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Articles Page 34

Articles Page 34

  1. One of the things that may get lost among all the hubbub when a company is ‘going public’ is that the business can now be owned, in part, by its greatest fans.
  2. One of my great teachers was the late Jean-Claude Vrinat of Taillevent in Paris.
  3. One great worker equals three not-so-great workers, so it’s worth paying terrific people not just for today but to find people that we think have upward mobility to become tomorrow’s leaders.
  4. Ninety-five percent of all brussels sprouts come from California.
  5. My staff’s job is to adjust to circumstances with technical precision and artful grace so that every patron has a wonderful experience.
  6. My history has been to grow the roots as deeply as you can before going on to the next thing. That’s why it took 10 years to go from Union Square Cafe to Gramercy Tavern, and another 10 years to go from Blue Smoke’s first location to its second, and five to go from Shake Shack 1 to Shake Shack 2.
  7. My favorite place is whichever sidewalk is beneath my feet because I am just constantly fascinated by walking and looking and learning. If I’ve already walked a street five times, then the next five times I walk it looking up, and I learn something about the cornices.
  8. My dad gave me the gene to enjoy cooking, and to enjoy consuming good food and wine.
  9. Museums are like sports stadiums, hotels and hospitals: they are in the category of captive-audience dining.
  10. More and more, museums will look at restaurants and chefs differently – as if they are curating art.
  11. Long before Starbucks popularized the phrase ‘the third place’ – somewhere to interact outside of work and home – it was neighborhood restaurants that helped to define places like Union Square.
  12. London has become one of the great world destinations for someone who likes food.
  13. Life is a series of waves to be embraced and overcome.
  14. It’s the job of any business owner to be clear about the company’s nonnegotiable core values. They’re the riverbanks that help guide us as we refine and improve on performance and excellence. A lack of riverbanks creates estuaries and cloudy waters that are confusing to navigate. I want a crystal-clear, swiftly flowing stream.
  15. It’s always imperative to improve and to remain dynamic – or you’ll become lunch, as opposed to serving it.
  16. It is sad that the more ‘successful’ a neighborhood becomes, the more it gradually takes on a recognizable, common look, as the same banks, drugstore chains and national brands move in.
  17. In the restaurant business, as opposed to the theater, center orchestra is an 8 P. M. reservation. Orchestra on the side is 7 or 8:30. Mezzanine is 6 and 9. But people don’t take it personally when they call the theater and can’t get what they want.
  18. In order to encourage the cattle farmers to raise a herd of all-natural cattle, which is a several-year process, they have to know that it’s not just Shake Shack that wants to buy it. They have to have other buyers who are willing to pay more for all natural.
  19. In one respect, it’s easier to open a restaurant in New York because you get more media attention than anywhere else. Almost everyone will try a new place once, irrespective of the reviews, because it’s a spectator sport.
  20. In an age when so many groups are rolling out restaurants faster than your local baker makes donuts, my goal is that each restaurant feels hand-crafted. That they have their own soul.
  21. If you’re constantly making business decisions on behalf of your investors first, ultimately you’re going to wear down your other stakeholders. It’s going to be potentially hurtful for your employees and your customers and the community you do business with.
  22. If you develop a dialogue with me and take an interest in me, I’ll want to give you the business. It’s human nature.
  23. If someone said, ‘You’ve got to eat your next two meals at American fast-food restaurants,’ I would do one meal at Chipotle and one meal at Popeyes fried chicken.
  24. If somebody doesn’t want to cook at home or has more family members than they have room for, then it’s great to be in a city that’s got restaurants that are actually busy on the holidays.
  25. I’ve been in love with Washington ever since renting my very first apartment there many years ago while working as a Senate intern.
  26. I’m a big believer that you can try to change the world based on philosophy, doctrine, and belief. But I think the thing that really drives the world is hedonism, the pleasure factor.
  27. I trust that McDonald’s can find a way to sell all-natural chicken without raising their prices; we did that at Shake Shack. It is more expensive, and we took a slight margin hit, but we did it. And if we can do it, I know that much bigger companies can.
  28. I throw 14 parties a week.
  29. I think that more and more and more really talented restauranteurs and chefs from the fine dining world are going to try their hand at fine casual. They’re going to say, ‘Why not us?’
  30. I think that any business that thinks that the transaction is ‘you give me money and I give you food, next, you give me money and I give you food, next,’ without understanding that people deeply want to feel restored is in danger.
  31. I think that Shake Shack wouldn’t exist had it not been for Twitter. I don’t think you would have gotten a hundred New Yorkers to stand in line for an hour if they couldn’t have made their time really productive and organized snowball fights, ordered free hot chocolate, and, you know, Instagrammed photos.
  32. I run in London, in San Francisco – any city that’s got a waterfront or park.
  33. I opened Union Square Cafe when I was just 27 years old, and my first hope was simply that it would stay in business. My higher hope was that in its lifetime, it might grow to play an essential role in the lives of its stakeholders.
  34. I never get sick on airplanes, which is incredible. You’re basically in a flying petri dish.
  35. I learned that you shouldn’t take your most esoteric concept and fit it into the largest space with the highest fixed costs. It puts too much pressure on the restaurant to hit grand slams every day when there just aren’t enough people who want to watch that sport.
  36. I just think the best way for me to be greedy is long-term greedy.
  37. I grew up in a reform Jewish family in St. Louis. Our idea of Judaism was no bar mitzvahs and a Christmas tree that had a skirt at the bottom embroidered with the names of my grandparents.
  38. I gasp for air if I don’t get to breathe Italian air once a year.
  39. I feel like not knowing Joe Torre is a hole in my New York experience.
  40. I don’t think there’s going to be sustainable demand for restaurants that force you to spend hours there.
  41. I don’t get to cook in my own restaurant.
  42. I couldn’t sit in a chair in an office all day.
  43. I adore going to a very, very fancy restaurant – as long as the spirit is genuine, like it’s their pleasure to welcome you.
  44. Human nature doesn’t change. When enough people are comfortable enough financially, there is going to be human nature that wants to spend more money on better quality and, to some degree, status symbols as well.
  45. How can you franchise hospitality?
  46. Hospitality knows no gender or race.
  47. Hospitality is present when something happens for you. It is absent when something happens to you. Those two simple prepositions – for and to – express it all.
  48. Hospitality is almost impossible to teach. It’s all about hiring the right people.
  49. Hospitality exists when you believe that the other person is on your side.
  50. Gramercy Tavern appeared on the cover of New York Magazine the day we opened, and it was five deep at the bar with people who were not necessarily here to dine. They just wanted to kinda sniff out the hot, new restaurant.
  51. Good service means never having to ask for anything.
  52. Festive cocktails mean color, lots of color.
  53. Every restaurant needs to have a point of view.
  54. Essentially what’s going to determine how you succeed in New York is how people feel about the space, how delicious the food is, how they perceive the value and, most important of all, how they feel treated. My understanding is Stephen Starr is exceptionally good at all of this and his ability to create a transporting experience.
  55. Earlier in my career, I needed to be the writer, casting director, set designer, leading man, and producer. I’ve been eliminating a lot of those jobs. I’m an executive producer right now. I still get to pick the best screenplays.
  56. During one of his uncannily well-timed impromptu visits to my restaurant, Union Square Cafe, Pat Cetta taught me how to manage people. Pat was the owner of a storied New York City steakhouse called Sparks, and by that time, he was an old pro at running a fine restaurant.
  57. Diners are upset that restaurants aren’t honoring reservations, and a lot of restaurants help bring this on by overbooking.
  58. Constant, gentle pressure is my preferred technique for leadership, guidance, and coaching.
  59. Comfort food is absolutely moving upscale.
  60. Be aware of textural elements throughout a party, like silverware, stemware, and linens. But the biggest element is metaphorical: it’s your own touch. How are you making people feel?
  61. At the base level, a burger is a piece of meat and a bun with something on it. It’s simple but it seems to make a lot of people happy.
  62. At my restaurants, we have training drills before every meal. We talk about what we did yesterday that was great and what we can improve today.
  63. A restaurant is a compendium of choices that the owner has made. If you look around a restaurant, everything represents a choice: the kind of salt shaker that’s on the table, the art on the walls, the uniforms on the waiters.
  64. A great restaurant is one that just makes you feel like you’re not sure whether you went out or you came home and confuses you. If it can do both of those things at the same time, you’re hooked.
  65. A great restaurant doesn’t distinguish itself by how few mistakes it makes but by how well they handle those mistakes.
  66. A delicious meal cooked by a colleague for many others nourishes not only the body but also the soul.
  67. A cocktail done right can really show your guests that you care.
  68. ‘Fine casual’ means taking the cultural priorities that fine dining, at its best, believes in.
  69. You shall find out how salt is the taste of another man’s bread, and how hard is the way up and down another man’s stairs.
  70. Worldly fame is but a breath of wind that blows now this way, and now that, and changes name as it changes direction.
  71. Will cannot be quenched against its will.
  72. There is no greater sorrow than to recall happiness in times of misery.
  73. The secret of getting things done is to act!
  74. The sad souls of those who lived without blame and without praise.
  75. The more perfect a thing is, the more susceptible to good and bad treatment it is.
  76. The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis.
  77. The customs and fashions of men change like leaves on the bough, some of which go and others come.
  78. Small projects need much more help than great.
  79. Remember tonight… for it is the beginning of always.
  80. Pride, envy, avarice – these are the sparks have set on fire the hearts of all men.
  81. O conscience, upright and stainless, how bitter a sting to thee is a little fault!
  82. No one thinks of how much blood it costs.
  83. Nature is the art of God.
  84. In the middle of the journey of our life I came to myself within a dark wood where the straight way was lost.
  85. If the present world go astray, the cause is in you, in you it is to be sought.
  86. I wept not, so to stone within I grew.
  87. I love to doubt as well as know.
  88. Heaven wheels above you, displaying to you her eternal glories, and still your eyes are on the ground.
  89. Heat cannot be separated from fire, or beauty from The Eternal.
  90. He listens well who takes notes.
  91. From a little spark may burst a flame.
  92. Follow your own star!
  93. Consider your origins: you were not made to live as brutes, but to follow virtue and knowledge.
  94. Beauty awakens the soul to act.
  95. Be as a tower firmly set; Shakes not its top for any blast that blows.
  96. At this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe.
  97. Art, as far as it is able, follows nature, as a pupil imitates his master; thus your art must be, as it were, God’s grandchild.
  98. All hope abandon, ye who enter here!
  99. A mighty flame followeth a tiny spark.
  100. Your personal history is a part of what happens with your hands and your head as you play music.
  101. You know, Nirvana used to start rehearsals with the three of us just jamming. For, like, a half an hour, just noise and freeform crap – and usually it was crap. But sometimes things would come from it, and some songs on Nevermind came from that, and ‘Heart Shaped Box’ and stuff on ‘In Utero’ just happened that way.
  102. You know why Foo Fighters have been a band for 20 years? Because I’ve never really told anybody what I think of them. The last thing you ever want to do is go to therapy with your band.
  103. Wow, I get to wake up again? Ok. You have to make good with what you’ve got.
  104. Who’s to say what’s a good voice and not a good voice?
  105. Whenever I say I made a record in the garage, people just assume that I have, like, a Lear jet parked in there or something. But really there’s old luggage, a couple of bikes. It’s big enough to put one minivan in. That’s it. No dartboard. I’m so not macho.
  106. When you’re young, you’re not afraid of what comes next. You’re excited by it.
  107. When you’re thirteen and listening to punk, the aggressive nature of music can sway you to the dark side.
  108. When you’re recording to analog tape, it captures performance and you can’t necessarily manipulate that in different ways. It is what it is.
  109. When you have kids, you see life through different eyes. You feel love more deeply and are maybe a little more compassionate. It’s inevitable that that would make its way into your songwriting.
  110. When there’s so much left to do, why spend your time focusing on things you’ve already done, counting trophies or telling stories about the good old days?
  111. When digital technology started becoming the norm, you’ve got 50, 60, 70 years of recordings on tapes that are just deteriorating. Like, a two-inch reel of recording tape won’t last forever. It dissolves. It will disappear.
  112. When Nirvana became popular, you could very easily slip and get lost during that storm. I fortunately had really heavy anchors – old friends, family.
  113. When I listen to the radio, I just hear so much music that doesn’t even sound like people. The vocals are all tuned, and the drums are all fake.
  114. When I listen to music these days, and I hear Pro Tools and drums that sound like a machine – it kinda sucks the life out of music.
  115. When I joined Nirvana, I was the fifth or sixth drummer – I don’t know if they’d ever had a drummer they were totally happy with. And they were strangers. There was never much of a deeper connection outside of the music.
  116. Usually, when you go in to make a record, you have 30 songs, and you record 30 of them, and 12 of them make it to the record.
  117. Usually, when Nirvana made music, there wasn’t a lot of conversation. We wanted everything to be surreal. We didn’t want to have some contrived composition.
  118. Through Kurt I saw the beauty of minimalism and the importance of music that’s stripped down.
  119. There’s something about pulling out a real tape from a shelf and looking at it and knowing that ‘Everlong’ is on it, or ‘Best of You’ is on it, and it’s really special.
  120. There’s poetry in being the band that can sell out Wembley but also makes a record in a garage. I don’t like doing what people expect me to do.
  121. There’s always gonna be rock n’ roll bands, there’s always gonna be kids that love rock n’ roll records, and there will always be rock n’ roll.
  122. There’s a reason why the Foo Fighters don’t blast out Nirvana songs every night: because we have a lot of respect for them. You know, that’s hallowed ground. We have to be careful. We have to tread lightly. We have talked about it before, but the opportunity hasn’t really come up, or it just hasn’t felt right.
  123. There’s a big difference between falling in love with someone and falling in love with someone and getting married. Usually, after you get married, you fall in love with the person even more.
  124. There weren’t a lot of career opportunities in crazy-fast hardcore punk, so you didn’t have a lot of ambition, just the love and passion to play music with your friends.
  125. There are times when I feel like I’m a traveling minister. I’m trying to go out and get kids to pick-up yard sale instruments and change the world.
  126. The whole slacker generation totally didn’t apply to us musically.
  127. The thing that will never go away is that connection you make with a band or a song where you’re moved by the fact that it’s real people making music. You make that human connection with a song like ‘Let It Be’ or ‘Long and Winding Road’ or a song like ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ or ‘Roxanne,’ any of those songs. They sound like people making music.
  128. The most important thing is that you honor that musical integrity, whether you make music that sounds like ABBA or you make music that sounds like Void.
  129. Some people record onto tape, and then they pay for the tape, and download those onto a hard drive. Initially in a Pro Tools program. Other people go straight into digital, and use no tape at all.
  130. Singing into a microphone and learning to play an instrument – learning to do your craft – that’s the most important thing! It’s not about what goes on in a computer!
  131. People are so into digital recording now they forgot how easy analog recording can be.
  132. No, there’s something about the sing-song cadence of children’s music that has its place in rock.
  133. No one has any faith in the tape anymore – everyone just relies on computers and considers the hardrive to be the safest option, and I don’t. I think an analog tape is something you can hold.
  134. Neil Young is my hero, and such a great example. You know what that guy has been doing for the past 40 years? Making music. That’s what that guy does. Sometimes you pay attention, sometimes you don’t. Sometimes he hands it to you, sometimes he keeps it to himself. He’s a good man with a beautiful family and wonderful life.
  135. My songwriting is like extending a hand to the listener.
  136. My mother was a public school teacher in Virginia, and we didn’t have any money, we just survived on happiness, on being a happy family.
  137. Music will never go away, and I will never stop making music; it’s just what capacity or what arena you decide to do it.
  138. Mick Fleetwood was one of my first interviews. And if you’ve ever talked to that dude, he’s the sweetest guy in the world – he’s just a trip.
  139. Ladies and gentlemen, god bless America – land of the free, home of the brave.
  140. Joining a band without ever having really met the people before, you just want to be musically powerful.
  141. It’s tough to go to sleep at night, and I wake up after five hours because I feel like I’m wasting time. I just sit up at night and think about what I can do next.
  142. It’s terrifying to play your favorite band’s song in front of your favorite band.
  143. It’s good to wander into the studio and walk out with something that’s better than you’d imagined it to be. If everything was as you imagined it to be, it just wouldn’t be as much fun.
  144. It’s funny; recently I’ve started to notice people’s impersonations of me, and it’s basically like a hyperactive child.
  145. It’s a weird thing when you make records. You try to hear it before you make it, so you walk into the studio with this idea of what you expect to happen, and that usually changes. That usually turns into something else, and that’s a good thing.
  146. It was that famous joke: What’s the last thing the drummer said before he got kicked out of the band? ‘Hey, I wrote a song.’
  147. In this day and age, when you can use a machine or computer to simulate or emulate what people can do together, it still can’t replace the magic of four people in a room playing.
  148. If there’s one thing I’m good at, it’s gathering people together to do something fun.
  149. If it weren’t for the Beatles, I would not be a musician.
  150. If I ever felt like I was getting lost in the hurricane that was storming around Nirvana, I’d just go back to Virginia.
  151. I’ve experienced great things, I’ve experienced great tragedies. I’ve done almost everything I could possibly ever imagine doing, but I just know that there’s more.
  152. I’ve always been a fan of melody and emotional melancholy, whether it was Rites of Spring or Tears for Fears or Neil Young. If I hear a song that has a sweet melody, I’m a sucker for it, whether it’s Linkin Park or Little Richard.
  153. I’m so not macho. It’s crazy. My man cave is so not a man cave.
  154. I’m not into albums that are meant to sound perfect.
  155. I’m kind of claustrophobic… It’s not even like enclosed spaces. It’s like I hate being stuck in one band, you know? Just being stuck is the biggest drag, for fear that, you know, just that you can’t get out.
  156. I’m happy that I have my family, and I’m happy that I had Virginia, where I grew up, to retreat to any time I felt overwhelmed. Whenever there were times when I felt like the rug was being pulled out from under me and I was floating in this crazy space, I would stop and go back to that neighborhood and realize nothing’s changed, really.
  157. I’d love it if everyone knew one Foo Fighters song.
  158. I was ready to quit music. It felt to me like music equalled death.
  159. I was at a New Year’s Eve party, and someone asked me how was my year, and I said, ‘I honestly think 2011 was the best year of my entire life,’ and I actually meant it.
  160. I think people should feel encouraged to be themselves.
  161. I think my biggest musical hero growing up was probably Ian MacKaye. He set a great example for all of us local musicians. Still, to this day, I see him as the best example of a right-on musician.
  162. I think maybe people see bands and musicians as some sort of superhero unrealistic sport that happens in another dimension where it’s not real people and not real emotions. So, I grew up listening to Beatles records on my floor. That’s how I learned how to play guitar. If it weren’t for them, I wouldn’t be a musician.
  163. I taught myself how to play the guitar, I taught myself how to play the drums, and I kind of fake doing both of them. But drumming comes more natural to me, and it just feels better.
  164. I stopped doing drugs when I was 20. I was finished with drugs before Nirvana even started.
  165. I owe everything to Nirvana. But I can’t let that overshadow the future. For the first few years, I didn’t even want to talk about Nirvana. Partly because it was just painful to talk about losing Kurt but also because I wanted the Foo Fighters to mean something.
  166. I once received a cape that was made from the little purple bags that Crown Royal Whisky comes in.
  167. I never went to rock concerts when I was a kid. I didn’t see any rock & roll bands. I had posters on my wall. I had Beatles records.
  168. I never went to rock concerts when I was a kid. I didn’t see any rock & roll bands.
  169. I never needed much, and I never thought I’d get more than what I had. A trip to Burger King was the biggest thing in the world to me. Heaven.
  170. I mean, I never liked being told what to do. It’s one of the reasons I dropped out of school.
  171. I love to play. And fortunately, I don’t know a lot of musicians that suck. I know a bunch of really good ones, and they’re always up for playing.
  172. I love to play music. So why endanger that with something like drugs?
  173. I love everything about my job, except being away from the kids.
  174. I know a lot of people who wouldn’t be comfortable with everything that comes with being in a band as big as Nirvana. The thing that I don’t understand is not appreciating that simple gift of being able to play music.
  175. I have crazy claustrophobic dreams, weird elevator dreams where the elevator closes in and all of a sudden I am lying down – oh my God, it’s a casket. Just freaky stuff like that.
  176. I had never been in charge of anything. I’d always worked for someone. I worked for a furniture warehouse. I did masonry. I always had a boss yelling at me. So I’d never been in charge of an organization.
  177. I had a Super Grover doll growing up. Super Grover was very clumsy, he wasn’t very good-looking. But in his own way he’d always save the day.
  178. I dropped out of high school and I couldn’t go to college ’cause I wasn’t smart enough, so I’d resigned myself to loading trucks and playing punk rock on the weekends.
  179. I don’t think of Kurt as ‘Kurt Cobain from Nirvana’. I think of him as ‘Kurt’. It’s something that comes back all the time. Almost every day.
  180. I didn’t start sweating until I had children. That was one of the first things I realized when my daughter Violet was born – I started getting wicked BO. You know there’s a difference between basketball BO and stress BO? This was definitely stress BO. Like, new dad BO.
  181. I can understand how some people might resent me for having the audacity to continue playing music, but it’d take a lot more than that to stop me from doing it. I started Foo Fighters because I didn’t want to retreat.
  182. Guilt is cancer. Guilt will confine you, torture you, destroy you as an artist. It’s a black wall. It’s a thief.
  183. Give me something to assemble, I won’t look at the directions, I’ll try to figure it out by myself. It’s why I love Ikea furniture.
  184. From the time that ‘Nevermind’ came out in September of 1991 to the time that Nirvana was over, it was really just a few years, and a lot happened in those few years.
  185. From one generation to the next, The Beatles will remain the most important rock band of all time.
  186. Dude, maybe not everyone loves ‘Glee.’ Me included. I watched 10 minutes and it wasn’t my thing.
  187. Chicago gave me more music than any other city in America.
  188. Cause when you’re sequencing a record, you want the listener to stick with it from beginning to end, and in order to do that, you really have to map out the journey from the first song to the last.
  189. Because you have things like ‘American Idol’ and you’ve got radio stations that play music made entirely by computers, it’s easy to forget there are bands with actual people playing actual instruments that rock.
  190. At 13 years old, I realized I could start my own band. I could write my own song, I could record my own record. I could start my own label. I could release my own record. I could book my own shows. I could write and publish my own fanzine. I could silk-screen my own T-shirt. I could do this all myself.
  191. And later, if I ever felt that I was getting swept away by the craziness of being in a band, well, I’d go back to Virginia.
  192. All I really had was a suitcase and my drums. So I took them up to Seattle and hoped it would work.
  193. Actually, I didn’t start sweating until I had children.
  194. A musician should only sound like what they do, and no two musicians sound the same. It’s an individual-feel thing, you know?
  195. A lot of the records you buy, there’s nothing you can hold in your hand, it’s all 1’s and 0’s, this digital cloud floating in the ether. but with analog albums, you can hold it in your hand.
  196. A lot of people from my generation of music are so focused on playing things correctly or to perfection that they’re stuck in that safe place.
  197. ‘Some Kind Of Monster’ is such a nightmare for any musician to watch because you’re watching a band be honest to each other. Not a good idea, man!
  198. ‘In Utero’ was the first time I’d made an album that reached into the dark side. I remember the conflict and the uncertainty. I remember all those things when I hear ‘Pennyroyal Tea.’
  199. You know, it is a terrible thing to appear on television, because people think that you actually know what you’re talking about.
  200. You have to steer a course between not appalling people, but at the same time not misleading them.
  201. You can only get really unpopular decisions through if the electorate is convinced of the value of the environment. That’s what natural history programmes should be for.
  202. You can cry about death and very properly so, your own as well as anybody else’s. But it’s inevitable, so you’d better grapple with it and cope and be aware that not only is it inevitable, but it has always been inevitable, if you see what I mean.
  203. What I am interested in with birds, just as I am with spiders or monkeys, is what they do and why they do it.
  204. Well, I’m having a good time. Which makes me feel guilty too. How very English.
  205. We really need to kick the carbon habit and stop making our energy from burning things. Climate change is also really important. You can wreck one rainforest then move, drain one area of resources and move onto another, but climate change is global.
  206. We keep putting on programmes about famine in Ethiopia; that’s what’s happening. Too many people there. They can’t support themselves – and it’s not an inhuman thing to say. It’s the case. Until humanity manages to sort itself out and get a coordinated view about the planet it’s going to get worse and worse.
  207. We are not overpopulated in an absolute sense; we’ve got the technology for 10 billion, probably 15 billion people, to live on this planet and live good lives. What we haven’t done is developed our technology.
  208. We are a plague on the Earth.
  209. Very few species have survived unchanged. There’s one called lingula, which is a little shellfish, a little brachiopod about the size of my fingernail, that has survived for 500 million years, but it’s survived by being unobtrusive and doing nothing, and you can’t accuse human beings of that.
  210. To suggest that God specifically created a worm to torture small African children is blasphemy as far as I can see. The Archbishop of Canterbury doesn’t believe that.
  211. There is no question that climate change is happening; the only arguable point is what part humans are playing in it.
  212. There are some four million different kinds of animals and plants in the world. Four million different solutions to the problems of staying alive.
  213. The whole of science, and one is tempted to think the whole of the life of any thinking man, is trying to come to terms with the relationship between yourself and the natural world. Why are you here, and how do you fit in, and what’s it all about.
  214. The question is, are we happy to suppose that our grandchildren may never be able to see an elephant except in a picture book?
  215. The process of making natural history films is to try to prevent the animal knowing you are there, so you get glimpses of a non-human world, and that is a transporting thing.
  216. The only way to save a rhinoceros is to save the environment in which it lives, because there’s a mutual dependency between it and millions of other species of both animals and plants.
  217. The most extraordinary thing about trying to piece together the missing links in the evolutionary story is that when you do find a missing link and put it in the story, you suddenly need all these other missing links to connect to the new discovery. The gaps and questions actually increase – it’s extraordinary.
  218. The more you go on, the less you need people standing between you and the animal and the camera waving their arms about.
  219. The fundamental issue is the moral issue.
  220. The climate, the economic situation, rising birth rates; none of these things give me a lot of hope or reason to be optimistic.
  221. The climate suits me, and London has the greatest serious music that you can hear any day of the week in the world – you think it’s going to be Vienna or Paris or somewhere, but if you go to Vienna or Paris and say, ‘Let’s hear some good music’, there isn’t any.
  222. Television of course actually started in Britain in 1936, and it was a monopoly, and there was only one broadcaster and it operated on a license which is not the same as a government grant.
  223. Steve Irwin did wonderful conservation work but I was uncomfortable about some of his stunts. Even if animals aren’t aware that you are not treating them with respect, the viewers are.
  224. People talk about doom-laden scenarios happening in the future: they are happening in Africa now. You can see it perfectly clearly. Periodic famines are due to too many people living on land that can’t sustain them.
  225. People must feel that the natural world is important and valuable and beautiful and wonderful and an amazement and a pleasure.
  226. People are not going to care about animal conservation unless they think that animals are worthwhile.
  227. Nature isn’t positive in that way. It doesn’t aim itself at you. It’s not being unkind to you.
  228. Natural history is not about producing fables.
  229. Many individuals are doing what they can. But real success can only come if there is a change in our societies and in our economics and in our politics.
  230. London has fine museums, the British Library is one of the greatest library institutions in the world… It’s got everything you want, really.
  231. It’s extraordinary how self-obsessed human beings are. The things that people always go on about is, ‘tell us about us’, ‘tell us about the first human being’. We are so self-obsessed with our own history. There is so much more out there than what connects to us.
  232. It’s coming home to roost over the next 50 years or so. It’s not just climate change; it’s sheer space, places to grow food for this enormous horde. Either we limit our population growth or the natural world will do it for us, and the natural world is doing it for us right now.
  233. It’s a moral question about whether we have the right to exterminate species.
  234. It was regarded as a responsibility of the BBC to provide programs which have a broad spectrum of interest, and if there was a hole in that spectrum, then the BBC would fill it.
  235. It seems to me that the natural world is the greatest source of excitement; the greatest source of visual beauty; the greatest source of intellectual interest. It is the greatest source of so much in life that makes life worth living.
  236. It is vital that there is a narrator figure whom people believe. That’s why I never do commercials. If I started saying that margarine was the same as motherhood, people would think I was a liar.
  237. It is that range of biodiversity that we must care for – the whole thing – rather than just one or two stars.
  238. In the old days… it was a basic, cardinal fact that producers didn’t have opinions. When I was producing natural history programmes, I didn’t use them as vehicles for my own opinion. They were factual programmes.
  239. If you watch animals objectively for any length of time, you’re driven to the conclusion that their main aim in life is to pass on their genes to the next generation.
  240. If my grandchildren were to look at me and say, ‘You were aware species were disappearing and you did nothing, you said nothing’, that I think is culpable. I don’t know how much more they expect me to be doing, I’d better ask them.
  241. If I can make programmes when I’m 95, that would be fine. But I would think I’ll have had enough by then.
  242. If I can bicycle, I bicycle.
  243. I’ve been to Nepal, but I’d like to go to Tibet. It must be a wonderful place to go. I don’t think there’s anything there, but it would be a nice place to visit.
  244. I’ve been bitten by a python. Not a very big one. I was being silly, saying: ‘Oh, it’s not poisonous…’ Then, wallop! But you have fear around animals.
  245. I’m swanning round the world looking at the most fabulously interesting things. Such good fortune.
  246. I’m not in politics.
  247. I’m not an animal lover if that means you think things are nice if you can pat them, but I am intoxicated by animals.
  248. I’m not a propagandist, I’m not a polemicist; my primary interest is just looking at and trying to understand how animals work.
  249. I’m luckier than my grandfather, who didn’t move more than five miles from the village in which he was born.
  250. I’m against this huge globalisation on the basis of economic advantage.
  251. I’m absolutely strict about it. When I land, I put my watch right, and I don’t care what I feel like, I will go to bed at half past eleven. If that means going to bed early or late, that’s what I live by. As soon as you get there, live by that time.
  252. I’d like to see the giant squid. Nobody has ever seen one. I could tell you people who have spent thousands and thousands of pounds trying to see giant squid. I mean, we know they exist because we have seen dead ones. But I have never seen a living one. Nor has anybody else.
  253. I would be absolutely astounded if population growth and industrialisation and all the stuff we are pumping into the atmosphere hadn’t changed the climatic balance. Of course it has. There is no valid argument for denial.
  254. I think we’re lucky to be living when we are, because things are going to get worse.
  255. I think a major element of jetlag is psychological. Nobody ever tells me what time it is at home.
  256. I suffer much less than many of my colleagues. I am perfectly able to go to Australia and film within three hours of arrival.
  257. I often get letters, quite frequently, from people who say how they like the programmes a lot, but I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature.
  258. I mean, it is an extraordinary thing that a large proportion of your country and my country, of the citizens, never see a wild creature from dawn ’til dusk, unless it’s a pigeon, which isn’t really wild, which might come and settle near them.
  259. I like animals. I like natural history. The travel bit is not the important bit. The travel bit is what you have to do in order to go and look at animals.
  260. I just wish the world was twice as big and half of it was still unexplored.
  261. I had a huge advantage when I started 50 years ago – my job was secure. I didn’t have to promote myself. These days there’s far more pressure to make a mark, so the temptation is to make adventure television or personality shows. I hope the more didactic approach won’t be lost.
  262. I don’t think we are going to become extinct. We’re very clever and extremely resourceful – and we will find ways of preserving ourselves, of that I’m sure. But whether our lives will be as rich as they are now is another question.
  263. I don’t run a car, have never run a car. I could say that this is because I have this extremely tender environmentalist conscience, but the fact is I hate driving.
  264. I don’t like rats, but there’s not much else I don’t like. The problem with rats is they have no fear of human beings, they’re loaded with foul diseases, they would run the place given half the chance, and I’ve had them leap out of a lavatory while I’ve been sitting on it.
  265. I don’t approve of sunbathing, and it’s bad for you.
  266. I can mention many moments that were unforgettable and revelatory. But the most single revelatory three minutes was the first time I put on scuba gear and dived on a coral reef. It’s just the unbelievable fact that you can move in three dimensions.
  267. I believe the Abominable Snowman may be real. I think there may be something in that.
  268. I am an ardent recycler. I would like to think that it works. I don’t know whether it does or not.
  269. Getting to places like Bangkok or Singapore was a hell of a sweat. But when you got there it was the back of beyond. It was just a series of small tin sheds.
  270. Everyone likes birds. What wild creature is more accessible to our eyes and ears, as close to us and everyone in the world, as universal as a bird?
  271. Dealing with global warming doesn’t mean we have all got to suddenly stop breathing. Dealing with global warming means that we have to stop waste, and if you travel for no reason whatsoever, that is a waste.
  272. Crying wolf is a real danger.
  273. Cameramen are among the most extraordinarily able and competent people I know. They have to have an insight into natural history that gives them a sixth sense of what the creature is going to do, so they can be ready to follow.
  274. Birds are the most popular group in the animal kingdom. We feed them and tame them and think we know them. And yet they inhabit a world which is really rather mysterious.
  275. Being in touch with the natural world is crucial.
  276. Before the BBC, I joined the Navy in order to travel.
  277. As far as I’m concerned, if there is a supreme being then He chose organic evolution as a way of bringing into existence the natural world… which doesn’t seem to me to be necessarily blasphemous at all.
  278. Apart from anything else, I am designed by evolution, like we all are: if we see a little thing like that, big eyes, tiny nose, we go ‘aaah’. That’s what evolution does. We are programmed to do that. So to find babies the most amazing, isn’t surprising, I don’t think.
  279. An understanding of the natural world and what’s in it is a source of not only a great curiosity but great fulfillment.
  280. All we can hope for is that the thing is going to slowly and imperceptibly shift. All I can say is that 50 years ago there were no such thing as environmental policies.
  281. All our environmental problems become easier to solve with fewer people and harder – and ultimately impossible to solve – with ever more people.
  282. You would think that a rock star being married to a supermodel would be one of the greatest things in the world. It is.
  283. You get to a certain age, and you are forbidden access. You’re not going to get the kind of coverage that you would like in music magazines; you’re not going to get played on radio, and you’re not going to get played on television. I have to survive on word of mouth.
  284. With a suit, always wear big British shoes, the ones with large welts. There’s nothing worse than dainty little Italian jobs at the end of the leg line.
  285. When you think about it, Adolf Hitler was the first pop star.
  286. When it comes down to it, glam rock was all very amusing. At the time, it was funny, then a few years later it became sort of serious-looking and a bit foreboding.
  287. When I’m stuck for a closing to a lyric, I will drag out my last resort: overwhelming illogic.
  288. When I was 18, I thought that, to be a romantic, you couldn’t live past 30.
  289. When I heard Little Richard, I mean, it just set my world on fire.
  290. What I like to do is try to make a difference with the work I do.
  291. What I have is a malevolent curiosity. That’s what drives my need to write and what probably leads me to look at things a little askew. I do tend to take a different perspective from most people.
  292. What I do is I write mainly about very personal and rather lonely feelings, and I explore them in a different way each time. You know, what I do is not terribly intellectual. I’m a pop singer for Christ’s sake. As a person, I’m fairly uncomplicated.
  293. Tony Visconti and I had been wanting to work together again for a few years now. Both of us had fairly large commitments and for a long time we couldn’t see a space in which we could get anything together.
  294. Tomorrow belongs to those who can hear it coming.
  295. To not be modest about it, you’ll find that with only a couple of exceptions, most of the musicians that I’ve worked with have done their best work by far with me.
  296. These are all personal crises, I’m sure, that I manifest in a song format and project into physical situations. You make little stories up about how you feel. It’s as simple as that.
  297. There, in the chords and melodies, is everything I want to say. The words just jolly it along. It’s always been my way of expressing what, for me, is inexpressible by any other means.
  298. There’s an effort to reclaim the unmentionable, the unsayable, the unspeakable, all those things come into being a composer, into writing music, into searching for notes and pieces of musical information that don’t exist.
  299. There’s a schizoid streak within the family anyway so I dare say that I’m affected by that. The majority of the people in my family have been in some kind of mental institution, as for my brother he doesn’t want to leave. He likes it very much.
  300. There are times when I prefer a cerebral moment with an artist, and I’ll just enjoy the wit of a Picabia or a Duchamp. It amuses me that they thought that what they did would be a good way of making art.
  301. There are half a dozen subjects that I return to time and time again, and that doesn’t bother me. Because most of my favorite writers do that, to hunt down the same topic or theme from different directions each time.
  302. The truth is of course is that there is no journey. We are arriving and departing all at the same time.
  303. The truest form of any form of revolutionary Left, whatever you want to call it, was Jack Kerouac, E.E. Cummings, & Ginsberg’s period. Excuse me, but that’s where it was at.
  304. The skin of my character in ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth’ was some concoction, a spermatozoon of an alien nature that was obscene and weird-looking.
  305. The name Zahra was to have been lman’s own name at birth, but a senior member of the family changed it to lman at the last minute.
  306. The humanists’ replacement for religion: work really hard and somehow you’ll either save yourself or you’ll be immortal. Of course, that’s a total joke, and our progress is nothing. There may be progress in technology but there’s no ethical progress whatsoever.
  307. The absolute transformation of everything that we ever thought about music will take place within 10 years, and nothing is going to be able to stop it. I see absolutely no point in pretending that it’s not going to happen. I’m fully confident that copyright, for instance, will no longer exist in 10 years.
  308. The Internet carries the flag of being subversive and possibly rebellious and chaotic, nihilistic.
  309. The Americans at heart are a pure and noble people; things to them are in black and white. It’s either ‘rawk’ or it’s not. We Brits putter around in the grey area.
  310. That’s the shock: All cliches are true. The years really do speed by. Life really is as short as they tell you it is. And there really is a God – so do I buy that one? If all the other cliches are true… Hell, don’t pose me that one.
  311. Strangely, some songs you really don’t want to write.
  312. Songs don’t have to be about going out on Saturday night and having a good rink-up and driving home and crashing cars. A lot of what I’ve done is about alienation… about where you fit in society.
  313. Sometimes you stumble across a few chords that put you in a reflective place.
  314. Since the departure of good old-fashioned entertainers the re-emergence of somebody who wants to be an entertainer has unfortunately become a synonym for camp. I don’t think I’m camper than any other person who felt at home on stage, and felt more at home on stage than he did offstage.
  315. Searching for music is like searching for God. They’re very similar. There’s an effort to reclaim the unmentionable, the unsayable, the unseeable, the unspeakable, all those things, comes into being a composer and to writing music and to searching for notes and pieces of musical information that don’t exist.
  316. Radio in England is nonexistent. It’s very bad English use of a media system, typically English use.
  317. Questioning my spiritual life has always been germane to what I was writing. Always. It’s because I’m not quite an atheist and it worries me. There’s that little bit that holds on: ‘Well, I’m almost an atheist. Give me a couple of months.’
  318. Pixies and Sonic Youth were so important to the eighties.
  319. Once I’ve written something it does tend to run away from me. I don’t seem to have any part of it – it’s no longer my piece of writing.
  320. On the other hand, what I like my music to do to me is awaken the ghosts inside of me. Not the demons, you understand, but the ghosts.
  321. Now I realize that from ’72 through to about ’76, I was the ultimate rock star. I couldn’t have been more rock star.
  322. Nearly all the synth work on Heathen is mine and some of the piano.
  323. My son’s full real name is Duncan Zowie Haywood. As a toddler, he was called by his second name Zowie. But it was such an identifiable name during the Seventies that if I called him loudly in public places, everyone would turn to stare, so I started calling him Joey to take the pressure off.
  324. My mother was Catholic, my father was Protestant. There was always a debate going on at home – I think in those days we called them arguments – about who was right and who was wrong.
  325. My father worked for a children’s home called Dr. Barnardo’s Homes. They’re a charity.
  326. Music itself is going to become like running water or electricity. So it’s like, just take advantage of these last few years because none of this is ever going to happen again. You’d better be prepared for doing a lot of touring because that’s really the only unique situation that’s going to be left.
  327. It’s amazing: I am a New Yorker. It’s strange; I never thought I would be.
  328. It would be my guess that Madonna is not a very happy woman. From my own experience, having gone through persona changes like that, that kind of clawing need to be the center of attention is not a pleasant place to be.
  329. It is amazing how a new child can refocus one’s direction seconds after its birth.
  330. It amazes me sometimes that even intelligent people will analyze a situation or make a judgement after only recognizing the standard or traditional structure of a piece.
  331. If I had a talent, it was for looking askew at everything, possibly more than my contemporaries. But I had to really push myself to be a writer.
  332. I’ve started doing book reviews for Barnes & Noble! They saw that I did a lot of book reviews on the site, and they figured that it might not be a bad thing if they got me to do some for them as well. I gave them five categories I’d be interested in reviewing, from art to fiction to music.
  333. I’ve never responded well to entrenched negative thinking.
  334. I’ve made over 25 studio albums, and I think probably I’ve made two real stinkers in my time, and some not-bad albums, and some really good albums. I’m proud of what I’ve done. In fact it’s been a good ride.
  335. I’ve always tended to write songs prolifically.
  336. I’ve always regretted that I never was able to talk openly with my parents, especially with my father. I’ve heard and read so many things about my family that I can no longer believe anything; every relative I question has a completely different story from the last.
  337. I’m well past the age where I’m acceptable. You get to a certain age and you are forbidden access. You’re not going to get the kind of coverage that you would like in music magazines, you’re not going to get played on radio and you’re not going to get played on television. I have to survive on word of mouth.
  338. I’m wallowing in the whole idea of just being a guy out there with a band, with songs. It’s a real enjoyment.
  339. I’m very good at what I do, and I don’t turn my hand to something unless I’m very good at it, frankly.
  340. I’m very at ease, and I like it. I never thought I would be such a family-oriented guy; I didn’t think that was part of my makeup. But somebody said that as you get older you become the person you always should have been, and I feel that’s happening to me. I’m rather surprised at who I am, because I’m actually like my dad!
  341. I’m responsible for starting a whole new school of pretension.
  342. I’m rather kind of old school, thinking that when an artist does his work, it’s no longer his… I just see what people make of it.
  343. I’m not very articulate.
  344. I’m not one of those guys that has a great worldview. I kind of deal with terror and fear and isolation and abandonment.
  345. I’m not actually a very keen performer. I like putting shows together. I like putting events together. In fact, everything I do is about the conceptualizing and realization of a piece of work, whether it’s the recording or the performance side.
  346. I’m not a prophet or a stone aged man, just a mortal with potential of a superman. I’m living on.
  347. I’m looking for backing for an unauthorized auto-biography that I am writing. Hopefully, this will sell in such huge numbers that I will be able to sue myself for an extraordinary amount of money and finance the film version in which I will play everybody.
  348. I’m just an individual who doesn’t feel that I need to have somebody qualify my work in any particular way. I’m working for me.
  349. I’m in awe of the universe, but I don’t necessarily believe there’s an intelligence or agent behind it. I do have a passion for the visual in religious rituals, though, even though they may be completely empty and bereft of substance. The incense is powerful and provocative, whether Buddhist or Catholic.
  350. I’m in awe of the universe, but I don’t necessarily believe there’s an intelligence or agent behind it. I do have a passion for the visual in religious rituals, though, even though they may be completely empty and bereft of substance.
  351. I’m an instant star. Just add water and stir.
  352. I’m an early riser. I get up between five and six, have coffee, and read for a couple of hours before everyone else gets up.
  353. I’m always amazed that people take what I say seriously. I don’t even take what I am seriously.
  354. I’ll tell you who I absolutely adore: Ian McEwan.
  355. I would drive to gigs in my tiny little Fiat. I would shoot up and down the M1 to play at various places.
  356. I would dream. I focused all my attention on going to America. The subculture, James Dean, the rock n’ roll, the beat writers.
  357. I wish myself to be a prop, if anything, for my songs. I want to be the vehicle for my songs. I would like to colour the material with as much visual expression as is necessary for that song.
  358. I went through all the musicians in my life who I admire as bright, intelligent, virtuosic players.
  359. I was very into making the Big Artistic Statement – it had to be innovative; it had to be cutting edge. I was desperately keen on being original.
  360. I was never particularly fond of my voice.
  361. I was born in London 1947, after the war. A real wartime baby. I went to school in Brixton, and then I moved up to Yorkshire, which is in the north of England. I lived on the farms up there.
  362. I wanted to prove the sustaining power of music.
  363. I wanted to imbue Ziggy with real flesh and blood and muscle, and it was imperative that I find Ziggy and be him.
  364. I wanted to be Gerry Mulligan, only, see, I didn’t have any kind of technique. So I thought, well, baritone sax is kind of easier; I can manage that – except I couldn’t afford a baritone, so I bought an alto, which was the same fingering.
  365. I thought that I wrote songs and wrote music, and that was sort of what I thought I was best at doing. And because nobody else was ever doing my songs, I felt – you know, I had to go out and do them.
  366. I think, generally, I just cannot really envision life without writing and producing records and singing.
  367. I think much has been made of this alter ego business. I mean, I actually stopped creating characters in 1975 – for albums, anyway.
  368. I think it all comes back to being very selfish as an artist. I mean, I really do just write and record what interests me and I do approach the stage shows in much the same way.
  369. I think in the ’70s that there was a general feeling of chaos, a feeling that the idea of the ’60s as ‘ideal’ was a misnomer. Nothing seemed ideal anymore. Everything seemed in-between.
  370. I think Mustique is Duchampian – it will always provide an endless source of delight.
  371. I think Mick Jagger would be astounded and amazed if he realized that to many people he is not a sex symbol, but a mother image.
  372. I suppose for me as an artist it wasn’t always just about expressing my work; I really wanted, more than anything else, to contribute in some way to the culture that I was living in. It just seemed like a challenge to move it a little bit towards the way I thought it might be interesting to go.
  373. I still derive immense pleasure from remembering how many hod-carrying brickies were encouraged to put on lurex tights and mince up and down the high street, having been assured by know-it-alls like me that a smidgen of blusher really attracted the birds.
  374. I realized the other day that I’ve lived in New York longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. It’s amazing: I am a New Yorker. It’s strange; I never thought I would be.
  375. I re-invented my image so many times that I’m in denial that I was originally an overweight Korean woman.
  376. I rate Morrissey as one of the best lyricists in Britain. For me, he’s up there with Bryan Ferry.
  377. I never thought I would be such a family-oriented guy; I didn’t think that was part of my makeup. But somebody said that as you get older, you become the person you always should have been, and I feel that’s happening to me.
  378. I never really felt like a rock singer or a rock star or whatever.
  379. I never could get over the fact that The Pixies formed, worked and separated without America taking them to its heart or even recognizing their existence for the most part.
  380. I knew that I was ‘interesting’ at 18 because I was aware that I could get away with doing things on stage.
  381. I have all the admiration in the world for somebody like Bono, who really puts himself on the line and tries actively to do something about our world situation.
  382. I had to resign myself, many years ago, that I’m not too articulate when it comes to explaining how I feel about things. But my music does it for me, it really does.
  383. I guess, taking away all the theatrics or the costuming and the outer layers of what I do, I’m a writer… I write.
  384. I guess it’s flattering that everyone believed I was those characters, but it also is dehumanizing.
  385. I find only freedom in the realms of eccentricity.
  386. I felt I really wanted to back off from music completely and just work within the visual arts in some way. I started painting quite passionately at that time.
  387. I feel confident imposing change on myself. It’s a lot more fun progressing than looking back. That’s why I need to throw curve balls.
  388. I don’t see any boundaries between any of the art forms. I think they all inter-relate completely.
  389. I don’t profess to have music as my big wheel and there are a number of other things as important to me apart from music. Theatre and mime, for instance.
  390. I don’t like to read things that people write about me. I’d rather read what kids have to say about me because it’s not their profession to do that.
  391. I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.
  392. I don’t have stylistic loyalty. That’s why people perceive me changing all the time. But there is a real continuity in my subject matter. As an artist of artifice, I do believe I have more integrity than any one of my contemporaries.
  393. I don’t have a problem with ageing – in fact, I embrace that aspect of it. And am able to and obviously am going to be able to quite easily… it doesn’t faze me at all.
  394. I don’t crave applause. I’m not one of those guys who comes alive on stage. I’m much more alive at home, I think.
  395. I do value the respect I get from my contemporaries, but to have Oasis cover my song, to have Puff Daddy cover a song, to have Goldie come along to my gigs – that’s where my ego is at. To have my fellow musicians like what I do, that’s very cool.
  396. I do some kind of work, whether writing or painting or recording, on a daily basis. And it’s so essential that when I’m involved in the actual process, my so-called ‘real life’ becomes almost incidental, which becomes worrying.
  397. I couldn’t have written things like ‘Low’ and ‘Heroes,’ those particular albums, if it hadn’t have been for Berlin and the kind of atmosphere I felt there.
  398. I could imagine at a certain age, when I have no vocal cords left, that I would find a young man who could sing my parts for me. But I don’t see why I would stop.
  399. I change my mind a lot. I usually don’t agree with what I say very much. I’m an awful liar.
  400. I cannot with any real integrity perform songs I’ve done for 25 years. I don’t need the money. What I need is to feel that I am not letting myself down as an artist and that I still have something to contribute.
  401. I believe that I often bring out the best in somebody’s talents.
  402. I always had a repulsive need to be something more than human.
  403. However, there’s no theme or concept behind Heathen, just a number of songs but somehow there is a thread that runs through it that is quite as strong as any of my thematic type albums.
  404. Heathenism is a state of mind. You can take it that I’m referring to one who does not see his world. He has no mental light. He destroys almost unwittingly. He cannot feel any Gods presence in his life. He is the 21st century man.
  405. Glam really did plant seeds for a new identity. I think a lot of kids needed that – that sense of reinvention. Kids learned that however crazy you may think it is, there is a place for what you want to do and who you want to be.
  406. GYBE are among my, erm, two favourite Montreal bands, Arcade Fire being the other.
  407. Funk, I don’t think I have anything to do with funk. I’ve never considered myself funky.
  408. From my standpoint, being an artist, I want to see what the new construction is between artist and audience.
  409. Frankly, if I could get away with not having to perform, I’d be very happy. It’s not my favorite thing to do.
  410. Frankly, I mean, sometimes the interpretations I’ve seen on some of the songs that I’ve written are a lot more interesting than the input that I put in.
  411. For me, the world that I inhabit in reality is probably a very different world than the one people expect that I would be in.
  412. For me, often, there’s such a cloud of melancholia about knowing I’m going to have to leave my daughter on her own. I don’t know what age that is going to be, thank God. It just doubles me up in grief.
  413. Fame itself… doesn’t really afford you anything more than a good seat in a restaurant.
  414. Fame can take interesting men and thrust mediocrity upon them.
  415. Everything I read about hitting a midlife crisis was true. I had such a struggle letting go of youthful things and learning how to exist and have enthusiasm while settling into the comfort of an older age.
  416. Even though I was very shy, I found I could get onstage if I had a new identity.
  417. Dance music is no longer a simple Donna Summer beat. It’s become a whole language that I find fascinating and exciting. Eventually, it will lose the dance tag and join the fore of rock.
  418. Confront a corpse at least once. The absolute absence of life is the most disturbing and challenging confrontation you will ever have.
  419. But I’ve got to think of myself as the luckiest guy. Robert Johnson only had one album’s worth of work as his legacy. That’s all that life allowed him.
  420. But I’m pretty good with collaborative thinking. I work well with other people.
  421. Being shoved into the top-40 scene was an unusual experience. It was great I’d become accessible to a huge audience but not terribly fulfilling.
  422. Being a hybrid maker off and on over the years, I’m very comfortable with the idea and have been the subject of quite a few pretty good mash-ups myself.
  423. As you get older, the questions come down to about two or three. How long? And what do I do with the time I’ve got left?
  424. As an adolescent, I was painfully shy, withdrawn. I didn’t really have the nerve to sing my songs on stage, and nobody else was doing them. I decided to do them in disguise so that I didn’t have to actually go through the humiliation of going on stage and being myself.
  425. Art was, seriously, the only thing I’d ever wanted to own. It has always been for me a stable nourishment. I use it. It can change the way that I feel in the mornings.
  426. Anxiety and spiritual searching have been consistent themes with me, and that figures into my worldview. But I tend to make my songs sound like relationship songs.
  427. And I saw the sax line-up that he had behind him and I thought, I’m going to learn the saxophone. When I grow up, I’m going to play in his band. So I sort of persuaded my dad to get me a kind of a plastic saxophone on the hire purchase plan.
  428. An armchair Jungian would say the whole thing is about my own ongoing spiritual search. My interior life has always been one of trying to find a spiritual link, maybe because I’m from a family of separate religious philosophies: Protestant and Catholic.
  429. All my big mistakes are when I try to second-guess or please an audience. My work is always stronger when I get very selfish about it.
  430. All art really does is keep you focused on questions of humanity, and it really is about how do we get on with our maker.
  431. All Montreal bands have around nine members, I believe.
  432. Age doesn’t bother me. So many of my heroes were older guys. It’s the lack of years left that weighs far heavier on me than the age that I am.
  433. A song has to take on character, shape, body and influence people to an extent that they use it for their own devices. It must affect them not just as a song, but as a lifestyle.
  434. What a peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the brain which we call ‘thought’.
  435. Truth springs from argument amongst friends.
  436. To hate, to love, to think, to feel, to see; all this is nothing but to perceive.
  437. To be a philosophical sceptic is, in a man of letters, the first and most essential to being a sound, believing Christian.
  438. This avidity alone, of acquiring goods and possessions for ourselves and our nearest friends, is insatiable, perpetual, universal, and directly destructive of society.
  439. There is not to be found, in all history, any miracle attested by a sufficient number of men, of such unquestioned good sense, education and learning, as to secure us against all delusion in themselves.
  440. There is a very remarkable inclination in human nature to bestow on external objects the same emotions which it observes in itself, and to find every where those ideas which are most present to it.
  441. The rules of morality are not the conclusion of our reason.
  442. The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.
  443. The law always limits every power it gives.
  444. The heights of popularity and patriotism are still the beaten road to power and tyranny.
  445. The corruption of the best things gives rise to the worst.
  446. The chief benefit, which results from philosophy, arises in an indirect manner, and proceeds more from its secret, insensible influence, than from its immediate application.
  447. The advantages found in history seem to be of three kinds, as it amuses the fancy, as it improves the understanding, and as it strengthens virtue.
  448. The Christian religion not only was at first attended with miracles, but even at this day cannot be believed by any reasonable person without one.
  449. That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.
  450. Scholastic learning and polemical divinity retarded the growth of all true knowledge.
  451. Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.
  452. Philosophy would render us entirely Pyrrhonian, were not nature too strong for it.
  453. Nothing is more surprising than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few.
  454. Nothing endears so much a friend as sorrow for his death. The pleasure of his company has not so powerful an influence.
  455. No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish.
  456. No advantages in this world are pure and unmixed.
  457. Men often act knowingly against their interest.
  458. Men are much oftener thrown on their knees by the melancholy than by the agreeable passions.
  459. It’s when we start working together that the real healing takes place… it’s when we start spilling our sweat, and not our blood.
  460. It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once.
  461. It is not reason which is the guide of life, but custom.
  462. It is not contrary to reason to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the scratching of my finger.
  463. It is a just political maxim, that every man must be supposed a knave.
  464. I have written on all sorts of subjects… yet I have no enemies; except indeed all the Whigs, all the Tories, and all the Christians.
  465. Human Nature is the only science of man; and yet has been hitherto the most neglected.
  466. Heaven and hell suppose two distinct species of men, the good and the bad. But the greatest part of mankind float betwixt vice and virtue.
  467. He is happy whom circumstances suit his temper; but he Is more excellent who suits his temper to any circumstance.
  468. Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous.
  469. Everything in the world is purchased by labor.
  470. Every wise, just, and mild government, by rendering the condition of its subjects easy and secure, will always abound most in people, as well as in commodities and riches.
  471. Eloquence, at its highest pitch, leaves little room for reason or reflection, but addresses itself entirely to the desires and affections, captivating the willing hearers, and subduing their understanding.
  472. Custom is the great guide to human life.
  473. Character is the result of a system of stereotyped principals.
  474. Belief is nothing but a more vivid, lively, forcible, firm, steady conception of an object, than what the imagination alone is ever able to attain.
  475. Beauty, whether moral or natural, is felt, more properly than perceived.
  476. Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them.
  477. Be a philosopher but, amid all your philosophy be still a man.
  478. Avarice, the spur of industry.
  479. Any person seasoned with a just sense of the imperfections of natural reason, will fly to revealed truth with the greatest avidity.
  480. And what is the greatest number? Number one.
  481. Accuracy is, in every case, advantageous to beauty, and just reasoning to delicate sentiment. In vain would we exalt the one by depreciating the other.
  482. A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence.
  483. A purpose, an intention, a design, strikes everywhere even the careless, the most stupid thinker.
  484. A propensity to hope and joy is real riches; one to fear and sorrow real poverty.
  485. A man acquainted with history may, in some respect, be said to have lived from the beginning of the world, and to have been making continual additions to his stock of knowledge in every century.
  486. You’re right on the money with that. We’re all like detectives in life. There’s something at the end of the trail that we’re all looking for.
  487. You get a painting idea, and you go do that. You get a cinema idea, and you go in to do that. The difference is, even though the paintings might take some time to make, with cinema you are booked for a year and a half, minimum.
  488. You don’t need a special place to meditate. You can transcend anywhere in the world. The unified field is here, and there, and everywhere.
  489. What I really like is to be at home, working.
  490. Transcendental meditation is like a car, a vehicle that allows you to go within. It’s a mental technique.
  491. Transcendental meditation is an ancient mental technique that allows any human being to dive within, transcend and experience the source of everything. It’s such a blessing for the human being because that eternal field is a field of unbounded intelligence, creativity, happiness, love, energy and peace.
  492. To me, a story can be both concrete and abstract, or a concrete story can hold abstractions. And abstractions are things that really can’t be said so well with words.
  493. To make the script, you need ideas, and for me a lot of times, a final script is made up of many fragments of ideas that came at different times.
  494. This whole world is wild at heart and weird on top.
  495. There are only 24 hours in a day, and my top priority is working on my films, but I love short film experiments.
  496. The mantra that you’re given in Transcendental Meditation you keep to yourself. The reason being, true happiness is not out there, true happiness lies within.
  497. The ideas dictate everything, you have to be true to that or you’re dead.
  498. The greatest thing my father left me was a love for cutting wood – my love for sawing, especially pine wood.
  499. The concept of absurdity is something I’m attracted to.
  500. The cinema is really built for the big screen and big sound, so that a person can go into another world and have an experience.
  501. The business side of film has goofed up so many things, but even that’s changing. It happened to the music industry and now it’s happening to the film studios. It’s crazy what’s going on. But artists should have control of their work; especially if, as I always say, you never turn down a good idea and never take a bad idea.
  502. Television provides the opportunity for an ongoing story – the opportunity to meld the cast and the characters and a world, and to spend more time there.
  503. Sugar does make people happy, but then you fall off the edge after a few minutes, so I’ve really pretty much cut it out of my diet. Except for cupcakes. I like those.
  504. Stories hold conflict and contrast, highs and lows, life and death, and the human struggle and all kinds of things.
  505. Somewhere in talking and rehearsing, there is a magical moment where actors catch a current, they’re on the right road. If they really catch it, then whatever they do from then on is correct and it all comes out of them from that point on.
  506. Sometimes I get ideas for lyrics in anyplace, but I work a lot in the studio. So I collect little bits of lyrics. I go through the box of lyrics I have and see if something fits.
  507. Sometimes I get an idea for cinema. And when you get an idea that you fall in love with, this is a glorious day.
  508. Somehow, the French got this idea of the starving artist. Very romantic, except it’s not so romantic for the starving artist.
  509. Some things we forget. But many things we remember on the mental screen, which is the biggest screen of all.
  510. Sex is a doorway to something so powerful and mystical, but movies usually depict it in a completely flat way.
  511. See, a painting is much cheaper than making a film. And photography is, you know, way cheap. So if I get an idea for a film, there are many ways to get it together and go realise that film. There’s really nothing to be afraid of.
  512. People think in Hollywood there’s a family, where everybody gets together talks about stuff and we all know each other, and it’s just not that way at all to me.
  513. Negativity is the enemy of creativity.
  514. My cow is not pretty, but it is pretty to me.
  515. Music deals with time and timing. It’s so magical, but when you get into it, every little sound and every little space between the sounds, it’s critical, so critical. And if it’s not there, it not only feels wrong, but it ruins things.
  516. Music as background to me becomes like a mosquito, an insect. In the studio we have big speakers, and to me that’s the way music should be listened to. When I listen to music, I want to just listen to music.
  517. Most of Hollywood is about making money – and I love money, but I don’t make the films thinking about money.
  518. More and more people are seeing the films on computers – lousy sound, lousy picture – and they think they’ve seen the film, but they really haven’t.
  519. Meditation is to dive all the way within, beyond thought, to the source of thought and pure consciousness. It enlarges the container, every time you transcend. When you come out, you come out refreshed, filled with energy and enthusiasm for life.
  520. Life should be blissful, and blissful doesn’t mean just a small happiness. It’s huge. It is profound.
  521. Life is very, very complicated, and so films should be allowed to be, too.
  522. It makes me uncomfortable to talk about meanings and things. It’s better not to know so much about what things mean. Because the meaning, it’s a very personal thing, and the meaning for me is different than the meaning for somebody else.
  523. Intuition is the key to everything, in painting, filmmaking, business – everything. I think you could have an intellectual ability, but if you can sharpen your intuition, which they say is emotion and intellect joining together, then a knowingness occurs.
  524. In Hollywood, more often than not, they’re making more kind of traditional films, stories that are understood by people. And the entire story is understood. And they become worried if even for one small moment something happens that is not understood by everyone.
  525. If you stay true to your ideas, film-making becomes an inside-out, honest kind of process.
  526. If we didn’t want to upset anyone, we would make films about sewing, but even that could be dangerous. But I think finally, in a film, it is how the balance is and the feelings are. But I think there has to be those contrasts and strong things within a film for the total experience.
  527. I’ve said many, many, many unkind things about Philadelphia, and I meant every one.
  528. I’ve loved music always, and my music fire was lit by Elvis Presley, really, and all that was happening back then.
  529. I’ve always loved the electric guitar: to hold it and work it and hear what it does is unreal.
  530. I’m not a real film buff. Unfortunately, I don’t have time. I just don’t go. And I become very nervous when I go to a film because I worry so much about the director and it is hard for me to digest my popcorn.
  531. I’m not a musician, but I play music. So it’s a strange thing.
  532. I was raised Presbyterian, but I’m not really going to church. I think the experience in meditation is pretty much where it’s at for me.
  533. I thought when I started meditation that I was going to get real calm and peaceful and it’s going to be over. It’s not that way; it’s so energetic. That’s where all the energy and creativity is.
  534. I think that ideas exist outside of ourselves. I think somewhere, we’re all connected off in some very abstract land. But somewhere between there and here ideas exist.
  535. I think that commercials can really ruin a song. You know that the person sold the song for a good deal of money, and that was the tradeoff. But, music and picture can marry in a beautiful way, and the reverse also.
  536. I think part of the reason ideas haven’t come in is that the world of cinema is changing so drastically, and in a weird way, feature films I think have become cheap. Everything is kind of throwaway. It’s experienced and then forgotten.
  537. I supported myself by delivering the ‘Wall Street Journal’ and doing odd jobs. I love plumbing and carpentry.
  538. I love the quality, feel and history of film. I love the pictures of the giant cameras and the way it was.
  539. I love super crispy, almost burned, snapping-crispy bacon.
  540. I love paint. I like watercolours. I like acrylic paint… a little bit. I like house paint. I like oil-based paint, and I love oil paint. I love the smell of turpentine and I like that world of oil paint very, very, very much.
  541. I love music, of course, and many, many, many genres. There are hardly any songs I would say that I hate. There’s a couple, and I don’t even know exactly why I don’t like them.
  542. I love Christmas tree bulbs, and I started putting them in my paintings. You’ve got to plug this painting in, and it’s got a rig in the back, so that each one can be replaced if it burns out.
  543. I love Bob Dylan. Who doesn’t? He tapped into some kind of vein and it keeps on keeping on. There’s nobody like him. He’s unique, and just… way out cool.
  544. I like watercolours. I like acrylic paint… a little bit. I like house paint. I like oil-based paint, and I love oil paint. I love the smell of turpentine and I like that world of oil paint very, very, very much.
  545. I like things to be orderly.
  546. I like cappuccino, actually. But even a bad cup of coffee is better than no coffee at all.
  547. I like L.A. because of the light. The light makes me feel so good. It’s really beautiful. And there’s something about L.A. being so spread out that gives you a feeling of freedom. Light and freedom.
  548. I have no problem getting financing. I have a problem catching ideas that I fall in love with for the next feature.
  549. I don’t think that people accept the fact that life doesn’t make sense. I think it makes people terribly uncomfortable. It seems like religion and myth were invented against that, trying to make sense out of it.
  550. I don’t remember my dreams too much. I hardly have ever gotten ideas from nighttime dreams. But I love daydreaming and dream logic and the way dreams go.
  551. I don’t paint the town red. But when I do go out, people always want to touch my hair. It happens every time.
  552. I don’t like Thomas Edison. I’m a fan of Nicolai Tesla.
  553. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there are always red ants underneath.
  554. I didn’t watch much TV as a kid and I don’ t watch it now. I don’ t find anything beautiful or unique to the medium, and the only thing you can do on TV that you can’t do in film is make a continuing story – which is so cool!
  555. I didn’t really grow up listening to blues, because I grew up in the Northwest. It wasn’t really the center for blues.
  556. I believe in creative control. No matter what anyone makes, they should have control over it.
  557. I always say Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is my biggest influence. But for painters, I like many, many painters, but I love Francis Bacon the most, and Edward Hopper.
  558. I always loved smokestack industry, and I love towns or cities that have grown up around factories.
  559. Humor is very interesting to me. My films are not comedies, but there’s comedy in them from time to time, absurdities, just like in real life.
  560. Happy accidents are real gifts, and they can open the door to a future that didn’t even exist. It’s kind of nice sometimes to set up something to encourage or allow happy accidents to happen.
  561. Francis Bacon is one of my giant inspirations. I just love him to pieces.
  562. Film can’t just be a long line of bliss. There’s something we all like about the human struggle.
  563. Everyone is on the internet but they’re not all talking with each other. There are groups upon groups out there, but they don’t talk to one another. So while the internet brings everyone into a shared space, it does not necessarily bring them together.
  564. Every viewer is going to get a different thing. That’s the thing about painting, photography, cinema.
  565. Digital video is so beautiful. It’s lightweight, modern, and it’s only getting better. It’s put film into the La Brea Tar Pits.
  566. Cinema is a medium that can translate ideas.
  567. Building a set is like building a place, but it’s a temporary place, because sets usually get torn down. Kind of unfortunate.
  568. As a kid, I was always building things. My father had a shop in the house, and we built things – we were kind of a project family. I started out as a painter, and then painting led to cinema, and in cinema, you get to build so many things, or help build them.
  569. An artist makes a painting, and nobody bugs him or her about it. It’s just you and your painting. To me, that’s the way it should be with film as well.
  570. Absurdity is what I like most in life, and there’s humor in struggling in ignorance. If you saw a man repeatedly running into a wall until he was a bloody pulp, after a while it would make you laugh because it becomes absurd.
  571. A poet could write volumes about diners, because they’re so beautiful. They’re brightly lit, with chrome and booths and Naugahyde and great waitresses. Now, it might not be so great in the health department, but I think diner food is really worth experiencing periodically.
  572. A lot of painters listen to music, I think, while they paint. But I hate to do that. It’s a horror. I can’t really listen to the music. I’m not really concentrating on it, and I’m not really concentrating on the painting.
  573. A lot of music doesn’t do one thing or another. It just doesn’t do anything. Then there are those pieces of music that thrill your soul. It’s such a wide range, and it’s really interesting that we all love different things.
  574. A lot of artists think they want anger. But a real, strong, bitter anger occupies the mind, leaving no room for creativity.
  575. A filmmaker doesn’t have to suffer to show suffering. You just have to understand it. You don’t have to die to shoot a death scene.
  576. A film – especially when it’s a personal film – is going to hit somebody or it’s not. There’s nothing you can do about it.
  577. Your immune cells are like a circulating nervous system. Your nervous system in fact is a circulating nervous system. It thinks. It’s conscious.
  578. Your conscious brain cannot multitask. If I’m speaking to you and checking my I-Phone at the same time, I’m doing neither. This is why our society is frazzled; this misconception that we can consciously do more than one thing at a time effectively.
  579. You know, religion itself, Eastern and Western, is divisive and quarrelsome anyway.
  580. You have to think of your brand as a kind of myth. A myth is a compelling story that is archetypal, if you know the teachings of Carl Jung. It has to have emotional content and all the themes of a great story: mystery, magic, adventure, intrigue, conflicts, contradiction, paradox.
  581. You can’t make positive choices for the rest of your life without an environment that makes those choices easy, natural, and enjoyable.
  582. You can free yourself from aging by reinterpreting your body and by grasping the link between belief and biology.
  583. You and I are essentially infinite choice-makers. In every moment of our existence, we are in that field of all possibilities where we have access to an infinity of choices.
  584. Yes, in all my research, the greatest leaders looked inward and were able to tell a good story with authenticity and passion.
  585. When resources become skimpy, human beings don’t suddenly cooperate to conserve what’s left. They fight to the last scrap for possession of a diminishing resource.
  586. When I was growing up, I went to an Irish-Christian missionary school.
  587. When I looked at the addictive qualities of video games and how they captivate people’s attention, I decided to try the same technology for enhancing well-being.
  588. What happens is consciousness operates in mysterious ways. One of those ways is that the old paradigm suddenly starts to die.
  589. What gets in our way is history and culture and religion and economic conditions. It is part of the hypnosis of our social conditioning.
  590. Well-being changes as we move through life, which is why a child’s version of it cannot be the same as an old person’s.
  591. Wealth is the progressive realization of worthy goals, the ability to love and have compassion, meaningful and caring relationships.
  592. We’re living in a time when the world has suddenly discovered India because it’s run out of raw material for its imagination. The raw materials for imagination are inexhaustible here.
  593. We need to build websites with celebrity speakers who talk about the ideals of fairness, sharing, democratic cooperation, and altruism in public life.
  594. We must revisit the idea that science is a methodology and not an ontology.
  595. We must go beyond the constant clamor of ego, beyond the tools of logic and reason, to the still, calm place within us: the realm of the soul.
  596. We have to really educate ourselves in a way about who we are, what our real identity is.
  597. We can actually accelerate the process through meditation, through the ability to find stillness through loving actions, through compassion and sharing, through understanding the nature of the creative process in the universe and having a sense of connection to it. So, that’s conscious evolution.
  598. We are not victims of aging, sickness and death. These are part of scenery, not the seer, who is immune to any form of change. This seer is the spirit, the expression of eternal being.
  599. We all feel the urge to condemn ourselves out of guilt, to blame others for our misfortunes and to fantasize about total disaster.
  600. We Americans sit at the head of the banquet table, as we have done for a century. Our standard of living is luxurious by any measure.
  601. Wall Street is broken for sure because it succumbed to greed and corruption and pure speculation with no values.
  602. Victims always feel alone and helpless.
  603. Ultimately spiritual awareness unfolds when you’re flexible, when you’re spontaneous, when you’re detached, when you’re easy on yourself and easy on others.
  604. Traditional science assumes, for the most part, that an objective observer independent reality exists; the universe, stars, galaxies, sun, moon and earth would still be there if no one was looking.
  605. Traditional Islam is a mixture of all obedience to Allah, and if that requires militancy, so be it.
  606. To think is to practice brain chemistry.
  607. There is no separation between mind and body… Self and other co-arise and fall away all the time.
  608. There is no fixed physical reality, no single perception of the world, just numerous ways of interpreting world views as dictated by one’s nervous system and the specific environment of our planetary existence.
  609. There is just no getting around that turning bad things into good things is up to you.
  610. There are very few good examples of effective, nurturing leadership that unlocks people’s potential or even enthusiasm.
  611. There are receptors to these molecules in your immune system, in your gut and in your heart. So when you say, ‘I have a gut feeling’ or ‘my heart is sad’ or ‘I am bursting with joy,’ you’re not speaking metaphorically. You’re speaking literally.
  612. There are no extra pieces in the universe. Everyone is here because he or she has a place to fill, and every piece must fit itself into the big jigsaw puzzle.
  613. The world sometimes feels like an insane asylum. You can decide whether you want to be an inmate or pick up your visitor’s badge. You can be in the world but not engage in the melodrama of it; you can become a spiritual being having a human experience thoroughly and fully.
  614. The world in general has meaning, deep meaning at times. This cannot be dismissed as a delusion, an artifact of chemicals.
  615. The way you think, the way you behave, the way you eat, can influence your life by 30 to 50 years.
  616. The symbolic language of the crucifixion is the death of the old paradigm; resurrection is a leap into a whole new way of thinking.
  617. The real key is to live in an environment where the mind feels free to choose the right thing instead of being compelled by habit and inertia to choose the wrong thing.
  618. The physical world, including our bodies, is a response of the observer. We create our bodies as we create the experience of our world.
  619. The masculine energy was about survival. The male was the hunter who risked his life and had to be in the fight-flight mode.
  620. The less you open your heart to others, the more your heart suffers.
  621. The intention to live as long as possible isn’t one of the mind’s best intentions, because quantity isn’t the same as quality.
  622. The highest levels of performance come to people who are centered, intuitive, creative, and reflective – people who know to see a problem as an opportunity.
  623. The greatest mystery of existence is existence itself.
  624. The fear of death comes from limited awareness.
  625. Success comes when people act together; failure tends to happen alone.
  626. Spirituality is meant to take us beyond our tribal identity into a domain of awareness that is more universal.
  627. Spiritual people should not be ashamed of being wealthy.
  628. Some Western biographies are apologist, and do not portray the negative side at all.
  629. So the universe is constantly moving in the direction of higher evolutionary impulses, creativity, abstraction, and meaning.
  630. So many things happen for every event, and if you try to manipulate it, it means you are struggling against the whole universe, and that’s just silly.
  631. Self-awareness is value-free. It isn’t scary. It doesn’t imply that you will subject yourself to needless pain.
  632. Self-awareness is not just relaxation and not just meditation. It must combine relaxation with activity and dynamism. Technology can aid that.
  633. Seeking can become stressful when you apply the same laws that you apply in the material world – hard work, exacting plans, driving ambition, and attachment to outcome.
  634. Science stands for rational thought, faith for superstition and unreason.
  635. Research has shown that the best way to be happy is to make each day happy.
  636. Religions take donations and don’t pay taxes.
  637. Preventive medicine isn’t part of a physician’s everyday routine, which is spent dispensing drugs and performing surgery.
  638. Perceptual reality is different for different species. In certain species it is a mode of observation, so what we call scientific fact is actually not ultimate truth, it is perceptual experience, and it’s a mode of observation.
  639. People think meditation is a huge undertaking. Don’t think of it like that.
  640. People need to know that they have all the tools within themselves. Self-awareness, which means awareness of their body, awareness of their mental space, awareness of their relationships – not only with each other, but with life and the ecosystem.
  641. Passivity is the same as defending injustice.
  642. Our thinking and our behaviour are always in anticipation of a response. It is therefore fear-based.
  643. Our most important task is to transform our consciousness so that violence is no longer an option for us in our personal lives, that understanding that a world of peace is possible only if we relate to each other as peaceful beings, one individual at a time.
  644. Our minds influence the key activity of the brain, which then influences everything; perception, cognition, thoughts and feelings, personal relationships; they’re all a projection of you.
  645. Once you’re more aware of people’s needs, you can create action plans for others to follow. That way, you’re responsible for your own well-being, too.
  646. Once the fabric of a just society is undone, it takes generations to weave it back together.
  647. Nothing is more important than reconnecting with your bliss. Nothing is as rich. Nothing is more real.
  648. No solution can ever be found by running in three different directions.
  649. No matter how closely you examine the water, glucose, and electrolyte salts in the human brain, you can’t find the point where these molecules became conscious.
  650. New Age values are conscious evolution, a non-sectarian society, a non-military culture, global sharing, healing the environment, sustainable economies, self-determination, social justice, economic empowerment of the poor, love, compassion in action, going beyond religious fundamentalism, going beyond nationalism-extreme nationalism, culture.
  651. My own training is in the field of neuroendocrinology and I really became very fascinated many years ago with the molecules of emotion, molecules that we call neuropeptides.
  652. My father was a doctor, an army cardiologist.
  653. Muhammad is more human, more self-doubting, even self-tortured at times. His story is full of adventure, intrigue, betrayal.
  654. Modern medicine, for all its advances, knows less than 10 percent of what your body knows instinctively.
  655. Meditation makes the entire nervous system go into a field of coherence.
  656. Mature workers are less impulsive, less reactive, more creative and more centered.
  657. Many scientists think that philosophy has no place, so for me it’s a sad time because the role of reflection, contemplation, meditation, self inquiry, insight, intuition, imagination, creativity, free will, is in a way not given any importance, which is the domain of philosophers.
  658. Life gives you plenty of time to do whatever you want to do if you stay in the present moment.
  659. Karma, when properly understood, is just the mechanics through which consciousness manifests.
  660. Karma, memory, and desire are just the software of the soul. It’s conditioning that the soul undergoes in order to create experience. And it’s a cycle. In most people, the cycle is a conditioned response. They do the same things over and over again.
  661. Karma is only in space time and causality. Your real self resides non-locally.
  662. Karma is experience, and experience creates memory, and memory creates imagination and desire, and desire creates karma again. If I buy a cup of coffee, that’s karma. I now have that memory that might give me the potential desire for having cappuccino, and I walk into Starbucks, and there’s karma all over again.
  663. It takes a little bit of mindfulness and a little bit of attention to others to be a good listener, which helps cultivate emotional nurturing and engagement.
  664. It is the nature of babies to be in bliss.
  665. In the midst of movement and chaos, keep stillness inside of you.
  666. In societies where mature workers are respected and where their wisdom is respected, everybody benefits. Workers are more engaged and productive. Their health is better. They live longer.
  667. In my definition of consciousness, consciousness is the same thing as life. What wisdom traditions also call spirit.
  668. In moments of transcendence, when time stands still, your biological clock will stop. The spirit is that domain of our awareness where there is no time.
  669. In every conversation I’ve had – with housewives in Mumbai, with middle-class people, upper-class, in the slums – everyone says there is an underlying consciousness of karma. That people believe in karma – that what you’re putting out is going to come back. If I do something to you, the energy of it is going to come back to me in the future.
  670. In a person’s career, well, if you’re process-oriented and not totally outcome-oriented, then you’re more likely to be success. I often say ‘pursue excellence, ignore success.’ Success is a by-product of excellence.
  671. In India, you’re taught that there are certain qualities that make you a divine human being.
  672. If you want to do really important things in life and big things in life, you can’t do anything by yourself. And your best teams are your friends and your siblings.
  673. If you and I are having a single thought of violence or hatred against anyone in the world at this moment, we are contributing to the wounding of the world.
  674. If insurance companies paid for lifestyle-management classes, they would save huge sums of money. We need to see that alternative medicine is now mainstream.
  675. I, of course, meditate for two hours every morning. It’s part of my schedule; I wake up at 4 a.m. every day and I love it.
  676. I’ve worked all my life on the subject of awareness, whether it’s awareness of the body, awareness of the mind, awareness of your emotions, awareness of your relationships, or awareness of your environment. I think the key to transforming your life is to be aware of who you are.
  677. I’ve always felt that technology can be used to our benefit and should be used to our benefit.
  678. I went to medical school because I wanted to ask the big questions. Do we have a soul? Does God exist? What happens after death?
  679. I was always interested in going deeply into the life of the Prophet.
  680. I think we need the feminine qualities of leadership, which include attention to aesthetics and the environment, nurturing, affection, intuition and the qualities that make people feel safe and cared for.
  681. I teach people that no matter what the situation is, no matter how chaotic, no matter how much drama is around you, you can heal by your presence if you just stay within your center.
  682. I like Muhammad a lot, because he’s like us more than anybody else. Jesus is just so exalted, and Buddha is just so exalted, it’s almost beyond our reach.
  683. I have tremendous faith in President Obama’s skills. He’s a long-term visionary.
  684. I have all the time in the world. I am in touch with the timeless. I am surrounded by infinity. When I think like that, it doesn’t mean I’m going to miss my train, it just means that I’m not thinking about it right now because I’m speaking to you.
  685. I grew up with a lot of Muslim friends, and the whole idea of revelation has been a lifelong interest of mine.
  686. I feel genius in great works of art. I have seen medical cures that science can’t explain, some seemingly triggered by faith. The same is true of millions of other people.
  687. I dislike the word ‘self-help.’ Self-awareness, yes, but not self-help.
  688. Human beings place their desires ahead of the collective good.
  689. Happiness is a continuation of happenings which are not resisted.
  690. Globalism began as a vision of a world with free trade, shared prosperity, and open borders. These are good, even noble things to aim for.
  691. From a scientist’s perspective, to understand everything that you need to know about human beings, you only have to tinker with all the mechanical parts of genes and the brain until there are no more secrets left.
  692. For thousands of years, human beings have been obsessed with beauty, truth, love, honor, altruism, courage, social relationships, art, and God. They all go together as subjective experiences, and it’s a straw man to set God up as the delusion. If he is, then so is truth itself or beauty itself.
  693. Every spiritual tradition has this idea of death and resurrection. It’s not unique to Christianity.
  694. Every person is a God in embryo. Its only desire is to be born.
  695. Enlightened leadership is spiritual if we understand spirituality not as some kind of religious dogma or ideology but as the domain of awareness where we experience values like truth, goodness, beauty, love and compassion, and also intuition, creativity, insight and focused attention.
  696. Dynamic activity and deep rest of the mind are complementary to each other.
  697. Consciousness, rather than being an epiphenomenon of matter, is actually the source of matter. It differentiates into space time, energy, information, and matter. Even though this view is an ancient view, an ancient world view, it is now finding some resonance amongst a few scientists.
  698. Consciousness conceives, governs, constructs, and becomes the activity of the body.
  699. But the real secret to lifelong good health is actually the opposite: Let your body take care of you.
  700. Being more aware creates responsibility. What does responsibility mean? It means the ability to respond. The more conscious you are in your ability to respond, the more creative you’ll be.
  701. Before a brain can register a thought, a mind must think it… every step of the way is mind over matter… We override our brains all the time.
  702. As long as you think of your real self as the person you are, then of course you’re going to be fearful of death. But what is a person? A person is a pattern of behavior, of a larger awareness. You know, the two-year-old dies before the three-year-old shows up, the three-year-old dies before the teenager shows up.
  703. And for me anyway, consciousness is three components: a personal component which for lack of a better word we can call the soul. A collective component which is more archetypal and a deeper level, and then a universal domain of consciousness.
  704. Always go with your passions. Never ask yourself if it’s realistic or not.
  705. Although we take it for granted, sanitation is a physical measure that has probably done more to increase human life span than any kind of drug or surgery.
  706. All religions develop, become exclusive, become divisive and quarrelsome.
  707. All of us are living with dogmas that we accept as truths. When one of these is overturned, there’s an initial gasp, soon followed by a rush of exhilaration.
  708. A risk-free life is far from being a healthy life.
  709. A person is a pattern of behavior, of a larger awareness.
  710. A child in India grows up with the idea that you have to make choices that will create a better future. In fact, your whole life is a continuum of choices, so the more conscious you are, the greater your life will be.
  711. Where I am today… I still have my ups and downs, but I take it one day at a time and I just hope that I can be the best that I can possibly be, not only for myself, but also young people that are out there today that need someone to look up to.
  712. Sometimes you don’t know who you can and cannot trust. I still learn that over and over again.
  713. Sometimes I think, ‘Why couldn’t I have been normal?’
  714. Some of my fans have said that because I’ve been able to speak about my issues, that they’re not afraid to speak about theirs, which is an amazing feeling.
  715. Rocker dudes don’t have a lot of swagger.
  716. Recovery is something that you have to work on every single day and it’s something that it doesn’t get a day off.
  717. One of the reasons I was so unhappy for years was because I never embraced my emotions and I was trying to stay in control.
  718. On TV, you have wardrobe fittings, you have four cameras on you at all times, and you’re worried about your angles and your lighting and your shots.
  719. Now on Friday nights, if I want to go hang out with friends, I go hang out with friends. If I want to stay in and be in the hot tub and have people over to watch movies, I do that.
  720. No matter what you’re going through, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel and it may seem hard to get to it but you can do it and just keep working towards it and you’ll find the positive side of things.
  721. Never be ashamed of what you feel. You have the right to feel any emotion that you want, and to do what makes you happy. That’s my life motto.
  722. My stepdad provided me with an amazing childhood. I played outside like a normal kid, I rode my bike, I walked to school, but the happiest times were when I was acting.
  723. My sisters and my mom, those people help me get through every single day.
  724. Music is what I love to do; it’s in my veins.
  725. It’s a big responsibility dating me. Because I come with a little bit of baggage, you know?
  726. In treatment, all of the negative things I did were stripped away and I had to start processing my feelings.
  727. If it takes me 10 years to be the musician I want to be, great.
  728. If I’m able to use my voice to do good in the world then I definitely want to do that.
  729. I’ve come to realize your career is all about the choices you make. Every single one matters.
  730. I’m honest about the journey I’ve been on, so I definitely don’t take dating lightly anymore.
  731. I was just so sick. I thought that orange juice was going to make me fat.
  732. I was compulsively overeating when I was eight years old.
  733. I want to get to the point where one day I don’t have to have anything but a rug and a microphone stand on stage and still be able to sell out places like Madison Square Garden, like Bruce Springsteen does.
  734. I want to be fearless.
  735. I want my music to do the explaining.
  736. I try to keep it real. I don’t have time to worry about what I’m projecting to the world. I’m just busy being myself.
  737. I think that women who know who they are are beautiful.
  738. I think scars are like battle wounds – beautiful, in a way. They show what you’ve been through and how strong you are for coming out of it.
  739. I think I’ve definitely had my rock bottom and I think that was probably right before I went into treatment where I said, ‘I definitely need help.’
  740. I still had a normal childhood with my friends from school.
  741. I pray every night before I go to sleep and every morning when I wake up.
  742. I never thought that I’d be a role model. Everyone kind of just made me a role model, and I hated that.
  743. I never found out until I went into treatment that I was bipolar.
  744. I love life on the road. I’m in a different city every night and it never gets old.
  745. I love having a boyfriend but need to be secure on my own first.
  746. I learned that you go through things, you deal with them and that’s what empowers you and ultimately makes you a happy person.
  747. I know that I have a voice and can use it for good or bad. It’s a gift from God.
  748. I knew from the second I stepped onstage. I was like, yep, this is what I want to do.
  749. I get mad. I get sad. I have all those emotions. But I just like to keep them to myself. I don’t think my fans need to be bothered with if I’m mad or sad about something. I should just be concerned that they are keeping up with my music or I’m making them happy with my show.
  750. I feel like I’m held more accountable to stay healthy now because now I’m a role model to young girls to not have eating issues and to not say, ‘Hey, it’s OK to starve yourself’ or ‘It’s OK to throw up after your meals’ – that’s not OK.
  751. I don’t think there’s going to be a day when I don’t think about food or my body, but I’m living with it, and I wish I could tell young girls to find their safe place and stay with it.
  752. I don’t see myself doing television, but I do see myself directing.
  753. I don’t let anyone’s insecurities, emotions, or opinions bother me. I know that if I am happy, that’s all that matters to me.
  754. I don’t have many deal breakers. I’ve done so much in my life, it doesn’t feel right to judge other people.
  755. I believe in aliens. I think it would be way too selfish of us as mankind to believe we are the only lifeforms in the universe.
  756. Everyone has the bully or the mean girl or the ex-boyfriend who tried to bring them down.
  757. Creativity is what helps me escape a lot of my inner demons.
  758. Being a celebrity can be dangerous. Nobody says ‘no.’
  759. After so long being thin, it was terrifying being heavier. But I am a naturally curvy Hispanic girl. I don’t deprive myself.
  760. After hundreds of auditions and nothing, you’re sitting home and wondering, ‘What am I doing?’
  761. Your ordinary acts of love and hope point to the extraordinary promise that every human life is of inestimable value.
  762. You stand out in the crowd only because you have these many, many carrying you on their shoulders.
  763. You must show the world that you abhor fighting.
  764. You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.
  765. Without forgiveness, there’s no future.
  766. When you think of the sort of things that happen when a genocide happens, it’s again not people who are intrinsically evil.
  767. When we see the face of a child, we think of the future. We think of their dreams about what they might become, and what they might accomplish.
  768. When the missionaries came to Africa they had the Bible and we had the land. They said ‘Let us pray.’ We closed our eyes. When we opened them we had the Bible and they had the land.
  769. When a pile of cups is tottering on the edge of the table and you warn that they will crash to the ground, in South Africa you are blamed when that happens.
  770. What is black empowerment when it seems to benefit not the vast majority but an elite that tends to be recycled?
  771. We would like to see you departing peacefully.
  772. We may be surprised at the people we find in heaven. God has a soft spot for sinners. His standards are quite low.
  773. We inhabit a universe that is characterized by diversity.
  774. We are each made for goodness, love and compassion. Our lives are transformed as much as the world is when we live with these truths.
  775. Universal education is not only a moral imperative but an economic necessity, to pave the way toward making many more nations self-sufficient and self-sustaining.
  776. Those who invest in South Africa should not think they are doing us a favor; they are here for what they get out of our cheap and abundant labor, and they should know that they are buttressing one of the most vicious systems.
  777. The universe can take quite a while to deliver.
  778. The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.
  779. The minute you got the Nobel Peace Prize, things that I said yesterday, with nobody paying too much attention, I say the same things after I got it – oh! It was quite crucial for people, and it helped our morale because apartheid did look invincible.
  780. The God who existed before any religion counts on you to make the oneness of the human family known and celebrated.
  781. Racism, xenophobia and unfair discrimination have spawned slavery, when human beings have bought and sold and owned and branded fellow human beings as if they were so many beasts of burden.
  782. People often speak of God being even-handed. God is not even-handed. God is biased, in favor of the weak, of the despised.
  783. Peace comes when you talk to the guy you most hate. And that’s where the courage of a leader comes, because when you sit down with your enemy, you as a leader must already have very considerable confidence from your own constituency.
  784. Oh, 1994, April 27. There won’t be a day like that ever again. I mean, the sky was blue, with a blueness that had never been there before.
  785. Niger is not an isolated island of desperation. It lies within a sea of problems across Africa – particularly the ‘forgotten emergencies’ in poor countries or regions with little strategic or material appeal.
  786. My humanity is bound up in yours, for we can only be human together.
  787. Many people would be surprised that, in fact, I’m quite shy.
  788. It’s a blessing that South Africa has a man like Nelson Mandela.
  789. It is our moral obligation to give every child the very best education possible.
  790. Isn’t it amazing that we are all made in God’s image, and yet there is so much diversity among his people?
  791. Inclusive, good-quality education is a foundation for dynamic and equitable societies.
  792. In the land of my birth I cannot vote, whereas a young person of eighteen can vote. And why? Because he or she possesses that wonderful biological attribute – a white skin.
  793. In the Bible, we first encounter God when he sides with a bunch of slaves against a powerful Pharaoh, an act of grace freely given.
  794. In my country of South Africa, we struggled for years against the evil system of apartheid that divided human beings, children of the same God, by racial classification and then denied many of them fundamental human rights.
  795. In many ways, when you’re a Nobel peace laureate, you have an obligation to humankind, to society.
  796. In its history, Europe has committed so many massacres and horrors that it should bow its own head in shame.
  797. In South Africa, we could not have achieved our freedom and just peace without the help of people around the world, who through the use of non-violent means, such as boycotts and divestment, encouraged their governments and other corporate actors to reverse decades-long support for the Apartheid regime.
  798. In God’s family, there are no outsiders, no enemies.
  799. If you want peace, you don’t talk to your friends. You talk to your enemies.
  800. If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. If an elephant has its foot on the tail of a mouse and you say that you are neutral, the mouse will not appreciate your neutrality.
  801. I’ve never doubted that apartheid – because it was of itself fundamentally, intrinsically evil – was going to bite the dust eventually.
  802. I wish I could shut up, but I can’t, and I won’t.
  803. I think that most of us would prefer to be popular than unpopular.
  804. I mean in the South African case, many of those who were part of death squads would have been respectable members of their white community, people who went to church on Sunday, every Sunday.
  805. I have been to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and I have witnessed the racially segregated roads and housing that reminded me so much of the conditions we experienced in South Africa under the racist system of Apartheid.
  806. I don’t think I’ve ever felt that same kind of peace, the kind of serenity that I felt after acknowledging that maybe I was going to die of this TB.
  807. I certainly know that I would not be able to survive if it were not for the fact that I am being upheld by the prayers of so many people.
  808. I am not interested in picking up crumbs of compassion thrown from the table of someone who considers himself my master. I want the full menu of rights.
  809. I am a leader by default, only because nature does not allow a vacuum.
  810. How could you have a soccer team if all were goalkeepers? How would it be an orchestra if all were French horns?
  811. Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.
  812. Hate has no place in the house of God.
  813. God’s love is too great to be confined to any one side of a conflict or to any one religion.
  814. God’s dream is that you and I and all of us will realize that we are family, that we are made for togetherness, for goodness, and for compassion.
  815. God is patient with us to become the God’s children he wants us to be but you really can see him weeping.
  816. God is not upset that Gandhi was not a Christian, because God is not a Christian! All of God’s children and their different faiths help us to realize the immensity of God.
  817. Forgiveness says you are given another chance to make a new beginning.
  818. For goodness sake, will they hear, will white people hear what we are trying to say? Please, all we are asking you to do is to recognize that we are humans, too.
  819. For Christians, who believe they are created in the image of God, it is the Godhead, diversity in unity and the three-in-oneness of God, which we and all creation reflect.
  820. Exclusion is never the way forward on our shared paths to freedom and justice.
  821. Europe became rich because it exploited Africa; and the Africans know that.
  822. Do your little bit of good where you are; it’s those little bits of good put together that overwhelm the world.
  823. Children are a wonderful gift. They have an extraordinary capacity to see into the heart of things and to expose sham and humbug for what they are.
  824. But God can only smile because only God can know what is coming next.
  825. Before Nelson Mandela was arrested in 1962, he was an angry, relatively young man. He founded the ANC’s military wing. When he was released, he surprised everyone because he was talking about reconciliation and forgiveness and not about revenge.
  826. Because forgiveness is like this: a room can be dank because you have closed the windows, you’ve closed the curtains. But the sun is shining outside, and the air is fresh outside. In order to get that fresh air, you have to get up and open the window and draw the curtains apart.
  827. Be nice to whites, they need you to rediscover their humanity.
  828. Be nice to the whites, they need you to rediscover their humanity.
  829. As human beings we have the most extraordinary capacity for evil. We can perpetrate some of the most horrendous atrocities.
  830. And every human being is precious.
  831. All the United States, it is a society that is split like to the bottom, that had very poor people in the country that is one of the wealthiest countries.
  832. A person is a person because he recognizes others as persons.
  833. Wise leaders generally have wise counselors because it takes a wise person themselves to distinguish them.
  834. Wise kings generally have wise counselors; and he must be a wise man himself who is capable of distinguishing one.
  835. Why not whip the teacher when the pupil misbehaves?
  836. When I look upon seamen, men of science and philosophers, man is the wisest of all beings; when I look upon priests and prophets nothing is as contemptible as man.
  837. What I like to drink most is wine that belongs to others.
  838. We have two ears and one tongue so that we would listen more and talk less.
  839. Those who have virtue always in their mouths, and neglect it in practice, are like a harp, which emits a sound pleasing to others, while itself is insensible of the music.
  840. There is only a finger’s difference between a wise man and a fool.
  841. The vine bears three kinds of grapes: the first of pleasure, the second of intoxication, the third of disgust.
  842. The sun, too, shines into cesspools and is not polluted.
  843. The sun too penetrates into privies, but is not polluted by them.
  844. The mob is the mother of tyrants.
  845. The great thieves lead away the little thief.
  846. The foundation of every state is the education of its youth.
  847. The art of being a slave is to rule one’s master.
  848. Stand a little less between me and the sun.
  849. Of what use is a philosopher who doesn’t hurt anybody’s feelings?
  850. No man is hurt but by himself.
  851. Most men are within a finger’s breadth of being mad.
  852. Modesty is the color of virtue.
  853. Man is the most intelligent of the animals – and the most silly.
  854. It was a favorite expression of Theophrastus that time was the most valuable thing that a man could spend.
  855. It takes a wise man to discover a wise man.
  856. It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little.
  857. In a rich man’s house there is no place to spit but his face.
  858. I threw my cup away when I saw a child drinking from his hands at the trough.
  859. I know nothing, except the fact of my ignorance.
  860. I have nothing to ask but that you would remove to the other side, that you may not, by intercepting the sunshine, take from me what you cannot give.
  861. I do not know whether there are gods, but there ought to be.
  862. I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.
  863. I am called a dog because I fawn on those who give me anything, I yelp at those who refuse, and I set my teeth in rascals.
  864. He has the most who is most content with the least.
  865. Dogs and philosophers do the greatest good and get the fewest rewards.
  866. Calumny is only the noise of madmen.
  867. Blushing is the color of virtue.
  868. As a matter of self-preservation, a man needs good friends or ardent enemies, for the former instruct him and the latter take him to task.
  869. A friend is one soul abiding in two bodies.
  870. You’ll never do a whole lot unless you’re brave enough to try.
  871. You’d be surprised how much it costs to look this cheap!
  872. You know, I look like a woman but I think like a man. And in this world of business, that has helped me a lot. Because by the time they think that I don’t know what’s goin’ on, I then got the money, and gone.
  873. You gotta keep trying to find your niche and trying to fit into whatever slot that’s left for you or to make one of your own.
  874. You don’t see too many atheists on the deathbed. They all start cramming then.
  875. You don’t need to buy expensive cosmetics; almost anything will do if you know how to apply it.
  876. You can be rich in spirit, kindness, love and all those things that you can’t put a dollar sign on.
  877. You always want your people to be proud of what you have accomplished.
  878. Years ago, when I first started being a big star, I had fans that were fanatical. It was when ‘Jolene’ was a big hit.
  879. Writing’s just as natural to me as getting up and cooking breakfast.
  880. When you’re 40, you can’t ride the fence anymore. You gotta make definite decisions about your life.
  881. When I’m inspired, I get excited because I can’t wait to see what I’ll come up with next.
  882. When I’m home, I spend Sunday with my husband. If we’re not cooking, we travel around in our camper, stop at fast-food restaurants, and picnic. We love that stuff that will harden your arteries in a hurry.
  883. When I was with Andy Warhol, I thought, ‘God, his wig looks cheaper than mine!’
  884. When I was a little girl, I always dreamed of being a star. I didn’t really know what all that meant. I didn’t know.
  885. When I wake up, I expect things to be good. If they’re not, then I try to set about trying to make them as good as I can ’cause I know I’m gonna have to live that day anyway. So why not try to make the most of it if you can? Some days, they pan out a little better than others, but you still gotta always just try.
  886. When I started the Imagination Library in my hometown, I never dreamed that one day we would be helping Scottish kids.
  887. When I got somethin’ to say, I’ll say it.
  888. When I get down, I don’t waller around for long.
  889. When I do listen to music, I’m more prone to listen to the people I’ve always listened to: George Jones, Otis Redding, Alison Krauss and Emmylou Harris.
  890. We’re all just a bunch of sinners, but we do the best we can.
  891. We just seem to have lost all our morals and principles and values these days.
  892. We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.
  893. Until I was a teenager, I used red pokeberries for lipstick and a burnt matchstick for eyeliner. I used honeysuckle for perfume.
  894. They say somebody’s ‘street smart.’ I feel like, if I got intelligence, it’s just a country smart.
  895. There’s nothing like white trash at the White House.
  896. There’s been a lot of talk about Jack White wanting to work with me, and I’ve always admired him, and of course, he lives in Nashville, too.
  897. There’s a scripture that says, ‘A merry heart doeth good like medicine.’ I think that’s true, too.
  898. There’s a lot of rednecks in the country where I grew up.
  899. There are some loony people in this world!
  900. There are certainly a lot of things that still need to change when it comes to women in the workforce.
  901. The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain.
  902. The secret to a long marriage is to stay gone.
  903. The only way I’d be caught without makeup is if my radio fell in the bathtub while I was taking a bath and electrocuted me and I was in between makeup at home. I hope my husband would slap a little lipstick on me before he took me to the morgue.
  904. That little Miley Cyrus… she’s like a little Elvis. The kids love her because she’s Hannah Montana, but what people don’t realize about her is she is such a fantastic singer and songwriter. She writes songs like she’s 40 years old!
  905. Thanks to Botox and fillers, as well as the work that I’ve already had, my face pretty much maintains itself.
  906. Tell me I have to be somewhere, and I’ll be there 20 minutes early and stay there longer than anybody else. You hold up a lot of people if you’re not on time.
  907. Storms make trees take deeper roots.
  908. Stop this attitude that older people ain’t any good anymore! We’re as good as we ever were – if we ever were any good.
  909. Songwriting is my way of channeling my feelings and my thoughts. Not just mine, but the things I see, the people I care about. My head would explode if I didn’t get some of that stuff out.
  910. Sometimes if you jump into something too quickly, you can screw up something that might have been good two years down the road.
  911. Someone once asked me, ‘How long does it take to do your hair.’ I said, ‘I don’t know, I’m never there.’
  912. Some guys look better as they get older.
  913. Sevier County is a great area.
  914. Plastic surgeons are always making mountains out of molehills.
  915. People say I look so happy – and I say, ‘That’s the Botox.’
  916. People make jokes about my bosoms, why don’t they look underneath the breasts at the heart? It’s obvious I’ve got big ones and if people want to assume they’re not mine, then let them.
  917. People like bluegrass. It’s had a following amongst a lot of hip and young people. A lot of college kids like bluegrass.
  918. People just overshoot trying to find God. They’re going outside and trying everything. They don’t realize that it’s right inside themselves.
  919. People get a kick out of my stupidity.
  920. People don’t realize that we, we meaning people in show business, have the same problems as everyone else. Money doesn’t change that. Fame doesn’t change that. Sometimes that brings on more problems. You know, it’s just a different kind of problems.
  921. People are looking for something a little more stable; people are feeling like they need to get closer to God.
  922. People are always asking me in interviews, ‘What do you think of foreign affairs?’ I just say, ‘I’ve had a few.’
  923. Oh, I can spot a phoney a mile away.
  924. Of course, ‘I Will Always Love You’ is the biggest song so far in my career. I’m famous for several, but that one has been recorded by more people and made me more money, I think, than all of them. But that song did come from a true and deep place in my heart.
  925. Nobody can ever make enough money for as many poor relatives as I’ve got. Somebody’s got a sick kid, or somebody needs an operation, somebody ain’t got this, somebody ain’t got that. Or to give the kids all a car when they graduate.
  926. No, I can’t do rap music!
  927. No one is ever successful at everything that they do.
  928. No one could have been nicer, classier nor better looking than Dick Clark. I’ve had a crush on him since I was a teenager.
  929. No matter what, I always make it home for Christmas. I love to go to my Tennessee Mountain Home and invite all of my nieces and nephews and their spouses and kids and do what we all like to do – eat, laugh, trade presents and just enjoy each other… and sometimes I even dress up like Santa Claus!
  930. No matter how beautiful a woman might be, you’re always threatened by certain… You’re always threatened by other women, period.
  931. Never leave a rhinestone unturned.
  932. My weaknesses have always been food and men – in that order.
  933. My songs are the door to every dream I’ve ever had and every success I’ve ever achieved.
  934. My songs are like my children – I expect them to support me when I’m old.
  935. My philosophy is simple: It’s a down-home, common, horse-sense approach to things.
  936. My nails are my rhythm section when I’m writing a song all alone. Some day, I may cut an album, just me and my nails.
  937. My mother was always fascinated with the fact that I could rhyme so much stuff.
  938. My mama never wore a pair of pants when I was growing up, and now that’s all she wears. It was so funny for me when I first started seeing Mama wear pants. It was like it wasn’t Mama. Now I’ve bought her many a pantsuit because she just lives in them.
  939. My lips, I’ve used collagen. I line my lips with collagen.
  940. My life has been very full.
  941. My husband says I look like a Q-tip.
  942. My husband calls me ‘catfish.’ He says I’m all mouth and no brains.
  943. My husband and I had to raise five of my younger brothers and sisters. They lived with us. We sent them to school.
  944. My grandpa was a preacher.
  945. My first phone was two tin cans tied together with string, and it worked pretty good.
  946. My first job was singing on the Cas Walker radio show in Knoxville, Tennessee. I was about 10 years old, and I thought it was big time.
  947. My favorite movies of all times is ‘Doctor Zhivago,’ and I love ‘Gone With the Wind.’ I’d love to play some Southern belle or something where I owned a plantation.
  948. My fat never made me less money.
  949. My biggest extravagances are also investments. I have several houses in California, a house in Nashville, an office complex, and I bought the old home place in Tennessee. They are different places for me to write, but I can turn right around and sell them.
  950. My best country record only sold 200,000 copies.
  951. Most country songs, certainly all the stuff I’ve written, are stories driven by characters.
  952. Money ain’t everything.
  953. Mine is only one of the millions of hearts broken over the death of Whitney Houston, I will always be grateful and in awe of the wonderful performance she did on my song, and I can truly say from the bottom of my heart, ‘Whitney, I will always love you. You will be missed.’
  954. Living in America and, of course, just being women in general, we’ve got more strength than we think we do.
  955. Life is a song to me.
  956. Kitty Wells was the first and only Queen of Country Music, no matter what they call the rest of us. She was a great inspiration to me as well as every other female singer in the country music business. In addition to being a wonderful asset to country music, she was a wonderful woman.
  957. It’s not easy being young. It’s hard to know what to do.
  958. It’s always great to perform at home in the good ol’ U.S.A.
  959. It’s a good thing I was born a girl, otherwise I’d be a drag queen.
  960. It took me years to eat a lot of shellfish. I was probably 20 years old before I had even seen a shrimp cocktail. I like oysters, but fried.
  961. It costs a lot of money to look this cheap.
  962. If you talk bad about country music, it’s like saying bad things about my momma. Them’s fightin’ words.
  963. If you like good ol’ fashion Southern soul food then, yes, I am a good cook! My specialty is chicken dumplings and poke salad.
  964. If you don’t like the road you’re walking, start paving another one.
  965. If people work for me over the years, I expect them to be paid what they’re owed, but I don’t expect them to be paid more than they earn.
  966. If I’d married someone in show business, there’d be too much competition.
  967. If I see something sagging, bagging or dragging I’ll get it nipped, tucked or sucked.
  968. If I hadn’t been a woman, I’d be a drag queen for sure. I like all that flair and I’d be dressing up in them high heels and putting on the big hair. I’d be like Ru Paul.
  969. If I can get my dress on, my weight is under control.
  970. I’ve… been accused of being involved with every man I’m ever seen with or worked with. Maybe I have, maybe I ain’t. I never tell if I have.
  971. I’ve used my femininity and my sexuality as a weapon and a tool… but that’s just natural.
  972. I’ve tried different things through the years to get some play on mainstream. I’ll try to tailor-make it.
  973. I’ve never had that much trouble with the paparazzi, but I don’t run the same circles that a lot of these people that do get hounded by the paparazzi.
  974. I’ve never had a divorce, but I’ve seen so many of my friends, my sister, my family go through that stuff, so I try to write for the people that can’t write about it. I take on their sorrow, so I’m able to kind of express it, or their joy.
  975. I’ve never been pregnant, so I just feel God didn’t mean for me to have kids so that everybody else’s children could be mine.
  976. I’ve never been a feminist.
  977. I’ve enjoyed all the parts of my career.
  978. I’ve done everything every fat person ever has. I’ve tried every diet.
  979. I’ve copyrighted 3,000 songs.
  980. I’ve been very fortunate.
  981. I’ve been to those places where it’s ‘poor, pitiful me.’
  982. I’ve been around longer than most of my fans have been alive.
  983. I’ve always loved the fans in Scotland and have a little Scottish blood of my own.
  984. I’ve always kinda been a little outcast myself, a little oddball, doin’ my thing, my own way. And it’s been hard for me to, to be accepted, certainly in the early years of my life.
  985. I’ve always been fascinated by everything with wings.
  986. I’m working on my life story. I’m not decided if it’s going to be a musical or a movie with music in it.
  987. I’m very short, so I just have to watch my weight because I have a big appetite.
  988. I’m very secure about my talents and about who I am.
  989. I’m trying my best to keep up with all this new technology, and I surround myself with all these wonderful people that are in the know and kind of help me out with all that.
  990. I’m pretty sure in my older years, I’ll be doing old-time flavored folk-mountain music.
  991. I’m old enough and cranky enough now that if someone tried to tell me what to do, I’d tell them where to put it.
  992. I’m not trying to be fashionable. Never was!
  993. I’m not offended by all the dumb blonde jokes because I know I’m not dumb… and I also know that I’m not blonde.
  994. I’m not intimidated by how people perceive me.
  995. I’m not happy all the time, and I wouldn’t want to be because that would make me a shallow person. But I do try to find the good in everybody.
  996. I’m not going to limit myself just because people won’t accept the fact that I can do something else.
  997. I’m not a politician. And I don’t want to be.
  998. I’m no natural beauty. If I’m gonna have any looks at all, I’m gonna have to create them.
  999. I’m just a simple country girl.
  1000. I’m just a friendly person; that runs in my family.
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