – than if we settle for the status quo.
  427. There are plenty of people out there talking about how difficult it is for some of us to just deal with all the stuff we already have, from packed closets that need organizers to storage spaces to maintenance costs, etc. Lots of people are reevaluating whether or not they need giant garages full of stuff and finding that they don’t.
  428. There are a lot of different ways of building a prosperous society, and some of them use much less energy than others. And it is possible and more practical to talk about rebuilding systems to use much less energy than it is to think about trying to meet greater demands of energy through clean energy alone.
  429. The planet’s biggest problems have to do with sustainability, environmental decline, global poverty, disease, conflict and so forth. Really, they’re all interconnected – it’s one big problem, which is that the way we’re doing things can’t go on.
  430. The most climate friendly trip we are ever going to take is the trip we never had to take because we were close to what we wanted.
  431. The idea that we are going to be able to take our entire society as it currently works and simply change the source of energy and make it sustainable is not actually congruent with reality.
  432. The denser places get, the lower the amount of energy people use to get around it.
  433. The brutal reality is that newer, more sprawling suburbs – and especially the cheap boom-years exburbs – aren’t just a bit unsustainable, they’re ruinously unsustainable in almost every way, and nothing we know of will likely stop their decline, much less fix them easily.
  434. The biggest thing growing cities need to do is minimize barriers to development so that as long as someone is doing good urbanism, they can get permitted quickly and get building quickly.
  435. The Internet has made some phenomenal breakthroughs that are still only poorly understood in terms of changing people’s ideas of us and them. If mass media, social isolation in the suburbs, alienating workplaces and long car commutes create a bunker mentality, the Internet does the opposite.
  436. Saying the Tech Bloom is not commercially driven is like saying Mother Teresa had an interest in the poor.
  437. People – especially the geeks who created it – have tended to look at the Internet as something that’s hermetically sealed: there’s the Internet and the rest of the world. But that’s not how people want to use the Internet. They want to use it as a way of better navigating the real world.
  438. One of the most unfortunate side effects of the urban activism of the ’60s and ’70s is the belief that development is wrong and that fighting it makes you an environmentalist.
  439. More is not better. Better is better. You don’t need a bigger house; you need a different floor plan. You don’t need more stuff; you need stuff you’ll actually use.
  440. Make no mistake: Tackling climate change is vital. But to see everything through the lens of short-term CO2 reductions, letting our obsession with carbon blind us to the bigger picture, is to court catastrophe.
  441. It’s not that hard to imagine the natural world recovering it’s health in our absence: it’s more difficult, and more necessary, to imagine it recovering its health in our presence.
  442. It is very possible to have lives that are just as prosperous, and nicer, that use 5 percent of the fossil fuels and virgin materials we do now. But if we’re living anything like the average McMansion-ite, SUV-driving suburbanites, there’s simply no way that can be powered in a climate-friendly way.
  443. In tough times, some of us see protecting the climate as a luxury, but that’s an outdated 20th-century worldview from a time when we thought industrialization was the end goal, waste was growth, and wealth meant a thick haze of air pollution.
  444. In almost all city governments in America, the small group of people who don’t want change are able to block change.
  445. If we’re talking about transportation, the best thing a city can do is densify as quickly as it can. That needs to be said every time this issue comes up, because it’s the only universal strategy that works.
  446. If people are given the opportunity to really make a difference in their own lives, their own communities, their own businesses and their own governments, then we can really transform the prospects of life on this planet. We can find ourselves living in a world that is more like the world that I think most of us want to be living in.
  447. If nothing else, the Internet allows people to put their ideas out there and let the world decide whether they’re worth paying attention to.
  448. If mass media, social isolation in the suburbs, alienating workplaces and long car commutes create a bunker mentality, the Internet does the opposite.
  449. I’m fascinated with design. I realized early that I had no talent in that direction, but I love talking with architects and designers about what they do. I appreciate applied creativity as a source of pleasure and meaning.
  450. I think we’re going to start to see a new model of civic advocacy where people get together once in a while to protest, but it’s more about an ongoing, sustained engagement in issues, networks and communities about which people care.
  451. I think there’s a gigantic generation gap in terms of how people understand the Internet and how much they think technology is an important factor in social change.
  452. For most people, using the Internet broadens their sense of who ‘we’ is and actually ends up leaving us in a place of greater compassion and understanding. It leaves us more connected to a larger group of people and more at one with a lot more people in our community.
  453. For carbon-neutral cities, there are things worth talking about in how our consumption patterns can change – sharing goods, etc. – but those are a fraction of the impacts of transportation and building energy use. If we need to choose priority actions, the most important things are to densify, provide transit, and green the buildings.
  454. Deep walkability describes a city that is built in such a way that you can move from one area to another on foot, on bicycle, on transit and have an experience that remains a pleasant one, that you feel you are welcome not just in the neighborhood but moving between neighborhoods.
  455. Copenhagen has done a remarkable job creating streets that are focused on bicycles and pedestrians.
  456. Climate change is not a discrete issue; it’s a symptom of larger problems. Fundamentally, our society as currently designed has no future. We’re chewing up the planet so fast, in so many different ways, that we could solve the climate problem tomorrow and still find that environmental collapse is imminent.
  457. Clean air and water, a diversity of animal and plant species, soil and mineral resources, and predictable weather are annuities that will pay dividends for as long as the human race survives – and may even extend our stay on Earth.
  458. Cities offer us powerful leverage on our most stubborn, wasteful practices. Long commutes in our cars, big power bills from our energy-hogging buildings, shopping trips to buy stuff that’ll spend a few short months in our homes and long centuries in our landfills.
  459. Cities generate most of the global economy, and most of its energy use, resource demands and climate emissions. How we build cities over the next decades will largely determine whether we can deliver a bright green future.
  460. Cities are responsible for the vast majority of the creation of the economy. They’re also places into which we pour the vast majority of resources, the vast majority of energy and the places where a huge percentage of the decisions about how systems are built and how products designed, etc., happen.
  461. Carbon zero simply means that the emissions you are releasing either are zero or balance out to zero.
  462. Cabbies in particular seem to like discussing the fate the Earth.
  463. By fundamentally changing how we design the places and systems that enable our daily lives, we can slash emissions way beyond the immediate carbon savings – because our own personal emissions are just the tip of a vast iceberg of energy and resources consumed far from our view.
  464. At its very heart, Worldchanging is about using the best of people’s new ideas, bringing them together and applying them to the massive problems that we all face.
  465. Americans trash the planet not because we’re evil, but because the industrial systems we’ve devised leave no other choice. Our ranch houses and high-rises, factories and farms, freeways and power plants were conceived before we had a clue how the planet works.
  466. You don’t meet that many people that you can talk about Roots Manuva with, but that was my favorite in school, this record of his called ‘Run Come Save Me.’ When I first started writing lyrics, it came from that.
  467. There’s something to be said for writing in the morning. At other points in the day, you’re a bit more defensive.
  468. There’s something about a Gucci loafer kicking on a fuzz pedal.
  469. The idea that talent is directly proportional to your trophy cabinet is one I oppose.
  470. The first time I went to New York, it was really exciting, and I thought, given half the chance, it would be nice to live there – the same with London.
  471. Television? It’s a gateway to writer’s block, isn’t it?
  472. Songwriters always reminded me of that kid at school who would go around with his guitar, like, ‘Yeah, songwritin’ man,’ looking wistful. That wasn’t me – those kinds of people put me off. In the early days, I’d write a bunch of lyrics and almost look at them as a sort of joke, to make the rest of the boys laugh.
  473. Sometimes, writing songs is like waiting in for deliveries. They give you a window, and your washing machine is going to show up, whether the window is the album or something you’re thinking, like, ‘This thing is going to come to me.’
  474. Sometimes I don’t want to be in the confines of what a band seems to provide.
  475. Someone asked me what the key to being a good frontman was, and I think having a sense of humor about it is pretty near the top of that list. It’s a very strange place to be in, and I don’t take that role too seriously.
  476. Rock n’ roll seems like it’s faded away sometimes, but it will never die.
  477. It’s a very unnatural environment to be in, up on a stage. So you put up defenses to hide. Like looking at the ground with your hair in your eyes, or being tightly wound and quite aggressive and uncooperative, as I used to do.
  478. If anyone asks me about songwriting, I guess I’d say that you just gotta do it.
  479. I’m not really one for collaborations, to be quite honest.
  480. I’m not even sure where home is. Probably Terminal 5. There is a strange sense of calm about arriving back at Heathrow.
  481. I’m like the Ben Affleck of crowd surfing.
  482. I’m in a difficult position in the sense that, preposterous as this might sound, I don’t like being the centre of attention. I get up on stage every night and play songs, but I almost feel the songs are the centre of attention. I don’t like opening my birthday presents in front of people, either.
  483. I usually sit around with the guitar in reach and grab it when I get an idea. Sometimes it lasts five minutes, and sometimes it lasts all day.
  484. I think New York is a good place to write in general because it’s a grid. It’s organized. You know where you are on the map. That centers you, and your imagination is perhaps freer to roam.
  485. I think I’m alright as a lyricist, you know? But then what will happen every couple of months or so is that I’ll hear a song I’ve never heard before and feel I’ve gone right back to square one.
  486. I still very much appreciate the storytelling of the best rappers.
  487. I like The Four Freshmen, anything with good harmonies, some Beach Boys. I like the girl groups as well, like The Dixie Cups and all that.
  488. I know my lyrics might be weird to some, but they’re not like that to me because I know where they come from – I know the secret.
  489. I just don’t think I’m equipped to soundtrack the times. There might be someone out there who can do that, but I haven’t cracked it.
  490. I get nervous about gigs sometimes, but not with records – I always get excited.
  491. I can’t draw. I’m good on the yo-yo, but I don’t draw.
  492. I can be a woodsman if need be. I grew up very close to some forest, and I spent a lot of my formative years up and down trees, fooling around in the woods. I’m no stranger to that sort of landscape.
  493. I am a romantic fool, no doubt about that.
  494. Guitar music or rock n’ roll or whatever you want to call it sort of goes away with trends, but it’ll never go away completely. It can’t die because it’s so fundamentally attractive.
  495. Every time you write a song, you’re looking for some sort of perfection, and you never quite reach it. You’re always looking for that extra missing piece.
  496. ‘Hatful of Hollow’ and ‘The Smiths’ were lent to me, and they made me want to create music that might make another person feel like they made me feel – to have an effect on someone.
  497. You’re always told by your publisher that you must only write one book a year and some years you should perhaps write none at all.
  498. You do not have to ladle on the impasto to make a point about human frailty or ambitions.
  499. Writing fiction, I really just sit there and it just comes.
  500. Writers obviously have to bear witness to the harsh face of the age.
  501. With ’44 Scotland Street’ I found myself having to work out how a daily novel works, and it is completely different to a conventional novel.
  502. Who can’t like pigs? They’re wonderful creatures! I’ve always liked pigs.
  503. Wherever I go in the world, people all know about Scotland Street and are always asking me about what’s going to happen to the characters next.
  504. Well, I’d say all of us are a combination of moods and emotions. In my day to day life I don’t go around skipping, but at times one can feel sheer exhilarating joy at the world.
  505. There is this intimacy still in Botswana. It’s a country of just under two million people, and there’s this sense of connectedness, in that people tend to be related to one another.
  506. The wider your readership, the greater the chances of offending your readers.
  507. The point of opera is that people are moved by the emotions and music.
  508. The local community is very important in one’s life; the feelings of identification with a place and people.
  509. The Okavango Delta is an astonishing sight: the great Okavango River, rather than flow towards the sea, flows inland, into the sands of the Kalahari.
  510. That my philosophy of life is, as far as possible, one of enjoyment. I’m not nihilistic.
  511. Serial novels have an unexpected effect; they hook the writer as well as the reader.
  512. Painters aren’t expected to paint bleak pictures, are they?
  513. One of the most destructive things that’s happening in modern society is that we are losing our sense of the bonds that bind people together – which can lead to nightmares of social collapse.
  514. Oh I love gadgets and I pride myself on keeping at the cutting edge of technology.
  515. New York is a wonderful place to be up, an awful place to be down.
  516. My wife Elizabeth and I started The Really Terrible Orchestra for people like us who are pretty hopeless musicians who would like to play in an orchestra. It has been a great success. We give performances; we’ve become the most famous bad orchestra in the world.
  517. My parents were very supportive and always encouraged us. My father was a gentle, nice man. My mother was quite a colorful character and a keen reader who encouraged me to write.
  518. My Botswana books are positive, and I’ve never really sought to deny that. They are positive. They present a very positive picture of the country. And I think that that is perfectly defensible given that there is so much written about Africa which is entirely negative.
  519. Many of my books are written from a female perspective. I rather enjoy the take that women have on the world, and certainly I enjoy the conversations that women have.
  520. Manners are the basic building blocks of civil society.
  521. It’s through the small things that we develop our moral imagination, so that we can understand the sufferings of others.
  522. It seems to me that we’re in danger of losing sight of certain basic civic values in society by allowing the growth of a whole generation of people who really have no sense of attachment to society.
  523. If you lose sight of the smaller accomplishments, you end up with an imbalance in your life.
  524. I’ve certainly always had a very high regard for Botswana and so I paint a very good picture of the country and I’ve never pretended to be painting an entirely realistic picture.
  525. I’ve always had a creative urge and I get immense satisfaction from creating something because it feels like I’m making sense of the world and imposing order on it.
  526. I’ve also long since realized that the way to really engage children is to give out prizes; it’s amazing how it concentrates their minds.
  527. I’m very interested in tea. I wouldn’t mind being involved in some aspect of the tea industry.
  528. I’m interested in character and dialogue and exchange of ideas.
  529. I write four books a year. I’m very fortunate that I write quickly; around 3,500 words a day. Being strict about delineating my writing time and personal life, as well as keeping distractions at bay, is the only way I can accomplish this.
  530. I would never inflict my bassoon on anybody really other than the long suffering audiences that come to the concerts of The Really Terrible Orchestra; which actually is really terrible.
  531. I would certainly never consider myself a Renaissance Man; I’m not fit to look at the dust from the chariot wheels of many of those who have gone before me.
  532. I think people in Botswana are pleased that my books paint a positive picture of their lives and portray the country as being very special. They’ve made a great success of their country, and the people are fed up with the constant reporting of only the problems and poverty of the continent. They welcome something which puts the positive side.
  533. I just focus on getting the first scene right, with a few lines about the overall plot, and then the book grows organically.
  534. I have three older sisters, so we were a reasonably large family and, in general, a happy one.
  535. I am capable of being idle.
  536. Fiction is able to encompass books that are bleak and which dwell on the manifold and terrible problems of our times. But I don’t think that all books need to have that particular focus.
  537. Every single day, I get letters – very moving, overwhelming letters – testifying how much my books have meant to people in times of crisis in their lives, when they were very ill, say. If I ever doubted that writing could play an important part in people’s lives, I don’t doubt that now.
  538. Every novel presents a slice of life. A noir policier for example presents one slice, one that perhaps addresses social dysfunction or some sort of pathology, while mine present a slice that is more upbeat and affirmative.
  539. Edinburgh used to be a haughty city.
  540. But you cannot expect every writer to dwell on human suffering. I think my books do deal with grave issues. People who say they are too positive probably haven’t read them.
  541. Botswana is actually very peaceful. It’s democratic. It never was in debt. They’ve been fortunate, they’ve had diamonds.
  542. Baboons take a bit of getting to know but, apparently, once you break the ice, so to speak, they are complex and interesting creatures with elaborate societies.
  543. As a writer, you have to realize that people want to like the characters, so you have to be careful to keep them involved.
  544. As a writer, I have readers who will have a range of political views. I don’t think they look to me for political guidance.
  545. As a writer I’ve learned certain lessons. One of them is to be careful about how you put a view, and to bear in mind how easily and readily you’ll be misinterpreted.
  546. Any author of fiction will tell you that characters don’t need to be told what to do.
  547. A very powerful theme in fiction is that of loss.
  548. You look at how many years you have left, and you start to think: ‘How many more films do I have in me?’
  549. You just never know when you’re living in a golden age.
  550. You begin a film more with questions than with direct intentions. It’s more of an exploration and discovery.
  551. When you’re a houseguest and you leave, it’s nice to straighten something up or send your hosts a useful gift. And when you leave the planet, it’s nice to have made a positive contribution.
  552. When you watch a movie, you don’t want to feel like a machine made it. You want to feel a soul.
  553. When I’m shooting, I don’t care who the star is. I have an actor playing a part, and I’m serving the script, not serving anyone’s career.
  554. What is filmmaking but groping in the dark?
  555. Well, that’s what life is – this collection of extraordinarily ordinary moments. We just need to pay attention to them all. Wake up and pay attention to how beautiful it all is.
  556. They say you can do honest, sincere work for decades, but you’re given in general a 10-year period when what you do touches the zeitgeist – when you’re relevant. And I’m aware of that, and I don’t want my time to go by.
  557. There’s a bizarre insistence on how a story should be. ‘The protagonist must be sympathetic!’ they say. Whatever that means. I never engage in that discussion. I never use that word, ‘sympathetic.’ I just know ‘interesting.’
  558. There is an audience out there for literate films – slower, more observant, more human films, and they deserve to be made.
  559. The novel succeeds on terms exclusive to literature. A good film succeeds on terms exclusive to the cinema. That’s why so many bad novels can become good movies, like ‘Jaws’ or ‘The Godfather.’
  560. The most heinous shift in American films is that they reinforce good things like ‘couples’ and ‘relationships.’
  561. The kindest thing a director can do is look with open eyes at everything.
  562. The hardest part of this whole movie-making endeavor is finding ideas.
  563. The biggest fear I have is to die with regrets, and of course that will come true.
  564. The best cinema is about ethics.
  565. The best actors are always the ones who’ve directed as well, as they understand all the problems you face.
  566. The actors are the greatest executors of tone in a film. They’re the most important cinematic component.
  567. That’s how I like to do it with actors, have them really go for it and I’ll tell them when it’s too much. It’s always easier to bring it back then to push it further.
  568. Omaha, like Rome, is built on seven hills.
  569. My flag is always flying. My shingle is always out. I’m always looking for movie ideas.
  570. Marketing has supplanted story as the primary force behind the worthiness of making a film, and that’s a very sad thing. It’s film only as a function of consumerism rather than as an important component of our culture, and that’s everywhere around the world.
  571. Life mixes tones all the time.
  572. Joe E. Lewis said, ‘Money doesn’t buy happiness but it calms the nerves.’ And that is how I feel about a film being well-received.
  573. Jesuits encourage an intellectual rigor in a way that I like.
  574. It seems that our politicians see the world in black and white, so why not our artists? Did Woody Allen’s ‘Manhattan’ have to be in black and white? No. But is it fantastic that it was? To see New York like that? Yes!
  575. In the moment of making films, I want to share my observations of life, not of other films.
  576. In a sense, ‘Schmidt’ is the most Omaha of my films. But have I gotten it right? I’m not sure. Did Fellini get Rome right? Did Ozu get Tokyo right?
  577. If you’re trying to recreate life, the life that you best know is the one you grew up with.
  578. If you were falling in love and you could go back in time and relive a day and see the banal things you did that you’d forgotten about, you’d weep, looking at that day.
  579. I’m so not interested in producing, other than doing my own work, producing my own films. I only do it as favors, for other people to get their films made.
  580. I’m hoping one day I can make one really good film.
  581. I want all of my films to belong to me.
  582. I think that Peter Jennings is the only decent one of the big three.
  583. I think if you watch most of my films with the sound off, you could still tell what’s going on.
  584. I think cynicism lasts. Sentimentality ages, dates quickly.
  585. I think a badly crafted, great idea for a new film with a ton of spelling mistakes is just 100 times better than a well-crafted stale script.
  586. I still have energy and some degree of youth, which is what a filmmaker needs.
  587. I never wanted money worries to slow me down or make me take a job I didn’t want.
  588. I mean, look, I love movies, not just the ones I make… In fact, I don’t like the movies I make very much.
  589. I like voice-over in films, and most of my films have been voice-over films.
  590. I like to think of film-making not just as an act of personal self-aggrandisement but rather as an act of public service.
  591. I like actors who, when you see them on screen, you sense a person, not just an actor.
  592. I guess maybe I try to make movies that are closer to real life than are many Hollywood movies. But I still try to stay within a commercial narrative, a contemporary American vernacular.
  593. I get asked, ‘How can you have such failures in your films?’ Well, what else is life about? There’s some sense of constant failure in something. Humor gives you a distance from it.
  594. I don’t want all of American cinema to be big cartoons that are just made to be digested by the entire world.
  595. I don’t think so much about verbal comedy. I always think about visual comedy. I was raised watching silents, and I’m always thinking about how to make cinema, not good talking – although I want good talking. I’m much more interested in framing, composition, and orchestration of bodies in space, and so forth.
  596. I don’t feel despair because I am able to make the films I want to make, and that gives me hope.
  597. I definitely in filmmaking more and more find writing and directing a means to harvest material for editing. It’s all about editing.
  598. I always wanted ‘Sideways’ to be like a great 1960s Italian film.
  599. Hollywood films have become a cesspool of formula and it’s up to us to try to change it… I feel like a preacher! But it’s really true. I feel personally responsible for the future of American cinema. Me personally.
  600. Even if we die at 100, we’re still dying young. I want at least 700 years. There’s a lot of travelling and books to read and movies to see. I’m not going to squeeze it all in in 85 years.
  601. Each one of my movies becomes easier to get off the ground.
  602. But it’s just that the whole country is making generally lousy films these days and has been for quite a while. That’s the big problem that we all have to think about.
  603. As the years go by and I make more films, I am increasingly interested in capturing place as a vivid backdrop for my films.
  604. Anytime you cast a movie and you need someone famous in the lead part, you’re a prisoner of whoever happens to be famous in the six-month window in which you’re trying to get a film financed.
  605. A pitfall of making a comedy with a studio-and it’s also an American cultural thing-is that I get tired of being encouraged to go always for laughs.
  606. A book suggests a whole world and story that I could have never thought of in a million years.
  607. ‘Independent’ means one thing to me: It means that regardless of the source of financing, the director’s voice is extremely present. It’s such a pretentious term, but it’s auteurist cinema. Director-driven, personal, auteurist… Whatever word you want.
  608. We bury love; Forgetfulness grows over it like grass: That is a thing to weep for, not the dead.
  609. We are never happy; we can only remember that we were so once.
  610. Trifles make up the happiness or the misery of human life.
  611. Trees are your best antiques.
  612. To sit for one’s portrait is like being present at one’s own creation.
  613. To be occasionally quoted is the only fame I care for.
  614. There is no ghost so difficult to lay as the ghost of an injury.
  615. The world is not so much in need of new thoughts as that when thought grows old and worn with usage it should, like current coin, be called in, and, from the mint of genius, reissued fresh and new.
  616. The sea complains upon a thousand shores.
  617. The saddest thing that befalls a soul is when it loses faith in God and woman.
  618. The man who in this world can keep the whiteness of his soul is not likely to lose it in any other.
  619. The dead keep their secrets, and in a while we shall be as wise as they – and as taciturn.
  620. Love is but the discovery of ourselves in others, and the delight in the recognition.
  621. In life there is nothing more unexpected and surprising than the arrivals and departures of pleasure. If we find it in one place today, it is vain to seek it there tomorrow. You can not lay a trap for it.
  622. If you wish to preserve your secret, wrap it up in frankness.
  623. If you wish to make a man look noble, your best course is to kill him. What superiority he may have inherited from his race, what superiority nature may have personally gifted him with, comes out in death.
  624. If you do your fair day’s work, you are certain to get your fair day’s wage – in praise or pudding, whichever happens to suit your taste.
  625. If the egotist is weak, his egotism is worthless. If the egotist is strong, acute, full of distinctive character, his egotism is precious, and remains a possession of the race.
  626. I would rather be remembered by a song than by a victory.
  627. I go into my library and all history unrolls before me.
  628. How deeply seated in the human heart is the liking for gardens and gardening.
  629. Everything is sweetened by risk.
  630. Every man’s road in life is marked by the graves of his personal liking.
  631. Death is the ugly fact which Nature has to hide, and she hides it well.
  632. Christmas is the day that holds all time together.
  633. Books are a finer world within the world.
  634. A man’s real possession is his memory. In nothing else is he rich, in nothing else is he poor.
  635. A man gazing on the stars is proverbially at the mercy of the puddles in the road.
  636. A man doesn’t plant a tree for himself. He plants it for posterity.
  637. A great man is the man who does something for the first time.
  638. You know, when you go to high school or, you know, when kids are younger and there’s not an understanding of differences. But I built up a very strong, thick skin.
  639. Where music leads, I follow.
  640. When you focus on the consumer, the consumer responds.
  641. When I decided to launch my first knitwear line, it was because I saw a void in the basics category. The editors were always looking for cool, fashion-forward tees and sweaters. So that’s where I started.
  642. Time passes faster and faster, but with every project I always want to find the next challenge and the next challenge is just as exciting as the previous one.
  643. There’s a tendency to think that young designers only do fantasy fashion, but I’m more interested in making clothes that women can afford.
  644. The industry’s changed so much that you can’t just design something, put on a great show, and say, ‘Okay, my job is done.’
  645. The great thing is that young talent isn’t tied to a how-to model for starting a line; we get to find new ways to go about doing things. And don’t let people tell you you can’t. Go find a way to show that you can.
  646. Probably the earliest memories for me would be going to restaurants with my family.
  647. No one is going to understand your brand better than you.
  648. No one ever taught me, and I never had formal classes in pattern making, so I was like, Okay, I’ll just drape, and I’ll sew as I pin it.
  649. My mom would take me to restaurants, and the first thing I’d ask for would be a pen and a napkin, and I’d sketch shoes and shoes and shoes.
  650. My mom would put me in these preppy little suits and slick my hair to the side. I have these baby pictures of me where I’m this little preppy kid with a sweater tied around my neck.
  651. My friends always joke that I run on batteries.
  652. It’s hard sometimes to take a step back and realize what’s happened because you’re always trying to move forward. You’re always looking at the next palette.
  653. In the beginning I pushed toward perfection, but it takes time to get to certain places.
  654. If you’re designing out of a purely creative place, not thinking of the girl, then the consumer’s not going to take notice.
  655. If someone realises the piece they are wearing is inspired by me then it only broadens my audience.
  656. I’ve always said I’m not the kind of designer who likes to lock himself away in a studio and let the rest of the company deal with it. I work very closely with everyone on the team.
  657. I’ve always loved when girls carry their wallets as a clutch instead of a bag.
  658. I’m not like most designers, who have to set sail on an exotic getaway to get inspired. Most of the time, it’s on my walk to work, or sitting in the subway and seeing something random or out of context.
  659. I was in fashion school, my brother has a law background, and my sister-in-law had worked in production, but none of us had a proper fashion business education.
  660. I thought I would attend school and get an assistant position and work my way up but being in NY and seeing the pace of everything, is very inspiring.
  661. I think sometimes there are negative connotations for those who have a business mind as well as a creative side.
  662. I think everyone shares a fear of failure – that you’re only as good as your most recent collection. That’s definitely a fear, but it’s a fear that fuels me, that makes me want to work harder, that makes me take on more challenges.
  663. I tend to like the most basic pieces with the perfect fit and fabric, like a simple tank.
  664. I seem to always start a collection by designing outerwear and jackets.
  665. I never really did sports growing up. Maybe that’s why they intrigue me. The technology that goes into that clothing is steps ahead, so it’s always been something I look towards.
  666. I mean, I’ve always said I have an amazing team and network of friends and people that I work with that, you know, inspire me and enable me to do what I do.
  667. I love layers!
  668. I like to write and draw everything with sharpies. I even got one with my own name on it!
  669. I feel so thankful that I’m able to be a part of something that I love to wake up and run to work every day.
  670. I don’t think fashion week will go back to what it used to be because people are realising that the industry is completely changing. It’s not just in Bryant Park any more, people are figuring out who their audience is, where they want to show, they aren’t really playing by the rules. It’s not so much about these editors, these buyers.
  671. I don’t care how small or big they are, insects freak me out.
  672. Designing a product and understanding how it filters through into the market and into the rest of the company is very important to me.
  673. Any style that Nike makes in all black, shoe, sweatshirt, onesie, doesn’t matter, I pretty much need to have.
  674. A lot of my work is a matter of reacting to surprises in life.
  675. A lot of designers get caught up in the creativity, but you’ve got to think about the legs of your collection – essentially, how the line is going to move forward.
  676. Pure love and suspicion cannot dwell together: at the door where the latter enters, the former makes its exit.
  677. Only a man who has felt ultimate despair is capable of feeling ultimate bliss.
  678. Nothing succeeds like success.
  679. It is rare that one can see in a little boy the promise of a man, but one can almost always see in a little girl the threat of a woman.
  680. It is neccessary to have wished for death in order to know how good it is to live.
  681. It is almost as difficult to keep a first class person in a fourth class job, as it is to keep a fourth class person in a first class job.
  682. Infatuated, half through conceit, half through love of my art, I achieve the impossible working as no one else ever works.
  683. If God were suddenly condemned to live the life which He has inflicted upon men, He would kill Himself.
  684. I prefer rogues to imbeciles, because they sometimes take a rest.
  685. How is it that little children are so intelligent and men so stupid? It must be education that does it.
  686. He was thinking alone, and seriously racking his brain to find a direction for this single force four times multiplied, with which he did not doubt, as with the lever for which Archimedes sought, they should succeed in moving the world, when some one tapped gently at his door.
  687. Happiness is like those palaces in fairy tales whose gates are guarded by dragons: we must fight in order to conquer it.
  688. Business? It’s quite simple; it’s other people’s money.
  689. All human wisdom is summed up in two words; wait and hope.
  690. All generalizations are dangerous, even this one.
  691. All for one, one for all, that is our device.
  692. Without any doubt, I am striving for power.
  693. When we get a chance to take part in elections, I am ready to fight for leading positions, including in the presidential vote.
  694. When men are arrested without any legal basis and for political reasons, it’s merely a routine, everyday occurrence in Russia, and hardly anyone has any sympathy.
  695. We’ve grown accustomed to injustice in Russia. People are constantly being arrested unlawfully.
  696. We need a real tent city in the heart of Moscow.
  697. The questioning is a stupid formality aimed exclusively at preventing us from speaking at the demonstration.
  698. The party of swindlers and thieves is putting forward its chief swindler and its chief thief for the presidency. We must vote against him, struggle against him.
  699. Putin and his advisers don’t understand the power of public opinion in the West. They believe in conspiracy theories and that someone is orchestrating a malicious campaign against Russia. They don’t realize that even conservative politicians have to react when newspapers and artists express their concern on such an issue.
  700. Politics is traditionally a male domain in Russia. Until now, women have only been accessories. Now, female protest groups are emerging – not because men came up with the idea, but through their own efforts. That’s something new for Russia.
  701. People hate politicians. And I can understand why.
  702. People don’t believe in positive changes anymore.
  703. People aren’t really afraid of my views. They are just afraid of the word ‘nationalism.’
  704. Nobody wants a political prisoner, but a political emigrant is no problem.
  705. I’ve been reading this little book. It’s called the Russian constitution. And it says that the only source of power in Russia is the people. So I don’t want to hear those who say we’re appealing to the authorities. Who’s the power here?
  706. I’ve always seen my campaigns against corruption as political work of a purer form than what opposition leaders usually do. All they do is hold roundtables and release political statements, which is all well and good. But there are concrete things that need to get done in order to achieve the basic goal of every opposition politician.
  707. I’m only sort of a politician.
  708. I’m on the very blackest part of the black list.
  709. I’m not going to appeal to violence or aggression – of course not.
  710. I’m not afraid and these 15 days convinced me there is nothing to fear. Let them be afraid instead.
  711. I think very poorly of United Russia. United Russia is the party of corruption, the party of crooks and thieves. And it is the duty of every patriot and citizen of our country to make sure that this party is destroyed.
  712. I think very poorly of United Russia. United Russia is the party of corruption, the party of crooks and thieves.
  713. I really hate the people in power. I hate them with every fiber of my being. That is what drives me in almost everything I do.
  714. I am not ready to back away from my views.
  715. Everyone says corruption is everywhere, but for me it seems strange to say that and then not try to put the people guilty of that corruption away.
  716. Everyone needs to understand that my work addresses existing problems, and one of the crucial problems in Russia today is corruption.
  717. Consistency for me is everything.
  718. Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, may have had his charms, but he really couldn’t be considered hip.
  719. You can’t do comedy with a beard.
  720. The optimum frequency with which comedians should do a series is every year. I do one every three years. My audience is literally dying off.
  721. The journalists have obviously failed to capture my innate magnetism, humour and charisma, and they all need to be fired from their newspapers right away.
  722. Recently, my personal advisors have been telling me to go to America. Actually, people have been walking up to me in the street and telling me to sod off, but that’s the same thing, isn’t it?
  723. People used to think I was just a shouty comic but I was doing stuff about Sartre.
  724. People aren’t universally heroic.
  725. People are more violently opposed to fur than leather because it’s safer to harass rich women than motorcycle gangs.
  726. Now, as a comic, if you’re vaguely amusing you can go straight into TV, then you play the O2 and then everyone’s sick of you.
  727. Most of the Communists I knew were nice people.
  728. Most of my friends are women – I quite fancied being a woman in a way.
  729. It seems easier to make a career out of comedy now than it was in the 1980s.
  730. It always seemed to be a constant that my parents were political.
  731. If you travel to the States… they have a lot of different words than like what we use. For instance: they say ‘elevator’, we say ‘lift’; they say ‘drapes’, we say ‘curtains’; they say ‘president’, we say ‘seriously deranged git.’
  732. If someone starts agreeing with me, I don’t like it. Out of pique, I become something else.
  733. If sitcoms were easy to write, there’d be a lot of good ones, and there aren’t.
  734. If I won the lottery I’d start a charity that helped little family hardware stores, cobblers and fruit shops open in city centres.
  735. I’ve been going to Granada for many years and 12 years ago bought a house a few miles outside the city.
  736. I’ve accentuated the look over the years. As a comic, you try something and if it works you go with it and grind it to death.
  737. I’m sure a psychologist would see something highly significant in how absent-minded I am. I mean I’d forget my head if it wasn’t attached to my neck by muscles, ligaments and my esophagus.
  738. I’m still fiercely ambitious.
  739. I’m fascinated by comedy.
  740. I’m distinct, really.
  741. I’m an intellectual.
  742. I would say I was still a Marxist – which is not to be confused with being a Communist. Despite its flaws, Marxism still seems to explain the material world better than anything else.
  743. I wanted to write about how people’s beliefs shift.
  744. I think that my ideas of the world are that it’s random and cruel but kind of quite comical really, and therefore the humour, in a sense, springs from that.
  745. I suppose the common idea of me is that I’m going to be someone who’s hyper and cracking jokes all the time, but people who meet me are soon disabused of that notion.
  746. I liked 35 and in both my novels that is the age of the lead characters. I tried making them my age but they just seemed to keep moaning about stuff.
  747. I like the south of Spain, notably for the Moorish influence and the weather.
  748. I have a lot of nice Italian winter clothes that make me look like a sophisticated Lebanese professor, so my friend Robert and I go around pretending to be experts in Arabic politics. It doesn’t work in the summer though. I don’t have the right clothes.
  749. I feel sorry for many politicians… we expect them to be completely consistent and moralised when we’re not.
  750. I feel really ambiguous about the psychology of people trying to do good in the world.
  751. I exist as an annexe of the BBC. I’m down the road a bit from the main building, in a little hut.
  752. I don’t think people were that interested in what I was doing for the most of the 1990s.
  753. I don’t think I’d ever get thin, but I don’t see why I should necessarily think that I couldn’t… You can’t live your life for your routines.
  754. I did six series for the BBC and that was enough. I’ve been writing for ten years, which is more challenging artistically.
  755. I am quite girly.
  756. I always thought communism was crap, really.
  757. However, my problems with my memory are further complicated by the fact that while I don’t have any recollection of things I have actually done, I have very vivid recollections of loads of things that I haven’t done.
  758. Honestly, sometimes I get really fed up of my subconscious – it’s like it’s got a mind of its own.
  759. For me, the showbiz memoir is uninteresting – you want to tell people something they don’t know about.
  760. First off, I have to mention what is undoubtedly the greatest phenomenon of the modern era: All You Can Eat Buffets.
  761. Everyone I used to work with is still alive and can afford expensive lawyers.
  762. Dire Straits is a great band. Someone tells you they like ‘Brothers in Arms’ and immediately you know they’re a stupid annoying git.
  763. Despite its flaws, Marxism still seems to explain the material world better than anything else.
  764. But as in all cults, what’s central to the Communist Party is the belief system and the elimination of nuance. From there you’re very slowly led down the road to fanaticism and mass murder.
  765. As a comic, you try something and if it works you go with it and grind it to death.
  766. Americans have different ways of saying things. They say ‘elevator’, we say ‘lift’… they say ‘President’, we say ‘stupid psychopathic git.
  767. A lot of those comics can’t hold down relationships and they’ve got no other life apart from performing. They sleep in their Jags and a lot of them can’t even talk. All they can do is tell gags.
  768. To make one good action succeed another, is the perfection of goodness.
  769. People’s hearts are like wild animals. They attach their selves to those that love and train them.
  770. No one has ever suffered from his people as I have.
  771. Let me alone, and go in search of someone else.
  772. If poverty were a man, I would have slain him.
  773. I was not created to be occupied by eating delicious foods like tied up cattle.
  774. He who busies himself with things other than improvement of his own self becomes perplexed in darkness and entangled in ruin. His evil spirits immerse him deep in vices and make his bad actions seem handsome.
  775. Do not share the knowledge with which you have been blessed with everyone in general, as you do with some people in particular; and know that there are some men in whom Allah, may He be glorified, has placed hidden secrets, which they are forbidden to reveal.
  776. Do not be too hard, lest you be broken; do not be too soft, lest you be squeezed.
  777. Do for this life as if you live forever, do for the afterlife as if you die tomorrow.
  778. Abstinence from sins is better than seeking help afterwards.
  779. A poor man is like a foreigner in his own country.
  780. A man’s measure is his will.
  781. You can try to take sorrow and make it into something enduring, meaningful and beautiful. I always feel guilty that this is my job, that I get to do this.
  782. They were written on cheap blue notebooks bought by poor women. I’m interested in folk tales in the way that medicine and magic in women’s stories are all kind of combined.
  783. The original fairy tale was about the youngest sister going into a room in the castle and finding all the bodies of the wives that came before her – she is confronted with truth, thinking about how often we think we know people and we really don’t.
  784. The adults don’t know what’s happening on the kids’ universe and the kids don’t know what’s happening on the adults’ universe.
  785. Sometimes movies really are the best medicine.
  786. No one knows how to write a novel until it’s been written.
  787. Mothers always find ways to fit in the work – but then when you’re working, you feel that you should be spending time with your children and then when you’re with your children, you’re thinking about working.
  788. It was a great escape for me and it was a way to take a break from what was going on in my own world, to go into another world.
  789. Ironically, now that my children are older and gone quite a bit, I find it harder to work when they’re not around. Too much free time!
  790. I’ve been a screenwriter for twenty-five years. Every one of my books have been optioned for movies and I have written a few of those screenplays.
  791. I’m much faster now. When you only have a certain amount of time to write, after a while you learn to use your time well or you stop writing.
  792. I think we are bound to, and by, nature. We may want to deny this connection and try to believe we control the external world, but every time there’s a snowstorm or drought, we know our fate is tied to the world around us.
  793. I think secrets often come out. I spoke to a friend who is a therapist and I asked her if there were people who came to her and admitted to doing horrible things and she said, ‘More than you know.’
  794. I think love is a huge factor in fiction and in real life. Is there a risk? Always. In fiction and in life.
  795. I think growing up is difficult and it’s a process that I’m always interested in, with kids and adults, they are often on two different universes.
  796. I really feel like the gift is also the curse. It’s always half-and-half. Whatever brings you the most joy will also probably bring you the most pain. Always a price to pay.
  797. I never see a novel as a film while I’m writing it. Mostly because novels and films are so different, and I’m such an internal novelist.
  798. I never plot out my novels in terms of the tone of the book. Hopefully, once a story is begun it reveals itself.
  799. I feel more influenced in my own work by dreams than I do by other writers’ works in a way. Or by popular culture, movies – what else is there to write about than love and loss?
  800. I don’t think I make much of a distinction between the ‘real’ and the ‘fantastic.’ They both seem to be threads in the same cloth as far as I’m concerned.
  801. I don’t really read as much as I used to. A lot of what I was looking for as an escape I find in writing. And the other thing is that I don’t want to get into someone else’s language when I’m working.
  802. I did go there later, but I hadn’t been there before I wrote the book. Sometimes I feel like the imagined can feel more real than the real?
  803. I can’t really work on more than one thing at a time.
  804. I always quit at three when my kids come home from school so I feel pretty spoiled.
  805. I always felt and still feel that fairy tales have an emotional truth that is so deep that there are few things that really rival them.
  806. I also like the whole idea of fairy tales and folk tales being a woman’s domain, considered a lesser domain at the time they were told.
  807. Hawthorne has given us a tradition that some people refer to as Yankee Magic Realism, and I do think there is a certain quality to the landscape that definitely leads into the dark woods.
  808. Every time I finish a book, I forget everything I learned writing it – the information just disappears out of my head.
  809. Even in times when it’s difficult to figure out, how do you go forward, art – and books – always help.
  810. Anyway, the sort of love that will not wait is probably best to pass by.
  811. Any institution becomes a community – whether it’s a high school or a boarding school or a publishing company or a small town where everybody knows certain things about people.
  812. Among men and women, those in love do not always announce themselves with declarations and vows. But they are the ones who weep when you’re gone. Who miss you every single night, especially when the sky is so deep and beautiful, and the ground so very cold.
  813. All the characters in my books are imagined, but all have a bit of who I am in them – much like the characters in your dreams are all formed by who you are.
  814. After a while, the characters I’m writing begin to feel real to me. That’s when I know I’m heading in the right direction.
  815. Writers are always writing about infidelity. It’s so dramatic. The wickedness of it, the secrecy, the complications, the finding that you thought you were one person but you’re also this other person. The innocent life and the guilty life. My God, it’s just full of stuff for a writer. I doubt it will ever go out of fashion.
  816. William Maxwell’s my favorite North American writer, I think. And an Irish writer who used to write for ‘The New Yorker’ called Maeve Brennan, and Mary Lavin, another Irish writer. There were a lot of writers that I found in ‘The New Yorker’ in the Fifties who wrote about the same type of material I did – about emotions and places.
  817. Why do I like to write short stories? Well, I certainly didn’t intend to. I was going to write a novel. And still! I still come up with ideas for novels. And I even start novels. But something happens to them. They break up. I look at what I really want to do with the material, and it never turns out to be a novel.
  818. While working on my first five books, I kept wishing I was writing a novel. I thought until you wrote a novel, you weren’t taken seriously as a writer. It used to trouble me a lot, but nothing troubles me now, and besides, there has been a change. I think short stories are taken more seriously now than they were.
  819. When you are young, you cannot imagine being disabled. You imagine you would conquer it somehow. As I’ve got older, I can imagine it; I can see how life narrows in. I feel compassion for my mother now.
  820. When I was into my 30s, I became increasingly depressed by rejection letters. I had had the feeling that by the time I was 30, I would be established. But I was not at all. By the time of ‘Lives of Girls and Women,’ I was into my 40s and I had become more thin-skinned.
  821. Time is something that interests me a whole lot – past and present, and how the past appears as people change.
  822. The stories are not autobiographical, but they’re personal in that way. I seem to know only the things that I’ve learned. Probably some things through observation, but what I feel I know surely is personal.
  823. The deep, personal material of the latter half of your life is your children. You can write about your parents when they’re gone, but your children are still going to be here, and you’re going to want them to come and visit you in the nursing home.
  824. The complexity of things – the things within things – just seems to be endless. I mean nothing is easy, nothing is simple.
  825. That’s something I think is growing on me as I get older: happy endings.
  826. Sometimes I get the start of a story from a memory, an anecdote, but that gets lost and is usually unrecognizable in the final story.
  827. Some of the stories I admire seem to zero in on one particular time and place. There isn’t a rule about this. But there’s a tidy sense about many stories I read. In my own work, I tend to cover a lot of time and to jump back and forward in time, and sometimes the way I do this is not very straightforward.
  828. People are more aware now of cities and of different ways of life. I suppose the writing I do is a bit in the past, and I’m not sure it’s the kind of writing I would do if I were starting now.
  829. One is lucky to be born in a place where no one is doing it, because then you can say, ‘Well, obviously I can write better than everyone else in high school.’ You have no idea of the competition.
  830. Naturally, my stories are about women – I’m a woman. I don’t know what the term is for men who write mostly about men. I’m not always sure what is meant by ‘feminist.’ In the beginning, I used to say, ‘Well, of course I’m a feminist.’ But if it means that I follow a kind of feminist theory, or know anything about it, then I’m not.
  831. My mother, I suppose, is still a main figure in my life because her life was so sad and unfair, and she so brave, but also because she was determined to make me into the Sunday-school-recitation little girl I was, from the age of seven or so, fighting not to be.
  832. Mothers and daughters generally have fairly complex relationships, and ours was made much more so by Mother’s illness. She had Parkinson’s disease, which was not diagnosed for a long time… All that made me very self-protective, because for one thing, I didn’t want to get trapped.
  833. Memory is the way we keep telling ourselves our stories – and telling other people a somewhat different version of our stories.
  834. Maybe I should say that memory interests me a great deal, because I think we all tell stories of our lives to ourselves as well as to other people. Well, women do, anyway. Women do this a lot. And I think when men get older, they do this too, but maybe in slightly different terms.
  835. It’s not possible to advise a young writer because every young writer is so different. You might say, ‘Read,’ but a writer can read too much and be paralyzed. Or, ‘Don’t read, don’t think, just write,’ and the result could be a mountain of drivel.
  836. In twenty years I’ve never had a day when I didn’t have to think about someone else’s needs. And this means the writing has to be fitted around it.
  837. In those early days, the important thing was the happy ending. I did not tolerate unhappy endings – for my heroines, anyway. And later on, I began to read things like ‘Wuthering Heights,’ and very, very unhappy endings would take place, so I changed my ideas completely and went in for the tragic, which I enjoyed.
  838. In my own work, I tend to cover a lot of time and to jump back and forward in time, and sometimes the way I do this is not very straightforward.
  839. In many ways, I’ve been writing personal stories all my life.
  840. I’ve often made revisions at that stage that turned out to be mistakes because I wasn’t really in the rhythm of the story anymore. I see a little bit of writing that doesn’t seem to be doing as much work as it should be doing, and right at the end, I will sort of rev it up. But when I finally read the story again, it seems a bit obtrusive.
  841. I’ve lived in a big showplace house, and I never want to live again in a house that overshadows me.
  842. I’m always trying. Between every book, I think, ‘Well now, it’s time to get down to the serious stuff.’
  843. I was brought up to believe that the worst thing you could do was ‘call attention to yourself,’ or ‘think you were smart.’ My mother was an exception to this rule and was punished by the early onset of Parkinson’s disease.
  844. I was a housewife, so I learned to write in times off, and I don’t think I ever gave it up, though there were times when I was very discouraged because I began to see that the stories I was writing were not very good, that I had a lot to learn, and that it was a much, much harder job than I had expected.
  845. I was a grade B housewife, maybe a B minus. But when I got time to write, I would be unable to finish a sentence. I had anxiety attacks. Partly it was a way of personifying the situation because I couldn’t breathe. I was surrounded by people and by duties. I was a housewife and the children’s mother, and I was judged on how I performed those roles.
  846. I want the reader to feel something is astonishing – not the ‘what happens’ but the way everything happens. These long short story fictions do that best, for me.
  847. I think, when you are growing up, you have to pull apart from what your mother wants or needs. You’ve got to go your own way, and that’s what I did.
  848. I think, often, people who run away are people who got into things most enthusiastically, and then they want more. They just demand more of life than what is happening in the moment. Sometimes this is a great mistake, as it’s always a good deal different than you expect it.
  849. I think any life can be interesting, any surroundings can be interesting. I don’t think I could have been so brave if I had been living in a town, competing with people on what can be called a generally higher cultural level.
  850. I seem to turn out stories that violate the discipline of the short story form and don’t obey the rules of progression for novels. I don’t think about a particular form: I think more about fiction, let’s say a chunk of fiction.
  851. I read all the time, and I’m often struck by something I’m reading.
  852. I no longer feel attracted to the well-made novel. I want to write the story that will zero in and give you intense, but not connected, moments of experience. I guess that’s the way I see life. People remake themselves bit by bit and do things they don’t understand.
  853. I never start out with any kind of connecting theme or plan. Everything just falls the way it falls. I don’t ever think about what kind of fiction I write or what I am writing about or what I am trying to write about. When I’m writing, what I do is I think about a story that I want to tell.
  854. I like gaps; all my stories have gaps. It seems this is the way people’s lives present themselves.
  855. I have never kept diaries. I just remember a lot and am more self-centered than most people.
  856. I had my first baby at twenty-one.
  857. I got interested in reading very early, because a story was read to me, by Hans Christian Andersen, which was ‘The Little Mermaid,’ and I don’t know if you remember ‘The Little Mermaid,’ but it’s dreadfully sad. The little mermaid falls in love with this prince, but she cannot marry him because she is a mermaid.
  858. I found it hard to be young. When I was married in my twenties, I hated being regarded as ‘the little wife.’ You don’t know what it was like then! I’d never even written a cheque. I had to ask my husband for money for groceries.
  859. I feel that I’ve done what I wanted to do, and that makes me feel fairly content.
  860. I don’t think that much about my relationship with my mother and what it did to me. I sometimes feel terrible regret about her, what her life must have been like. Often, when I’m enjoying something, I think of how meager her rewards were and how much courage, in a way, she needed to go on living.
  861. I can’t play bridge. I don’t play tennis. All those things that people learn, and I admire, there hasn’t seemed time for. But what there is time for is looking out the window.
  862. I can have people around a lot more because I’m not always chasing them away so I can work on my novel. My non-novel, I mean.
  863. Housework never really bothered me… what bothered me about it later was that it was expected to be your life… when you’re a housewife, you are constantly interrupted. You have no space in your life. It isn’t the fact that you do the laundry.
  864. For a long time, I had the idea that I would do a certain amount of work the best I could, and then I would reach a comfort zone, and I wouldn’t be pushed to write more. I would become a different person. It’s a surprise to me that this hasn’t happened. Your body ages, but your mind is the same.
  865. Charlotte Bronte was writing about sex. I supposed Jane Austen was, too. Where do you get a hero like Darcy unless you are writing about sex?
  866. ‘The New Yorker’ was really my first experience with serious editing. Previously, I’d more or less just had copyediting with a few suggestions – not much.
  867. ‘Royal Beatings’ was my first story, and it was published in 1977. But I sent all my early stories to ‘The New Yorker’ in the 1950s, and then I stopped sending for a long time and sent only to magazines in Canada. ‘The New Yorker’ sent me nice notes, though – penciled, informal messages. They never signed them. They weren’t terribly encouraging.
  868. ‘Lives’ is one of those books I should really have written when I was younger. It is the classic childhood, adolescence, breakthrough-into-maturity book. Every beginning writer has that material – and after that, you’re not sure what you can do.
  869. We all work hard to understand the dynamic relationship we have with a parent.
  870. To me, the idea of heaven would give you certain pleasures, certain joys – but it’s very important to have an intellectual understanding of why you want those things.
  871. The relationship with the words someone uses is more intimate and integrated than just a quick read and a blurb can ever be. This intimacy – the words on the page being sent back and forth from engaged editor to open author – is unique in my experience.
  872. It’s hard, because when you talk about process or your characters ruling your narrative, it sounds like you have no control, but obviously you’re ultimately the author, so you do have control.
  873. In my 20s, I railed against anything ‘spiritual’; I thought it was all crap.
  874. I’m gradually working through my obsessions, and maybe, when they’re all free and clear, I’ll write a comedy. But I’m not there yet.
  875. I’d like to go back to poetry again. I really, really revere good poetry. It’s been my private discipline.
  876. I went to church irregularly and was mostly reading comics in the pew.
  877. I was motivated to write about violence because I believe it’s not unusual. I see it as just a part of life, and I think we get in trouble when we separate people who’ve experienced it from those who haven’t.
  878. I wanted to be the moron of the family, because morons seemed to have more fun, more freedom and more personality.
  879. I wanted to be a novelist for so long.
  880. I wake up very early in the morning. I like to start in the dark, and I never work at night, because my brain is evaporated by 4 P.M.
  881. I think you only learn what kind of personality you have by committing to things.
  882. I think understanding is the way to gain perspective – and therefore can live among those hideous realities. You can live with them.
  883. I think it’s an interesting thing to me, because we have this desire for everything to be explained to us. But if you go through your daily actions, very little ends up having a written-down explanation for why things happen, or why people do specific things.
  884. I like gardening – it’s a place where I find myself when I need to lose myself.
  885. I have never been shy about listening to the input of others and weighing it seriously.
  886. I have always felt extremely weird. But I am very happy with my weirdnesses, and I want other people to be very happy with theirs.
  887. I find talking about my work harder than it might be if honesty wasn’t my calling card.
  888. I don’t think ignorance is a way that you gain distance on something.
  889. I always had that sense of being censored for the things that I thought. Why is it wrong to embroider your pants, or paint with acrylics on your clothing? Why is that weird? Isn’t it weirder to want to be like everyone else?
  890. For me, heaven would be a lack of alienation. The whole time I was growing up, I felt comfort was inherently evil. I think that, for me, heaven isn’t about couches and milk shakes and never having a troubling thought again.
  891. Depending on where I am in the process, sometimes I have a page count and sometimes I don’t. Sometimes I have an hour count; sometimes I’m just happy to string a few words together. I do keep pretty rigorous hours, because otherwise you never get anything done.
  892. Your opinion is not influenced by anyone when you’re alone at a matinee. It’s just you and the movie.
  893. You wanna do a lot of backstory for your character – as an actor, you wanna research that. But on the show, it’s fun to remain in that naive place as you go along, and be able to continue to discover things about your character as the writers come up with them.
  894. You know, ‘Mad Men’ is notoriously secretive with its plotlines, even with exposing them to actors on the show.
  895. What is it about women that they just go right for the guy that totally repulses them?
  896. Twitter is the first information that I ingest in the morning. When there are important things happening, friends of mine who follow news feeds will report on it, so I find out about most major news on Twitter.
  897. Ted Danson is amazing. He’s incredible.
  898. My parents are definitely reformed hippies.
  899. My first TV job was on an episode of ‘Hannah Montana’… Since then, I’ve been fortunate to end up on shows that are just such a high quality, where the writing and material is incredible.
  900. Money means better meals at better places.
  901. In my personal life, I’m hilarious! I was always a bit of a jokester.
  902. If you’re a guy, you should get girls flowers all the time. They never get old and you can never get them enough. I’m never disappointed when I get flowers. I always thought guys who don’t buy women flowers are such fools. All it takes is one. A little goes a long way with flowers.
  903. I’ve always loved film and wanted to work in film. I just love working and creating new characters, and trying different genres and different things. For me, I just love to work and I love movies.
  904. I’ve always loved film and wanted to work in film. I just love working and creating new characters, and trying different genres and different things.
  905. I’m really not a TV junkie… OK, I kind of am a TV junkie, but I’m much more of a movie junkie – my junk food is romantic comedies I’ve seen a million times.
  906. I’m a generally optimistic person.
  907. I was always a bit of a jokester.
  908. I try to be very much in control when it comes to work. I have a strong work ethic.
  909. I think that a big part of comedy is being made fun of, and it is looking silly or looking stupid.
  910. I think it’s never too late to learn – or it’s a lesson that’s good to continue learning – that you need to treat everyone on a set with respect.
  911. I think it’s important to be honest with yourself about what you want and it’s important to be honest with your partner about what you need.
  912. I think Twitter is such a cool thing because it really is a direct line to the fans and for fans back to you, and it’s such a new thing. I think in the past there’s been usually fan mail and that’s really good, but Twitter, it gets an immediate response.
  913. I think I used to be lower maintenance. I think I’m slowly becoming higher maintenance.
  914. I love Jason Bateman. He’s so funny.
  915. I look really good in a scuba suit.
  916. I like to have my breakfast in bed, and I use that time to watch the recorded shows on my TiVo. I seldom watch shows in real time – I’m always at work.
  917. I like to be in pain when I’m getting massaged. That way I know I’m getting my money’s worth.
  918. I like that ‘Mad Men’ is now an adjective I use to describe clothing when I’m shopping: ‘I like this top. It’s very ‘Mad Men.’
  919. I kind of love going to weddings – it’s a guilty pleasure. I’ve never been the wedding-y type girl dreaming about the big day, the dress, but I always cry. Always. Even if I don’t know the bride that well, I’m verklempt!
  920. I get pigeonholed into type-A personality characters, but I’m really not type A. I’m kind of a spaz.
  921. I feel like any time John Oliver is added to something, the comedy is instantly there. He’s so funny.
  922. I enjoy doing drama, and I enjoy doing comedy equally.
  923. I don’t know much about writing a show or being a show-runner on a show, but I can only imagine that when you first cast a show and you first do a pilot, there are so many components that you’re throwing into the mix and you’re not sure how they’re going to develop.
  924. I always wanted to play a mental patient. I was fascinated with playing crazy people in college, and I don’t know if I ever quite perfected it.
  925. Honestly, my favorite kind of dancing is just lettin’ loose. There’s something great about the carefree flinging of your body to great music. It can be so joyous.
  926. A wedding, people decide to get married, it comes out of such love for one another and then women can turn into these other people. They’re planning something that’s the biggest event they’ll ever plan in their lives and it turns them into this other person, so it’s not totally the guy’s fault that he’s feeling disconnected from this person.
  927. A lot of people come to Los Angeles and think that they’re going to be famous, just like that.
  928. ’30 Rock’ is probably one of my favorite shows. It’s just joke after joke after joke.
  929. Young children seem to be learning who to share this toy with and figure out how it works, while adolescents seem to be exploring some very deep and profound questions: ‘How should this society work? How should relationships among people work?’ The exploration is: ‘Who am I, what am I doing?’
  930. When nobody read, dyslexia wasn’t a problem. When most people had to hunt, a minor genetic variation in your ability to focus attention was hardly a problem, and may even have been an advantage. When most people have to make it through high school, the same variation can become a genuinely life-altering disease.
  931. What, of course, we want in a university is for people to learn the skills they’re going to need outside the classroom. So, having a system that had more emphasis on inquiry and exploration but also on learning and practising specific skills would fit much better with how we know people learn.
  932. What we want in students is creativity and a willingness to fail. I always say to students, ‘If you’ve never at some point stayed up all night talking to your new boyfriend about the meaning of life instead of preparing for the test, then you’re not really an intellectual.’
  933. What teenagers want most of all are social rewards, especially the respect of their peers.
  934. What makes knowledge automatic is what gets you to Carnegie Hall – practice, practice, practice.
  935. What happens when children reach puberty earlier and adulthood later? The answer is: a good deal of teenage weirdness.
  936. We say that children are bad at paying attention, but we really mean that they’re bad at not paying attention – they easily get distracted by anything interesting.
  937. We learn differently as children than as adults. For grown-ups, learning a new skill is painful, attention-demanding, and slow. Children learn unconsciously and effortlessly.
  938. We know what makes babies smart and happy and thrive. It’s having human beings who are dedicated to caring for them – human beings who are well supported, not stressed out and not poor.
  939. We have lots of evidence that putting investments in early childhood education, even evidence from very hard-nosed economists, is one of the very best investments that the society can possibly make. And yet we still don’t have public support for things like preschools.
  940. We fear death so profoundly, not because it means the end of our body, but because it means the end of our consciousness – better to be a spirit in Heaven than a zombie on Earth.
  941. We do nothing for children between the ages of zero and five. And we seem to be quite happy to have children growing up in not just poverty, which wouldn’t be so bad, but isolation, lack of people around them, lack of support, lack of ability to go out and play in the dirt.
  942. The youngest children have a great capacity for empathy and altruism. There’s a recent study that shows even 14-month-olds will climb across a bunch of cushions and go across a room to give you a pen if you drop one.
  943. The thing that is most important is having people who are involved and engaged with the kids and also are not stressed and can be involved with them. And that’s actually not boring and banal. That actually takes a lot of work to make that happen, and it’s not something that our society does very well at all.
  944. The science can tell you that the thousands of pseudo-scientific parenting books out there – not to mention the ‘Baby Einstein’ DVDs and the flash cards and the brain-boosting toys – won’t do a thing to make your baby smarter. That’s largely because babies are already as smart as they can be; smarter than we are in some ways.
  945. The real excitement is collaborating with computer scientists and neuroscientists and starting to understand in detail how children learn so much so quickly.
  946. The radio was an improvement on the telegraph but it didn’t have the same exponential, transformative effect.
  947. The brain knows the real secret of seduction, more effective than even music and martinis. Just keep whispering, ‘Gee, you are really special’ to that sack of water and protein that is a body, and you can get it to do practically anything.
  948. The brain is highly structured, but it is also extremely flexible. It’s not a blank slate, but it isn’t written in stone, either.
  949. The best scientific way to discover if one factor influences another is to do a controlled experiment.
  950. The ancient media of speech and song and theater were radically reshaped by writing, though they were never entirely supplanted, a comfort perhaps to those of us who still thrill to the smell of a library.
  951. Texts and e-mails travel no faster than phone calls and telegrams, and their content isn’t necessarily richer or poorer.
  952. Teaching is a very effective way to get children to learn something specific – this tube squeaks, say, or a squish then a press then a pull causes the music to play. But it also makes children less likely to discover unexpected information and to draw unexpected conclusions.
  953. Successful creative adults seem to combine the wide-ranging exploration and openness we see in children with the focus and discipline we see in adults.
  954. Something like reading depends a lot on just having people around you who talk to you and read you books, more than sitting down and, say, doing a reading drill when you’re 3 or 4 years old.
  955. Siblings are the guarantors that the private childhood world – so unlike the adult world that scientists are only just beginning to understand it – is a fully shared and objective one.
  956. Scientists learn about the world in three ways: They analyze statistical patterns in the data, they do experiments, and they learn from the data and ideas of other scientists. The recent studies show that children also learn in these ways.
  957. Scientists and philosophers tend to treat knowledge, imagination and love as if they were all very separate parts of human nature. But when it comes to children, all three are deeply entwined. Children learn the truth by imagining all the ways the world could be, and testing those possibilities.
  958. Samuel Johnson called it the vanity of human wishes, and Buddhists talk about the endless cycle of desire. Social psychologists say we get trapped on a hedonic treadmill. What they all mean is that we wish, plan and work for things that we think will make us happy, but when we finally get them, we aren’t nearly as happy as we thought we’d be.
  959. Putting together philosophy and children would have been difficult for most of history. But very fortunately for me, when I started graduate school there was a real scientific revolution taking place in developmental psychology.
  960. Overall, female scientists have fewer resources than male scientists, just as poor people have less access to health care. But if you compare male and female scientists with identical resources, you find that the women are just as likely to be successful.
  961. Ours is an age of pedagogy. Anxious parents instruct their children more and more, at younger and younger ages, until they’re reading books to babies in the womb.
  962. Our babies are like penguins; penguin babies can’t exist unless more than one person is taking care of them. They just can’t keep going.
  963. One of the things I say is, ‘You want to know what it’s like to be a baby? It’s like being in love for the first time in Paris after four double espressos.’ And boy, you are alive and conscious.
  964. One of the things I say is from an evolutionary point of view: probably the ideal rich environment for a baby includes more mud, livestock, and relatives than most of us could tolerate nowadays.
  965. One of the most distinctive evolutionary features of human beings is our unusually long, protected childhood.
  966. One of the best ways of understanding human nature is to study children. After all, if we want understand who we are, we should find out how we got to be that way.
  967. On the Web we all become small-town visitors lost in the big city.
  968. Many philosophers say it’s impossible to explain our conscious experience in scientific, biological terms at all. But that’s not exactly true. Scientists have explained why we have certain experiences and not others. It’s just that they haven’t explained the special features of consciousness that philosophers care about.
  969. Like most parents, I think, my children have been the source of some of my most intense joys and despairs, my deepest moral dilemmas and greatest moral achievements.
  970. Knowing what to expect from a teacher is a really good thing, of course: It lets you get the right answers more quickly than you would otherwise.
  971. In most places and times in human history, babies have had not just one person but lots of people around who were really paying attention to them around, dedicated to them, cared to them, were related to them. I think the big shift in our culture is the isolation in which many children are growing up.
  972. Imagine if baseball were taught the way science is taught in most inner-city schools. Schoolchildren would get lectures about the history of the World Series. High school students would occasionally reproduce famous plays of the past. Nobody would get in the game themselves until graduate school.
  973. Imaginary friends are one of the weirder forms of pretend play in childhood. But the research shows that imaginary friends actually help children understand the other people around them and imagine all the many ways that people could be.
  974. If you wanted to design a robot that could learn as well as it possibly could, you might end up with something that looked a lot like a 3-year-old.
  975. If you just, pretty much, take a random 15-month-old, just sit and watch them for 10 minutes and count out how many experiments, how much thinking you see going on, and it will put the most brilliant scientist to shame.
  976. If you just casually look at a baby, it doesn’t look like there’s very much going on there, but they know more and learn more than we would ever have thought. Every single minute is incredibly full of thought and novelty. It’s easy as adults to take for granted everything it took to arrive at the state where we are.
  977. If parents are the fixed stars in the child’s universe, the vaguely understood, distant but constant celestial spheres, siblings are the dazzling, sometimes scorching comets whizzing nearby.
  978. I’ve had three of my own children and spent my professional life thinking about children. And yet I still find my relation to my children deeply puzzling.
  979. I’m the oldest of six children and I had my own first baby when I was 23. So I’ve always been interested in babies, and I had lots of opportunities to watch them.
  980. I’m afraid the parenting advice to come out of developmental psychology is very boring: pay attention to your kids and love them.
  981. I wanted to answer big questions about humanity, about how it is that we understand about the world, how we can know as much as we do, why human nature is the way that it is. And it always seemed to me that you find answers to those questions by looking at children.
  982. I think universities are trying to figure out how we could use what we know about learning to change our education system, but it is sort of funny that they don’t necessarily seem to be consulting the people who are sitting right there on campus.
  983. Historically, absolute IQ scores have risen substantially as we’ve changed our environment so that more people go to school longer.
  984. From an evolutionary perspective children are, literally, designed to learn. Childhood is a special period of protected immaturity. It gives the young breathing time to master the things they will need to know in order to survive as adults.
  985. For better or worse, we live in possible worlds as much as actual ones. We are cursed by that characteristically human guilt and regret about what might have been in the past. But that may be the cost for our ability to hope and plan for what might be in the future.
  986. Even the very youngest children already are perfectly able to discriminate between the imaginary and the real, whether in books or movies or in their own pretend play. Children with the most elaborate and beloved imaginary friends will gently remind overenthusiastic adults that these companions are, after all, just pretend.
  987. Each new generation of children grows up in the new environment its parents have created, and each generation of brains becomes wired in a different way. The human mind can change radically in just a few generations.
  988. Developmental scientists like me explore the basic science of learning by designing controlled experiments.
  989. Culture is our nature, and the ability to learn and change is our most important and fundamental instinct.
  990. Children have a very good idea of how to distinguish between fantasies and realities. It’s just they are equally interested in exploring both.
  991. Childhood is a fundamental part of all human lives, parents or not, since that’s how we all start out. And yet babies and young children are so mysterious and puzzling and even paradoxical.
  992. Being a developmental psychologist didn’t make me any better at dealing with my own children, no. I muddled through, and, believe me, fretted and worried with the best of them.
  993. Becoming an adult means leaving the world of your parents and starting to make your way toward the future that you will share with your peers.
  994. Because we imagine, we can have invention and technology. It’s actually play, not necessity, that is the mother of invention.
  995. Babies and young children are like the research and development division of the human species, and we grown-ups are production and marketing.
  996. Asking questions is what brains were born to do, at least when we were young children. For young children, quite literally, seeking explanations is as deeply rooted a drive as seeking food or water.
  997. As adults, when we attend to something in the world we are vividly conscious of that particular thing, and we shut out the surrounding world. The classic metaphor is that attention is like a spotlight, illuminating one part of the world and leaving the rest in darkness.
  998. Animals are certainly more sophisticated than we used to think. And we shouldn’t lump together animals as a group. Crows and chimps and dogs are all highly intelligent in very different ways.
  999. Adults often assume that most learning is the result of teaching and that exploratory, spontaneous learning is unusual. But actually, spontaneous learning is more fundamental.
  1000. A theory not only explains the world we see, it lets us imagine other worlds, and, even more significantly, lets us act to create those worlds. Developing everyday theories, like scientific theories, has allowed human beings to change the world.
Comment