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Articles Page 27

Articles Page 27

  1. We can celebrate how far we’ve come from our sexist past when women and men are equally represented in the pages of science fiction anthologies.
  2. Watching ‘Interstellar’ is really like watching two movies slowly collide with each other.
  3. Using predictive models from engineering and public health, designers will plan safer, healthier cities that could allow us to survive natural disasters, pandemics, and even a radiation calamity that drives us underground.
  4. Unlike economics, whose sole preoccupation in our finance-obsessed era is the near-term profit motive, history offers a way to place our tiny lifespans in a narrative that spans dozens of generations – perhaps even reaching into a future where capitalism is no longer our dominant form of economic organization.
  5. Turning a zombie pandemic into a generic disaster movie robs the zombies of their dirty, nasty edginess and robs the disaster of its epic scope.
  6. To understand the future properly, it’s crucial that we listen to geologists as often as we do computer scientists.
  7. To share a story is in part to take ownership of it, especially because you are often able to comment on a story that you are sharing on social media.
  8. There is evidence that we are headed into what would be the planet’s sixth mass extinction. It’s hard to know for sure if you’re in one because a mass extinction is an event where over 75 percent of the species on the planet die out over a – usually about a million-year period. The fastest it might happen is in hundreds of thousands of years.
  9. There can be problems with extended families, and it can get a little close for comfort. But for the younger generations, it’s clear that this option is becoming almost as appealing as living alone.
  10. The novel ‘World War Z’ is told from the perspectives of so many people – speaking to the narrator – that there’s no way a movie could capture all of them. Still, the idea of turning a zombie pandemic into a war story is fascinating and could have translated easily to film.
  11. The myth that young people should leave the nest at 18, never to return, started with iconic American Benjamin Franklin.
  12. The first time I saw ‘Star Wars,’ I got so excited that I threw up.
  13. The U.N.’s current projection is that humanity will number 9.3 billion individuals in 2050 and then hit 10.1 billion by 2100. Meanwhile, our energy resources are dwindling, and droughts threaten our food supplies.
  14. Technological change is both familiar and easy to observe.
  15. Suddenly, all the giant Hollywood franchises are being driven by alternative filmmakers.
  16. Science fiction is exciting because it promises to show the world and the universe from perspectives radically unlike what we’ve seen before.
  17. Reader was by far the most popular feed reader out there, and its user base had been in a steep decline for two years before Google decided to shut it down.
  18. Radio Shack is meeting the fate of many other stores that were wildly popular in the twentieth century, including record stores, comic book stores, bookstores and video stores.
  19. RSS, as a format and an idea, grew directly out of an internet culture that many people online today know nothing about: Usenet.
  20. Put simply, ‘Interstellar’ has a strong undercurrent of cheesiness.
  21. Publishers often push women in a subtle way to focus on fantasy and paranormal writing.
  22. People who gentrify are usually new transplants to a city, changing it to suit their particular cultural needs and whims.
  23. Once you’ve worked as a writer and editor in the world of social media for a decade, the way I have, you start to notice patterns.
  24. Millions of nerdy kids who grew up in the 1980s could only find the components they needed at local Radio Shacks, and the stores were like a lifeline to a better world where everybody understood computers.
  25. Michel Gondry’s ‘Green Hornet’ was another franchise flick that felt like it came out of left field – I thought in a good way, but most audiences disagreed.
  26. Max Brooks’ novel ‘World War Z’ is one of the greatest zombie stories ever written, partly for reasons that make it basically unfilmable.
  27. It is true that I will confess that I have an incredible fascination for pop-culture stories about the Apocalypse and the end of the world.
  28. In the 1970s, as historians became enchanted with microhistories, economists were expanding the reach of their discipline. Nations, states and cities began to plan for the future by consulting with economists whose prognostications were shaped by investment cycles rather than historical ones.
  29. In the 1920s and 30s, when Radio Shack was young, a much earlier generation of nerds swarmed into these tiny shops to talk excitedly about building radios and other transmission devices. You might say that Radio Shack helped define gadget culture for four generations, from radio whizzes up to smartphone dorks.
  30. In many cities, it’s become popular to hate ‘gentrifiers,’ rich people who move in and drive up housing prices – pushing everyone else out.
  31. If you love epic space opera, you shouldn’t miss ‘Interstellar’.
  32. If we lose bees, we may be looking at losing apples and oranges. We may be looking at losing a great deal of other crops, as well, and other animals that depend on those crops.
  33. If we look at the past two centuries of economic history in Europe and the United States, we see an astounding pattern. Capital will accumulate in a tiny portion of the population, no matter what we do.
  34. If outsider perspectives made ‘Lord of the Rings’ and ‘Dark Knight’ into fantastic franchises, imagine what would happen if you brought in the perspectives of women and people of color.
  35. I think a lot of us responded intensely to ‘True Detective’ because it was so incredibly earnest. That’s what made it heartbreaking and involving.
  36. I founded io9 back in 2008, and I watched it journey from the farthest reaches of space to its current home under this atmosphere bubble on Ceres.
  37. I am a big proponent of character arcs that show us how people change over time.
  38. Humans have obviously contributed a great deal of carbon to the atmosphere. So we are warming the planet up.
  39. Humans have continued to evolve quite a lot over the past ten thousand years, and certainly over 100 thousand. Sure, our biology affects our behavior. But it’s unlikely that humans’ early evolution is deeply relevant to contemporary psychological questions about dating or the willpower to complete a dissertation.
  40. Gentrification is a form of immigration, though almost nobody calls it that.
  41. Fifty years ago, historians advised politicians and policy-makers. They helped chart the future of nations by helping leaders learn from past mistakes in history. But then something changed, and we began making decisions based on economic principles rather than historical ones. The results were catastrophic.
  42. Evolutionary psychology has often been a field whose most prominent practitioners get embroiled in controversy – witness the 2010 case of Harvard professor Marc Hauser, whose graduate students came forward to say he’d been faking evidence for years.
  43. Evolution, climate change, and the construction of the physical universe down to its atoms are processes that we measure in millions or billions of years.
  44. Economic systems rise and fall just like empires. That’s the kind of perspective we need to take if we hope to prosper for centuries rather than for the next quarter.
  45. Critics have called alien epic ‘Avatar’ a version of ‘Dances With Wolves’ because it’s about a white guy going native and becoming a great leader. But Avatar is just the latest scifi rehash of an old white guilt fantasy.
  46. Cities might become biological entities, walls hung with curtains of algae that glow at night and sequester carbon, and floors made from tweaked cellular material that strengthens like bones as we walk on it.
  47. Cities are not static objects to be feared or admired, but are instead a living process that residents are changing all the time.
  48. Capitalism is, fundamentally, an economic system that promotes inequality.
  49. Before the 21st century, stories became popular because people talked about them in other publications or shared magazine and newspaper clippings with friends.
  50. Back in the 1980s, you could learn how to add memory cards to your PC in a Radio Shack.
  51. At last we’ve seen the first installment of Joss Whedon’s new web series, ‘Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog,’ and it’s sweeter than we’d ever imagined.
  52. As fears about the energy and environmental crises reach a fever pitch, we’re all searching for solutions. And one possibility is that we could fix everything if we’d just shrink our population back down to about 2 billion people – which would put us roughly where we were at 80 years ago.
  53. A series of studies in the 1990s and 2000s revealed that as women gained more access to education, jobs, and birth control, they had fewer children. As a result, developed countries in western Europe, Japan, and the Americas were seeing zero or negative population growth.
  54. A hard-hitting investigative report that uncovers a nugget of genuine truth is the ultimate viral hit.
  55. A group of scientists wanted to find the most effective mosquito repellents. So they tested 10 different substances, including campout standbys like DEET, as well as a random choice: Victoria’s Secret perfume Bombshell. Turns out the perfume is almost as good as DEET.
  56. ‘World War Z’ is basically a big-budget B-movie.
  57. ‘The Red’ is the first book in a trilogy that gained a big following as a self-published e-book, and is now out in paper from Saga. It introduces us to reluctant hero Shelley, a former anti-war activist who chooses to join the military rather than serve jail time after being arrested at a protest.
  58. ‘The Red’ delivers intense action, leavened by a genuinely sympathetic portrait of soldiers caught up in battles they never chose.
  59. ‘Interstellar’ is a thematic sequel to Christopher Nolan’s last original film, ‘Inception’. It drops us into a dark future full of otherworldly landscapes and time distortions.
  60. ‘Avatar’ imaginatively revisits the crime scene of white America’s foundational act of genocide, in which entire native tribes and civilizations were wiped out by European immigrants to the American continent.
  61. There is always a ‘but’ in this imperfect world.
  62. She was trusted and valued by her father, loved and courted by all dogs, cats, children, and poor people, and slighted and neglected by everybody else.
  63. Oh, I am very weary, Though tears no longer flow; My eyes are tired of weeping, My heart is sick of woe.
  64. No generous mind delights to oppress the weak, but rather to cherish and protect.
  65. Keep both heart and hand in your own possession, till you see good reason to part with them; and if such an occasion should never present itself, comfort your mind with this reflection: that, though in single life your joys may not be very many, your sorrows, at least, will not be more than you can bear.
  66. It seems as if life and hope must cease together.
  67. It is a woman’s nature to be constant – to love one and one only, blindly, tenderly, and for ever – bless them, dear creatures!
  68. If you would have your son to walk honourably through the world, you must not attempt to clear the stones from his path, but teach him to walk firmly over them – not insist upon leading him by the hand, but let him learn to go alone.
  69. I would not send a poor girl into the world, ignorant of the snares that beset her path; nor would I watch and guard her, till, deprived of self-respect and self-reliance, she lost the power or the will to watch and guard herself.
  70. I see that a man cannot give himself up to drinking without being miserable one half his days and mad the other.
  71. His heart was like a sensitive plant, that opens for a moment in the sunshine, but curls up and shrinks into itself at the slightest touch of the finger, or the lightest breath of wind.
  72. But he that dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.
  73. Beauty is that quality which, next to money, is generally the most attractive to the worst kinds of men; and, therefore, it is likely to entail a great deal of trouble on the possessor.
  74. All our talents increase in the using, and every faculty, both good and bad, strengthens by exercise: therefore, if you choose to use the bad, or those which tend to evil till they become your masters, and neglect the good till they dwindle away, you have only yourself to blame.
  75. Adoration isn’t love.
  76. A man must have something to grumble about; and if he can’t complain that his wife harries him to death with her perversity and ill-humour, he must complain that she wears him out with her kindness and gentleness.
  77. A light wind swept over the corn, and all nature laughed in the sunshine.
  78. You write a book and you finish the book. That’s your job done, right? You win the Booker and you have a whole new job. You have to be the thing, right? So instead of writing the story, you somehow are the story. And that I found that sort of terrible.
  79. When I’m working, I’m not so much disciplined as obsessive. I have this feeling that I need to clear everything away and get this down.
  80. To be able to have the space to sit down and write has always been my central policy.
  81. There’s no such thing as a life that is not normal, or, there’s no such thing as a life that is not abnormal. We all have amazing lives; we all have very dull lives.
  82. There often is a dark secret in books… There is often a gathering sense of dread; there’s a gap sometimes in the text from which all kinds of monsters can emerge.
  83. There are certain books that should be taken away from young writers; that should be prised out of their clutching fingers and locked away until they are all grown up and ready to read them without being smitten.
  84. The writing day can be, in some ways, too short, but it’s actually a long series of hours, for months at a time, and there is a stillness there.
  85. Recently I read the stories I wrote in my early 20s, to put in a volume. And here is this brittle young woman, writing about marriage as, not the worst thing, but the most boring thing that could happen to a person. Now I think I was wrong. I like to be proven wrong.
  86. Naming is nice. It took me days before I was able to speak a name for my first child (what if people did not like it?), and I suspect we gave her a secret, second name as well, to keep her safe.
  87. It is very hard to trace the effect of words on a life.
  88. Ireland is a series of stories that have been told to us, starting with the Irish Celtic national revival. I never believed in ‘Old Ireland.’ It has been made all of kitsch by the diaspora, looking back and deciding what Ireland is. Yes, it is green. Yes, it is friendly. I can’t think of anything else for definite.
  89. In more static societies, like Ireland, you can tell where a person is from by their surname, or where their grandparents are from.
  90. If your life just falls apart early on, you can put it together again. It’s the people who are always on the brink of crisis who don’t hit bottom who are in trouble.
  91. If you grow up in Ireland and read books then you really are obliged to attempt your own some time. It is not exactly a choice. I still don’t know if I am a writer. Believe me, there are days when I have my doubts.
  92. If you can just actually let the character be for a bit, then you get the right sense.
  93. I’ve heard people, usually writers, say that no one wrote a great book after winning the Booker, but I honestly did not feel any big pressure. ‘The Gathering’ did hang over me in that it was darker than I thought at the time.
  94. I’m very keenly aware that there aren’t very many women writing literary fiction in Ireland and so that gives me a sense that what I say matters, in some small way.
  95. I’m starting to think my narrators’ sentences are getting too big for them, and they are getting to sound a bit samey and, more disturbingly, a bit too much like me.
  96. I’m really lucky with the people around me. They know me, so they don’t confuse the issues, really. They know what a book is and they know who I am and they know the difference between the two.
  97. I’m quite interested in the absolute roots of narrative, why we tell stories at all: where the monsters come from.
  98. I write anywhere – when I have an idea, it’s hard not to write. I used to be kind of precious about where I wrote. Everything had to be quiet and I couldn’t be disturbed; it really filled my day.
  99. I work at the sentences. Many of the things people find distinctive about my writing, I think of as natural.
  100. I was raised in a very old fashioned Ireland where women were reared to be lovely.
  101. I think it’s very important to write a demythologized woman character. My characters are flawed. They are no better than they should be.
  102. I never wanted to be mainstream as a writer, but look at what’s happened.
  103. I love the characters not knowing everything and the reader knowing more than them. There’s more mischief in that and more room for seriousness, too.
  104. I have a small room to write in. One wall is completely covered in books. And I face the window with the curtain closed to stop the light hitting the computer.
  105. I find being Irish quite a wearing thing. It takes so much work because it is a social construction. People think you are going to be this, this, and this.
  106. I do wish I could write like some of the American women, who can be clever and heartfelt and hopeful; people like Lorrie Moore and Jennifer Egan. But Ireland messed me up too much, I think, so I can’t.
  107. I can’t think of anything you might say about Irish people that is absolutely true.
  108. I became a full-time writer in 1993 and have been very happy, insofar as anybody is, since.
  109. I am interested in levels of brain discourse. How articulate are the voices in your head? You know, there’s a different voice for the phone, and a different voice if you’re talking in bed. When you’re starting off with a narrator, it’s interesting to think, where is their voice coming from, what part of their brain?
  110. For 10 or 11 years, I had my kids, I wrote four or five books, and I was working all the damn time.
  111. You can work all your life and make all the waters in all the rivers on Earth drinkable, but if, when you die, you are not ready to meet God, it doesn’t matter.
  112. When the storms of life come, if they come to me personally, to my family or to the world, I want to be strong enough to stand and be a strength to somebody else, be shelter for somebody else.
  113. When life is good and we have no problems, we can almost let ourselves believe we have no need for God. But in my experience, sometimes the richest blessings come through pain and hard things.
  114. When Jesus says you must leave your family to follow Him, he doesn’t necessarily mean physically. He means leave your dependence on them, make an emotional break with them.
  115. When I put my faith in Jesus Christ as my savior, and I asked him to forgive and to come into my life, and He does – from that moment forward I have established a personal relationship with God that I have to develop, you know, through Bible reading and prayer, and living my life for him.
  116. There were so many outstanding women in scripture that were leaders. And, you know, the organized church sometimes puts boundaries on us that the Bible doesn’t.
  117. There is nothing at all that God won’t forgive.
  118. The blessing of my mother is that she is so interested, she is so bright, she never complains – the joy of the Lord just bubbles out of her. Anybody who’s in her presence is blessed to be there.
  119. Sometimes when you’re suffering really intensely, you can’t pray for yourself.
  120. Some people who suffer run away from God, and I know the tendency, but instead I just run to Him.
  121. Religion can be one of the greatest impediments to finding God.
  122. One misconception is that if we follow God in the life of faith, and that means obedience – that we read His Word, we’re obedient, we pray, we go to church, we do the right things – that somehow His blessing means we’re going to be okay.
  123. My life’s goal is not to write books; my life’s goal is to know God better today. The neat thing about a goal like that is you can achieve it. Faith is constant; it’s a relationship.
  124. My hope is that this life is not all there is. This life is like preparation for what is coming next, and what is coming next is something so glorious that the Bible says minds can’t conceive it, eye has never seen, your imagination could never even enter into all that God is preparing for those who love him.
  125. Just like you need to strengthen your core physically with exercise, you also need to strength your core spiritually.
  126. It was when my children were 5, 3 and 10 months old that I just felt the desperate need to get to know God through the pages of my Bible. And as a result, I started a Bible class in my city for the primary purpose of being in it.
  127. It has been religious people, often within the organized church, who have been the most critical of and even hostile to my relationship with God.
  128. In the Bible, ordination – I don’t see that in the Scripture. In the Bible, it’s whether you’re filled with the Holy Spirit, whether you’re anointed by God, whether you’re called by God, whether you’re obedient to Him. I want to be those things, but I don’t see any purpose for me in being ordained.
  129. If I can center down and strengthen the core of who I am, and the core of who I am is my relationship with God, then that helps me maintain peace deep down. If I can maintain a healthy spiritual core, I think that’s enormous for helping the stress.
  130. If God can bring blessing from the broken body of Jesus and glory from something that’s obscene as the cross, He can bring blessing from my problems and my pain and my unanswered prayer.
  131. I’ve had Christians treat me in a way that is so wrong and so vicious, I realized there’s a difference between God’s people and God.
  132. I’m living my life for an audience of one. I live my life to please God. And I believe if He’s pleased, that people like my mother and my daddy, my grandparents, you know, my husband, my children, they’ll be pleased.
  133. I’ll tell you what, I love my daddy. And he’s so special. He’s meant so much to me, so it’s not a thorn in my side to be known as Billy Graham’s daughter. It’s a privilege.
  134. I want to take my focus off myself and focus on God. It’s like setting your spiritual compass so no matter which way you turn during the day, whatever comes up, then my thoughts go back to Him and whatever He said that morning.
  135. I think some people who say they’re not Christians can behave in a more godly fashion than people who call themselves Christians.
  136. I think of religion as man’s attempt to reach God, and you can’t do that.
  137. I read God’s word when I am not suffering. And then I don’t have to all of a sudden establish this habit when I am hurting.
  138. I get up earlier than my husband and I intentionally spend time in prayer and Bible reading just to focus myself for the day, because the days get crazy.
  139. I felt that one of the things God impressed on me was that I needed to start a nonprofit corporation, so that any money that came my way, whether it was an honorarium, a book sale or a gift, would go into a nonprofit ministry.
  140. I don’t want to be entertained. I don’t want visuals or musicals. I don’t want a vacation. I don’t want to quit. I don’t want sympathy. The cry of my heart is ‘Just Give Me Jesus.’
  141. I don’t take any money from my ministry. I’m not on salary. My husband supports me.
  142. I do not believe evil men are led by God. I believe there are plots of evil. We live in a sinful world, and there are a lot of things that happen as a result of sin.
  143. I believe that God has a plan and purpose not only for the human race, but for my individual life.
  144. Every time I see my brother, I just praise God for God’s grace in his life. Because if God can change Franklin from a prodigal into a man of God, he can do it for anybody.
  145. Even as a teenager, I felt that for whatever reason that we were living very close to the end of human history. And now at my age I believe that with almost an increasing certainty.
  146. Death is a door. When we close our eyes in this life, we will open our eyes to Jesus.
  147. Besides walking, I do stretches every day. I had back trouble starting when I turned 40, so I have to stretch out my muscles every day.
  148. As burned as I’ve been by local churches and by people who call themselves in God’s name, Jesus gave us the church. It’s supposed to be a community of like-minded people who encourage and strengthen each other. But that’s not how it always works.
  149. Around 1998, I went through lots of pressures and struggles. My children got married within eight months of each other, my son was diagnosed with cancer and went through major surgery and radiation, my mother had five life-threatening hospitalizations where I stayed with her, my husband’s dental office burned to the ground.
  150. Are you facing a superheated furnace? What God wants is for you to look full in the face of Jesus. Get your focus off whatever it is that appears to be unanswered and focus on the Son.
  151. Abraham wasn’t perfect. He failed, made mistakes. But, he would go back, get right with God, and then just keep moving forward. He didn’t quit when things got hard. He just kept on going. And everywhere he went, God was there. God was with him.
  152. Abraham is such a fascinating figure. Three world religions – Judaism, Christianity, and Islam – all claim him as a patriarch. He was raised in a religious home. And yet he rejected religion in order to pursue a personal relationship with God.
  153. You should be accumulating really great relationships throughout your career.
  154. You know a good board when you see one.
  155. You have to live the mission… love what you do.
  156. Xerox’s innovative technology and service offerings – delivered through an expanding distribution system with a lean and flexible business model – continue to solidify our market leadership, driving consistently strong earnings performance.
  157. Work/life benefits allow companies meaningful ways for responding to their employees’ needs; they can be a powerful tool for transforming a workforce and driving a business’ success.
  158. Whenever an earthquake or tsunami takes thousands of innocent lives, a shocked world talks of little else. I’ll never forget the wrenching days I spent in Haiti last year for Save the Children just weeks after the earthquake.
  159. Whenever an earthquake or tsunami takes thousands of innocent lives, a shocked world talks of little else.
  160. When you have that window of opportunity called a crisis, move as quickly as you can, get as much done as you can. There’s a momentum for change that’s very compelling.
  161. When you get in a job, the tendency is to say, ‘I’ve got to know it. I’ve got to give direction to others. I’m in this job because I’m better and smarter.’ I always took a different view, that the key was to identify the people who really knew and learn from them.
  162. When parents are confident that their children will live, they have fewer of them. They invest more in each child’s food, health and education.
  163. When I became CEO of Xerox 10 years ago, the company’s situation was dire. Debt was mounting, the stock sinking and bankers were calling. People urged me to declare bankruptcy, but I felt personally responsible for tens of thousands of employees.
  164. We’re long past having to defend or explain why women should be on boards, given all the data that shows how companies with female as well as male directors perform better. It’s unfortunate when companies with a large percentage of women constituents don’t reflect that in their boardrooms.
  165. We’re living in a different world now in terms of employee needs, and companies have to offer alternative methods for getting the work done. Even under the most difficult circumstances you can have creative flexibility.
  166. Turnaround or growth, it’s getting your people focused on the goal that is still the job of leadership.
  167. There’s nothing quite as powerful as people feeling they can have impact and make a difference. When you’ve got that going for you, I think it’s a very powerful way to implement change.
  168. There is an explosion of information happening, yet people demand quick access to relevant content that cuts through the clutter.
  169. The hardware business is all about per-unit manufacturing cost and functionality. The services business is less asset-intensive and more dependent on people.
  170. The day I was announced as CEO, I think the stock dropped another 20%.
  171. Sustainable development is a proven catalyst for Xerox innovation.
  172. Something as simple as better breastfeeding could save a million children a year.
  173. People ask my mother whether she had any idea that I’d be CEO of a company some day, and she would say, ‘Absolutely not. Totally out of the realm of possibility.’ There was certainly nothing that would have been very predictable in my upbringing.
  174. One of the things we often miss in succession planning is that it should be gradual and thoughtful, with lots of sharing of information and knowledge and perspective, so that it’s almost a non-event when it happens.
  175. Not everybody is created equal, and it’s important for companies to identify those high potentials and treat them differently, accelerate their development and pay them more. That process is so incredibly important to developing first-class leadership in a company.
  176. My dad was an editor and a writer, and that’s really where I would have liked to have gone. But the genetic link was not intact there, so I wound up going into business. But I love to write, still. I’m not a great writer, but I enjoy it.
  177. My dad was an editor and a writer, and that’s actually what I aspired to be.
  178. Most of my career has been in sales. I spend 50% or more of my time with customers and employees, and I can’t wait for it to be more than 50%.
  179. Investing in early childhood nutrition is a surefire strategy. The returns are incredibly high.
  180. If you’re a global company you are going to have jobs overseas. The reality is if we start taxing those jobs at a rate that makes them noncompetitive in those markets, the reality is that we’re going to lose business.
  181. If we could muster the same determination and sense of responsibility that saves a country like Japan – or a company like Xerox – then investing to save women and children who are dying in the developing world would be very good business.
  182. I’m not formal and I’m impatient. So I think my team would say that when she starts tapping her pen and the leg starts moving quickly, that it’s time to move on. I’m not good at long, drawn-out kinds of sessions.
  183. I’m at the gym at 6, so I’m usually in my office by 7:15. And I try to not schedule a lot of meetings before 8. So I’ve got that first hour to get myself organized for the day and to make sure that I’ve structured what I want to do.
  184. I worked in sales. It was definable, it had a quantifiable approach to accomplishment that had a great deal of importance to me. It had a degree of clarity that I loved. And of course, it was core.I worked in sales. It was definable, it had a quantifiable approach to accomplishment that had a great deal of importance to me. It had a degree of clarity that I loved. And of course, it was core.
  185. I left Xerox for the non-profit sector because it was clear to me that only public/private partnerships can pull off a turnaround plan at the scale we need to tackle global poverty.
  186. I learned how to be a learner. When you get in a job, the tendency is to say, ‘I’ve got to know it. I’ve got to give direction to others. I’m in this job because I’m better and smarter.’ I always took a different view, that the key was to identify the people who really knew and learn from them.
  187. I have zero tolerance for people who don’t come completely prepared. I expect contribution, I expect attendance, and I expect directors to take trips and visit the company’s programs.
  188. I got a journalism degree. I started doing journalism – I interned at ‘Cosmopolitan’ magazine in the 1970s, which probably wasn’t the best place for me, and I spent six or nine months freelancing. Anyway, I wasn’t that good at it.
  189. Entire families work for Xerox.
  190. Employees who believe that management is concerned about them as a whole person – not just an employee – are more productive, more satisfied, more fulfilled. Satisfied employees mean satisfied customers, which leads to profitability.
  191. Employees are a company’s greatest asset – they’re your competitive advantage. You want to attract and retain the best; provide them with encouragement, stimulus, and make them feel that they are an integral part of the company’s mission.
  192. Educated and productive young people are needed to help lift their countries out of poverty and create a wealthier, more secure world.
  193. Customers require the effective integration of technologies to simplify their workflow and boost efficiency.
  194. By the time I stepped down as Xerox’s CEO in 2009 – and as chairman in January 2010 – Xerox had become the vibrant, profitable and revitalized company that it still is today. What made the difference was a strong turnaround plan, dedicated people and a firm commitment from company leaders.
  195. Boards without women – blacklist those suckers. It’s 2011. They’ve had the time – it’s significant that they don’t have women.
  196. As much as it’s sometimes hard to make choices about where you invest, it’s equally hard to make choices about where you don’t invest and what you eliminate.
  197. You reach deep down and bring up what feels absolutely authentic to you as you move along with the book, but you don’t know everything about it. You can’t.
  198. You can look at the New York Times Bestseller List and you can be pretty sure that the writers on that list don’t know each other very well.
  199. Writers, as they gain success, feel like outsiders because writers don’t come together in real groups.
  200. When you make his sandwiches, put a sexy or loving note in his lunch box.
  201. When I write something, every word of it is meant. I can’t say it enough.
  202. What I did was take the Jesus of the Gospels, the Son of God, the Son of the Virgin Mary, and sought to make Him utterly believable, a vital breathing character.
  203. We’re frightened of what makes us different.
  204. We need to stop fighting Christian against Christian. I have no time for anything but trying to love other people. That is a full-time job.
  205. We have to become saints. We have to become like Christ. Anything less is simply not enough.
  206. Very few beings really seek knowledge in this world. Mortal or immortal, few really ASK. On the contrary, they try to wring from the unknown the answers they have already shaped in their own minds.
  207. To write something, you have to risk making a fool of yourself.
  208. To really ask is to open the door to the whirlwind. The answer may annihilate the question and the questioner.
  209. There may be writing groups where people meet but it’s occasional. You really do it all at your own computer or your own typewriter by yourself.
  210. The world doesn’t need any more mediocrity or hedged bets.
  211. The whole theme of Interview with the Vampire was Louis’s quest for meaning in a godless world. He searched to find the oldest existing immortal simply to ask, What is the meaning of what we are?
  212. The vampires have always been metaphors for me. They’ve always been vehicles through which I can express things I have felt very, very deeply.
  213. The thing should have plot and character, beginning, middle and end. Arouse pity and then have a catharsis. Those were the best principles I was ever taught.
  214. The only pain in pleasure is the pleasure of the pain.
  215. The most difficult novel I have had to write in terms of just getting it done was The Vampire Lestat. It took a year to write.
  216. That process by which you become a writer is a pretty lonely one. We don’t have a group apprenticeship like a violinist might training for an orchestra.
  217. Stephen King in many respects is a wonderful writer. He has made a contribution. People in the future will be able to pick up Stephen King’s books and learn a lot about who we were by reading those books.
  218. Re-telling the Christian story is the essence of my vocation. That has been going on since the Evangelists in one form or another.
  219. People who cease to believe in God or goodness altogether still believe in the devil. I don’t know why. No, I do indeed know why. Evil is always possible. And goodness is eternally difficult.
  220. Obviously, a writer can’t know everything about what she writes. It’s impossible.
  221. Obsession led me to write. It’s been that way with every book I’ve ever written. I become completely consumed by a theme, by characters, by a desire to meet a challenge.
  222. My own funeral, I’d like to be laid out in a coffin in my own house. I would like my coffin to be put in the double parlor, and I would like all the flowers to be white.
  223. Memnoch the Devil happen to be my favorite of all The Vampire Chronicles.
  224. It is tragic that many in America think of us – Christians – as being people who hate others.
  225. Invest in a feather duster – the possibilities are endless.
  226. I’m usually working on my own mythology, my own realm of created characters. Stories in mythology inspire me, though I may not be conscious of it.
  227. I’m going to keep on dealing with the supernatural in a lot of ways.
  228. I’m fascinated by almost any mythology that I can get my hands on.
  229. I’m definitely more influenced by European writers than I am by American writers, there’s no doubt about that.
  230. I’m always looking, and I’m always asking questions.
  231. I wish we had more visible Christian and Catholic leaders who talked about love.
  232. I was obsessed with religious questions, the basics: Why are we here? Why is the world so beautiful?
  233. I want to love all the children of God – Christian, Jew, Moslem, Hindu, Buddhist – everyone. I want to love gay Christians and straight Christians.
  234. I thought The Shining was just absolutely wonderful. Stephen King reaches all kinds of people. In the beginning he was just dismissed out of hand, which was terrible.
  235. I read The Old Curiosity Shop before I began Blackwood Farm. I was amazed at the utter madness in that book.
  236. I loved words. I love to sing them and speak them and even now, I must admit, I have fallen into the joy of writing them.
  237. I love New Orleans physically. I love the trees and the balmy air and the beautiful days. I have a beautiful house here.
  238. I know nothing of God or the Devil. I have never seen a vision nor learned a secret that would damn or save my soul.
  239. I gave up on the big screen. The Witching Hour was at Warner Bros. for 10 years and it just didn’t work out.
  240. I feel like an outsider, and I always will feel like one. I’ve always felt that I wasn’t a member of any particular group.
  241. I enjoy the Web site a lot and I like being able to talk to my readers. I’ve always had a very close relationship with them.
  242. I do want to go another way – to write something completely different.
  243. I do not read the ancient languages, but I am beginning to study Greek.
  244. I claim Dickens as a mentor. He’s my teacher. He’s one of my driving forces.
  245. I can’t keep up with Stephen King’s output.
  246. I can’t get very far away from Christianity, I can’t get very far away from the angels and the saints. I work them in always, in some way.
  247. I broke with my religion in college.
  248. First-person narrators is the way I know how to write a book with the greatest power and chance of artistic success.
  249. Evil is always possible. Goodness is a difficulty.
  250. Dickens is a very underrated writer at the moment. Everyone in his time admired him but I think right now he’s not spoken of enough.
  251. You have to be a lover of books without expecting more of them than they give – a little pleasure, a little insight, a moment of escape, a deepening of your own humanity. Not much else.
  252. You can be creative and not addictive, or addictive and not creative. Most addicted people do not produce anything of remarkable note.
  253. When I grew up, you needed to have straight hair. It’s symbolic of needing to be like everyone else, needing to look like everyone else. And what that meant was looking like the dominant ruling class in America.
  254. We also have to make sure our children know the history of women. Tell them the rotten truth: It wasn’t always possible for women to become doctors or managers or insurance people. Let them be armed with a true picture of the way we want it to be.
  255. Self-pity is never useful. It tends to distort like a fun-house mirror.
  256. Romanticizing the act of writing or any other art is not very helpful to the artist or the art. It’s much better if one simply does.
  257. If I were planning to be stranded on a desert island, I wouldn’t take Freud’s books with me, because I’ve already read them all.
  258. I think that certainly the artists of the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s were fighting a very conformist society, which didn’t give them enough space to live or create, and they were bucking all kinds of spoken and unspoken rules.
  259. I think it is a good thing to have woman friends at every stage of life. We confide in each other, we support each other, we understand each other most of the time. Of course, sometimes we are competitive or angry or distant, too. But I do think it is important not to let the main friendships slip away in the sweep of the days.
  260. I really consider myself a writer, and a writer who is sometimes a social critic. I’m not an ideologue, I don’t join a party. I follow along and take notes. Sometimes I throw in my two cents.
  261. I have always been fascinated by the human mind, conscious and unconscious – that is what writing and reading is about, too. The why of your life and the why of your choices and the what has happened that you know and the what that you don’t know is really riveting, and psychoanalysts share my wonder at how it all unfolds.
  262. I believe that it is our human right to be parents and women. And there’s no contradiction between feminism, which means women should have all that they are entitled to, all that they can do, all the opportunities that they can take advantage of they should have.
  263. I am not a perfect friend, and it is impossible not to rebuff or be rebuffed if you move about the world.
  264. Grief is in two parts. The first is loss. The second is the remaking of life.
  265. Everybody is bound by some social rules. But I think that artists need some kind of freedom to explore their minds and that some of them tend to take that freedom to live a little more openly or a little more dangerously, sometimes a lot more self-destructively, than other people.
  266. Decay is quiet but ghastly, explosion is dramatic and dreadful. There’s not much to choose between the two of them in reality, and most of our lives have sufficient of both.
  267. A woman whose smile is open and whose expression is glad has a kind of beauty no matter what she wears.
  268. Yes, I am proud, and very humble too.
  269. We imagine that we want to escape our selfish and commonplace existence, but we cling desperately to our chains.
  270. We have no firm hold on any knowledge or philosophy that can lift us out of our difficulties.
  271. We are bothered a good deal by people who assume the responsibility of the world when God is neglectful.
  272. We are afraid of ideas, of experimenting, of change. We shrink from thinking a problem through to a logical conclusion.
  273. We all like stories that make us cry. It’s so nice to feel sad when you’ve nothing in particular to feel sad about.
  274. The wrong things are predominantly stressed in the schools – things remote from the student’s experience and need.
  275. The truth is not wonderful enough to suit the newspapers; so they enlarge upon it, and invent ridiculous embellishments.
  276. The processes of teaching the child that everything cannot be as he wills it are apt to be painful both to him and to his teacher.
  277. The immediate future is going to be tragic for all of us unless we find a way of making the vast educational resources of this country serve the true purpose of education, truth and justice.
  278. The Great War proved how confused the world is. Depression is proving it again.
  279. People seldom see the halting and painful steps by which the most insignificant success is achieved.
  280. Our material eye cannot see that a stupid chauvinism is driving us from one noisy, destructive, futile agitation to another.
  281. No matter how mistaken Communist ideas may be, the experience and knowledge gained by trying them out have given a tremendous impetus to thought and imagination.
  282. My heart is singing for joy this morning! A miracle has happened! The light of understanding has shone upon my little pupil’s mind, and behold, all things are changed!
  283. Keep on beginning and failing. Each time you fail, start all over again, and you will grow stronger until you have accomplished a purpose – not the one you began with perhaps, but one you’ll be glad to remember.
  284. It’s queer how ready people always are with advice in any real or imaginary emergency, and no matter how many times experience has shown them to be wrong, they continue to set forth their opinions, as if they had received them from the Almighty!
  285. It’s a great mistake, I think, to put children off with falsehoods and nonsense, when their growing powers of observation and discrimination excite in them a desire to know about things.
  286. It is a rare privilege to watch the birth, growth, and first feeble struggles of a living mind; this privilege is mine.
  287. If the child is left to himself, he will think more and better, if less showily. Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself.
  288. I’d rather break stones on the king’s highway than hem a handkerchief.
  289. I think that there are some teachers that do a very good job of incorporating culture and history. And there are some teachers who could use a little more help in that area.
  290. I need a teacher quite as much as Helen. I know the education of this child will be the distinguishing event of my life, if I have the brains and perseverance to accomplish it.
  291. I have thought about it a great deal, and the more I think, the more certain I am that obedience is the gateway through which knowledge, yes, and love, too, enter the mind of the child.
  292. I cannot explain it; but when difficulties arise, I am not perplexed or doubtful. I know how to meet them.
  293. I am beginning to suspect all elaborate and special systems of education. They seem to me to be built up on the supposition that every child is a kind of idiot who must be taught to think.
  294. Every renaissance comes to the world with a cry, the cry of the human spirit to be free.
  295. Education in the light of present-day knowledge and need calls for some spirited and creative innovations both in the substance and the purpose of current pedagogy.
  296. Children require guidance and sympathy far more than instruction.
  297. Certain periods in history suddenly lift humanity to an observation point where a clear light falls upon a world previously dark.
  298. A strenuous effort must be made to train young people to think for themselves and take independent charge of their lives.
  299. While armchair travelers dream of going places, traveling armchairs dream of staying put.
  300. When I’m working on something, I proceed as if no one else will ever read it.
  301. When I read, I’m purely a reader.
  302. Time, in general, has always been a central obsession of mine – what it does to people, how it can constitute a plot all on its own. So naturally, I am interested in old age.
  303. The one ironclad rule is that I have to try. I have to walk into my writing room and pick up my pen every weekday morning.
  304. The hardest novel to write was Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant.
  305. The Amateur Marriage grew out of the reflection that of all the opportunities to show differences in character, surely an unhappy marriage must be the richest.
  306. She worded it a bit strongly, but I do find myself more and more struck by the differences between the sexes. To put it another way: All marriages are mixed marriages.
  307. People always call it luck when you’ve acted more sensibly than they have.
  308. Not until the final draft do I force myself to remember that I’m going to have to think about how it will affect other people.
  309. None of my own experiences ever finds its way into my work. However, the stages of my life – motherhood, middle age, etc. – often influence my subject matter.
  310. My writing day has grown shorter as I’ve aged, although it seems to produce the same number of pages.
  311. My stories are never quite good enough.
  312. My family can always tell when I’m well into a novel because the meals get very crummy.
  313. My decision to start a new one is just that, a decision, since I never get inspirations.
  314. It’s true that it’s a solitary occupation, but you would be surprised at how much companionship a group of imaginary characters can offer once you get to know them.
  315. It seems to me that since I’ve had children, I’ve grown richer and deeper. They may have slowed down my writing for a while, but when I did write, I had more of a self to speak from.
  316. It seems to me that good novels celebrate the mystery in ordinary life, and summing it all up in psychological terms strips the mystery away.
  317. In real life I avoid all parties altogether, but on paper I can mingle with the best of them.
  318. If I waited till I felt like writing, I’d never write at all.
  319. I’ve always thought a hotel ought to offer optional small animals. I mean a cat to sleep on your bed at night, or a dog of some kind to act pleased when you come in. You ever notice how a hotel room feels so lifeless?
  320. I’ve always enjoyed studying the small clues that indicate a particular class level.
  321. I’m too shy for personal appearances, and I’ve found out that anytime I talk about my writing, I can’t do any writing for many weeks afterward.
  322. I’ll write maybe one long paragraph describing the events, then a page or two breaking the events into chapters, and then reams of pages delving into my characters. After that, I’m ready to begin.
  323. I would advise any beginning writer to write the first drafts as if no one else will ever read them – without a thought about publication – and only in the last draft to consider how the work will look from the outside.
  324. I was standing in the schoolyard waiting for a child when another mother came up to me. Have you found work yet? she asked. Or are you still just writing?
  325. I think it must be very hard to be one of the new young writers who are urged to put themselves forward when it may be the last thing on earth they’d be good at.
  326. I spend about a year between novels.
  327. I save the best of myself for novels, and I believe it shows.
  328. I remember leaving the hospital – thinking, ‘Wait, are they going to let me just walk off with him? I don’t know beans about babies! I don’t have a license to do this.’ We’re just amateurs.
  329. I never think about the actual process of writing. I suppose I have a superstition about examining it too closely.
  330. I just want to be told a story, and I want to believe I’m living that story, and I don’t give a thought to influences or method or any other writerly concerns.
  331. I forget a book as soon as I finish writing it, which is not always a good thing.
  332. I expect that any day now, I will have said all I have to say; I’ll have used up all my characters, and then I’ll be free to get on with my real life.
  333. I don’t want to say I hear voices; well, actually I do hear voices, but I don’t think it’s supernatural. I think it’s just that when characters are given enough texture and backbone, then lo and behold, they stand on their own.
  334. I do write long, long character notes – family background, history, details of appearance – much more than will ever appear in the novel. I think this is what lifts a book from that early calculated, artificial stage.
  335. I didn’t really choose to write; I more or less fell into it.
  336. I consciously try to end my novels at a point where I won’t have to wonder about my characters ever again.
  337. I can never tell ahead of time which book will give me trouble – some balk every step of the way, others seem to write themselves – but certainly the mechanics of writing, finding the time and the psychic space, are easier now that my children are grown.
  338. For my own family, I would always choose the makeshift, surrogate family formed by various characters unrelated by blood.
  339. For me, writing something down was the only road out.
  340. Ever consider what pets must think of us? I mean, here we come back from a grocery store with the most amazing haul – chicken, pork, half a cow. They must think we’re the greatest hunters on earth!
  341. But what I hope for from a book – either one that I write or one that I read – is transparency. I want the story to shine through. I don’t want to think of the writer.
  342. At most I’ll spend three or four hours daily, sometimes less.
  343. And I am interested in the fact that class is very much a factor in America, even though it’s not supposed to be.
  344. Yes, I know I’ve played these women, but I’m not really conniving at all.
  345. With movies, so much of it is, ‘Who is the human being that is going to be directing it?’ Because it is their medium. In a way, you are serving the director, and when it is someone that you feel you can have a lot of confidence in, it can make a big difference.
  346. When I watch my kids, and I see the primal level at which the sibling relationships are formed, then I completely understand what these unresolved adult sibling problems are based on. You know, ‘Mom liked you better’ and, ‘You got your own room and I didn’t.’
  347. When I started, I was a theater actress, and there were roles that I couldn’t imagine not playing, like Rosalind in ‘As You Like It.’ I used to think I would die if I could play that. But then I started doing movies, and I had children, and I moved to Los Angeles. And now I kind of can’t remember what those roles would be.
  348. When I started in the theater, I’d do plays by Shakespeare or Ibsen or Chekhov, and they all created great women’s roles.
  349. When I look at women, older than I am, in their 50s, 60, 70s, 80s, and I see women that I admire, I think, ‘Oh, I get it; that’s how I’m going to be.’ I’m not scared. I want to be that.
  350. What really motivates you to try to work things out as an actor is in large part fear, because you want to get into that narrative and bring the audience along.
  351. What makes us love a character is a character that tries.
  352. We still want to idealize moms, and sometimes we want to idealize actresses who are moms, too. I know that’s something I’ve experienced, but we’re all just doing the best we can and we’re all trying to raise our kids and talk to them about everything that needs to be discussed.
  353. We all perform our lives in a way. And the actor is a perfect metaphor to get at that theme of ‘how do we find our authentic selves?’ And that we all – whether we’re actors or not – perform ourselves. As a way of searching. As a way of fumbling around and trying to say, is this my voice? Is this who I am?
  354. We all get lost along the way, but hopefully we figure out some sort of path. It helps if you can imagine the process as well as the goal. Those kinds of dreams are easier to achieve.
  355. To me, I didn’t think of acting as being a young thing only.
  356. To me idealized characters are so boring to play, especially having grown up in the classical theater. That’s a great experience, but as a woman, especially, you’ve played a lot of idealized characters. So when you’ve got someone who has weaknesses as well as strengths, that’s interesting.
  357. There’s so much of our psychological makeup which is impermissible for us to explore because it’s inappropriate or perverse or scary. I’m interested in exploring that in myself. I try to be honest with myself about everything that I feel. I’m not saying I’m able to do that all the time, but it’s something I’m interested in.
  358. There’s no question that you can explore aspects of yourself through roles that you play, and you get a chance to investigate yourself; that’s healthy, and it’s therapeutic in a way. But if you’re indulging yourself, exploration at the cost of the story or the project, that’s not good.
  359. There’s love for your parents, your family, your spouse, your partner, your friends, but the nature of the connection you have with your child, there’s nothing like it. It has its own character and it’s so serious and so powerful, and so it’s a prism through which I see everything.
  360. There are so many different kinds of relationships, so it’s sort of difficult to define what is considered normal.
  361. The time I spend with my kids informs every fiber of who I am.
  362. The tension I feel is the moment they say, ‘Action!’ Movies are like lightning in a bottle, and you always want to find when you possibly can catch a surprising moment.
  363. Sometimes you’re reading something, and you don’t know it will be important in your life. You’re reading this script, and you start to get involved. It’s not an intellectual experience.
  364. Somebody said something really smart: It’s like you end up being the defense attorney for your role. Your job is to defend their point of view. You’re fighting for what they want. You learn that in acting school – it’s Acting 1A: ‘What do you want? What’s in the way?’
  365. Right now, I love the fact that I have so many opportunities, but I know this privileged position cannot last. That doesn’t mean that I’ll stop working. I picture myself as an old actress doing cameos in films with people saying: ‘Isn’t that that Bening woman?’
  366. Our children see us a certain way, and we want to be seen by them in a certain way. I certainly want to be a strong, stable, loving, consistent presence in my children’s lives. But we are human beings, too.
  367. Oh, honey, I’m from Oklahoma! This is who I am – middle-class all the way!
  368. My sister and I fought a lot when we were kids. I was the little bratty sister, and she would kind of walk away, not wanting to be associated with me.
  369. My parents were very supportive. They went to every show. And they never told me not to do what I was doing.
  370. My mother is not somebody who’s troubled by aging.
  371. My husband and I have very similar backgrounds even though we’re years apart. So there are a lot of things that we basically share.
  372. My dad was in the life insurance business, so I learned about selling when I was about 14 because I started working as a secretary.
  373. My character in ‘Running With Scissors’ is manic-depressive. She starts out as a wonderfully eccentric person, and then descends into a terrible illness.
  374. Most women would say they relate to ‘Hedda Gabler’ – there’s a part of her in them. Ibsen was writing about a deep ambivalence that many women feel about domesticity. I think about myself and friends of mine – we have some of Hedda’s qualities and traits.
  375. Most people are looking for something to give their life meaning.
  376. It’s kind of a mystery to me, as far as my own life experiences and what I’ve witnessed – why some people can just move on through traumatic experiences, in childhood particularly, and why other people are just paralyzed by it. I just don’t know how and why that is.
  377. It’s hard to make a living in this business. Unions aren’t as strong as they used to be. For a journeyman actor – someone who doesn’t have a famous name but has consistent work in theater or film or TV – it has become harder to get through, harder to raise a family.
  378. It’s easier to see in someone else, another actor, how they kind of disappear and then this other persona appears. A great actor is a thing of mystery.
  379. It’s always ‘busy’ with four children; it’s chaos.
  380. It used to be the one or the other, right? You were the ‘bad girl’ or the ‘good girl’ or the ‘bad mother’ or ‘the good mother,’ ‘the horrible businesswoman who eschewed her children’ or ‘the earth mother who was happy to be at home baking pies,’ all of that stuff that we sort of knew was a lie.
  381. If you’re an actor, you have to find a way to make peace with all the media attention.
  382. If you can open people’s hearts first, then maybe people’s minds get opened after that.
  383. If anything, I want to please people too much.
  384. I’ve tried to take roles with great demands.
  385. I’ve played parts that were just likable people, and there’s a certain pleasure in that. And that’s that.
  386. I’ve made some movies that I really loved that nobody saw.
  387. I’ve always been pretty levelheaded. In show business, you need to have a certain internal stability.
  388. I’m still very critical of myself in film.
  389. I’m lucky: almost all my family has lived to be very old. I have one grandfather who lived to be 100.
  390. I’m interested in writing that explores all sides of human beings.
  391. I’m certainly not a perfect mother, but I am an avid mother, let me put it that way.
  392. I wanted to be a classical actress. I plodded along. I went to junior college in San Francisco, I was in a Repertory Company. My hero was Eva Le Gallienne, who was a great theater actress at the turn of the century who created her own company, and she wrote these hilarious autobiographies at the time.
  393. I think you sort of shed skins as you go along in life. You get into your 40s, and you feel like, ‘OK, no more pretending.’ You get to just be who you are.
  394. I think when you’re at your best as an actor, it is cathartic.
  395. I think what’s interesting about the whole paparazzi thing is that unless you’re Brad Pitt or Madonna, you can pretty much avoid it. You know when you’re going to an opening that you will be photographed, so that’s fine. And you know the restaurants that have paparazzi, so you don’t go to them.
  396. I think we as celebrities have a lot more control.
  397. I think people have a right to their point of view.
  398. I think in the past, around the time that method acting became so prevalent, it used to be that American actors were thought to be the kind that would work more from the inside out, and that the English actors worked more from the outside in.
  399. I think for all of us, as we age, there are always a few moments when you are shocked.
  400. I still remember the five points of salesmanship: attention, interest, conviction, desire and close.
  401. I saw a Shakespeare play when I was – I guess I was in junior high. And I just fell in love with the theater because, for me, it was a combination of big ideas and feeling.
  402. I remember hearing someone say that good acting is more about taking off a mask than putting one on, and in movie acting, certainly that’s true. With the camera so close, you can see right down into your soul, hopefully. So being able to do that in a way is terrifying, and in another way, truly liberating. And I like that about it.
  403. I read ‘Game Change.’ If you want to relive the campaign, that book is unbelievable. It’s great. It’s the book of that campaign. It brought all the memories back of everything with Clinton and Obama, and Sarah Palin and McCain, and choosing her, and John Edwards. It was an interesting book.
  404. I never thought my private life would be newsworthy.
  405. I never speak for my husband, and I never speak for my children. It’s a rule. Believe me, it is.
  406. I never felt like I had made it.
  407. I love the luxury of the camera. The camera does so much for you. I like the secrets a camera can tell.
  408. I love the craft of acting, I love learning, I love everything that comes with the new project; the whole process is totally intoxicating to me.
  409. I love being busy, and I love having a lot going on; it’s exciting.
  410. I like things that I feel comfortable in.
  411. I like that I’ve been through things, that when something happens, it resonates with something that already happened. It’s not that things like loss are more or less painful. But they’re deeper. I find that fascinating.
  412. I knew I wanted children in my life. The acting was always in relation to it. Life at home is chaos. They’re wonderful. They’re such interesting human beings. I just love it. I’m lucky.
  413. I just want to be educated.
  414. I have perfected the art of putting my feet on my husband’s lap during awards ceremonies so he can rub them.
  415. I have huge chunks of time when I’m not working.
  416. I had never been attracted to younger guys. I had, from my late teens, always liked men who were older than me.
  417. I find the reality of our emotional lives interesting.
  418. I feel very, very lucky to have come from the family I did. We have our dysfunctions and our problems, just like any family. But my parents are extremely loving people.
  419. I feel very lucky I don’t have to be a critic.
  420. I feel that certain things are best kept inside a family and not discussed with anyone else.
  421. I feel really lucky that I’m able to pursue the work that I love. I want my children to see that. I want them to have that for themselves, something that they love, that they do, that they pursue in their lives as a way of growing and learning.
  422. I don’t see myself as having to compete with younger actresses; I don’t feel that.
  423. I don’t see myself as competing with other actresses. I mean, I went through a time when I was in New York, and I was going to lots of auditions and trying to get parts, but even then, you’re not really competing with the other actresses. There is a competition going on, but it’s not like something you can win in that way.
  424. I don’t really have a choice. I’m getting older.
  425. I do have to take care of myself, not only because I’m in the movies, just for mental health reasons. I exercise for me. You know, maybe it would be nice to not have to do that in order to feel good, but I do. I feel like I have to, to feel good. To clear my head and all of that, so.
  426. I didn’t picture myself as a movie actress. I began to think about it around college. I remember thinking, ‘Well somebody has to be in them,’ so maybe I could do that eventually. It’s all been a surprise.
  427. I didn’t do a movie until I was almost 30. I’m grateful for that because it gave me a chance to be an adult in the world and do work in the regional theater that very few people cared about. I loved it and I wanted to do that stuff.
  428. I am really looking forward as I get older and older, to being less and less nice.
  429. I am in awe of Ruth Draper.
  430. I always wonder about people’s history and their lives, especially people that are a little bit more distant, who obviously have had some kind of a thing, and you know there’s some reason why they’re not able to connect. It’s not because they don’t want to. They don’t have the ability.
  431. I act, but I am a mother first and wife second.
  432. Having a life outside of movies is like pure oxygen. It makes the work more precious and informed.
  433. Glamour is really fun.
  434. Getting all dressed up and putting on fancy clothes – all of that’s a great thing, but oddly, it doesn’t really have a lot to do with acting most of the time.
  435. Five billion people have played Hamlet. ‘To be or not to be.’ And how do you do that and find your way into your own journey, your own way of telling it?
  436. Find the story you want to tell. If you don’t want to write it, find somebody to write it.
  437. Everybody has a public life, and they have their own private life. Everybody has their secrets. Everybody has their own private, you know, agonies as well as joys. And that’s what great drama, whether it’s the movies or the theater, that’s what it shows.
  438. Every person’s opinion, in a way, does matter.
  439. Even with a stable character, you want something surprising to happen, hopefully because that’s what the camera loves the most. That’s what is great about film.
  440. Critics have a responsibility to put things in a cultural and sociological or political context. That is important.
  441. By the time I was in high school, Roe v. Wade had passed, so that was also happening; girls were getting pregnant and getting abortions – and that happened in my school too.
  442. Anyone who is drawn in broad strokes either negatively or positively is generally not very interesting to play.
  443. Anybody who has children and children who are well feels a sense of responsibility towards parents and kids and families that are struggling and that aren’t well.
  444. And if there’s anything movies can do in a way that I just love, and I love as an audience is, ‘Show me something I don’t know about. Show me something I haven’t seen.’
  445. Acting is not about being famous, it’s about exploring the human soul.
  446. A lot of directors in my experience are very receptive. They see what you do first, and then they want to find a place to put the camera, and they tweak you here and there.
  447. You should always take a religion at its best and not at its worst, from its highest teachings and not from the lowest practices of some of its adherents.
  448. What, after all, is the object of education? To train the body in health, vigor and grace, so that it may express the emotions in beauty and the mind with accuracy and strength.
  449. What is the essence of theosophy? It is the fact that man, being himself divine, can know the divinity whose life he shares. As an inevitable corollary to this supreme truth comes the fact of the brotherhood of man.
  450. What is the constitution of the universe? The universe is the manifestation of the divine thought; the thought of God embodies itself in the thought-forms that we call worlds.
  451. What is a philosophy? It Is an answer satisfactory to the reason to all the great problems of life. That is what is meant by philosophy. It must satisfy the reason, and it must show the unity underlying the endless diversity of the facts that science observes.
  452. We were an ill-matched pair, my husband and I, from the very outset; he, with very high ideas of a husband’s authority and a wife’s submission, holding strongly to the ‘master-in-my-own-house theory,’ thinking much of the details of home arrangements, precise, methodical, easily angered and with difficulty appeased.
  453. We learn much during our sleep, and the knowledge thus gained slowly filters into the physical brain, and is occasionally impressed upon it as a vivid and illuminative dream.
  454. We have no right to pick out all that is noblest and fairest in man, to project these qualities into space, and to call them God. We only thus create an ideal figure, a purified, ennobled, ‘magnified’ Man.
  455. To me in my childhood, elves and fairies of all sorts were very real things, and my dolls were as really children as I was myself a child.
  456. This Old Testament – containing error, folly, absurdity and immorality – is by English statute law declared to be of divine authority, a blasphemy – if there were anyone to be blasphemed – blacker and more insolent than any word ever written or penned by the most hotheaded Freethinker.
  457. There is much, of course, in the exclusive claims of Christianity which make it hostile to other faiths.
  458. There is far more misunderstanding of Islam than there is, I think, of the other religions of the world. So many things are said of it by those who do not belong to that faith.
  459. There is a charm in making a stew, to the unaccustomed cook, from the excitement of wondering what the result will be, and whether any flavour save that of onions will survive the competition in the mixture.
  460. There can be no wise politics without thought beforehand.
  461. Theosophy tries to bridge the gulf between Buddhism and Christianity by pointing to the fundamental spiritual truths on which both religions are built, and by winning people to regard the Buddha and the Christ as fellow-laborers, and not as rivals.
  462. Theosophy has no code of morals, being itself the embodiment of the highest morality; it presents to its students the highest moral teachings of all religions, gathering the most fragrant blossoms from the gardens of the world-faiths.
  463. The worlds in which man is evolving as he treads the circle of births and deaths are three: the physical world, the astral or intermediate world, the mental or heavenly world.
  464. The true basis of morality is utility; that is, the adaptation of our actions to the promotion of the general welfare and happiness; the endeavour so to rule our lives that we may serve and bless mankind.
  465. The sunlight ranges over the universe, and at incarnation we step out of it into the twilight of the body, and see but dimly during the period of our incarceration; at death we step out of the prison again into the sunlight, and are nearer to the reality.
  466. The soul grows by reincarnation in bodies provided by nature, more complex, more powerful, as the soul unfolds greater and greater faculties. And so the soul climbs upward into the light eternal. And there is no fear for any child of man, for inevitably he climbs towards God.
  467. The orthodox believers in God are divided into two camps, one of which maintains that the existence of God is as demonstrable as any mathematical proposition, while the other asserts that his existence is not demonstrable to the intellect.
  468. The mental body, like the astral, varies much in different people; it is composed of coarser or of finer matter, according to the needs of the more or less unfolded consciousness connected with it. In the educated it is active and well-defined; in the undeveloped it is cloudy and inchoate.
  469. The idea that Buddhism denies what is called in the West ‘individual immortality’ is a mistake, so far as the Buddhist scriptures are concerned.
  470. The idea of reverence for God is transmitted from parent to child, it is educated into an abnormal development, and thus almost indefinitely strengthened, but yet it does appear to me that the bent to worship is an integral part of man’s nature.
  471. The human body is constantly undergoing a process of decay and of reconstruction. First builded into the astral form in the womb of the mother, it is built up continually by the insetting of fresh materials. With every moment tiny molecules are passing away from it; with every moment tiny molecules are streaming into it.
  472. The highest Hindu intellectual training was based on the practice of yoga, and produced, as its fruit, those marvellous philosophical systems, the six Darshanas and the Brahma Sutras, which are still the delight of scholars and the inspiration of occultists and mystics.
  473. The generous wish to share with all what is precious, to spread broadcast priceless truths, to shut out none from the illumination of true knowledge, has resulted in a zeal without discretion that has vulgarised Christianity, and has presented its teachings in a form that often repels the heart and alienates the intellect.
  474. The essence of religion is the knowledge of God which is eternal life. That and nothing less than that is religion. Everything else is on the surface, is superfluous save for the needs of men.
  475. The destruction of India’s village system was the greatest of England’s blunders.
  476. The body is never more alive than when it is dead; but it is alive in its units, and dead in its totality; alive as a congeries, dead as an organism.
  477. The birth of science rang the death-knell of an arbitrary and constantly interposing Supreme Power.
  478. The Roman Catholic Church, had it captured me, as it nearly did, would have sent me on some mission of danger and sacrifice and utilised me as a martyr; the Church established by law transformed me into an unbeliever and an antagonist.
  479. The Buddha over and over again spoke clearly and definitely on post-mortem states – as in his conversation with Vasetta.
  480. That is the true definition of sin; when knowing right you do the lower, ah, then you sin. Where there is no knowledge, sin is not present.
  481. Sun-worship and pure forms of nature-worship were, in their day, noble religions, highly allegorical but full of profound truth and knowledge.
  482. Strange indeed would it be if all the space around us be empty, mere waste void, and the inhabitants of Earth the only forms in which intelligence could clothe itself.
  483. Socialism is the ideal state, but it can never be achieved while man is so selfish.
  484. Science regards man as an aggregation of atoms temporarily united by a mysterious force called the life-principle. To the materialist, the only difference between a living and a dead body is that in the one case that force is active, in the other latent.
  485. Representative institutions are as much a part of the true Briton as his language and his literature.
  486. Refusal to believe until proof is given is a rational position; denial of all outside of our own limited experience is absurd.
  487. Quick condemnation of all that is not ours, of views with which we disagree, of ideas that do not attract us, is the sign of a narrow mind, of an uncultivated intelligence. Bigotry is always ignorant, and the wise boy, who will become the wise man, tries to understand and to see the truth in ideas with which he does not agree.
  488. Premonitions, presentiments, the sensing of unseen presences and many allied experiences are due to the activity of the astral body and its reaction on the physical; their ever-increasing frequency is merely the result of its evolution among educated people.
  489. One of the great advantages of cremation – apart from all sanitary conditions – lies in the swift restoration to Mother Nature of the material elements composing the physical and astral corpses, brought about by the burning.
  490. Nothing but an imperious intellectual and moral necessity can drive into doubt a religious mind, for it is as though an earthquake shook the foundations of the soul, and the very being quivers and sways under the shock.
  491. No philosophy, no religion, has ever brought so glad a message to the world as this good news of Atheism.
  492. No durable things are built on violent passion. Nature grows her plants in silence and in darkness, and only when they have become strong do they put their heads above the ground.
  493. Never yet was a nation born that did not begin in the spirit, pass to the heart and the mind, and then take an outer form in the world of men.
  494. My own life in India, since I came to it in 1893 to make it my home, has been devoted to one purpose, to give back to India her ancient freedom.
  495. My first serious attempts at writing were made in 1868, and I took up two very different lines of composition; I wrote some short stories of a very flimsy type, and also a work of a much more ambitious character, ‘The Lives of the Black Letter Saints.’
  496. Muhammadan law in its relation to women, is a pattern to European law. Look back to the history of Islam, and you will find that women have often taken leading places – on the throne, in the battle-field, in politics, in literature, poetry, etc.
  497. Men are at every stage of evolution, from the most barbarous to the most developed; men are found of lofty intelligence, but also of the most unevolved mentality; in one place there is a highly developed and complex civilisation, in another a crude and simple polity.
  498. Matter is, in its constituent elements, the same as spirit; existence is one, however manifold in its phenomena; life is one, however multiform in its evolution.
  499. Man is ever searching for the source whence he has come, searching for the life which is upwelling within him, immortal, nay, eternal and divine; and every religion is the answer from the Universal Spirit to the seeking spirits of men that came forth from Him.
  500. Man is a spiritual intelligence, who has taken flesh with the object of gaining experience in worlds below the spiritual, in order that he may be able to master and to rule them, and in later ages take his place in the creative and directing hierarchies of the universe.
  501. Liberty is a great celestial Goddess, strong, beneficent, and austere, and she can never descend upon a nation by the shouting of crowds, nor by arguments of unbridled passion, nor by the hatred of class against class.
  502. Let Indian history be set side by side with Europe history with what there is of the latter century by century and let us see whether India need blush at the comparison.
  503. Karma brings us ever back to rebirth, binds us to the wheel of births and deaths. Good Karma drags us back as relentlessly as bad, and the chain which is wrought out of our virtues holds as firmly and as closely as that forged from our vices.
  504. Jeremiah is a most melancholy prophet. He wails from beginning to end; he is often childish, is rarely indecent, and although it may be blasphemy to say so, he and his ‘Lamentations’ are really not worth reading.
  505. It is the duty of the followers of Islam to spread through the civilised world, a knowledge of what Islam means – its spirit and message.
  506. It is not monogamy when there is one legal wife, and mistresses out of sight.
  507. Islam believes in many prophets, and Al Quran is nothing but a confirmation of the old Scriptures.
  508. Isaiah is by far the finest and least objectionable of the seventeen prophets whose supposed productions form the latter part of the Old Testament. A distinctly higher moral tone appears in the writings called by his name, and this is especially noticeable in the ‘Second Isaiah,’ who wrote after the Babylonish captivity.
  509. India is a country in which every great religion finds a home.
  510. In morals, theosophy builds its teachings on the unity, seeing in each form the expression of a common life, and therefore the fact that what injures one injures all. To do evil i.e., to throw poison into the life-blood of humanity, is a crime against the unity.
  511. In a deep metaphysical sense, all that is conditioned is illusory. All phenomena are literally ‘appearances,’ the outer masks in which the One Reality shows itself forth in our changing universe. The more ‘material’ and solid the appearance, the further is it from reality, and therefore the more illusory it is.
  512. I was a wife and mother, blameless in moral life, with a deep sense of duty and a proud self-respect; it was while I was this that doubt struck me, and while I was in the guarded circle of the home, with no dream of outside work or outside liberty, that I lost all faith in Christianity.
  513. I often think that woman is more free in Islam than in Christianity. Woman is more protected by Islam than by the faith which preaches monogamy. In AI Quran the law about woman is juster and more liberal.
  514. I often think that woman is more free in Islam than in Christianity. Woman is more protected by Islam than by the faith which preaches monogamy.
  515. I have ever been the queerest mixture of weakness and strength, and have paid heavily for the weakness.
  516. For centuries the leaders of Christian thought spoke of women as a necessary evil, and the greatest saints of the Church are those who despise women the most.
  517. Evil is only imperfection, that which is not complete, which is becoming, but has not yet found its end.
  518. Everyone knows the beautiful story of Abraham and the sacrifice of Isaac. How this noble father led his child to the slaughter; how Isaac meekly submitted; how the farce went on till the lad was bound and laid on the altar, and how God then stopped the murder, and blessed the intending murderer for his willingness to commit the crime.
  519. Every person, every race, every nation, has its own particular keynote which it brings to the general chord of life and of humanity.
  520. Every form, not being the whole, must, of necessity, be imperfect; less than the whole, it cannot be identical with the whole, and being less than the whole and, therefore, imperfect by itself, it shows imperfection as evil, and only the totality of a universe can mirror the image of God.
  521. Empty-brained triflers who have never tried to think, who take their creed as they take their fashions, speak of atheism as the outcome of foul life and vicious desires.
  522. Debating clubs among boys are very useful, not only as affording pleasant meetings and interesting discussions, but also as serving for training grounds for developing the knowledge and the qualities that are needed in public life.
  523. Death consists, indeed, in a repeated process of unrobing, or unsheathing. The immortal part of man shakes off from itself, one after the other, its outer casings, and – as the snake from its skin, the butterfly from its chrysalis – emerges from one after another, passing into a higher state of consciousness.
  524. Continents may break up, continents may emerge, but the human race is immortal in its origin and in its growth, and there is nothing to be afraid of, even if the foundations of the earth be moved.
  525. Clairvoyants can see flashes of colour, constantly changing, in the aura that surrounds every person: each thought, each feeling, thus translating itself in the astral world, visible to the astral sight.
  526. Britons are good, though often brutal, colonists where they come into relations with entirely uncivilized tribes whose past is so remote as to be forgotten. But they trample with their heavy boots over the sensitive, delicate susceptibilities of an ancient, highly civilized and cultured nation, such as India.
  527. Better remain silent, better not even think, if you are not prepared to act.
  528. Beauty is no dead thing. It is the manifestation of God in nature. There is not one object in nature untouched by man that is not beautiful, for God’s manifestation is beauty. It shines through all His works, and not only in those that may give pleasure to man.
  529. At the solemn moment of death, every man, even when death is sudden, sees the whole of his past life marshalled before him, in its minutest details. For one short instant the personal becomes one with the individual and all-knowing ego. But this instant is enough to show to him the whole chain of causes which have been at work during his life.
  530. As the heat of the coal differs from the coal itself, so do memory, perception, judgment, emotion, and will, differ from the brain which is the instrument of thought.
  531. As civilisation advances, the deities lessen in number, the divine powers become concentrated more and more in one Being, and God rules over the whole earth, maketh the clouds his chariot, and reigns above the waterfloods as a king.
  532. As a man may be born with a mathematical faculty, and by training that faculty year after year may immensely increase his mathematical capacity, so may a man be born with certain faculties within him, faculties belonging to the soul, which he can develop by training and by discipline.
  533. An accurate knowledge of the past of a country is necessary for everyone who would understand its present, and who desires to judge of its future.
  534. Among the various vernaculars that are spoken in different parts of India, there is one that stands out strongly from the rest, as that which is most widely known. It is Hindi. A man who knows Hindi can travel over India and find everywhere Hindi-speaking people.
  535. All men die. You may say: ‘Is that encouraging?’ Surely yes, for when a man dies, his blunders, which are of the form, all die with him, but the things in him that are part of the life never die, although the form be broken.
  536. After death we live for some time in the astral world in the astral body used during our life on earth, and the more we learn to control and use it wisely now the better for us after death.
  537. A prophet is always much wider than his followers, much more liberal than those who label themselves with his name.
  538. A people can prosper under a very bad government and suffer under a very good one, if in the first case the local administration is effective and in the second it is inefficient.
  539. A myth is far truer than a history, for a history only gives a story of the shadows, whereas a myth gives a story of the substances that cast the shadows.
  540. A common religion is not possible for India, but a recognition of a common basis for all religions, and the growth of a liberal, tolerant spirit in religious matters, are possible.
  541. ‘Easter’ is a movable event, calculated by the relative positions of sun and moon, an impossible way of fixing year by year the anniversary of a historical event, but a very natural and indeed inevitable way of calculating a solar festival. These changing dates do not point to the history of a man, but to the hero of a solar myth.
  542. When, at the end of the 1960s, I became interested in the Nazi era, it was a taboo subject in Germany. No one spoke about it anymore, no more in my house than anywhere else.
  543. When I see a new artist I give myself a lot of time to reflect and decide whether it’s art or not.
  544. What does the artist do? He draws connections. He ties the invisible threads between things. He dives into history, be it the history of mankind, the geological history of the Earth or the beginning and end of the manifest cosmos.
  545. The reason for this project comes from my childhood, that is clear to me. I did not have any toys. So, I played in the bricks of ruined buildings around me and with which I built houses.
  546. Ruins, for me, are the beginning. With the debris, you can construct new ideas. They are symbols of a beginning.
  547. Not content, but the road the artist takes, is the interesting part.
  548. Life is an illusion. I am held together in the nothingness by art.
  549. If I do something that depresses, it’s not because I’m depressed, but because political life and history is depressing.
  550. I was interested in transcendence from a very early age. I was interested in what was over there, what was behind life. So when I had my first communion I was very disappointed. I had expected something amazing and surprising and spiritual. Instead all I got was a bicycle. That wasn’t what I was after at all.
  551. I might have been born into a very literal sense of chaos, but in fact that state is true of all of us.
  552. I grew up in a forest. It’s like a room. It’s protected. Like a cathedral… it is a place between heaven and earth.
  553. I believe in empty spaces; they’re the most wonderful thing.
  554. I believe art has to take responsibility but it should not give up being art.
  555. I am against the idea of the end, that everything culminates in paradise or judgment.
  556. History speaks to artists. It changes the artist’s thinking and is constantly reshaping it into different and unexpected images.
  557. History is formed by the people, those who have power and those without power. Each one of us makes history.
  558. Buying art is not understanding art.
  559. But we should also not forget the difference between what first motivated me and the work that is the result.
  560. But I believe above all that I wanted to build the palace of my memory, because my memory is my only homeland.
  561. Because of my Calvinistic upbringing, I was trained to think that what you do has to have a purpose.
  562. Art really is something very difficult. It is difficult to make, and it is sometimes difficult for the viewer to understand. It is difficult to work out what is art and what is not art.
  563. Art is longing. You never arrive, but you keep going in the hope that you will.
  564. Art is difficult. It’s not entertainment.
  565. You might be asking too much if you’re looking for one vaccine for every conceivable influenza. If you have one or two that cover the vast majority of isolates, I wouldn’t be ashamed to call that a ‘universal vaccine.’
  566. You don’t have to vaccinate every man, woman and child in the country if you have a couple of cases of smallpox cropping up.
  567. You can’t rush the science, but when the science points you in the right direction, then you can start rushing.
  568. You can have an epidemic in a state. You can have it in a region. You can have it in a country where the critical level of disease passes a certain threshold, and we call that an ‘epidemic threshold.’
  569. Whooping cough is not a mild disease. Whooping cough, before the vaccination, could make you very, very sick. First of all, there was a chance you could die from it – small chance, not a big chance. You would be coughing and coughing. It wouldn’t last for a few days, like a cold.
  570. When you’re dealing with a very sick person and you’re doing something to them, an intervention, be it a procedure or a medication, safety is critical.
  571. When you vaccinate someone, or when you get infected, the microbe is presenting itself to the immune system in a way that the immune system recognizes the important elements of the microbe and makes an immune response, both an antibody response and a cellular response, to ultimately contain the microbe.
  572. When you think in terms of public service, I heard so much about what Mother Theresa had done in her life. And I was fortunate enough to get a chance to meet her and talk to her a lot about what motivates her and what drives her. And that, to me, is a person that really is an extraordinary role model.
  573. When we can get the incidence of HIV down enough to turn the trajectory of the pandemic, it will assume a momentum of its own in diminishing HIV.
  574. When a company is fairly certain of a profit margin that is substantial, it can assume responsibility for the clinical trials to develop a blockbuster drug.
  575. When I was a child, there were not that many vaccines. I was vaccinated for polio. I actually got measles as a child. I got pertussis, whooping cough. I remember that very well.
  576. What the immune system of man has in its advanced development is what we call immunological memory, so that once it sees something for the first time, when it sees it the second or the third time, it can respond against it in a way that’s much more accelerated than when it sees it for the first time.
  577. Well I think the media has a very powerful influence on almost anything and everything we do because the general public gets their perception of what is going on in things they don’t have immediate access to from what they get through the media.
  578. We need to know more about how group A strep interact with humans to cause so many different illnesses.
  579. We can sharply deflect the curve of HIV incidence.
  580. Today we know the best way to prevent the spread of Ebola infection is through public health measures.
  581. There’s more than one way to get to the goal that you want to get to, but once you compromise your own principles, then you’re lost. You’re really lost.
  582. There’s always the danger when you have influenzas that infect chickens, that when you have the close quarters of chickens spreading from one to another and occasionally a human coming into close contact, that there will be the jumping of species from a chicken to a human. This is not something new.
  583. There’s always going to be the need for new medications, better medications.
  584. There is an urgent need for a protective Ebola vaccine, and it is important to establish that a vaccine is safe and spurs the immune system to react in a way necessary to protect against infection.
  585. There has been treatment for hepatitis C, but the treatment has not been overwhelmingly effective, number 1. And number 2, it has had considerable toxicity.
  586. There cannot be any impediment to science that will ultimately be good to the general public.
  587. There are so many different varieties of HIV out there.
  588. There are a number of candidate vaccines that are in development for HIV/AIDS.
  589. The worst potential bio-terrorist is nature itself.
  590. The world is a place that is so interconnected that what happens in another part of the world will impact us.
  591. The nature of a protective immune response to HIV is still unclear. Because in a very, very unique manner, unlike virtually any other microbe with which we’re familiar, the HIV virus has evolved in a way that the immune system finds it very difficult, if not impossible, to deal with the virus.
  592. The most pressing ethical question is to make sure that everything you do from a scientific standpoint is done for the ultimate good and positive issue for the people that you’re caring about.
  593. The most confounding thing of all is that we still haven’t identified the cause of 20% to 30% of adult common colds.
  594. The launch of phase 1 Ebola vaccine studies is a first step in developing a vaccine that could be licensed and used in the field to protect not only the front line health care workers but also those living in areas where Ebola virus exists.
  595. The immune system’s goal is to protect the body against invaders either from without, such as microbes, or from within, such as cancers and different types of neoplastic transformation.
  596. The discovery of HIV in 1983 and the proof that it was the cause of AIDS in 1984 were the first major scientific breakthroughs that provided a specific target for blood-screening tests and opened the doorway to the development of antiretroviral medications.
  597. The difference between H7N9 and H5N1, is that H5N1 kills chickens very rapidly, so it is easy to identify where the infected flocks of chickens are. H7N9 doesn’t make the chicken sick, so it has been difficult to pinpoint where the infected chickens are.
  598. The body’s immune system is like any other system of the body. Each of them have their vital function for the human host.
  599. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is an institute of the National Institutes of Health that is responsible predominantly for basic and clinical research in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of immunologic and infectious diseases.
  600. The Europeans have lots of data on the use of adjuvanted flu vaccine in the elderly, but I don’t think anybody has really good data on adjuvants in children.
  601. Testing two vaccines against different H1N1s at the same time has never been done.
  602. Staph lives on skin. That’s the reason why many infections start as a boil.
  603. Some people feel, you make your case, if they listen to you, fine, if they don’t, that’s it. That’s not what leadership is. Leadership is trying to continue to make a case.
  604. Some of the most vulnerable people to getting the SARS virus are health care providers. The general public, walking in the street, there is really not that much risk at all. It’s a very, very low risk – a very, very low risk.
  605. Science is telling us that we can do phenomenal things if we put our minds and our resources to it.
  606. Previous efforts to eradicate malaria failed for several reasons, including political instability and technical challenges in delivering resources, especially in certain countries in Africa.
  607. Pneumococcal disease is a real threat. Pneumococcal disease is a bacterial infection that causes anything from middle ear infection to pneumonia to meningitis. Children are particularly vulnerable to it, but adults can get pneumococcal disease themselves.
  608. Knowledge goes hand-in-hand with truth – something I learned with a bit of tough love from my Jesuit education first at Regis High School in New York City and then at Holy Cross College in Worcester, Mass.
  609. It’s very, very difficult when you have to prepare for something that might not ever happen.
  610. It’s the advantage of the virus to spread, and you can only spread when you infect people and they infect other people without necessarily killing them. So if you had 100 percent mortality, the potential pandemic would almost self-eliminate itself.
  611. It’s extremely likely that the people who have never been exposed to a human who has leprosy, it’s very likely they got leprosy from exposure to an armadillo.
  612. It is now widely recognized that any attempt at malaria eradication must be a long-term commitment that involves multiple interventions, disciplines, strategies and organizations.
  613. Is it or is it not ethical to create an embryo, and to create a person for the purpose of getting an organ to give to someone else? Your knee-jerk reaction is ‘absolutely not;’ but you need the ethical analysis of that to show why and how that is something that you need to stay away from.
  614. Investigating rare diseases gives researchers more clues about how the healthy immune system functions.
  615. Inevitably, malaria parasites developed resistance to commonly used drugs, and mosquito vectors became insecticide-resistant.
  616. I’m generally considered a conservative in my predictions for disease.
  617. I’m a born, cautious optimist.
  618. I think, collectively, we should be paying more attention to what is going on around us in the world among people who don’t have the advantages that we have.
  619. I think the media can be a very positive influence by essentially holding people to task about the importance of high quality medical care. And when the media is scrutinizing you, then I think that’s a very good, positive thing for the field of medicine.
  620. I think it would be over-exaggeration to think that there are millions of viruses ready to jump on us and bring us back to the 14th century. That would be looking over a ledge that isn’t there.
  621. I run a modest-sized laboratory that’s looking specifically at what we call ‘the pathogenic mechanisms of HIV disease, or AIDS.’
  622. I grew up in an inner city neighborhood called the Benson Hurst section of Brooklyn, which was a very embracing, warm, family-type neighborhood.
  623. I enjoy very much communication. I think that scientists need to communicate.
  624. I consider myself a perpetual student. You seek and learn every day: from an experiment in the lab, from reading a scientific journal, from taking care of a patient. Because of this, I rarely get bored.
  625. I believe I have a personal responsibility to make a positive impact on society.
  626. Human nature is weak.
  627. For the first time, we have the genetic sequences of all three of the players in the global malaria debacle: the parasite, the anopheles mosquito and the human. It’s a very important milestone.
  628. Even the pandemic flu of 1918 only killed one to two percent of the people who were infected.
  629. Disagreements are one of the fundamental positive aspects of science.
  630. Certainly the support for research in HIV/AIDS was good in the Clinton administration, good in the Bush administrations. It just was.
  631. Bioethics is a very, very important field. As we get more and more in the arena of understanding science and getting better opportunities, the fact that you can do things with biological sciences that have an impact on a human being means you must have ethical standards.
  632. Bio-terrorism is a threat.
  633. Better ways to diagnose, treat and prevent E. coli 0157:H7 infections are badly needed.
  634. Antibiotics are a very serious public health problem for us, and it’s getting worse. Resistant microbes outstrip new antibiotics. It’s an ongoing problem. It’s not like we can fix it, and it’s over. We have to fight continued resistance with a continual pipeline of new antibiotics and continue with the perpetual challenge.
  635. An AIDS-free generation would mean that virtually no child is born with HIV; that, as those children grow up, their risk of becoming infected is far lower than it is today; and that those who become infected can access treatment to help prevent them from developing AIDS and from passing the virus on to others.
  636. Although it is still important to develop an HIV vaccine, we have significant tools already at our disposal that can make a major impact on the trajectory of this epidemic.
  637. Activism has been very productive in our society.
  638. A pandemic influenza would mean widespread infection essentially throughout every region of the world.
  639. The driving force behind doing everything that I’ve been doing for 11 years as a stand-up is having problems with authority and not liking to be told what to do.
  640. That’s the worst way you can hear about comedy material: from a third person’s blog story that they wrote when they were upset.
  641. On Twitter, when someone would die, I would write a joke. Or if there’s a tragedy, I would write a joke and tweet it. That was my thing, and then at a certain point, people started demanding it.
  642. In the second grade, I would just get bored and a joke would pop into my head and I would have to say it. It was almost like I had some brilliant novel in my head that I had to get down, and I would interrupt class all the time and get in trouble.
  643. I’m not the voice of reason; I’m more the guy using these offensive topics as fodder to raise tension in a joke.
  644. I’m not just offensive, I’m very smart about the way that I do it, and that takes a lot of time. People say that young comics shouldn’t be trying these things. That’s ridiculous. You should try everything and see what sticks.
  645. I would write 100 jokes a day. Most of them were terrible. But I just said, ‘I’ll write more than everybody else, and that’s how I’ll get better.’
  646. I think a theater show is a pure version of me doing my material. The theater crowd is a bit more polite, there really aren’t hecklers, and there are a lot of people there to see me, and they’re excited about the jokes and hanging out with me for a show.
  647. I never knew if I would get my own show, but I knew I loved stand-up.
  648. I loved Stephen Wright, and I loved Mitch Hedberg, but they seemed like geniuses you could never emulate. You’d just be ripping them off.
  649. I like seeing what the comedian thinks is funny, not just what they think I’ll think is funny.
  650. I had written for Jimmy Kimmel and Sarah Silverman in the past. Jimmy had a different voice, and different priorities. He couldn’t be the bad guy in the joke; he couldn’t upset people, really.
  651. I feel like every first episode of a TV show is bad, you know, and it always improves.
  652. I enjoyed writing for someone else’s voice, but I wasn’t very good at it.
  653. I don’t think people shouldn’t try to be edgy, but you have to take what the audience says to you in consideration.
  654. Everyone has the same kind of fears; everyone has the same big problems in the world, which is, like, fear of death and ‘I hope horrible things don’t happen to my family,’ but they do. And I think people laugh at them as this great release.
  655. Every comic went through their Mitch Hedberg phase – the glasses, the hair in the face – and you knew immediately when they were doing it.
  656. You want to do work that is remembered, you want to be a part of something that’s remembered.
  657. You have film actors doing TV, rap stars doing TV, with everyone kind of crossing the line.
  658. Well, I’ve learned something from Michael Robison just about maximizing your shots. For example, if I’m shooting a scene and someone’s driving at the wheel, you could steal an insert in the same shot.
  659. Well, I’ve just gotten accustomed to just being in Canada for five and a half months a year.
  660. We don’t want to show our hand to the fan base or give up too much too early.
  661. They all matter to me, whether I’m working on a Sam Jackson film for a week or I’m the star of my own TV series – I take it all very seriously, and I have a healthy respect for the work in general, despite the role.
  662. There’ve been many a season where I couldn’t get work, and I think that you learn character development and you learn how to really want what you do in life when you can’t really do it.
  663. There are people who do De Niro and Walken impersonations.
  664. That, we encourage, and I think we’re doing a pretty good job with the website and also the DVD, like the first season came out and the second season’s being prepared now.
  665. So I think it’s fair to say it’s even more of a challenge for some of these actors that are coming up, because there’s such a pressure to look good, to be sexy and be palatable to people on whatever level.
  666. Obviously with the onset of cable and satellite, there are more opportunities for programming and original programming, so it creates more opportunities for actors and producers and directors and everything.
  667. Movies are just ridiculously expensive.
  668. Like any show, I think some episodes are going to be stronger than others, but I think it’s a good show that people enjoy and I hear the reactions too.
  669. It’s funny, like 15 years ago when I was a kid doing all the John Hughes movies, I remember Bruce Willis was the only guy who was transitioning from television into film.
  670. In the years since I worked with John Hughes, there were many years where I literally had hundred of doors slammed in my face because I wasn’t that kid anymore, and I wasn’t a character actor, and I wasn’t a leading man, and I wasn’t whatever Hollywood was looking for.
  671. I would say probably Pirates of Silicon Valley just because I’m proud of the work, playing Gates.
  672. I think the obvious answer is I was raised in New York City, so growing up, not only myself but my family, like my father, we would watch a lot of Scorsese films.
  673. I think that obstacles lead to growth and ultimately, the most learning I’ve done in my life is between jobs.
  674. I think my favorite, and Coppola and that whole thing. East coast Italian directors I guess.
  675. I think it’s even harder because I think as always, Hollywood is sort of glamour central for the world, and the entire world looks to it for not only entertainment, but the whole idea of the youth factor and youth being sold to our culture via young actors and actresses.
  676. I think in both of those situations, it’s important as an actor to learn, despite the success I had as a kid, that it’s important to understand what it means to be a small fish in a big pond.
  677. I mean, before this, I would have said playing Bill Gates, because I’m playing someone obviously who is alive and is the richest man in the world. That was a heavy responsibility.
  678. First of all, it was in my contract. I knew I would be directing an episode.
  679. Cutting edge, breakthrough, television. That’s what we want to do.
  680. But on this show, it’s a good question because in the 35 shows that we’ve done now, I’ve really made a consistent effort to really shadow the directors because in many ways they have to be more prepared than feature directors.
  681. 15 years later, it’s all the TV stars with the film deals, whether it’s the cast of Friends or That ’70s Show now with Ashton and other people doing stuff.
  682. You always want to come back with an image that’s interesting visually, and you hope to get something from the person you photograph that’s different than other images you know of these people.
  683. Working with actors is something I’ve never done before. I find it tremendous. It’s hard work.
  684. With photography, you are lucky if you get people to look at your pictures at some point. There’s no formal way to show them.
  685. With a film, you try to keep your vision in it. I think with ‘The American’ and ‘Control’ I managed to do that.
  686. When you make a movie, you know you’re making a long-form thing, so the visuals are different than for a video where it has to be more obvious or in your face, I think, a little bit.
  687. When I was younger, I’d buy a vinyl album, take it home and live with it, and I think that attachment’s largely gone for the file-sharing generation.
  688. There’s only one music video that had an emotional impact on me, and that’s ‘Hurt’ by Johnny Cash. That’s exceptional. There is no music video I can think of apart from that one that really reaches you inside.
  689. There’s a lot about records that you cannot feel from a CD.
  690. There are some elements of digital photography that I don’t really like, such as the fact that you see the results immediately.
  691. The really simple approach to photography is a great balance to making the films.
  692. The only advantage of the CD is that you have a booklet that can tell a bit of a story, but the little covers are just boring. I love vinyl, and I have loads of it. It’s the same thing as digital photography versus film photography. It’s a quality thing.
  693. Once you make decisions, you can’t go back, but in photography, that process can continue. With film, you have to eliminate all the possibilities and make the one possibility work the best for you, so you have to become very creative with the direction you’ve chosen.
  694. My world is much bigger than music, and that’s why I always fight the ‘rock’ label.
  695. My photography changed from being more documentary-like to arranging things more, and that came into being partly because I started doing music videos, and I incorporated some things from the music videos into my photography again, by arranging things more.
  696. My life changed incredibly when I moved from Holland to England.
  697. My first pictures are from 1972, and my first proper camera dates back to 1973. During the first year I used my father’s camera. It had a flash on it, which I don’t like, but I didn’t know anything about photography back then, so it was just what I did.
  698. Mandela is just the eternal man. You want that man to be around forever. It’s the closest thing we have to God, I think. He’s the father of mankind, almost.
  699. It’s so easy for people to stick a label on you, and then that taints everything you touch.
  700. In England, I’m already labeled a rock photographer, which is a little insulting, because I’m not a rock photographer at all.
  701. In 1979, I moved to England and photographed Joy Division and Bowie and Beefheart. At that time I got images that I felt had that special, well – power is a big word to say – more like intimacy and ambition that outlasted the photo shoot. I felt that they would have a longer life.
  702. If you’re an artist, it’s OK to put your money into your art. The advantage, in hindsight, is that you become the film, and the film becomes you; you breathe it.
  703. If you make something with love and, you know, passion and you tell a real story, I think it will always find an audience somehow, you know.
  704. I’ve gotten used to not looking too far into the future; it’s best when you can begin each day anew.
  705. I’ve finally become an old guy.
  706. I’ve always thought photography was a bit of an adventure, so to come home with the film, develop it, then look at the results has more of a sense of excitement.
  707. I’m not totally blind to the fact that I like people to see my work, but if it’s not something I would enjoy seeing in a magazine, then I think I shouldn’t be making it. I think that I don’t represent only myself, I represent more people; I mean, if I like it, then I think more people will like it because I think I’m quite a normal guy.
  708. I’m not famous; I am simply very well-known to certain people. Famous is something different.
  709. I’m not educated as a filmmaker, so it’s quite a jump for me.
  710. I wanted to move away from Holland for my work because I felt that things would be better for me in England. But when I heard Joy Division’s ‘Unknown Pleasures’, that pushed me towards making the move and making it real. I met them within 12 days of moving to England.
  711. I wanted to make a film as an artist, and it’s going to have to find an audience, you know. I don’t know how big the audience will be.
  712. I wanted to do a film for a while, but I never found a script that I felt I was going to be the right person for; because if you’ve never made a film, you’re not taught how to make a film, and you feel like you lack skills.
  713. I think if you don’t feel passionate about the first movie you’re doing, in the end the project will lack something because you don’t have enough experience to make the movie something special.
  714. I think Amsterdam is to Holland what New York is to America in a sense. It’s a metropolis, so it’s representative of Holland, but only a part of it – you know, it’s more extreme, there’s more happening, it’s more liberal and more daring than the countryside in Holland is.
  715. I photograph artists, and some of them are very well known, but if you ask the average man on the street, ‘Do you like Anselm Kiefer?’ He would stare at you with a blank stare, because these are not celebrities. They are celebrated in a specific circle.
  716. I only make storyboards for action scenes. Once you make a storyboard, you don’t film; it can be a stiff move.
  717. I never really enjoyed getting a portfolio together then sending it out; whereas, putting up the website is quite an enjoyable experience. The net’s just a much faster and more modern way to distribute things, and you have to embrace it.
  718. I love body language.
  719. I have such a love of good music that I find even melancholic music uplifting. Maybe I’m a rare breed.
  720. I have never understood models. I find it really hard to find beauty in that or to discover beauty because the beauty was so obvious.
  721. I happen to take photographs, and they happen to be used for a lot of things, but they’re not really made to order. They’re paid for, but they’re not made for order. I’ve never really done real commercial work.
  722. I had no agent, and I was getting approached by so many people that I tried to escape for a while because I couldn’t believe that world. Photography is not an industry, and suddenly an industry came to me, so I sort of had to accept it in the end and get an agent.
  723. I feel a responsibility to myself, and not so much for the world at large. Because of my Calvinistic upbringing, I was trained to think that what you do has to have a purpose.
  724. I don’t want to knock photography, and I don’t feel that film is up there but photography isn’t. I think they’re next to each other really, you know. There’s an incredible strength to a still picture. Or there can be an incredible strength to a still picture that can outlive you. That can outlive a film.
  725. I don’t want to continue to do what I did when I was 20. I would like to continue to develop myself and not continue to hang around with bands.
  726. I don’t like fast editing.
  727. I don’t have lights, I don’t have assistants, I just go and meet somebody and take a photograph. That’s really basic, and that’s how I used to work when I was 17 or 18 in Holland.
  728. I do have an ego, but I acknowledge the help I get.
  729. I didn’t really know how to make a film when I made ‘Control’. I had to create my own language, just as I did when I started taking photographs. I never studied either one.
  730. I didn’t make music videos in order to make a movie. Music videos were the goal for me, so it was never a step to something else. I approached it seriously.
  731. I am a village boy, and Amsterdam for me was always the big town.
  732. Generally my focus has been on people who make things, whether it’s writers or directors or painters or musicians.
  733. For me N.M.E. was a very big thing. When I first came to the United Kingdom I started taking pictures for them and I became their main photographer for five years, and that’s really been the basis of everything I’ve been doing since.
  734. For many years I wanted to do a film, but I never had the courage to clear my desk and say, ‘OK I’ll take a year off and do a film.’
  735. Film was something that I didn’t see as a step up from music videos, though obviously, music videos, the fact that you work with a crew and a film camera, are the closest to film I’ve ever been. That is the only schooling I’ve ever had.
  736. Directing film is the hardest thing I have ever done.
  737. Apart from photography and music videos, I also do graphic design.
  738. Analog is more beautiful than digital, really, but we go for comfort.
  739. A lot of scripts that I was given I didn’t feel were right for me, because I didn’t feel anything for them – I didn’t feel like I was going to change in life and start directing.
  740. ‘Control’ had to do with my own life a lot, and that’s why that seemed to be a film I could be the director of, because I had an emotional attachment to the whole story. And because of that experience, I feel that I can try other films. I didn’t set out to become a director.
  741. You spend your life having lessons, practising and competing as an amateur, and working during the day. As you get to the top end of the amateur field, you try not to work anymore; you earn your living through dancing, maybe by doing a bit of teaching. It’s an ongoing life’s work.
  742. You can’t talk about yourself in the third party – that makes you a lunatic!
  743. With the media how it is these days, people expect to know everything. I don’t talk about my girlfriend because essentially she doesn’t want to be talked about.
  744. Wherever I can get a fast track, I’ll try to because I can’t stand the airport experience. If you can afford priority boarding, then do it. Nobody wants an unpleasant experience before it starts.
  745. When you dance together, there’s a fabulous interaction. It’s quite intimate. You’re touching your partner, leading them. Learning how to behave in that person’s proximity is a skill. I love it. I can’t imagine tiring of it.
  746. When I’m dancing with any woman, I immediately get rid of intimacy barriers. I just give her a big hug and crack on.
  747. We didn’t know anything about Judy Murray until we met her, but once we got to know her, we found she was an absolute scream.
  748. Too many multi-vitamins are packaged as one size fits all, but you should be more specific about what you need. When I was competing as a dancer, I took zinc for healthy skin and immune system.
  749. There is not a lot of money in competition dancing. There never has been; it’s all about winning the trophies, really. It’s not like golf.
  750. The worst question is, ‘Where do you see yourself in five years?’ I don’t know. Variety is the spice of life. That’s the best way to describe it.
  751. The world would be a better place if everyone learned to dance.
  752. The thing about me is that I love variety. I like to try new things, and I don’t want to be pinned back.
  753. The Ritz in London has an old-fashioned charm, with waiters wearing tails and white gloves. The dining room is exquisite, with immaculate service and ornate details.
  754. The Fred Astaire movies made a huge impression on me.
  755. So much illness is self-induced – which I can’t stand. And I’m not a good nursemaid. Don’t call me if you’re ill.
  756. Since being involved in ‘Strictly Come Dancing,’ my life has changed completely. I can’t walk down the street without women throwing themselves at me, I usually wouldn’t mind, but they are of a certain age. Hopefully, after this series, they will bring their daughters!
  757. One day, I just wandered into a dance class full of girls, and that was it. I thought, ‘Hang on! I’ll have a bit of this.’ I went back a week later and got dragged up by the teacher. It wasn’t a massive calling.
  758. My perfect morning is spent drinking coffee, eating porridge and reading the paper at a local cafe.
  759. My only drive was to be the best dancer in the world, but I never won the world championship.
  760. My old dance teacher, Jimmy Wilde, a former European ballroom dancing champion, was so sophisticated.
  761. My goal was to become the best dancer in the world and, because I started late, I always had this feeling I was playing catch-up, so I’ve been a bit of a maniac most of my life, sort of striving.
  762. My goal is to be the best TV presenter, the best entertainer, the best singer. I still want to be the best dancer. I want to be the best at everything I do.
  763. My favourite dance is the Foxtrot. It’s a proper dance with proper music. It has class.
  764. My father is Hungarian and moved to Britain during the uprising, and my Spanish mum comes from Galicia; they moved here at the end of the Fifties.
  765. Mum was always hard-working. She came over from Spain and bought her own council house.
  766. Life’s supposed to be an adventure, a surprise!
  767. It’s great that ballroom dancing is being recognised. For many years ballroom dancers were misunderstood and other dance forms didn’t want anything to do with us.
  768. It may sound cliched, but ‘Strictly’ is a real journey. I try to encourage my partner to stay in as long as they can, but above all to enjoy it.
  769. If things don’t go fantastically, you just have to deal with it.
  770. If I do find myself walking up the aisle and dancing at my own wedding reception, I want the first dance to be both spontaneous and dramatic.
  771. If I avoid anything, it’s that I don’t really go to places that are like a little corner of England. I also never mind going to a dance show because I love it all so much.
  772. I’ve never worried about being rich or famous – for me, it’s all about the dancing.
  773. I’ve been playing golf as long as I’ve been dancing, since I was 13 or 14. I play off six. I like to get out on a golf course as often as I can.
  774. I’ve been playing golf as long as I’ve been dancing, since I was 13 or 14.
  775. I’ve become a produce snob. I like to eat food that’s in season.
  776. I’m happy to dance with anyone, to be honest. I’ve had some great partners, who have all been talented. But not all of them at dancing.
  777. I’m going for Britain’s Best Dressed Man award, but strangely, I’m never on the list.
  778. I’m busier than ever and it’s led to new opportunities. But I’ve never worried about being rich or famous – for me, it’s all about the dancing.
  779. I’m a bit of a traditionalist; the ballroom is all about tails and I never mess about with that. But for the Latin you can have a bit fun: tight trousers, gold shirt open to my waist, be a bit ridiculous.
  780. I’d like to do a kind of ‘Sunday Night At The Palladium’-style variety show on the BBC.
  781. I worked as an interior designer. I worked as a furniture salesman. I worked as a financial adviser. I worked as a painter and decorator – that wasn’t for very long. I was a baker for about four-and-a-half years.
  782. I work out in the gym three times a week on top of my dancing, so I have to eat a lot to keep my weight and energy up: a big breakfast, and little and often throughout the day.
  783. I wish I’d become a professional dancer sooner. I did other jobs – like baking – while dancing part-time, and didn’t commit until I was 29.
  784. I went professional with my partner, Erin Boag, 11 years ago, and we had success competing round the world, but appearing on ‘Strictly’ has changed my life.
  785. I was one of those people who just flitted about in life. I had no plans and no sense of direction.
  786. I want to do lots of exciting, varied, interesting things. That’s what I want to do.
  787. I think cookery shows have become so sophisticated, and everyone’s so marvellous at it, but there are people like me who aren’t into the cooking malarkey, who still don’t know how to boil an egg for three minutes.
  788. I think I’ve got a bit more to offer than just dancing. It might just be me that thinks that, but it’s worth saying.
  789. I remember watching the Three Tenors at the World Cup in 1990, and it was amazing. They made opera accessible to the man in the street.
  790. I look better with a tan, but I’ve never gone the fake route. I don’t need to – I have good foreign genes: half Spanish, half Hungarian.
  791. I like to get up and get out. Otherwise you end up kicking about, and it’s easy to flick the telly on; then before you know it, it is 11 A.M. and you haven’t done anything.
  792. I know what I’m good at, and if I’m asked to do something I’m not – like hip-hop dancing – I get self-conscious.
  793. I just like to sit and admire my garden; it’s so well kept by my gardener and my girlfriend.
  794. I just get grumpy with bad behaviour.
  795. I have no trouble with my sleep, but the amount I have varies from four to eight hours, depending on my schedule.
  796. I have a magnificent chin and a long, odd-shaped face. As a result, I always look better in collars.
  797. I hated most music in the 1970s, especially disco, but Bowie was edgier.
  798. I got sent some cheese once. I’m not sure if that was saying something about my act, or just because I like cheese.
  799. I go through money like a bloke with three arms.
  800. I get really very upset when I’m voted out, and I feel very disappointed.
  801. I enjoy watching talented cooks bringing together ingredients into a fabulous dish.
  802. I don’t profess to be Luciano Pavarotti, but I can hold a tune.
  803. I don’t mind how good or bad my partner is, as long as we have a lovely time.
  804. I don’t like the Samba; it’s nonsense. With a lot of these Latin dances I can’t really understand what they’re all about. I like the Rumba and the Paso Doble but the others I could take or leave.
  805. I don’t get grumpy at a ‘Strictly’ level, you understand. We’re just making a television show – the person I’m dancing with can’t dance; they’re doing their best, and we’re not going to win the World Championships.
  806. I do watch what I eat, but I don’t make it myself. When I eat out, I just have to make sure the things I buy are good and healthy.
  807. I always enjoy the process, meeting somebody new and spending time with them and becoming friends with them. That has always been the joy of ‘Strictly’ for me, so I enjoy every year.
  808. Having been part of this wonderful show ever since series one, I know all too well what it’s like to perform to the nation on the famous ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ dancefloor.
  809. Give up smoking. Don’t get so fat. So much illness is self-induced – which I can’t stand. And I’m not a good nursemaid. Don’t call me if you’re ill.
  810. Frank Sinatra was a great singer, but my favourite is Sammy Davis Jr. He had incredible versatility in his voice, often doing impressions of people. It’s always going to be classic, and you’ll never get bored listening.
  811. Bruce Forsyth is my hero, and the thought that I’d be in a TV show with him was incredible.
  812. Being fit is the easiest part of being a dance professional. I used to just throw on a backpack full of rocks and run up a hill. You don’t even have to go to a gym.
  813. Being a competitive dancer is an expensive business – you have to buy the £2,000 or so tail suit and the shoes, and then get yourself around the world to the competitions. And there is not a lot of money to be made in competing.
  814. Because we had no other relatives living in the U.K., me, my parents and my siblings continuously journeyed abroad to bond with our extended family.
  815. Because we had no money when I was growing up, when I started dancing, I wasn’t allowed to be frivolous – my mum made me go to every lesson because she was paying for it.
  816. Ballroom is two people dancing together to music, touching in perfect harmony.
  817. Ballroom dancing: it’s a wonderful thing at so many levels because you’ve got to follow the rules. They used to call those rules etiquette once upon a time, but you don’t really have that any more.
  818. At places like Chelsea, often the garden displays are so big and grand that you’d never be able to have them at home.
  819. As soon as I started dancing at 14, I knew I was always going to be a professional dancer.
  820. As soon as I left school at 16, I worked in a factory making aircraft components.
  821. As I grew up, I wasn’t a great buyer of albums, but I really liked ‘The Jam.’ I like good musicians and loved the energy of their songs.
  822. A dancer’s career is short – you just keep going until your legs pack up.
  823. ‘Strictly’ is a bit like scoring the winning goal in the FA Cup Final or sinking the final putt in the Ryder Cup – only a few people get the opportunity to do it, and they have got to be famous.
  824. You see a woman, 22 years old, going out with a guy over 60 – and it’s kind of natural. But if it happens in the opposite direction everyone says, ‘What is going on there?’
  825. You have to work with people you really love.
  826. When you’re feeling very comfortable with an actor, you are doing nothing.
  827. When you work in a different language you are not so attached to the words.
  828. When you go to the movie theater and the opening of this movie and you see the kids just cracking up with a character you are giving your voice to, you get goose bumps. It’s so beautiful.
  829. When I do a political movie, I do a political movie.
  830. Whatever happens in my life from now on, I know the day I finally die – the final act of my script – people will always make references to the work I’ve done with Almodovar.
  831. We’re living in hard times.
  832. We are now integrated into American society and I don’t like the word fashionable, because fashionable means that it’s going to pass. It’s not like that anymore.
  833. Up until the time I was 31 years old, in Spain, I still didn’t know how I was going to pay the rent.
  834. This may sound a little harsh, but I don’t care about my career. Really, I don’t like actors who are always planning what they’re going to do next or always worrying about doing something that will go against the image they’ve created. To me, that’s almost like an attack of narcissism.
  835. There’s something happening in the world that didn’t happen before. We are acting like one big brain.
  836. There are some movies that I would like to forget, for the rest of my life. But even those movies teach me things.
  837. There are some movies that I would like to forget, for the rest of my life – really! But even those movies that I’d like to forget teach me things.
  838. The recycling in my house was imposed by my kids.
  839. The only time you actually are a spectator of your own work is the day you read the script.
  840. The man who doesn’t want anything is invincible.
  841. Sometimes I have wrinkles, in the morning. It depends on what kind of night that I had. I accept myself and the way that I am growing older. I have eye bags and some people have proposed to me to take them out but I said no.
  842. Picasso is a character that has pursued me for a long time and I always rejected. He deserves a lot of respect because I am from Malaga, and I was born four blocks from where he was born.
  843. People are not patient anymore.
  844. One thing I have clear is that I don’t want to work for money anymore.
  845. Melanie is more of a disciplinarian with the little girl than me, probably because it’s my first baby. She gets everything easy from Papa. I am more weak. She takes advantage of me.
  846. Making movies is difficult and you get disorientated sometimes – even when you’re working with fantastic talent.
  847. Listen, I think movies serve many different purposes, from those movies that are frivolous and just an entertainment, to movies that just go to exploring the complexities of the human soul. Everything is valid if it’s done with honesty and dignity, and I actually do both of those types of movies in my career.
  848. It’s a character that I always found really likable. I’m fond of Zorro because he was a popular figure who worked for the people.
  849. It was an honor and privilege to arrive to this country 16 years ago with almost no money in my pocket. A lot has happened since then.
  850. In my personal life, I am very contemplative.
  851. If you call a cat, he may not come. Which doesn’t happen with dogs. They’re different types of animals. Cats are very sexy I think too in the way they move.
  852. If bad things are going to be said about me, I have to bear that. If I don’t understand that it’s part of being in show business, then I’d better go work in a bank.
  853. I’ve never worried about what audiences would accept or had a game plan regarding the career. I never had an idea of how I should look to my fans or anybody else.
  854. I’ve never liked watching real-life couples play couples onscreen or onstage. It takes me out of the story.
  855. I’ve done many different movies in many different contexts.
  856. I’ve always been an optimistic guy, to tell you the truth.
  857. I’m still a promising actor. It’s better to be climbing even if you have a lot of falls than to be descending. Maybe that’s kept me young. I haven’t gotten to any peak yet.
  858. I’m not such a big star. I am just a little planet. In Spain, people don’t put so much attention on the star system. But here in America, I can feel it. Mostly, people are very, very nice. But there are also a bunch of fanatics behind the stars.
  859. I’m a complete hypochondriac. If my heart starts beating a little faster than normal, I think I’m having an attack.
  860. I wouldn’t want my daughters to date a guy like me. I was dangerous around women in my twenties. I’m terrified that they might end up with someone like me.
  861. I wake up every morning, look in the mirror and ask, ‘Am I a sex symbol?’ Then I go back to bed again. It’s stupid to think that way.
  862. I used to be scared of women. When I was very young they terrified me, but discovering the female universe was incredible and still is to this day, as you never stop learning about them.
  863. I try to teach my kids to be open.
  864. I think we are realising that governments can’t govern us any more.
  865. I think the problems with being older come when your body cannot do what your mind wants. Then, Houston, we have a problem.
  866. I think that comedy is one of the more serious things that you can do in our day, especially in the world that we’re living in.
  867. I think Shrek makes an effect in older people. And there are many things in the movie that you saw that are not for kids. Kids would not understand certain things.
  868. I think I’m a romantic person, yeah.
  869. I suppose that I am ambitious.
  870. I remember in ‘Law of Desire,’ where I played a homosexual, that people were more upset that I kissed a man on the mouth than I killed a man. It’s interesting to see how people can pardon you for murdering a man, but they can’t pardon you for kissing one.
  871. I often feel very guilty because of the time that I spend outside of my home and the little time that sometimes I have for my kids.
  872. I mean, the Constitution of this country was written 200 years ago. The house I was living in in Madrid is 350 years old! America is still a project, and you guys are working on it and bringing new things to it every day. That is beautiful to watch.
  873. I love the diversity of America. I love the plain, normal sense of humor Americans have. It is not wicked, like in some countries. And I also love how new America is.
  874. I love my country. And I would have to renounce my Spanish citizenship to become a U.S. Citizen.
  875. I long to get back into theater.
  876. I like going everywhere. And I love starting new things.
  877. I like flesh. I do! Something to hold.
  878. I have to recognize that I am agnostic.
  879. I have a fantastic studio in my home, and it’s my biggest toy. I have about a half a million dollars worth of musical equipment in my house.
  880. I get caught up in my bubble of reading, writing, or music.
  881. I drink a bucket of white tea in the morning. I read about this tea of the Emperor of China, which is supposedly the tea of eternal youth. It’s called Silver Needle. It’s unbelievably expensive, but I get it on the Web.
  882. I don’t think there is a guy that played more gay characters than I have done in my life.
  883. I don’t like to over-intellectualize scenes that are working. I tend to think when you do that you may lose it.
  884. I don’t believe in any kind of fundamentalism.
  885. I do yoga every morning, then I run for half an hour and take a sauna.
  886. I divide my time badly.
  887. I did my first movie, ‘The Mambo Kings,’ in America without speaking the language. I learned the lines phonetically. I had an interpreter actually just to understand directions from my director.
  888. I cry a lot, you know. Which is very difficult for a man to recognise, but I do. I cry in movies, you know, just watching movies.
  889. I couldn’t be with someone who is depressed all the time.
  890. I completely take on the risk, the poker game, which being an artist means, and I’m going to try to make a film which honestly reflects what I have in my head.
  891. I am lucky, that is all. Lucky because there are a lot of people – producers, directors, people who buy tickets – who put confidence in me.
  892. I always feel that art in general and acting in particular should make the audience a little uncomfortable, to slap them and wake them up.
  893. Hollywood is a very strong machine that needs, and in… especially with female actors, fresh flesh. It’s that cruel. But that’s the way it is.
  894. Films should be for everybody.
  895. Expectation is the mother of all frustration.
  896. Everything changes as you get older – your mind, your body, the way you view the world.
  897. Cinema has opened a world of possibilities up for me.
  898. Characters don’t belong to anyone, not even the person who plays them.
  899. Cats are very independent animals. They’re very sexy, if you want. Dogs are different. They’re familiar. They’re obedient. You call a cat, you go, ‘Cat, come here.’ He doesn’t come to you unless you have something in your hand that he thinks might be food. They’re very free animals, and I like that.
  900. As an actor, when you encounter a psychopathic personality, you naturally want to make him ‘bigger than life,’ as the Americans say.
  901. Always when you go to a new country and they teach you bad words, you just say them without knowing the value and people look at you because you didn’t know that value of them.
  902. A couple of years after I arrived in Hollywood, everything that was Latino was fashionable, and years after, my thought is that we’re not fashionable anymore. We’re here to stay.
  903. When I write short fiction or novellas, I like to leave a hint of the fantastic, of the unreal. If you write a completely fantastic novel with ghosts and everything, the effect is less powerful than if you portray an absolutely realistic situation and, in the middle of this, you put a layer of fantasy, of mystery.
  904. There can be no better prize for a writer than one awarded by an international book fair.
  905. There are two types of stories: public and private.
  906. The worth of a prize depends on the people who have received it before you.
  907. The fact that evil exists in the world bothers me. I think that people do terrible things for ideological or political reasons. I think that evil stems from ideology. People are taught to hate.
  908. The ’80s was the time for the great so-called modernization in Spain. It was a moment when it seemed that everything was breaking up and moving fast into modernity.
  909. Shakespeare is a permanent presence in the English letters.
  910. People think that dreams are better than reality but this is not always the case; sometimes, because you dream too much, you are unable to see what you have in front of your very eyes.
  911. One can criticize the Israeli government, but it is not fair to judge the people of Israel.
  912. Nothing good ever happens by itself – it is achieved through striving, though this sometimes bears a high price.
  913. Money makes people bold and cosmopolitan; if you are poor, you are naturally conservative. It’s not easy to be a bohemian when you have to worry about what is going to happen with you and with your next paycheck.
  914. Many of the books I read, I had to read them in French, English, or Italian, because they hadn’t been translated into Spanish.
  915. If, as a Spaniard, I am so often offended by the stereotypes that abound regarding my country, how can I accept and repeat the ones that fall even more heavily upon Israel?
  916. If you’re well-known, you’re at the risk of becoming your own character. When you’re alone, as a writer, you have to be unknown, putting it all on the paper.
  917. I’m afraid I have an incurable urge for teaching.
  918. I have spent a great deal of my life being part of minorities. Some of the people I admire the most in the world have had the courage to defend, against wind and tide, minority viewpoints in those frightening times when any disagreement with universal conformity is identified as treason.
  919. I have absolute respect for Israel and people in Israel who are critical of their own country.
  920. Here in Spain, there are Argentine Jews, children and grandchildren of immigrants of Jews who fled Germany or Austria in the thirties, and in the seventies during the dictatorship, they had to go into exile again.
  921. Cervantes is the most important Spanish writer. But he is not the most representative of the Spanish. His irony, his sense of humor – they are too subtle to seem Spanish.
  922. As a writer, you live in permanent self-doubt; you’re on permanent trial.
  923. An idea like equality between men and women, which is now accepted in the West, is quite new.
  924. A writer doesn’t write about just anything. He writes about things he has an affinity for.
  925. A few British suffragettes everybody laughed at started the cause of equality between men and women.
  926. Xenophobia manifests itself especially against civilizations and cultures that are weak because they lack economic resources, means of subsistence or land. So nomadic people are the first targets of this kind of aggression.
  927. When you have a foreign invasion – in this case by the Indonesian army – writers, intellectuals, newspapers and magazines are the first targets of repression.
  928. We all want to be someone else but without ceasing to be ourselves. I think it’s very important to defend this idea in real life too.
  929. There are some fundamental values it’s impossible to be wrong about.
  930. The salt of any interesting civilization is mixture.
  931. The most important basis of any novel is wanting to be someone else, and this means creating a character.
  932. Perfection spawns doctrines, dictators and totalitarian ideas.
  933. People with lots of doubts sometimes find life more oppressive and exhausting than others, but they’re more energetic – they aren’t robots.
  934. No, I’m happy to go on living the life I’ve chosen. I’m a university teacher and I like my job.
  935. My job is to look at what politics is doing, not be a politician myself.
  936. My books are about losers, about people who’ve lost their way and are engaged in a search.
  937. Literature is my life of course, but from an ontological point of view. From an existential point of view, I like being a teacher.
  938. Literature for me isn’t a workaday job, but something which involves desires, dreams and fantasy.
  939. Like a blazing comet, I’ve traversed infinite nights, interstellar spaces of the imagination, voluptuousness and fear.
  940. It’s very useful when politicians have doubts because there are so many choices to be made in the world.
  941. It’s the job of intellectuals and writers to cast doubt on perfection.
  942. In a novel, my feelings and sense of outrage can find a broader means of expression which would be more symbolic and applicable to many European countries.
  943. I’ve always been drawn to tormented people full of contradictions.
  944. I was born in the Second World War during the Nazi invasion of my country.
  945. I vividly remember the stories my grandfather told me about the carnage of the First World War, which people tend to forget was one of the worst massacres in human history.
  946. I prefer insomnia to anaesthesia.
  947. I live quietly at home among my family and friends.
  948. I don’t want to promote my own image either. I don’t like going on television or mixing in literary circles.
  949. I don’t know whether these people are going to find themselves, but as they live their lives they have no choice but to face up to the image others have of them. They’re forced to look at themselves in a mirror, and they often manage to glimpse something of themselves.
  950. I don’t have any doubts either about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Perhaps some more should be added to the list, but I don’t have the slightest doubt about human rights.
  951. I don’t go for people who lead full and satisfying lives.
  952. I claim the right to take a stand once in a while.
  953. Fifty years after half a million gypsies were exterminated in the Second World War – thousands of them in Auschwitz – we’re again preparing the mass killing of this minority.
  954. Eco sees the intellectual as an organizer of culture, someone who can run a magazine or a museum. An administrator, in fact. I think this is a melancholy situation for an intellectual.
  955. Doubts are like stains on a shirt. I like shirts with stains, because when I’m given a shirt that’s too clean, one that’s completely white, I immediately start having doubts.
  956. But democracy isn’t a state of perfection. It has to be improved, and that means constant vigilance.
  957. But I don’t think I have any particular talent for prediction, because when you have three or four elements in hand, you don’t have to be a genius to reach certain conclusions.
  958. As a writer, I’ve always been interested in others.
  959. An intellectual is going to have doubts, for example, about a fundamentalist religious doctrine that admits no doubt, about an imposed political system that allows no doubt, about a perfect aesthetic that has no room for doubt.
  960. Without an understanding of history, we are politically, culturally and socially impoverished. If we sacrifice history to economic pressures or to budget cuts, we will lose a part of who we are.
  961. When we dwell on the enormity of the Second World War and its victims, we try to absorb all those statistics of national and ethnic tragedy. But, as a result, there is a tendency to overlook the way the war changed even the survivors’ lives in ways impossible to predict.
  962. When my first novel was published, I went in great excitement round bookshops in central London to see if they had stocked it.
  963. When I was younger I used to get my best writing done at night, but now it has to be during the day. I usually finish work at half past seven, then go back to the house to open a bottle of wine, have dinner, and then read or watch television.
  964. When I was a child I had something called Perthes’ Disease which meant I was on crutches, so I was bullied at school and all that sort of stuff.
  965. When I started to write, I realised that you need a bit of both: the overall context as well as the individual’s experience.
  966. What is terrifying is the ability, through mass brainwashing or propaganda, to change normal human instinct, which does not necessarily contain very much hatred.
  967. To begin impatiently is the worst mistake a writer can make.
  968. There are one or two very good women military historians who use imagination, great study and research; they can put themselves in the boots of the soldier.
  969. The vital thing for me is to integrate the history from above with the history from below because only in that way can you show the true consequences of the decisions of Hitler or Stalin or whomever on the ordinary civilians caught up in the battle.
  970. The temptation in any approaching crisis or conflict is, because people haven’t got a clue what lies ahead, they’re always searching into the past for some sort of pattern … to galvanise the nation or their supporters and put themselves on a pedestal to sound Churchillian or Rooseveltian.
  971. The reason that ‘Stalingrad’ took off was because it emphasized the influence of history on the individual.
  972. The punishment of shaving a woman’s head had biblical origins. In Europe, the practice dated back to the Dark Ages with the Visigoths.
  973. The power of historical fiction for bad and for good can be immense in shaping consciousness of the past.
  974. The memory of the Second World War hangs over Europe, an inescapable and irresistible point of reference. Historical parallels are usually misleading and dangerous.
  975. The majority of soldiers and officers of the Soviet Army and the allied armies treated the local population humanely.
  976. The greatest heroes of the Normandy battlefield were the unarmed medics, whom snipers often shot at despite their Red Cross armbands.
  977. The great help of being in the Army is to understand why are the armies clever in what they describe as emotional intelligence, making soldiers come to terms with the death of comrades by certain rituals.
  978. The great European dream was to diminish militant nationalism. We would all be happy Europeans together. But we are going to see the old monster of militant nationalism being awoken when people realise how little control their politicians have.
  979. The duty of a historian is simply to understand and then convey that understanding, no more than that.
  980. The blurring of fact and fiction has great commercial potential, which is bound to be corrupting in historical terms.
  981. The British bombing of Caen beginning on D-Day in particular was stupid, counter-productive and above all very close to a war crime.
  982. Teaching the history of the British Empire links in with that of the world: for better and for worse, the Empire made us what we are, forming our national identity. A country that does not understand its own history is unlikely to respect that of others.
  983. Some novelists want to give people in history a voice because they have been denied it in the past.
  984. School-leavers unfortunately will come away thinking the First World War consisted simply of ‘going over the top’ on the Western Front to slaughter in no-man’s-land, when the conflict extended so much further, to the collapse of four empires and numerous civil wars.
  985. Restorers of paintings and pottery follow a code of conduct in their work to distinguish the original material from what they are adding later.
  986. Politicians are often tempted to deploy history as a weapon against each other.
  987. One has this image of the Soviet state and the Red Army as being extremely disciplined but in the first four months of 1945 their soldiers were completely out of control.
  988. Of course history is easily manipulated – though that makes it even more important for us to know what actually happened.
  989. It was only after five years in the army, when I was having to do a very boring job in a very boring place, that I thought: ‘Why not try writing a novel?’ partly out of youthful arrogance and partly because there had been a long line of writers in my mother’s family.
  990. It takes me three or four years to research and write each book and the individual stories stay with you for a long time afterwards.
  991. It is this compulsion to look backwards at a time of crisis because one’s got no idea of what lies ahead. There is a notion of security that somehow it must resemble the past. It’s never going to. Just because we muddled through in the past doesn’t mean we can automatically muddle through in the future.
  992. It is important to understand the continuing, confused fascination with the Second World War. For most of us, the great unspoken question is how would we have behaved in the face of danger and when forced to make major moral choices.
  993. In the Iraq war, for instance, so much of the information is digitized and can easily be wiped out. That will make it very hard to write accurate histories. Also, there’s a much greater opportunity for suppression of information before it can even be archived.
  994. In my library/study/barn, there is a Ping-Pong table on which I can pile working books and spread maps.
  995. If you smash a city when you’re trying to capture it, you actually end up providing the perfect terrain for the defenders while blocking the access for your own armoured vehicles.
  996. I’m often reassured in a bizarre – perhaps perverse – way when I find in the archive stuff that contradicts what my assumptions have been. That’s interesting and exciting.
  997. I was planning to stay in the Army all my life, but I ended up being posted to a training camp in Wales and was so bored there, I wrote a novel.
  998. I was in Estonia when a professor asked me if I was aware that making any criticism of the Red Army during the war was now an imprisonable offence. I was quite shaken.
  999. I used to write in a room overlooking the valley from where I could see too much, whether checking the sheep and alpacas or seeing the trout rise on the lake.
  1000. I think it’s outrageous if a historian has a ‘leading thought’ because it means they will select their material according to their thesis.
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