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Articles Page 9

Articles Page 9

  1. Sometimes you can’t prioritise family and you feel guilty.
  2. Sixth grade was a big time, in my childhood, of hoops and friendship, and coming up with funny things.
  3. Sir one more comment like that and I will strangle you with my microphone wire!
  4. SNL is a home. You’ve got all of your brothers and sisters there, and it’s a great time.
  5. Now that I’m a parent, I understand why my father was in a bad mood a lot.
  6. My sisters are stronger and my brother’s bigger than me.
  7. My name is Adam Sandler. I’m not particularly talented. I’m not particularly good-looking. And yet I’m a multi-millionaire.
  8. My movies just kind of sneak up on you. I don’t have to worry too much about what everybody is going to say. Anyway, I really don’t pay attention to what the world says about my movies. I just care about what my buddies think.
  9. My grandmother used to embarrass me more, when she would pick me up from school wearing a big fuzzy hat. I didn’t like that.
  10. My father wasn’t perfect. He had a temper. I took some of that. He would snap, but the older he got, he started calming down. He learned about life, but the thing that he taught my whole family was that family was the most important thing and, no matter what, if a family member needs you, you go and help them out; you get there.
  11. My father used to wear the same pants for like a week.
  12. My comedy is different every time I do it. I don’t know what the hell I’m doing.
  13. Most of the stuff I do on the show comes out of me just trying to make my friends laugh.
  14. Kids end up seeing my movies anyway but some of the mothers get mad at me so I figured I’d make one that I can’t get yelled at for.
  15. It’s nice when little teams win.
  16. It definitely has learning a lesson about the way you’re living your life. I wouldn’t compare our movie to that, but it has a structure where it’s about a man who doesn’t appreciate all that he has and finds out at the end that life has been great and he has to enjoy that.
  17. In one day, I have times where I’m feeling great, I feel like I love my life, and then 2:30 rolls around and I’m the angriest man alive. My wife sees it.
  18. In high school I wanted to be a rock star and was in a lot of bands.
  19. I’ve been called a moron since I was about four. My father called me a moron. My grandfather said I was a moron. And a lot of times when I’m driving, I hear I’m a moron. I like being a moron.
  20. I’ve always wanted to do a family movie.
  21. I’ve always liked older ladies, ever since my mother would have B’nai B’rith at our house.
  22. I’ve always had lots of friends and my house was the house they all hung out at.
  23. I’m not looking to get away from anything. I like what I’ve done. I like what I get to do and I enjoy working with my friends. I loved those movies, but this is incredible.
  24. I’m not great at bedtime stories. Bedtime stories are supposed to put the kid to sleep. My kid gets riled up and then my wife has to come in and go, ‘All right! Get out of the room.’
  25. I’m not comfortable being around too many people. I don’t like being out in public too much. I don’t like going to bars. I don’t like doing celebrity stuff. So most of the characters I play are people who don’t always feel comfortable beyond their small circle of friends.
  26. I’m filthy rich!
  27. I’m 31 now. I think I’m beginning to understand what life is, what romance is, and what a relationship means.
  28. I’ll continue to make the typical Adam Sandler comedies.
  29. I wasn’t a kid growing up thinking, ‘One day I’ll get an Oscar and make a speech.’ That wasn’t on my mind.
  30. I was raised by a mother who told me I was great every day of my life.
  31. I was just a young guy who was excited to become a comedian and an actor and I just wanted to get to do what I got to do.
  32. I think the reason I don’t read is because, when I’m reading, I feel like I’m missing out on something else. You know, What are my friends doing? Where’s my girlfriend?
  33. I still get very scared when I step in front of a live audience.
  34. I sing seriously to my mom on the phone. To put her to sleep, I have to sing ‘Maria’ from West Side Story. When I hear her snoring, I hang up.
  35. I shouldn’t be near Vegas and have money in my pocket.
  36. I sang a song at my sister’s wedding. My mother forced me into that, too. But that one felt all right.
  37. I read to my kid, but I can’t stand reading.
  38. I prefer musicals, because I am the best dancer who ever lived. The best plies, the best sashays, and by far the best-smelling Capezios.
  39. I never thought about what people would say about me. I was just a young guy who was excited to become a comedian and an actor, and I just wanted to get to do what I got to do.
  40. I never had a speech from my father ‘this is what you must do or shouldn’t do’ but I just learned to be led by example. My father wasn’t perfect.
  41. I mean, I look at my dad. He was twenty when he started having a family, and he was always the coolest dad. He did everything for his kids, and he never made us feel like he was pressured. I know that it must be a great feeling to be a guy like that.
  42. I like sitting and writing with my buddies.
  43. I know I want to always do the best I can.
  44. I had my moments of being humiliated, and then I had moments of doing something humiliating. I’m glad I lived out both roles.
  45. I grew up cursing a lot. It felt natural. My parents told me to stop.
  46. I grew up cursing a lot.
  47. I go to sleep thinking about my kids being spoiled and I wake up thinking about it.
  48. I don’t think about that. I wasn’t a kid growing up saying one day I’ll get an Oscar and make a speech. That wasn’t on my mind. So what I do is the best work I can do.
  49. I don’t know who I touch and who I don’t. I work hard trying to make people laugh. I try to do the kind of stuff that made me laugh growing up. I don’t have any secrets. I don’t know the reasons I’ve been so well received.
  50. I don’t know what drives me to succeed.
  51. I do love the films I’ve done in the past. I work hard in my movies and my friends work hard and we’re trying to make people laugh and I’m very proud of that.
  52. I definitely connected to the fact that life gets out of control and you end up doing things and wishing you were doing other things instead.
  53. I can handle pain.
  54. How do I speak Spanish? Not too well.
  55. God gave me some weird, beautiful scent that makes men and women go crazy. People compare it to Carvel. It is a whale of a smell.
  56. Girls are soft and pretty.
  57. Feels good to try, but playing a father, I’m getting a little older. I see now that I’m taking it more serious and I do want that lifestyle.
  58. Doing Saturday Night Live definitely affects my relationship with my girlfriend and with my family, because you feel so much pressure to do well that night. But I think everyone’s grown to accept that and so they give me my space at the show.
  59. Chemistry can be a good and bad thing. Chemistry is good when you make love with it. Chemistry is bad when you make crack with it.
  60. As a kid, I’d go into the bathroom when I was having a tantrum. I’d be in the bathroom crying, studying myself in the mirror. I was preparing for future roles.
  61. A lot of critics object to what I do, but I got into comedy to make people laugh, and I’ve always worked hard.
  62. Whether it’s the experiments on ‘MythBusters’ or my earlier work in special effects for movies, I’ve regularly had to do things that were never done before, from designing complex motion-control rigs to figuring out how to animate chocolate.
  63. When I finally got up to Industrial Light And Magic to work on the ‘Star Wars’ movies as a model-maker, it felt like dying and going to heaven.
  64. We’re not leaving here without Buster, man. Leave no crash-test dummy behind!
  65. We didn’t set out to be educators or even scientists, and we don’t purport that what we do is real science but we’re demonstrating a methodology by which one can engage and satisfy your curiosity.
  66. Walking the floor at a con dressed as Chewbacca, you might as well be Bono. I mean it’s ridiculous. People just walk up and grab you and hold you, because they love Chewbacca so much.
  67. This is the point in the show where we say, ‘Oh, what else do we have in the van that’s flammable?’
  68. There’s this group online that I frequent. It’s a group of prop crazies just like me called the Replica Props Forum, and it’s people who trade, make and travel in information about movie props.
  69. There is no dignity in television.
  70. The skeptical community is absolutely near and dear to the ‘Mythbusters’ heart and there’s no small reason that they’ve embraced us. That’s our people. That’s the way we like to think.
  71. The only thing that differentiates you and me from a couple of fourteen year old pyromaniacs is balistic glass!
  72. The idea of an ordered and elegant universe is a lovely one. One worth clinging to. But you don’t need religion to appreciate the ordered existence. It’s not just an idea, it’s reality. We’re discovering the hidden orders of the universe every day.
  73. The fact is that the British Museum had a complete specimen of a dodo in their collection up until the 18th century – it was actually mummified, skin and all – but in a fit of space-saving zeal, they actually cut off the head and they cut off the feet and they burned the rest in a bonfire.
  74. The coolest toys don’t have to be bought; they can be built. In fact, sometimes the only way they’ll ever exist is if you make them yourself.
  75. The best-case scenario is that the glass shatters in my face! How do you think that makes me feel?
  76. The Internet is probably the most important technological advancement of my lifetime. Its strength lies in its open architecture and its ability to allow a framework where all voices can be heard.
  77. The ‘Mythbusters’ crew, we monitor the Discovery boards, we look for the new ideas that are being forwarded on those boards, and we keep track of what’s going on, we keep updated.
  78. That’s the show. it’s like 5 minutes of science and then 10 minutes of me hurting myself.
  79. That aesthetic of the Star Wars universe: the do-it-yourself, hotrod ethic that George Lucas exported from his childhood, is exactly the same kind of soul behind what we do and build for the show. It may not look pretty, but it gets the job done.
  80. Technology is usually there to let some process go on hidden in the background. For us on ‘MythBusters,’ we’re always trying to make the process apparent. So, we have learned to try and never rely on a technological solution when an analogue one is in front of us.
  81. Stand back! I gotta get some rocket fuel out of the fridge!
  82. Remember kids, I have life insurance.
  83. Prayer doesn’t work because someone out there is listening, it works because someone in here is listening. I’ve paid attention. I’ve pictured what I want to happen in my life. I’ve meditated extensively on my family, my future, my past actions and what did and didn’t work for me about them.
  84. Of course, I love tools. I also love arranging them, to the point where I came up with a name for my organizing metric: first-order retrievability.
  85. New York State is giant and has some of the most beautiful landscape on the Eastern seaboard. There is so much history in New York State, from the Erie Canal to the Catskills, the birth of American stand-up comedy.
  86. My dignity and good television – they’ll never meet.
  87. My advice is keep your lips away from the spinning things.
  88. Mostly I make lists for projects. This can be daunting. Breaking something big into its constituent parts will help you organize your thoughts, but it can also force you to confront the depth of your ignorance and the hugeness of the task. That’s OK. The project may be the lion, but the list is your whip.
  89. Lists are how I parse and manage the world.
  90. Let’s get on our knees and pray. I don’t know to whom. Is there a patron saint of ballistics gel?
  91. Let’s blow some stuff up.
  92. Jamie’s gonna go take a break now, and i am going to continue the on-going process of making a fool of myself and go ahead and try it myself.
  93. Jamie doesn’t like to do anything hastily, and I like to do everything incredibly hastily. So therein you have the dichotomy of our patterns.
  94. It’s sort of a mental attitude about critical thinking and curiosity. It’s about mindset of looking at the world in a playful and curious and creative way.
  95. Isn’t television glamourous?
  96. In theory, cars are fairly simple. If they don’t start, it’s either the fuel system or the electrical system. Teach yourself about the path of each in your engine and tracing it is fairly straightforward. But at the beginning, mastering each new system seems like an unreachable shore. The car is effectively a black box.
  97. In the spirit of science, there really is no such thing as a ‘failed experiment.’ Any test that yields valid data is a valid test.
  98. I’ve learned over decades of building that a deadline is a potent tool for problem-solving.
  99. I’ve always thought something that makes you laugh, it makes you laugh because there’s a little bit of truth to it.
  100. I’m obsessed with the form of a toolbox. The idea of a portable kit that has everything you might need ignites something inside me. It’s like Batman’s utility belt.
  101. I’m not gonna shoot anyone with the pellet gun… Not unless I have to!
  102. I’m not a sculptor; I’m a hard-edged model maker. You give me a drawing, you give me a prop to replicate, you give me a crane, scaffolding, parts from ‘Star Wars’ – especially parts from ‘Star Wars’ – I can do this stuff all day long. It’s exactly how I made my living for 15 years.
  103. I’m always going to be making costumes. It’s one of the ways I relax my brain. In addition to the pleasure of having the piece, there is a deep and abiding pleasure for me assembling something in my head – learning to know something in its totality in my head, and then putting together all the constituent parts into a cohesive whole.
  104. I’m actually the fourth generation in my family to have no practical use for the church, or God, or religion. My children continue this trend.
  105. I’m a lifelong movie addict, and one of my favorite projects is making replica props and costumes. Nearly every one of these – from R2D2 to Hellboy’s revolver – ends with the paint job. And it’s not just cosmetic. The paint literally tells a story: what this thing is made of, where it’s been, what it’s been used for, and for how long.
  106. I wouldn’t say jamie is an evil genius. I’m not sure he’s evil and I’m not sure he’s a genius.
  107. I would have to say that looked like it hurt.
  108. I think one of the defining moments of adulthood is the realization that nobody’s going to take care of you. That you have to do the heavy lifting while you’re here. And when you don’t, well, you suffer the consequences.
  109. I think LEGOs are one of the best toys ever developed.
  110. I reject your reality and substitute my own.
  111. I like to work fast. I despise not having the right tool or, worse, knowing I have it but not being able to find it. It’s a pointless delay that wrecks my pace – and mood.
  112. I learned at an early age that I could make the things that I wanted. That’s a very powerful thing to realize as a kid. LEGOs were a key part of that.
  113. I just had one of those ‘what the hell are we doing’ moments.
  114. I have some ideas on how to fix that. They’re not very good ideas, but at least they’re ideas!
  115. I had saved a few hundred photos of dodo skeletons into my ‘Creative Projects’ folder – it’s a repository for my brain, everything that I could possibly be interested in. Any time I have an Internet connection, there’s a sluice of stuff moving into there, everything from beautiful rings to cockpit photos.
  116. I go home at the end of the day and I rarely talk about what I did that day. So my wife’s experience is just like that of anybody else whose husband goes away to a blue collar job and comes home bruised and dirty and often proud of the work that they’re doing.
  117. I am now standing in a mixture of cooling fluid, gasoline, and cola.
  118. I am incrementally a pessimist, but I see the international debate that Edward Snowden has engendered, and I think this is exactly where the discussion should be. So, I would say I’m more optimistic than pessimistic.
  119. Growing up in New York, I was sort of shocked when I realized that my children are Californians. They are 14 years old, and I explain to them frequently that they will never realize the glory of a snow day. You wake up and the world says, ‘Oops, it’s too much fun to go to school, you’ve got to stay home and deal with the snow!’
  120. From earliest times, humans – explorers and thinkers – have wanted to figure out the shape of their world. Forever, the way we’ve done that is through storytelling. It is difficult to let the truth get in the way of a good story.
  121. Firemen have the coolest toys ever!
  122. Failure is always an option.
  123. Deadlines refine the mind. They remove variables like exotic materials and processes that take too long. The closer the deadline, the more likely you’ll start thinking waaay outside the box.
  124. Bigger is always better.
  125. Being a geek is all about learning the inventories of things.
  126. Back when I was a professional model-maker at Industrial Light & Magic, my specialty was hard-edged construction – spaceships, miniature sets, and architectural stuff. These objects were sometimes just 12 inches across yet needed enough detail to fill a movie screen.
  127. Audiences of critical thinkers are my favorite kinds of audiences. There are jokes I tell in the show that don’t get laughs unless I am in front of an audience of critical thinkers. Put me in front of a crowd of science teachers or astronauts! The guileless aren’t our audience – it’s the critical thinkers we love.
  128. Am I about to feel really, really stupid?
  129. Again, like I said, my life has been about being fascinated by objects and the stories that they tell, and also making them for myself, obtaining them, appreciating them and diving into them.
  130. With the greater part of rich people, the chief enjoyment of riches consists in the parade of riches.
  131. What can be added to the happiness of a man who is in health, out of debt, and has a clear conscience?
  132. Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because its excesses are not subject to the regulation of conscience.
  133. To feel much for others and little for ourselves; to restrain our selfishness and exercise our benevolent affections, constitute the perfection of human nature.
  134. This is one of those cases in which the imagination is baffled by the facts.
  135. The theory that can absorb the greatest number of facts, and persist in doing so, generation after generation, through all changes of opinion and detail, is the one that must rule all observation.
  136. The real tragedy of the poor is the poverty of their aspirations.
  137. The real and effectual discipline which is exercised over a workman is that of his customers. It is the fear of losing their employment which restrains his frauds and corrects his negligence.
  138. The propensity to truck, barter and exchange one thing for another is common to all men, and to be found in no other race of animals.
  139. Science is the great antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition.
  140. Resentment seems to have been given us by nature for a defense, and for a defense only! It is the safeguard of justice and the security of innocence.
  141. Poor David Hume is dying fast, but with more real cheerfulness and good humor and with more real resignation to the necessary course of things, than any whining Christian ever dyed with pretended resignation to the will of God.
  142. On the road from the City of Skepticism, I had to pass through the Valley of Ambiguity.
  143. No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable.
  144. No complaint… is more common than that of a scarcity of money.
  145. Man is an animal that makes bargains: no other animal does this – no dog exchanges bones with another.
  146. Little else is requisite to carry a state to the highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism but peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice: all the rest being brought about by the natural course of things.
  147. Labour was the first price, the original purchase – money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all wealth of the world was originally purchased.
  148. Labor was the first price, the original purchase – money that was paid for all things.
  149. It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest.
  150. It is not by augmenting the capital of the country, but by rendering a greater part of that capital active and productive than would otherwise be so, that the most judicious operations of banking can increase the industry of the country.
  151. I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good.
  152. Humanity is the virtue of a woman, generosity that of a man.
  153. Happiness never lays its finger on its pulse.
  154. Great ambition, the desire of real superiority, of leading and directing, seems to be altogether peculiar to man, and speech is the great instrument of ambition.
  155. Defense is superior to opulence.
  156. Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production; and the interest of the producer ought to be attended to, only so far as it may be necessary for promoting that of the consumer.
  157. As soon as the land of any country has all become private property, the landlords, like all other men, love to reap where they never sowed, and demand a rent even for its natural produce.
  158. All money is a matter of belief.
  159. Adventure upon all the tickets in the lottery, and you lose for certain; and the greater the number of your tickets the nearer your approach to this certainty.
  160. When man lives under government, he is fallen, his worth is gone, and his nature tarnished.
  161. This is the great object held out by this association; and the means of attaining it is illumination, enlightening the understanding by the sun of reason which will dispell the clouds of superstition and of prejudice.
  162. The human race will then become one family, and the world will be the dwelling of Rational Men.
  163. The head of every family will be what Abraham was, the patriarch, the priest and the unlettered lord of his family, and Reason will be the code of laws to all mankind.
  164. The hankering of the mind is irresistible.
  165. The first task of the association must therefore be to form the young members.
  166. Oh mortal man, is there anything you cannot be made to believe?
  167. Of all the means I know to lead men, the most effectual is a concealed mystery.
  168. Nothing would be more profitable to us than a right history of mankind.
  169. My general plan is good, though in the detail there may be faults.
  170. Morality will perform all this; and Morality is the fruit of Illumination.
  171. Let this circumstance of our constitution therefore be directed to this noble purpose, and then all the objections urged against it by jealous tyranny and affrighted superstition will vanish.
  172. It was the full conviction of this, and of what could be done, if every man were placed in the office for which he was fitted by nature and a proper education, which first suggested to me the plan of Illumination.
  173. In another situation, and in an active station in life, I should have been keenly occupied, and the founding of an order would have never come into my head.
  174. I did not bring Deism into Bavaria.
  175. I am proud to be known to the world as the founder of the Illuminati.
  176. G is Grace, the Flaming Star is the Torch of Reason. Those who possess this knowledge are indeed Illuminati.
  177. But alas, they are all sadly deficient, because they leave us under the domination of political and religious prejudices; and they are as inefficient as the sleepy dose of an ordinary sermon.
  178. But I would have executed much greater things, had not government always opposed my exertions, and placed others in situations which would have suited my talents.
  179. And of all illumination which human reason can give, none is comparable to the discovery of what we are, our nature, our obligations, what happiness we are capable of, and what are the means of attaining it.
  180. You have to prioritize what you stress about when you have a child.
  181. You can’t complain about your dressing room or you’ll look like Celine Dion.
  182. There will be no new music until it’s good enough and until I’m ready.
  183. There is nothing that would upset me more than my dad being bribed by the press. It’s like, ‘Just let them run it, then. Don’t you give them ammunition.’
  184. The way I write my songs is that I have to believe what I’m writing about, and that’s why they always end up being so personal – because the kind of artists I like, they convince me, they totally win me over straight away in that thing. Like, ‘Oh my God, this song is totally about me.’
  185. The thought of someone spending $20 to come and see me and saying, ‘Oh, I prefer the record and she’s completely shattered the illusion’ really upsets me. It’s such a big deal that people come give me their time.
  186. The focus on my appearance has really surprised me. I’ve always been a size 14 to 16, I don’t care about clothes, I’d rather spend my money on cigarettes and booze.
  187. Sometimes with pop music, you have to see it to love it. With soul music, it’s sparse. There’s nothing that’s pretentious or planned. It’s just so gutsy.
  188. Sometimes my songs wander off a bit and are not always coherent.
  189. People think that I popped out of my mother’s womb singing ‘Chasing Pavements’.
  190. People are starting to go on about my weight but I’m not going to change my size because they don’t like the way I look.
  191. My worst fear is my music won’t connect with the public.
  192. My voice went recently, never happened before, off like a tap. I had to sit in silence for nine days, chalkboard around my neck. Like an old-school mime. Like a kid in the naughty corner. Like a Victorian mute.
  193. My life is full of drama, and I don’t have time to worry about something as petty as what I look like.
  194. My body doesn’t have any rhythm, you know. I’ve got quite good rhythm when I’m singing but my feet are very much two left feet.
  195. Mum loves me being famous! She is so excited and proud, as she had me so young and couldn’t support me, so I am living her dream, it’s sweeter for both of us. It’s her 40th birthday soon and I’m going to buy her 40 presents.
  196. It’s warts and all in my songs, and I think that’s why people can relate to them.
  197. It’s never been an issue for me – I don’t want to go on a diet, I don’t want to eat a Caesar salad with no dressing, why would I do that? I ain’t got time for this, just be happy and don’t be stupid. If I’ve got a boyfriend and he loves my body then I’m not worried.
  198. It has gotten worse as I’m becoming more successful. My nerves. Just because there’s a bit more pressure, and people are expecting a lot more from me.
  199. In the songs I can still be really really direct but in interviews when I’m explaining my songs I shouldn’t be so direct about who they’re about.
  200. In five years’ time I’d like to be a mum. I want to settle down and have a family, definitely sooner rather than later. I’d like to have finished my second album too, maybe even my third. I’d like a sound that sticks around that other people are inspired by and that people know is me.
  201. If I were a writer and not a singer in 10 years, I don’t know how I’d feel about writing really personal songs and getting someone else to sing them.
  202. If I am constantly working, my relationships fail. So at least now I can have enough time to write a happy record. And be in love and be happy. And then I don’t know what I’ll do. Get married. Have some kids. Plant a nice vegetable patch.
  203. I’ve never wanted to look like models on the cover of magazines. I represent the majority of women and I’m very proud of that.
  204. I’ve never been more normal than I am now.
  205. I’ve got some news… I’m delighted to announce that Simon and I are expecting our first child together. I wanted you to hear the news direct from me, obviously we’re over the moon.
  206. I’ve been singing properly every day since I was about fifteen or sixteen, and I have never had any problems with my voice, ever. I’ve had a sore throat here and there, had a cold and sung through it, but that day it just went while I was onstage in Paris during a radio show. It was literally like someone had pulled a curtain over it.
  207. I’ve always written down how I feel.
  208. I’m very confident. Even when I read people saying horrible stuff about my weight.
  209. I’m scared of audiences. One show in Amsterdam I was so nervous, I escaped out the fire exit. I’ve thrown up a couple of times. Once in Brussels, I projectile vomited on someone. I just gotta bear it. But I don’t like touring. I have anxiety attacks a lot.
  210. I’m scared of audiences.
  211. I’m really happy to be me, and I’d like to think people like me more because I’m happy with myself and not because I refuse to conform to anything.
  212. I’m nervous whenever I perform.
  213. I’m like Johnny Cash. I only wear black.
  214. I’m a big personality. I walk into a room, big and tall and loud.
  215. I’d love to be an artist always, but if no one wants me, I’d love to write songs for other people, be a manager, nurture new talent.
  216. I wouldn’t be able to write a song like ‘Someone Like You’ and get someone else to sing it because it’s so personal. It’s like giving away your heart.
  217. I will not do festivals. The thought of an audience that big frightens the life out of me.
  218. I was adopting an Ethiopian child, that’s not true. My house was haunted, that wasn’t true. God, there’s been so many rumours.
  219. I was about to meet Beyonce, and I had a full-blown anxiety attack. Then she popped in looking gorgeous, and said, ‘You’re amazing! When I listen to you I feel like I’m listening to God.’
  220. I wanted to be a singer forever. But it’s not really my cup of tea. Having the whole world know who you are.
  221. I want to go and see things as a fan again. I am a fan, but I can’t remember what it feels like to be a fan anymore. Because I’ve become an artist. I’ve become the artist.
  222. I think it’s shameful when you sell out. It depends what kind of artist you wanna be, but I don’t want my name anywhere near another brand.
  223. I no longer buy papers or tabloids or magazines or read blogs. I used to. But it was just filling up my day with hatred.
  224. I no longer buy papers or tabloids or magazines or read blogs. I used to.
  225. I love love songs. But I love pop music as well: Girls Aloud, Kylie, the Spice Girls, East 17, Mika.
  226. I love hearing my audience breathe.
  227. I love a card. You know, cards? At birthdays? I collect them.
  228. I love a bit of drama. That’s a bad thing. I can flip really quickly.
  229. I like looking nice, but I always put comfort over fashion. I don’t find thin girls attractive; be happy and healthy. I’ve never had a problem with the way I look. I’d rather have lunch with my friends than go to a gym.
  230. I like having my hair and face done, but I’m not going to lose weight because someone tells me to. I make music to be a musician not to be on the cover of Playboy.
  231. I just want to make music, I don’t want people to talk about me. All I’ve ever wanted to do was sing. I don’t want to be a celebrity. I don’t want to be in people’s faces, you know, constantly on covers of magazine that I haven’t even known I’m on.
  232. I have never been insecure, ever, about how I look, about what I want to do with myself. My mum told me to only ever do things for myself, not for others.
  233. I have insecurities of course, but I don’t hang out with anyone who points them out to me.
  234. I get so nervous on stage I can’t help but talk. I try. I try telling my brain: stop sending words to the mouth. But I get nervous and turn into my grandma. Behind the eyes it’s pure fear. I find it difficult to believe I’m going to be able to deliver.
  235. I find it quite difficult to think that there’s, you know, about 20 million people listening to my album that I wrote very selfishly to get over a breakup. I didn’t write it being that it’s going to be a hit.
  236. I doubt I’ll be singing forever, because at some point people aren’t going to want to hear my music, and I hope that I’ll still get the opportunity to write songs.
  237. I don’t write songs about a specific, elusive thing. I write about love, and everyone knows what it is like to have your heart broken.
  238. I don’t write songs about a specific, elusive thing.
  239. I don’t want to be in everyone’s face. I’m a big music fan, and I get really pissed off when it gets like that… and I don’t want people to get like that with me.
  240. I don’t want to be a celebrity. I don’t want to be in people’s faces, you know, constantly on covers of magazine that I haven’t even known I’m on.
  241. I don’t want people confusing what it is that I’m about. I just stand there and sing. And I don’t do stunts or anything. if I wanted to do all that, I don’t think I’d get away with it.
  242. I don’t rely on my figure to sell records.
  243. I don’t really need to stand out, there’s room for everyone. Although I haven’t built a niche yet, I’m just writing love songs.
  244. I don’t make music for eyes. I make music for ears.
  245. I don’t like going to the gym.
  246. I don’t date celebrities.
  247. I can’t write another breakup record. That would be a real cliche.
  248. I can’t dance to save my life.
  249. I can’t believe I did a peace sign on TV – like Ringo Starr!
  250. I am quite loud and bolshie. I’m a big personality. I walk into a room, big and tall and loud.
  251. I am quite loud and bolshie.
  252. I am never writing a breakup record again, by the way. I’m done with being a bitter witch.
  253. Heartbreak can definitely give you a deeper sensibility for writing songs. I drew on a lot of heartbreak when I was writing my first album, I didn’t mean to but I just did.
  254. Even if I did have, you know, a ‘Sports Illustrated’ body, I’d still wear elegant clothes.
  255. Crying is really bad for your vocal cords.
  256. Americans are always mortified when I tell them this, but in England, it’s a tradition to put your plaques and photographs and awards and gold records and stuff in your bathroom. I don’t know why.
  257. Your days are short here; this is the last of your springs. And now in the serenity and quiet of this lovely place, touch the depths of truth, feel the hem of Heaven. You will go away with old, good friends. And don’t forget when you leave why you came.
  258. You know, you really can’t beat a household commodity – the ketchup bottle on the kitchen table.
  259. You can tell the size of a man by the size of the thing that makes him mad.
  260. What a man knows at fifty that he did not know at twenty is for the most part incommunicable.
  261. We travel together, passengers on a little spaceship, dependent on its vulnerable reserves of air and soil, all committed, for our safety, to its security and peace. Preserved from annihilation only by the care, the work and the love we give our fragile craft.
  262. We must recover the element of quality in our traditional pursuit of equality. We must not, in opening our schools to everyone, confuse the idea that all should have equal chance with the notion that all have equal endowments.
  263. We mean by ‘politics’ the people’s business – the most important business there is.
  264. We have confused the free with the free and easy.
  265. We can chart our future clearly and wisely only when we know the path which has led to the present.
  266. To act coolly, intelligently and prudently in perilous circumstances is the test of a man – and also a nation.
  267. Those who corrupt the public mind are just as evil as those who steal from the public purse.
  268. There was a time when a fool and his money were soon parted, but now it happens to everybody.
  269. There is a spiritual hunger in the world today – and it cannot be satisfied by better cars on longer credit terms.
  270. The whole basis of the United Nations is the right of all nations – great or small – to have weight, to have a vote, to be attended to, to be a part of the twentieth century.
  271. The time to stop a revolution is at the beginning, not the end.
  272. The relationship of the toastmaster to speaker should be the same as that of the fan to the fan dancer. It should call attention to the subject without making any particular effort to cover it.
  273. The journey of a thousand leagues begins with a single step. So we must never neglect any work of peace within our reach, however small.
  274. The idea that you can merchandise candidates for high office like breakfast cereal – that you can gather votes like box tops – is, I think, the ultimate indignity to the democratic process.
  275. The human race has improved everything, but the human race.
  276. The hardest thing about any political campaign is how to win without proving that you are unworthy of winning.
  277. The first principle of a free society is an untrammeled flow of words in an open forum.
  278. The best reason I can think of for not running for President of the United States is that you have to shave twice a day.
  279. That which seems the height of absurdity in one generation often becomes the height of wisdom in another.
  280. Some people approach every problem with an open mouth.
  281. Public confidence in the integrity of the Government is indispensable to faith in democracy; and when we lose faith in the system, we have lost faith in everything we fight and spend for.
  282. Peace is the one condition of survival in this nuclear age.
  283. On this shrunken globe, men can no longer live as strangers.
  284. On the plains of hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who at the dawn of victory lay down to rest, and in resting died.
  285. Nothing so dates a man as to decry the younger generation.
  286. Nixon is finding out there are no tails on an Eisenhower jacket.
  287. Newspaper editors are men who separate the wheat from the chaff, and then print the chaff.
  288. Nature is neutral.
  289. Nature is indifferent to the survival of the human species, including Americans.
  290. Man is a strange animal. He generally cannot read the handwriting on the wall until his back is up against it.
  291. Man does not live by words alone, despite the fact that sometimes he has to eat them.
  292. Making peace is harder than making war.
  293. Laws are never as effective as habits.
  294. Law is not a profession at all, but rather a business service station and repair shop.
  295. Journalists do not live by words alone, although sometimes they have to eat them.
  296. It’s hard to lead a cavalry charge if you think you look funny on a horse.
  297. It will be helpful in our mutual objective to allow every man in America to look his neighbor in the face and see a man-not a color.
  298. It is not the years in your life but the life in your years that counts.
  299. In quiet places, reason abounds.
  300. Ignorance is stubborn and prejudice is hard.
  301. If the Republicans will stop telling lies about the Democrats, we will stop telling the truth about them.
  302. I’m not an old, experienced hand at politics. But I am now seasoned enough to have learned that the hardest thing about any political campaign is how to win without proving that you are unworthy of winning.
  303. I think that one of the most fundamental responsibilities is to give testimony in a court of law, to give it honestly and willingly.
  304. I have tried to talk about the issues in this campaign… and this has sometimes been a lonely road, because I never meet anybody coming the other way.
  305. I have been thinking that I would make a proposition to my Republican friends… that if they will stop telling lies about the Democrats, we will stop telling the truth about them.
  306. I don’t want to send them to jail. I want to send them to school.
  307. I believe that if we really want human brotherhood to spread and increase until it makes life safe and sane, we must also be certain that there is no one true faith or path by which it may spread.
  308. I believe in the forgiveness of sin and the redemption of ignorance.
  309. He who slings mud generally loses ground.
  310. Freedom rings where opinions clash.
  311. Flattery is all right so long as you don’t inhale.
  312. Every age needs men who will redeem the time by living with a vision of the things that are to be.
  313. Do you know the difference between a beautiful woman and a charming one? A beauty is a woman you notice, a charmer is one who notices you.
  314. Communism is the death of the soul. It is the organization of total conformity – in short, of tyranny – and it is committed to making tyranny universal.
  315. Communism is the corruption of a dream of justice.
  316. Change is inevitable. Change for the better is a full-time job.
  317. As citizens of this democracy, you are the rulers and the ruled, the law-givers and the law-abiding, the beginning and the end.
  318. An editor is someone who separates the wheat from the chaff and then prints the chaff.
  319. An Independent is someone who wants to take the politics out of politics.
  320. All progress has resulted from people who took unpopular positions.
  321. After four years at the United Nations I sometimes yearn for the peace and tranquility of a political convention.
  322. Accuracy to a newspaper is what virtue is to a lady; but a newspaper can always print a retraction.
  323. A politician is a statesman who approaches every question with an open mouth.
  324. A hypocrite is the kind of politician who would cut down a redwood tree, then mount the stump and make a speech for conservation.
  325. A hungry man is not a free man.
  326. A beauty is a woman you notice; a charmer is one who notices you.
  327. The work of art shows people new directions and thinks of the future. The house thinks of the present.
  328. The work of art is brought into the world without there being a need for it. The house satisfies a requirement. The work of art is responsible to none; the house is responsible to everyone. The work of art wants to draw people out of their state of comfort.
  329. The room has to be comfortable; the house has to look habitable.
  330. The law courts must appear as a threatening gesture toward secret vice. The bank must declare: here your money is secure and well looked after by honest people.
  331. The house has to serve comfort. The work of art is revolutionary; the house is conservative.
  332. The house has to please everyone, contrary to the work of art which does not. The work is a private matter for the artist. The house is not.
  333. The Potemkin city of which I wish to speak here is none other than our dear Vienna herself.
  334. Supply and demand regulate architectural form.
  335. Man loves everything that satisfies his comfort. He hates everything that wants to draw him out of his acquired and secured position and that disturbs him. Thus he loves the house and hates art.
  336. It does not do to use it with forms whose origin is intimately bound up with a specific material simply because no technical difficulties stand in the way.
  337. Does it follow that the house has nothing in common with art and is architecture not to be included in the arts? Only a very small part of architecture belongs to art: the tomb and the monument. Everything else that fulfils a function is to be excluded from the domain of art.
  338. Changes in the traditional way of building are only permitted if they are an improvement. Otherwise stay with what is traditional, for truth, even if it be hundreds of years old has a stronger inner bond with us than the lie that walks by our side.
  339. Be truthful, nature only sides with truth.
  340. Be not afraid of being called un-fashionable.
  341. At the beginning of the nineteenth century we abandoned tradition, it’s at that point that I intend to renew it because the present is built on the past just as the past was built on the times that went before it.
  342. Architecture arouses sentiments in man. The architect’s task therefore, is to make those sentiments more precise.
  343. Young people are often asked, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ and given advice about how to lead meaningful adult lives, but where’s the encouragement to lead meaningful lives right now?
  344. With writing, I can express myself, really, and share my ideas and just let my thoughts flow out.
  345. When I was little, I thought everyone in the world liked to read because it was so fun. But then I realised that was not exactly true. I want other kids to read and write more all over the world, because it helps them to understand things better.
  346. We’re used to the characteristics of social media – participation, connection, instant gratification – and when school doesn’t offer the same, it’s easy to tune out.
  347. We need to reward the ‘thankless job’ of substitute teaching with better pay and chances for permanent positions. I look forward to the day when no student comes home saying, ‘I didn’t learn much today… we had a sub.’
  348. We always reference kids but very rarely ask their opinion. Our inexperience might be what gives us the ability to teach our elders something, due to the fact that we are not jaded or cynical.
  349. We all love people who give credit to others for their success. Companies would probably do better with CEOs who didn’t blow their own horn and ask for ridiculous salaries and new yachts every year.
  350. To try to teach ignoring technology is to ignore the progress that we have made over the last century. If school is preparation for the real world – a real world that is increasingly technology-driven – then to ignore technology is to become obsolete.
  351. There are lots of different interpretations of the word ‘prodigy.’ My own is of someone who is talented and tries to help other children. So in that respect I could be called one, although I don’t think I’ll go off the rails.
  352. The world needs opportunities for new leaders and new ideas. Kids need opportunities to lead and succeed. Are you ready to make the match? Because the world’s problems shouldn’t be the human family’s heirloom.
  353. The unsaid message of that endless rack of juniors’ pushup bras? No matter what size you are, it still isn’t good enough.
  354. The traits the word ‘childish’ addresses are seen so often in adults that we should abolish this age-discriminatory word when it comes to criticizing behavior associated with irresponsibility and irrational thinking.
  355. The point of my work is to make it clear that all youth can make ‘big miracles’ happen.
  356. The only time I felt I was different was when one of my friends said, ‘I hate reading’ and I stared at her like, ‘What kind of an alien creature are you?!’ Because it was so incomprehensible to me that someone could dislike reading! That really started my desire to help other children love reading and writing.
  357. The idea there were kids out there who didn’t love to read and write just as much as I did struck me. So I went around schools and tried to make other kids love to read and write.
  358. The first thing anyone can do, about any issue, is get informed.
  359. The fact that a baby can be born today and condemned to a life of hardship, struggle, and discrimination simply because of sex is enraging.
  360. The current concept of prom just seems so empty. Teenagers get dressed up to go to a dance at a fancy location. It encourages social inclusion or exclusion based on your ability or inability to snag a date.
  361. Success on the front of women’s rights will look like a world not only with obvious advances – where no girl is denied access to education, for instance – but also one with more subtle changes in how we regard gender and gender stereotypes.
  362. Students read for tests and because their parents ask them to, but I think it’s very important to tell children that you can read for fun, too, and to understand human spirit. It builds empathy.
  363. Since the age of four, I’ve been exploring what I can do with the written word: everything from championing literacy and youth voice to raising awareness about world hunger.
  364. Prom has all the elements of a popular story. It reeks of all-Americanness, tension, drama. It has romance. Pretty dresses. Dancing. Limos. High school. Coming of age.
  365. None of my friends don’t have Facebook accounts. Op-eds and studies can highlight our decreased enthusiasm for Facebook ’til the cows come home, but it doesn’t change the fact that we are chained to the beast. Voluntarily, of course.
  366. My parents homeschooled my sister and me for many years. Why? Because the local school insisted that I, being three, should go to preschool, and my sister, being five, should go to kindergarten. The problem? You learn your alphabet in preschool, and I was already reading chapter books.
  367. My family joke that I’m really a very senior person who accidentally happens to be 11.
  368. Mostly, I avoid worrying since the time spent doing it could be spent more constructively.
  369. Make sure that your kids or the kids in your life have an opportunity to share their ideas, and to teach you something about what we know.
  370. Like probably a lot of people, I came away from watching films like ‘Miss Representation’ and ‘Half the Sky’ with the realization that the battle for women’s rights is not over, especially not globally, and that the moral imperative of our century is to achieve full rights for everyone regardless of gender.
  371. It seems we’re not only uninformed about our present, we’re ignorant of our past.
  372. Ineffective substitute teaching is a problem that means thousands of hours of lost learning for America’s students. It cannot be dismissed with a sigh and ‘Just wait for the teacher to come back on Monday.’
  373. In many countries, schools are preparing students to participate in a democratic environment; yet schools themselves tend to be extremely autocratic, with all high-level decisions being made by adults.
  374. If we all understood we can learn from both older and younger people, then we’d have a better world.
  375. If I had my way, I’d end all wars and poverty. We should all be more aware of what’s going on in the world around us and less ignorant.
  376. I wouldn’t call myself a geek, but I do sometimes teach Mommy and Daddy stuff about computers. And I do watch TV, but only informative programmes like the news and documentaries.
  377. I would say that kids are great in many ways, because I think that we are less hampered when it comes to ‘this costs too much’ or ‘that’s impossible’.
  378. I would love it if we made more comparisons between current issues and issues of the past. Maybe we’d realize that sometimes ‘current issues’ and ‘past issues’ are one and the same. Our world’s people still fight over natural resources, kill in the name of religion, occupy regions and give them up – just as we did ‘so long ago.’
  379. I was thrilled to be able to read at three. I just thought everyone loved reading as much as I did.
  380. I think women should be more independent. In society, we’re portrayed as people who simply wear make-up and sit around. We need a Princess Charming – a woman who rescues her man and slays the dragon instead of the other way round.
  381. I think that my peers deserve more than products to buy wrapped up in advertising. We need ideas to share and causes to believe in – opportunities to lead and teach.
  382. I think one of the keys to better writing is releasing all of your ideas and to not be afraid. Dream big. This could be the greatest novel in the world you know.
  383. I realise I’m still a child, though I do feel older. I recently did an on-line test called ‘What’s Your True Age?’ My result was 50-60 years old.
  384. I realise I’m still a child, though I do feel older.
  385. I need to be allowed to make my own decisions and mistakes, take leaps – and fall – without receiving too much help, because it’s what I’ll be doing for the rest of my life.
  386. I do wear a lot of hats, and sometimes people get confused with all that I do, but one thing that I am extraordinarily passionate about is furthering women’s rights. I think it’s something that’s incredibly important, not just for girls everywhere but also boys to get involved in.
  387. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of family encouragement – not just for me, but for everyone.
  388. I am writing to make sure that kids don’t lose very important traits like curiosity that can drive social change because oftentimes I think parents emphasise more on doing well in school, which is important, but perhaps that sometimes comes at the cost of a child’s natural curiosity.
  389. Hoping to instill my love of learning in other children, I taught my first class at a local elementary school the year my first book, ‘Flying Fingers,’ debuted; since then, I have spoken at hundreds of schools, classrooms and conferences around the world.
  390. History is made every day. The challenge is getting everyone to pay attention to it.
  391. For kids like me, being called childish can be a frequent occurrence. Every time we make irrational demands, exhibit irresponsible behavior, or display any other signs of being normal American citizens, we are called childish.
  392. Enthusiasm just creates bubbles; it doesn’t keep them from popping.
  393. CEOs of top companies could probably use a dose of not-asking-for-raise behavior and less self-entitlement, rather than us trying to change girls in order to fit into the common mold of what we think a CEO looks like.
  394. By creating so many illusory images of physical perfection, whether on store aisles or storefront ads, magazine covers or TV shows, we speak more to the profit margins of companies than the self-esteem of today’s girls.
  395. By bringing current events into the classroom, everyday discussion, and social media, maybe we don’t need to wait for our grandchildren’s questions to remind us we should have paid more attention to current events.
  396. As we grow up in more technology-enriched environments filled with laptops and smart phones, technology is not just becoming a part of our daily lives – it’s becoming a part of each and every one of us.
  397. As children, we have a tenuous idea of love; we often try to quantify it with how much we feel seen and heard.
  398. Any good teacher knows how important it is to connect with students and understand our culture.
  399. America, you’re sending girls a mixed message. On one hand, you’re saying to have positive body image and love who we are; on the other, we’re being marketed makeup and clothing that obviously turns us into someone different.
  400. A lot of negative words adults call the young, like ‘naive,’ ‘impulsive’ and ‘way too connected online,’ are all things we can turn into strengths to help us.
  401. You have been trapped in the inescapable net of ruin by your own want of sense.
  402. Words are the physicians of a mind diseased.
  403. Wisdom comes alone through suffering.
  404. Whoever is new to power is always harsh.
  405. Who, except the gods, can live time through forever without any pain?
  406. Who apart from the gods is without pain for his whole lifetime’s length?
  407. Whenever a man makes haste, God too hastens with him.
  408. When strength is yoked with justice, where is a mightier pair than they?
  409. When a match has equal partners then I fear not.
  410. When a man’s willing and eager the god’s join in.
  411. What is there more kindly than the feeling between host and guest?
  412. What good is it to live a life that brings pains?
  413. What exists outside is a man’s concern; let no woman give advice; and do no mischief within doors.
  414. What atonement is there for blood spilt upon the earth?
  415. We shall perish by guile just as we slew.
  416. We must pronounce him fortunate who has ended his life in fair prosperity.
  417. Unions in wedlock are perverted by the victory of shameless passion that masters the female among men and beasts.
  418. Too few rejoice at a friend’s good fortune.
  419. To mourn and bewail your ill-fortune, when you will gain a tear from those who listen, this is worth the trouble.
  420. To be free from evil thoughts is God’s best gift.
  421. Time brings all things to pass.
  422. Time as he grows old teaches all things.
  423. There is no sickness worse for me than words that to be kind must lie.
  424. There is no pain so great as the memory of joy in present grief.
  425. There is no disgrace in an enemy suffering ill at an enemy’s hand, when you hate mutually.
  426. There are times when fear is good. It must keep its watchful place at the heart’s controls.
  427. The words of truth are simple.
  428. The wisest of the wise may err.
  429. The one knowing what is profitable, and not the man knowing many things, is wise.
  430. The man whose authority is recent is always stern.
  431. The man who does ill must suffer ill.
  432. The evils of mortals are manifold; nowhere is trouble of the same wing seen.
  433. The anvil of justice is planted firm, and fate who makes the sword does the forging in advance.
  434. Since long I’ve held silence a remedy for harm.
  435. Self-will in the man who does not reckon wisely is by itself the weakest of all things.
  436. Search well and be wise, nor believe that self-willed pride will ever be better than good counsel.
  437. Only when a man’s life comes to its end in prosperity dare we pronounce him happy.
  438. Of prosperity mortals can never have enough.
  439. Of all the gods only death does not desire gifts.
  440. Obedience is the mother of success and is wedded to safety.
  441. Neither a life of anarchy nor one beneath a despot should you praise; to all that lies in the middle a god has given excellence.
  442. My friends, whoever has had experience of evils knows how whenever a flood of ills comes upon mortals, a man fears everything; but whenever a divine force cheers on our voyage, then we believe that the same fate will always blow fair.
  443. Mourn for me rather as living than as dead.
  444. Memory is the mother of all wisdom.
  445. Married love between man and woman is bigger than oaths guarded by right of nature.
  446. Know not to revere human things too much.
  447. Justice turns the scale, bringing to some learning through suffering.
  448. It is not the oath that makes us believe the man, but the man the oath.
  449. It is in the character of very few men to honor without envy a friend who has prospered.
  450. It is good even for old men to learn wisdom.
  451. It is easy when we are in prosperity to give advice to the afflicted.
  452. It is best for the wise man not to seem wise.
  453. It is an ill thing to be the first to bring news of ill.
  454. It is an easy thing for one whose foot is on the outside of calamity to give advice and to rebuke the sufferer.
  455. It is always in season for old men to learn.
  456. It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish.
  457. It is a light thing for whoever keeps his foot outside trouble to advise and counsel him that suffers.
  458. In the lack of judgment great harm arises, but one vote cast can set right a house.
  459. In every tyrant’s heart there springs in the end this poison, that he cannot trust a friend.
  460. If you pour oil and vinegar into the same vessel, you would call them not friends but opponents.
  461. If a man suffers ill, let it be without shame; for this is the only profit when we are dead. You will never say a good word about deeds that are evil and disgraceful.
  462. I, schooled in misery, know many purifying rites, and I know where speech is proper and where silence.
  463. I would rather be ignorant than knowledgeable of evils.
  464. I willingly speak to those who know, but for those who do not know I forget.
  465. I say you must not win an unjust case by oaths.
  466. I know how men in exile feed on dreams.
  467. I have learned to hate all traitors, and there is no disease that I spit on more than treachery.
  468. His resolve is not to seem the bravest, but to be.
  469. He who learns must suffer. And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, and in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God.
  470. He who goes unenvied shall not be admired.
  471. Happiness is a choice that requires effort at times.
  472. God’s most lordly gift to man is decency of mind.
  473. God loves to help him who strives to help himself.
  474. God lends a helping hand to the man who tries hard.
  475. God always strives together with those who strive.
  476. From a small seed a mighty trunk may grow.
  477. For this is the mark of a wise and upright man, not to rail against the gods in misfortune.
  478. For there is no defense for a man who, in the excess of his wealth, has kicked the great altar of Justice out of sight.
  479. For the poison of hatred seated near the heart doubles the burden for the one who suffers the disease; he is burdened with his own sorrow, and groans on seeing another’s happiness.
  480. For the impious act begets more after it, like to the parent stock.
  481. For somehow this disease inheres in tyranny, never to trust one’s friends.
  482. For know that no one is free, except Zeus.
  483. For hostile word let hostile word be paid.
  484. For children preserve the fame of a man after his death.
  485. For a murderous blow let murderous blow atone.
  486. Excessive fear is always powerless.
  487. Everyone’s quick to blame the alien.
  488. Don’t you know this, that words are doctors to a diseased temperment?
  489. Destiny waits alike for the free man as well as for him enslaved by another’s might.
  490. Death is softer by far than tyranny.
  491. Death is easier than a wretched life; and better never to have born than to live and fare badly.
  492. By polluting clear water with slime you will never find good drinking water.
  493. By Time and Age full many things are taught.
  494. But time growing old teaches all things.
  495. Bronze in the mirror of the form, wine of the mind.
  496. Be bold and boast, just like the cock beside the hen.
  497. And though all streams flow from a single course to cleanse the blood from polluted hand, they hasten on their course in vain.
  498. And one who is just of his own free will shall not lack for happiness; and he will never come to utter ruin.
  499. Alas for the affairs of men! When they are fortunate you might compare them to a shadow; and if they are unfortunate, a wet sponge with one dash wipes the picture away.
  500. Ah, lives of men! When prosperous they glitter – Like a fair picture; when misfortune comes – A wet sponge at one blow has blurred the painting.
  501. A god implants in mortal guilt whenever he wants utterly to confound a house.
  502. We would often be sorry if our wishes were gratified.
  503. We should look to the mind, and not to the outward appearance.
  504. We often give our enemies the means for our own destruction.
  505. We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office.
  506. United we stand, divided we fall.
  507. The unhappy derive comfort from the misfortunes of others.
  508. The smaller the mind the greater the conceit.
  509. The little reed, bending to the force of the wind, soon stood upright again when the storm had passed over.
  510. The level of our success is limited only by our imagination and no act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.
  511. The injuries we do and those we suffer are seldom weighed in the same scales.
  512. The gods help them that help themselves.
  513. Slow but steady wins the race.
  514. Self-conceit may lead to self destruction.
  515. Put your shoulder to the wheel.
  516. Plodding wins the race.
  517. Please all, and you will please none.
  518. Persuasion is often more effectual than force.
  519. People often grudge others what they cannot enjoy themselves.
  520. Outside show is a poor substitute for inner worth.
  521. Our insignificance is often the cause of our safety.
  522. No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.
  523. Never trust the advice of a man in difficulties.
  524. Men often applaud an imitation and hiss the real thing.
  525. It is with our passions as it is with fire and water, they are good servants, but bad masters.
  526. It is thrifty to prepare today for the wants of tomorrow.
  527. It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.
  528. It is in vain to expect our prayers to be heard, if we do not strive as well as pray.
  529. It is easy to be brave from a safe distance.
  530. Injuries may be forgiven, but not forgotten.
  531. If you allow men to use you for your own purposes, they will use you for theirs.
  532. He that is discontented in one place will seldom be happy in another.
  533. He that always gives way to others will end in having no principles of his own.
  534. Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.
  535. Familiarity breeds contempt.
  536. Example is the best precept.
  537. Every truth has two sides; it is as well to look at both, before we commit ourselves to either.
  538. Don’t let your special character and values, the secret that you know and no one else does, the truth – don’t let that get swallowed up by the great chewing complacency.
  539. Do not count your chickens before they are hatched.
  540. Destroy the seed of evil, or it will grow up to your ruin.
  541. Beware that you do not lose the substance by grasping at the shadow.
  542. Beware lest you lose the substance by grasping at the shadow.
  543. Better be wise by the misfortunes of others than by your own.
  544. Be content with your lot; one cannot be first in everything.
  545. Appearances are often deceiving.
  546. Any excuse will serve a tyrant.
  547. After all is said and done, more is said than done.
  548. Affairs are easier of entrance than of exit; and it is but common prudence to see our way out before we venture in.
  549. Adventure is worthwhile.
  550. A liar will not be believed, even when he speaks the truth.
  551. A doubtful friend is worse than a certain enemy. Let a man be one thing or the other, and we then know how to meet him.
  552. A crust eaten in peace is better than a banquet partaken in anxiety.
  553. Where large sums of money are concerned, it is advisable to trust nobody.
  554. Very few of us are what we seem.
  555. Too much mercy… often resulted in further crimes which were fatal to innocent victims who need not have been victims if justice had been put first and mercy second.
  556. These little grey cells. It is up to them.
  557. There’s too much tendency to attribute to God the evils that man does of his own free will.
  558. There is nothing more thrilling in this world, I think, than having a child that is yours, and yet is mysteriously a stranger.
  559. The popular idea that a child forgets easily is not an accurate one. Many people go right through life in the grip of an idea which has been impressed on them in very tender years.
  560. The happy people are failures because they are on such good terms with themselves they don’t give a damn.
  561. The best time to plan a book is while you’re doing the dishes.
  562. One of the luckiest things that can happen to you in life is, I think, to have a happy childhood.
  563. One doesn’t recognize the really important moments in one’s life until it’s too late.
  564. Never do anything yourself that others can do for you.
  565. Most successes are unhappy. That’s why they are successes – they have to reassure themselves about themselves by achieving something that the world will notice.
  566. It is ridiculous to set a detective story in New York City. New York City is itself a detective story.
  567. It is a curious thought, but it is only when you see people looking ridiculous that you realize just how much you love them.
  568. If one sticks too rigidly to one’s principles, one would hardly see anybody.
  569. I’ve always believed in writing without a collaborator, because where two people are writing the same book, each believes he gets all the worry and only half the royalties.
  570. I specialize in murders of quiet, domestic interest.
  571. I married an archaeologist because the older I grow, the more he appreciates me.
  572. I live now on borrowed time, waiting in the anteroom for the summons that will inevitably come. And then – I go on to the next thing, whatever it is. One doesn’t, luckily, have to bother about that.
  573. I like living. I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow, but through it all I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing.
  574. I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow, but through it all I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing.
  575. I don’t think necessity is the mother of invention. Invention, in my opinion, arises directly from idleness, possibly also from laziness – to save oneself trouble.
  576. Good advice is always certain to be ignored, but that’s no reason not to give it.
  577. Evil is not something superhuman, it’s something less than human.
  578. Everything that has existed, lingers in the Eternity.
  579. Every murderer is probably somebody’s old friend.
  580. Dogs are wise. They crawl away into a quiet corner and lick their wounds and do not rejoin the world until they are whole once more.
  581. Curious things, habits. People themselves never knew they had them.
  582. Crime is terribly revealing. Try and vary your methods as you will, your tastes, your habits, your attitude of mind, and your soul is revealed by your actions.
  583. But surely for everything you have to love you have to pay some price.
  584. Any woman can fool a man if she wants to and if he’s in love with her.
  585. An archaeologist is the best husband a woman can have. The older she gets the more interested he is in her.
  586. Widespread state control over art and culture has left no room for freedom of expression in the country. For more than 60 years, anyone with a dissenting opinion has been suppressed. Chinese art is merely a product: it avoids any meaningful engagement. There is no larger context. Its only purpose is to charm viewers with its ambiguity.
  587. When you have strict censorship of the internet, young students cannot receive a full education. Their view of the world is imbalanced. There can be no true discussion of the issues.
  588. We see the tendency in the world to criticise democracy and sometimes even to say that authoritarian countries like China are more efficient. That is very short-sighted. China looks efficient only because it can sacrifice most people’s rights. This is not something the west should be happy about.
  589. Twitter was like a poem. It was rich, real and spontaneous. It really fit my style. In a year and a half, I tweeted 60,000 tweets, over 100,000 words. I spent a minimum eight hours a day on it, sometimes 24 hours.
  590. To work in architecture you are so much involved with society, with politics, with bureaucrats. It’s a very complicated process to do large projects. You start to see the society, how it functions, how it works. Then you have a lot of criticism about how it works.
  591. To the media, I have become a symbolic figure, critical of China. According to the government, I am a dangerous threat.
  592. To survive, China had to open up to the West. It could not survive otherwise. This was after many millions have died of hunger in a country that was like North Korea is today. Once we became part of global competition, we had to agree to some rules. It’s painful, but we had to. Otherwise there was no way to survive.
  593. To protect the right of expression is the central part of an artist’s activity… In China many essential rights are lacking, and I wanted to remind people of this.
  594. This week, the world gathers in Beijing for the 2008 Olympic games. This is the extraordinary moment China has been dreaming of for 100 years. People have been longing for this moment, because it symbolises a turning point in China’s relationship with the outside world.
  595. This nation is notorious for its ability to make or fake anything cheaply. ‘Made-in-China’ goods now fill homes around the world. But our giant country has a small problem. We can’t manufacture the happiness of our people.
  596. The seed is a household object but at the same time it is a revolutionary symbol.
  597. The internet is a wild land with its own games, languages and gestures through which we are starting to share common feelings.
  598. The Olympic Games are highly commercialised. They purport to follow the traditions of an ancient athletics competition, but today it is the commercial aspect that is most apparent. I have seen how, through sport, cities and corporations compete against each other for financial gain.
  599. The Chinese art world does not exist. In a society that restricts individual freedoms and violates human rights, anything that calls itself creative or independent is a pretence. It is impossible for a totalitarian society to create anything with passion and imagination.
  600. The Beijing Olympics and the Shanghai World Expo show just how much effort China is willing to spend to enter the global stage. But while China desires to understand the world, it fails to accept its universal values.
  601. The American experience influenced my understanding of individuality, basic human rights, freedom of expression and the rights and responsibilities of citizens.
  602. The ‘Bird’s Nest’ National Stadium, which I helped to conceive, is designed to embody the Olympic spirit of ‘fair competition.’ It tells people that freedom is possible but needs fairness, courage and strength.
  603. So maybe there are three parts in my life – earlier background living in exile in Xinjiang in a very political circumstance, then later the United States from 24 to 36 years old. I was quite equipped with liberal thinking. Then the Internet. If there is no Internet, of course, I cannot really exercise my opinion or my ideas.
  604. Since the global economic crisis began, the change in global attitudes is clear to see – and I think it is pitiful. Barack Obama came to China and he is probably the only president of the United States never to mention the words ‘human rights’ in public.
  605. Recently I danced in a video spoof of the song ‘Gangnam Style,’ and it was quickly banned across multiple Chinese online video platforms. But the story still traveled all over the world, carried in hundreds of international media reports.
  606. Police in China can do whatever they want; after 81 days in arbitrary detention you clearly realise that they don’t have to obey their own laws. In a society like this there is no negotiation, no discussion, except to tell you that power can crush you any time they want – not only you, your whole family and all people like you.
  607. People are always wondering if I am an artist or political activist or politician. Maybe I’ll just clearly tell you: Whatever I do is not art. Let’s say it is just objects or materials, movies or writing, but not art, OK?
  608. Now the British are coming. I think Cameron should ask the Chinese government not to make people ‘disappear’ or to jail them merely because they have different opinions.
  609. If we all say the same thing, then I think the government has to listen. But because no one is saying it, I become singled out, even though what I’m saying is common sense. It’s very essential values that we all have to protect. But in Chinese society, people are giving up on protecting these values.
  610. If my art has nothing to do with people’s pain and sorrow, what is ‘art’ for?
  611. I’m most embarrassed at my art shows, even though I don’t show it.
  612. I’m always followed by two or three cars and have police around. Even walking in the park, you see them taking photos behind the bushes and trying to videotape everything.
  613. I think Chinese leadership is trying to tell the world they have another set of logic or reasoning or values which are different from yours. Of course, I don’t think they believe that. It’s just an argument that’s made when you can’t confront the truth and facts. They really want to maintain power.
  614. I see the Beijing National Stadium as an architectural project. I accepted Herzog and De Meuron’s invitation to collaborate on the design, and our proposal won the competition. From beginning to end, I stayed with the project. I am committed to fostering relationships between a city and its architecture.
  615. I don’t think it’s worth discussing new directions in the context of Chinese art – there were no old directions, either. Chinese art has never had any clear orientation.
  616. I don’t believe in the so-called Olympic spirit. I speak from personal experience. When China hosted the Games, it failed to include the people. The event was constructed without regard for their joy.
  617. I call on people to be ‘obsessed citizens,’ forever questioning and asking for accountability. That’s the only chance we have today of a healthy and happy life.
  618. Historically, China is not a nation of sportsmen. We traditionally put more emphasis on being close to nature than pushing endlessly to excel. A philosophy that values tranquil contemplation of the landscape cannot easily be adapted to the Olympic slogan of ‘higher, stronger, faster.’
  619. For me, it is OK as long as I can breathe, as long as my heart is pumping, as long as I can express myself.
  620. For all the tough talk about China during the presidential debates, Romney and Obama evaded any mention of China’s suspect human rights record, corruption, and rule of law. By not tackling these controversial topics, the candidates are protecting a strategic partnership with China at the expense of essential human values and beliefs.
  621. Everyone wants an iPhone, but it would be impossible to design an iPhone in China because it’s not a product; it’s an understanding of human nature.
  622. Chinese citizens have never had the right to really express their opinions; in the constitution it says you can, but in the real world it is more dangerous. In the west people think it’s a right they’re born with. Here it’s a right given by the government, and one that’s not really practised.
  623. China is an old nation with a colourful history. Its booming economy has triggered an appetite and a curiosity around the world for its art and culture, one that continues to grow. I can, however, tell people that it is a show with no actor.
  624. China has not established the rule of law and if there is a power above the law there is no social justice. Everybody can be subjected to harm. I’m just a citizen: my life is equal in value to any other. But I’m thankful that when I lost my freedom so many people shared feelings and put such touching effort into helping me.
  625. China and the U.S. are two societies with very different attitudes towards opinion and criticism. In China, I am constantly under surveillance. Even my slightest, most innocuous move can – and often is – censored by Chinese authorities.
  626. Censorship is saying: ‘I’m the one who says the last sentence. Whatever you say, the conclusion is mine.’ But the internet is like a tree that is growing. The people will always have the last word – even if someone has a very weak, quiet voice. Such power will collapse because of a whisper.
  627. Beijing’s Olympics were very grand – they were trying to throw a party for the world, but the hosts didn’t enjoy it. The government didn’t care about people’s feelings because it was trying to create an image.
  628. Because of the economic crisis, China and the United States are bound together. This is a totally new phenomenon, and nobody will fight for ideology anymore. It’s all about business.
  629. Because Great Britain has self-confidence, it doesn’t need a monumental Olympics.
  630. As a person, I was born to give out my opinions. By giving out my opinions, I realize who I am. As long as I can communicate, I’m not so lonely. If I cannot travel, or do art, or have company, if they take away all my belongings, it doesn’t matter at all.
  631. A nation that has no music and no fairytales is a tragedy.
  632. You might not like that Facebook shares your political opinions with Politico, but are you really going to delete all the photos, all the posts, all the connections – the presence you’ve spent years establishing on the world’s dominant social network?
  633. You know, Lincoln was funny. I don’t think F.D.R. was very funny. But Lincoln was funny. Lincoln was really funny. But I think you should get elected first, and then show that you’re funny.
  634. You have to love your country like an adult loves somebody, not like a child loves its mommy. And right-wing Republicans tend to love America like a child loves its mommy, where everything Mommy does is okay. But adult love means you’re not in denial, and you want the loved one to be the best they can be.
  635. You can’t change your fingerprints. You have only ten of them. And you leave them on everything you touch; they are definitely not a secret.
  636. Yeah, we shot ourselves in the foot right out of the gate. The guy who ran it at first misled pretty much everybody about how much capital we had. He said we had enough to go three years without making money, and we had enough to go three weeks.
  637. Yeah, but you need an experienced radio veteran who is a liberal advocate. And there just hadn’t been any radio that did that. And so they weren’t trained – they had developed all these bad habits of being objective and balanced and stuff like that.
  638. Why don’t we focus on what Afghan women can do? They can cook, bear children and pray. As I recall, that was fine for our grandmothers.
  639. When you win an election, what you really win is a chance to go to work for working families who need a voice in Minnesota.
  640. When you live in New York, one of two things happen – you either become a New Yorker, or you feel more like the place you came from.
  641. When you encounter seemingly good advice that contradicts other seemingly good advice, ignore them both.
  642. When the president during the campaign said he was against nation building, I didn’t realize he meant our nation.
  643. When the Constitution was written, the founders had no way of anticipating the new technologies that would evolve in the coming centuries.
  644. When people talked about protecting their privacy when I was growing up, they were talking about protecting it from the government. They talked about unreasonable searches and seizures, about keeping the government out of their bedrooms.
  645. When I first started writing for television in the seventies and eighties, the Internet didn’t exist, and we didn’t need to worry about foreign websites illegally distributing the latest TV shows and blockbuster movies online.
  646. What you see on the campaign trail is me. It’s easy being me.
  647. Well, a lot of politics is communicating with people, and obviously comedy has something to do with that. I’ve been a producer and led people. Also, being a comedian, you’re under pressure.
  648. Well, I think that there’s a value to comedy in and of itself.
  649. We owe an historic debt to American Indians. They have a unique set of concerns that haven’t been addressed, and I’d like to stand with them. Also, I’d like to get their views on immigration.
  650. We need to start by having a conversation about climate change. It would be irresponsible to avoid the issue just because it’s uncomfortable to talk about.
  651. We need to prepare our kids for a 21st Century economy, and we’re not doing it with our schools.
  652. We need to be pro-science; we have to go back to science.
  653. Veterans report that service dogs help break their isolation. People will often avert their eyes when they see a wounded veteran. But when the veteran has a dog, the same people will come up and say, ‘Hi’ to pet the dog and then strike up a conversation.
  654. Too many people don’t protect their smartphones with a password or PIN. I anticipate that Apple’s fingerprint reader will in fact make iPhone 5S owners more likely to secure their smartphones.
  655. To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus.
  656. To ask whether the mainstream media has a conservative or liberal bias is like asking whether al-Qaida uses too much oil in their hummus. It’s – I think they might use too much oil in their hummus – but it’s the wrong question.
  657. There’s plenty of room for humor in politics, God knows, but it’s a serious business.
  658. There’s no comparison between NPR and the propaganda that you hear from Rush or from Sean Hannity, the news movement conservatives that are just laying out, slathering out the disinformation and the lies, as I discuss in my book, ‘Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them: A Fair and Balanced Look at the Right.’
  659. There’s an appeal to the American sense of exceptionalism, that we’re morally superior, as way to not be self-critical. I think that’s a bit dangerous.
  660. There is – I mean – I found early in life that righteous indignation is a little off-putting, and so I try to couch it with humor.
  661. The way I see it, I’m not going to Washington to be the 60th Democratic senator. I’m going to Washington to be the second senator from the state of Minnesota.
  662. The thing that interests me least about the radio business is the radio business. But I’ve had to learn a little bit about it. It’s not rocket science: You get ratings, that’s good.
  663. The right wing has had a radio apparatus for years and years, so they’ve had minor leagues – they’ve had local rightwing guys who’ve become national rightwing guys, and who build slowly, and that’s how it goes. We haven’t had that. It isn’t like we have a farm team.
  664. The reason I wrote political satire was because I thought it – politics – was important… that public policy was important. Then I transitioned into books, then into radio.
  665. The point is that there is tremendous hypocrisy among the Christian right. And I think that Christian voters should start looking at global warming and extreme poverty as a religious issue that speaks to the culture of life.
  666. The next thing I am doing is moving back home to Minnesota and getting involved in politics. I’m looking at a run for Senate in 2008, but in the meantime I am focused on knitting together the progressive network in the upper Midwest.
  667. The nature of the Internet and the importance of net neutrality is that innovation can come from everyone.
  668. The institutions that we’ve built up over the years to protect our individual privacy rights from the government don’t apply to the private sector. The Fourth Amendment doesn’t apply to corporations. The Freedom of Information Act doesn’t apply to Silicon Valley. And you can’t impeach Google if it breaks its ‘Don’t be evil’ campaign pledge.
  669. The government must give proper weight to both keeping America safe from terrorists and protecting Americans’ privacy. But when Americans lack the most basic information about our domestic surveillance programs, they have no way of knowing whether we’re getting that balance right. This lack of transparency is a big problem.
  670. The civil rights movement was very important in my house, and then Vietnam was very important ’cause there were two boys, so I came of age during a very heated political climate.
  671. The biases the media has are much bigger than conservative or liberal. They’re about getting ratings, about making money, about doing stories that are easy to cover.
  672. The Republican agenda is a radical vision in which Medicaid is slashed to the bone – in which we start to balance the budget on the backs of, literally, our most vulnerable citizens.
  673. The Minnesotans I talk to are really concerned about what the future holds for their families. They’re trying to pay for health care and send their kids to college, they’re worried about declining home values, they’re scared for a loved one they have serving in Iraq.
  674. The Medicare Part D prescription drug bill, which might be the most corrupt piece of legislation in history, was a huge giveaway of taxpayer funds to the big pharmaceutical companies.
  675. The Fourth Amendment doesn’t apply to corporations.
  676. The Founders who crafted our Constitution and Bill of Rights were careful to draft a Constitution of limited powers – one that would protect Americans’ liberty at all times – both in war, and in peace.
  677. Terrorism, to me, is the use of terror for political purpose, and terror is indiscriminate murder of civilians to make a political point.
  678. Teen pregnancy went way down in the ’90s, and 75 percent of it was because of increased use of contraception.
  679. Technology is an incredible tool – it connects people to each other, creates jobs all over the world, and makes life easier for millions of Americans.
  680. Sometimes if I tell people, ‘I’m afraid that I’m really a fraud,’ or ‘I have a lot of self-doubt,’ they go, ‘Oh, no, you’re kidding.’ I go, ‘No, I’m really honest.’
  681. Some of my colleagues seem more interested in using every procedural method possible to keep the Senate from doing anything than they are in creating jobs or helping Americans struggling in a difficult economy.
  682. Some of George W. Bush’s friends say that Bush believes God called him to be president during these times of trial. But God told me that He/She/It had actually chosen Al Gore by making sure that Gore won the popular vote and, God thought, the Electoral College. ‘That worked for everyone else,’ God said.
  683. Small businesses should have the same ability to reach customers as powerful corporations. A blogger should have the same ability to find an audience as a media conglomerate.
  684. Service dogs raise their masters’ sense of well-being.
  685. Ralph Nader is a hero. I know Ralph, and I call him up occasionally. He’s helped me out on a couple of occasions when I’ve given speeches to corporations where he’d have a good… He’d give me some good information.
  686. Progressives, in a way, are the new conservatives. We want to conserve what we fought to build.
  687. People lucky enough to live in the vicinity of an industrial hog farm are, with each breath, made keenly aware of the cause of their declining property values.
  688. Part of the middle class promise is that, after a lifetime of hard work, you’ll be able to retire and enjoy the fruits of that labor. Medicare was established to secure that promise.
  689. Our laws need to reflect the evolution of technology and the changing expectations of American society. This is why the Constitution is often called a ‘living’ document.
  690. No one is more sensitive to the issue of overeating than the creator of Stuart Smalley.
  691. Net neutrality isn’t a government takeover of the Internet, as many of my Republican colleagues have alleged.
  692. Net neutrality has been in place since the very beginning of the Internet.
  693. National security laws must protect national security. But they must also protect the public trust and preserve the ability of an informed electorate to hold its government to account.
  694. My views about God come from my dad. Dad told me that he believed Nature, which to him included humankind, to be so beautiful, so magnificent, that there had to be something behind it all.
  695. My spiritual life is… sometimes I have access to it and sometimes I don’t. When I do have access to it, it’s usually a sense of my understanding what the best course of action or the best thing for me to do. By best, I mean when I have a real sense of doing the right thing and doing good for people and the connected universe of everybody.
  696. My parents were really political. The news was very important in our home. We basically had dinner every night while watching the news, and then we’d discuss it with our parents.
  697. My parents didn’t make a lot of money. My dad was not a high school graduate – he didn’t have a career as such; he was a printing salesman essentially for most of his working life.
  698. My daughter became a teacher right out of college.
  699. My dad was a terrible businessman.
  700. My dad never graduated high school. He was a printing salesman. We lived in a two-bedroom, one-bath house in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. We weren’t rich – but we felt secure.
  701. My dad loved comedians, especially George Jessel, and he loved Henny Youngman and Buddy Hackett.
  702. My dad didn’t graduate from high school, ended up being a printing salesman, probably never made more than $8,000 a year. My mom sold real estate and did it part time.
  703. My dad always told me to stand up to bullies, and Bill O’Reilly is kind of a bully, and he’s the kind of kid who hits other kids on the playground. And when you hit him, he runs to the teacher and says, ‘Teacher, sue him.’
  704. Most Americans don’t think about antitrust law when they look at their cable bill, flip channels on TV, or worry about what their favorite website knows about them. But they should.
  705. Mistakes are a part of being human. Appreciate your mistakes for what they are: precious life lessons that can only be learned the hard way. Unless it’s a fatal mistake, which, at least, others can learn from.
  706. Minnesotans lost their jobs because the credit rating agencies didn’t do the only job they’re supposed to have, the only job they had, which is to give accurate, objective ratings to financial products.
  707. Minnesotans know the difference between the job of satirist and the job of senator. And so do I.
  708. Minnesota has a proud tradition of having two Senators on the Ag committee – a tradition I’d like very much to continue.
  709. Liberals like me love America. We just love America in a different way.
  710. Let’s not let the government sell us out. Let’s fight for net neutrality.
  711. Let’s keep the Internet weird. Let’s keep the Internet free.
  712. It’s the Power of the Almighty, the Splendor of Nature, and then you.
  713. It’s hard to have that debate around secret programs authorized by secret legal opinions issued by a secret court. Actually, it’s impossible to have that debate.
  714. It’s hard for a liberal to go on between Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh, because it’s like doing country music after hip-hop. I mean, just, the audience doesn’t go from one to the other.
  715. It’s easier to put on slippers than to carpet the whole world.
  716. It is my fondest wish that in the fullness of time, the American people will look back on the Franken presidency as something of a mixed bag and not as a complete disaster.
  717. In our political system, money is power. And that means a few can have a lot more power than the rest. That’s bad news for everyone else – and for our democracy itself.
  718. In my first week as a U.S. senator, I had the privilege of participating in the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Judge Sonia Sotomayor.
  719. If you want a free email service that doesn’t use your words to target ads to you, you’ll have to figure out how to port years and years of Gmail messages somewhere else, which is about as easy as developing your own free email service.
  720. If you use a cell phone – as I do – your wireless carrier likely has records about your physical movements going back months, if not years.
  721. If you use Facebook – as I do – Facebook in all likelihood has a unique digital file of your face, one that can be as accurate as a fingerprint and that can be used to identify you in a photo of a large crowd.
  722. If you look at terrorists, they really have no sense of humor.
  723. If you hear, day after day, liberals are rooting against armed forces, that is eventually going to have an effect on soldiers and troops who are actually going to believe that and it’s wrong. It’s just wrong.
  724. If we have George W. Bush as president, we’re going to go back to the kind of policies we had when his father and Ronald Reagan were president.
  725. If someone hacks your password, you can change it – as many times as you want. You can’t change your fingerprints. You have only ten of them. And you leave them on everything you touch; they are definitely not a secret.
  726. If someone hacks your password, you can change it – as many times as you want.
  727. If Republicans eliminate Medicare, America will become a country in which you can never retire – and once you physically can no longer work, you are desperately poor until you die.
  728. If I put myself on the ballot and even 50 people voted for me, it’d be a travesty.
  729. If 98 out of 100 doctors tell me I’ve got a problem, I should take their advice. And if those two other doctors get paid by Big Snack Food, like certain climate deniers get paid by Big Coal, I shouldn’t take their advice.
  730. I’ve spent my entire career being a satirist.
  731. I’ve never understood why we would want to deny all the joys – and the challenges – of marriage to anyone. Which is why I think any loving, committed couple – gay or straight – should be able to get married.
  732. I’m the New York Jew who actually grew up in Minnesota.
  733. I’m sure I’ve devoted enough thought to Rush Limbaugh for one lifetime.
  734. I’m part of the mushball middle. I consider ‘confused’ the majority position because, thankfully, most people would rather be uncertain some of the time than 100% positive all the time – even when they’re wrong.
  735. I’m from the Vietnam generation. I didn’t serve.
  736. I’m for Israel’s right to exist.
  737. I’m crushed by the responsibility of writing a satirical book.
  738. I’m a bit of a shill for the Clinton Administration, which has its perks. I’m invited to all the inaugural balls.
  739. I want to reclaim ‘liberal.’ I’m a liberal, and I think most Americans are liberals.
  740. I think the government has a role in protecting the fundamental rights of its citizens.
  741. I think the Internet has developed at this incredibly rapid pace because of net neutrality, because of the free nature of it, because a YouTube can start the way YouTube started.
  742. I think that the default for collecting any kind of personal data should be opt-in consent.
  743. I think Hell exists on Earth. It’s a psychological state, or it can be a physical state. People who have severe mental illness are in Hell. People who have lost a loved one are in Hell. I think there are all kinds of different hells. It’s not a place you go to after you die.
  744. I think Clinton fatigue was a real thing. It’s just hard to get comfortable with Gore – it was hard for him to project who he is, the person people know in private.
  745. I once asked the most fabulous couple I know, Madonna and Guy Ritchie, how they kept things fresh despite having been married for almost seven months. ‘It’s a job, Al,’ Guy told me. ‘We work at it every day.’
  746. I listen to NPR when I listen to the radio, but I don’t listen to the radio that much. You know, I listen to Garrison Keillor, I listen to ‘Prairie Home Companion.’
  747. I know that it’s probably not a good idea for a comedian, especially a satirist, to support a public policy group or a politician. This is something I learned only too well years ago when I did a fundraiser for Pol Pot. A few years later I saw ‘The Killing Fields,’ and I’ve got to tell you, I just felt like a schmuck.
  748. I know I have an awful lot to learn from the people of Minnesota.
  749. I just can’t sit still and meditate; that doesn’t kind of work for me. I don’t even know exactly what it means.
  750. I hope you realize, in a democracy, laughter is assent.
  751. I grew up in Minnesota, where we treasure our tradition of civic engagement – and our record of having the nation’s highest voter participation.
  752. I got interested in politics during the civil rights movement and then Vietnam.
  753. I get satisfaction when I write something I like, when I’m happy with it.
  754. I felt like the luckiest kid in the world. And I was. I was growing up middle-class in a time when growing up middle-class in America meant there would be jobs for my parents, good schools for me to prepare myself for a career, and, if I worked hard and played by the rules, a chance for me to do anything I wanted.
  755. I don’t think I’m an angry person. I think I’m a person who’s angry. I’m angry at the Bush administration; I’m angry at the right wing media. And by that I don’t mean the media is right wing. I mean, there is a part of the media that’s not the mainstream media. That’s Fox, that is ‘The Wall Street Journal’ editorial page.
  756. I don’t know what happens to you after you die. I’m not banking on there being, like, a heaven.
  757. I don’t know how many of you have been to New York, but if a building is two blocks away from anything, you can’t see it.
  758. I don’t consider myself an artist necessarily, but craftsmen or people in the arts, their spiritualism is sort of when you’re writing well or performing well or doing whatever you do well, there’s an element of that that’s either God-given, a talent that you’re not necessarily responsible for.
  759. I do personal attacks only on people who specialize in personal attacks.
  760. I do have a self-censor; everybody does, or at least most who are not pathological do.
  761. I couldn’t think of anything less appealing than molding the minds of tomorrow’s leaders.
  762. I believe people have a right to know what’s going on with their information and how it’s collected, how it’s stored and who gets it.
  763. I believe in not attacking a country pre-emptively unless you’re sure of what you’re doing and you’re working with allies.
  764. I ask the American people not to fall victim to disinformation. There are no death panels. The Affordable Care Act cuts the deficit.
  765. I am a Minnesotan, and not just because I root for the Vikings and the Twins. I like the Minnesota-nice sensibility. I like the liberal tradition; I like the Hubert Humphrey tradition fighting for civil rights.
  766. I also focus on Bush and his administration – who do a lot of lying – and how a right-wing media has allowed them to get away with a lot of stuff that, in a different media environment, they probably wouldn’t be able to get away with.
  767. Humor and seriousness are not in opposition to each other.
  768. Having an actual income can expand your romantic horizons toward the more appealing end of the spectrum.
  769. Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government asked me to serve as a fellow at its Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy. After my varied and celebrated career in television, movies, publishing, and the lucrative world of corporate speaking, being a fellow at Harvard seemed, frankly, like a step down.
  770. Grown-up love means actually understanding what you love, taking the good with the bad and helping your loved one grow. Love takes attention and work and is the best thing in the world.
  771. Google’s screen for privacy settings does give you more options for what you share than Apple’s does. But it’s not a complete list, and people aren’t aware of whether or not that information will go to a third party.
  772. Gary Bauer is a very good – he’s a good friend of mine.
  773. For 35 years, I was a writer. I wrote a lot of jokes. Some of them weren’t funny. Some of them weren’t appropriate. Some of them were downright offensive. I understand that.
  774. During Vietnam, I was in college, enjoying my student deferment. The government wisely felt that, in my case, military service was less important than completing my studies to prepare me for my chosen career: comedian.
  775. Demagoguery sells. And therefore, radio stations will put it on. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t do something else and also make it sell.
  776. Demagoguery sells. And therefore radio stations will put it on. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t do something else and also make it sell. You know, when I look at an Ann Coulter or I look at a Rush or I look at a Sean Hannity, I think to myself, ‘What kind of self-image do you have?’
  777. Comedy to the Senate? Well, there certainly hasn’t been a satirist or a political satirist who’s done that. So, that really was uncharted territory during the campaign. But I think it’s a good thing. Some people thought that it was an odd career arc, but to me it made absolute sense.
  778. Changing technologies, changing marketplaces, and even changing trends in anti-competitive practices have all presented challenges to antitrust enforcement.
  779. Call-time has renewed my faith in the need for public financing of elections. ‘Call-time’ is where I as the candidate, sit in a room with my ‘call-time manager,’ and a phone. Then I call people and ask them for money. For hours. Apparently, I’m really good at it.
  780. But in the right-wing media, they do have a right-wing bias. And they also have an agenda. So their agenda is: we’re an adjunct of the Republican Party, and we’re going push that agenda every day, and, as you say, brand these stories that help further the right-wing cause.
  781. Bob Dole used to be really funny. Barney Frank can be kind of funny. Bob Kerrey has a good sense of humor.
  782. Bill Clinton is the greatest president of the 20th century because I played touch football with him.
  783. At ‘SNL,’ I wrote political stuff, but I never felt the show should have an axe to grind. But when I left in ’95, I could let my own beliefs out.
  784. As someone who’s spent time with our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan on USO tours and met wounded warriors at Walter Reed and Bethesda, I feel a deep obligation to the men and women who have risked life and limb on our behalf.
  785. As a source of innovation, an engine of our economy, and a forum for our political discourse, the Internet can only work if it’s a truly level playing field. Small businesses should have the same ability to reach customers as powerful corporations. A blogger should have the same ability to find an audience as a media conglomerate.
  786. Armed with nothing more than a Facebook user’s phone number and home address, anyone with an Internet connection and a few dollars can obtain personal information they should never have access to, including a user’s date of birth, e-mail address, or estimated income.
  787. Apple has long been a leading innovator of mobile technology; I myself own an iPhone.
  788. Anybody who deliberately propagandizes with lies should be held up to scorn and ridicule.
  789. Antitrust law isn’t about protecting competing businesses from each other, it’s about protecting competition itself on behalf of the public.
  790. And I think that being able to make people laugh and write a book that’s funny makes the information go down a lot easier and it makes it a lot more fun to read, easier to understand, and often stronger. So there’s all kinds of advantages to it.
  791. You know the old saying: you win some, you lose some… and then there’s that little-known third category.
  792. Winston Churchill aroused this nation in heroic fashion to save civilisation in World War Two. We have everything we need except political will, but political will is a renewable resource.
  793. While President Bush likes to project an image of strength and courage, the real truth is that in the presence of his large financial contributors, he is a moral coward.
  794. When you have the facts on your side, argue the facts. When you have the law on your side, argue the law. When you have neither, holler.
  795. When people flirt with despair about the future, they are less likely to take the actions necessary to safeguard it, focusing instead on the short-term.
  796. We’re all capable of mistakes, but I do not care to enlighten you on the mistakes we may or may not have made.
  797. We need to remake the Democratic party. We need to remake America.
  798. We are going to have the best educated American people in the world.
  799. Today we’re dumping 70 million tons of global-warming pollution into the environment, and tomorrow we will dump more, and there is no effective worldwide response. Until we start sharply reducing global-warming pollution, I will feel that I have failed.
  800. There’s lots about politics I don’t feel comfortable with. To talk about the politics of future ideas is impossible in soundbite form.
  801. There is the natural tendency that all of us are vulnerable to, to deny unpleasant realities and to look for any excuse to push them away and resolve to think about them another day long in the future.
  802. There is an air of unreality in debating these arcane points when the world is changing in such dramatic ways right in front of our eyes because of global warming.
  803. There are skeptics who do not come to their view because they have a source of income from carbon polluters.
  804. There are many who would much prefer that the word ‘climate’ never be mentioned and that the issue be eliminated from our national conversation.
  805. The struggle against poverty in the world and the challenge of cutting wealthy country emissions all has a single, very simple solution… Here it is: Put a price on carbon.
  806. The signs that the world is spinning out of kilter are increasingly difficult to misinterpret. The question is how to convince enough people to join a critical mass of urgent opinion, in the U.S. and the rest of the world.
  807. The science linking the increased frequency and severity of extreme weather to the climate crisis has matured tremendously in the last couple of years.
  808. The presidency is more than a popularity contest.
  809. The heart of the security agenda is protecting lives – and we now know that the number of people who will die of AIDS in the first decade of the 21st Century will rival the number that died in all the wars in all the decades of the 20th century.
  810. The golden thread of reason that used to be stretched taut to mark the boundary between the known and the unknown is now routinely disrespected.
  811. The first less is this: take it from me, every vote counts.
  812. The entire North Polar ice cap is disappearing before our very eyes. It’s been the size of the continental United States for the last 3 million years and now 40 percent is gone and the rest of it is going.
  813. The dominance of short-term perspectives has led to routine decisions in the markets that sacrifice the long-term buildup of genuine value in pursuit of artificial, short-term gains.
  814. The day I made that statement, about the inventing the internet, I was tired because I’d been up all night inventing the Camcorder.
  815. The conversation on global warming has been stalled because a shrinking group of denialists fly into a rage when it’s mentioned.
  816. The ability of big money to shape perceptions – where you have four anti-climate lobbyists for every single member of the House and Senate – is a big factor.
  817. The Internet empowers individuals to play a more active role in the political process, as Obama’s campaign has manifested.
  818. The Congress is virtually incapable of passing any reforms unless they first get permission from the powerful special interests who are most affected by the proposal.
  819. The Bush-Cheney administration had betrayed some basic American values. So there was hunger for change.
  820. The Bush administration works closely with a network of rapid response digital brownshirts who work to pressure reporters and their editors for ‘undermining support for our troops.’
  821. Surveillance technologies now available – including the monitoring of virtually all digital information – have advanced to the point where much of the essential apparatus of a police state is already in place.
  822. Science has a culture that is inherently cautious and that is normally not a bad thing. You could even say conservative, because of the peer review process and because the scientific method prizes uncertainty and penalises anyone who goes out on any sort of a limb that is not held in place by abundant and well-documented evidence.
  823. Population growth is straining the Earth’s resources to the breaking point, and educating girls is the single most important factor in stabilizing that. That, plus helping women gain political and economic power and safeguarding their reproductive rights.
  824. Our world faces a true planetary emergency. I know the phrase sounds shrill, and I know it’s a challenge to the moral imagination.
  825. Our democracy, our constitutional framework is really a kind of software for harnessing the creativity and political imagination for all of our people. The American democratic system was an early political version of Napster.
  826. No matter how hard the loss, defeat might serve as well as victory to shake the soul and let the glory out.
  827. It’s not unusual to find big political shifts that take place beneath the surface before they’re visible above the surface.
  828. It’s a blessing to have work that feels fulfilling.
  829. Iraq’s search for weapons of mass destruction has proven impossible to deter and we should assume that it will continue for as long as Saddam is in power.
  830. In digital era, privacy must be a priority. Is it just me, or is secret blanket surveillance obscenely outrageous?
  831. If you want your energy bills to go up, you should support an ever greater dependence on foreign oil, because the rate of new discoveries is declining as demand in China and India is growing, and the price of oil and thus the price of coal will go sky high.
  832. If we don’t succeed, we run the risk of failure.
  833. If the only tool we use to analyse what’s valuable is a price tag, then those things that don’t have price tags begin to look like they have no value.
  834. I’ve learned the importance of changing people’s minds at the grassroots level so that whoever does run will have a much better chance of encountering public opinion that reaches a critical mass and brings about a change not only in White House policies but in the Congress and in the state legislatures and all around the world.
  835. I’m old enough to know that a red carpet’s just a rug, and I’ve been able to enjoy the pageantry without letting it go to my head.
  836. I’m naturally an optimist, but my basis for hope is rooted in my understanding of human nature.
  837. I wrote newspaper articles professionally for seven years, and I love newspapers.
  838. I was in elective politics for 24 years. I’ve made four national races, two for President, two for Vice President. I have found there are other ways to serve, and I’m enjoying them.
  839. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country’s economic growth, environmental protection, improvements in our educational system.
  840. I think the cost of energy will come down when we make this transition to renewable energy.
  841. I think that more diversity is a good thing, and fresh points of view articulated by people who are committed to excellence in journalism is a beneficial change in the American media landscape.
  842. I think it’s harder for people than it should be. But as more and more of us become carbon neutral and change the patterns in our lives to be part of the solution instead of part of the problem, we are now beginning to see the changes in policy that are needed.
  843. I think George W. Bush has a warm, engaging personality. But, you know, the presidency is more than just a popularity contest.
  844. I take no pleasure in the fact that the scientific predictions I’ve relayed to popular audiences turn out to be true.
  845. I see myself in the mold of Rin Tin Tin. It didn’t go to his head either.
  846. I remember as a boy when the conversation on civil rights was won in the South. I remember a time when one of my friends made a racist joke and another said, ‘Hey man, we don’t go for that anymore.’
  847. I pledge to you today that as president, in my first budget, I will introduce the largest increase in special education ever.
  848. I have faith in the United States and our ability to make good decisions based on the facts.
  849. I have always been fascinated with those who try to look over the horizon and see things that are coming at us.
  850. I have absolutely no plans and no expectations of ever being a candidate again.
  851. I flew on Air Force Two for eight years, and now I have to take off my shoes to get on an aeroplane.
  852. I drive a hybrid, and we’ve changed our light bulbs and windows and installed solar panels and geothermal ground source heat pumps and most everything else.
  853. I do genuinely believe that the political system is not linear. When it reaches a tipping point fashioned by a critical mass of opinion, the slow pace of change we’re used to will no longer be the norm. I see a lot of signs every day that we’re moving closer and closer to that tipping point.
  854. I did very extensive diligence on Al Jazeera English, the network from which Al Jazeera America is going to be derived, and it’s really very clear that they have long since established a reputation for excellence and integrity and objectivity.
  855. I am Al Gore, and I used to be the next president of the United States of America.
  856. How could this Y2K be a problem in a country where we have Intel and Microsoft?
  857. Hey, you know what, I’ve gotta go on that ‘Letterman’ show. That show is so lame.
  858. George Bush taking credit for the wall coming down is like the rooster taking credit for the sun rising.
  859. For a free country to continue thriving, there have to be regular reforms, because any society, any economy that stays in place, you’re going to see repeated attempts to exploit the openings for twisting policy to the advantage of those who already have wealth and power.
  860. During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet.
  861. Consider what kind of car you get. Buy cars and other products that have the least impact environmentally.
  862. Consider a clock thermostat, and set it so that you’re not using energy when you don’t need it, when you’re out of your house.
  863. Civil disobedience has an honourable history, and when the urgency and moral clarity cross a certain threshold, then I think that civil disobedience is quite understandable, and it has a role to play.
  864. CO2 is the exhaling breath of our civilization, literally… Changing that pattern requires a scope, a scale, a speed of change that is beyond what we have done in the past.
  865. As president, I will bring all the parties and stakeholders together. I am going to come up with a solution that respects the environment and does not cause an upheaval in the economy.
  866. As human beings, we are vulnerable to confusing the unprecedented with the improbable. In our everyday experience, if something has never happened before, we are generally safe in assuming it is not going to happen in the future, but the exceptions can kill you and climate change is one of those exceptions.
  867. As I have said for many years throughout this land, we’re borrowing money from China to buy oil from the Persian Gulf to burn it in ways that destroy the future of human civilization. Every bit of that has to change.
  868. America’s political system has evolved over the last 50 years in ways that have enhanced the power of business lobbies.
  869. Airplane travel is nature’s way of making you look like your passport photo.
  870. A zebra does not change its spots.
  871. A president who breaks the law is a threat to the very structure of our government.
  872. A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the polls.
  873. You’re never quite prepared for the inundation of stardom, or whatever you want to call it.
  874. You tell me one other person that graduated from Yale that is as inarticulate as Bush. Yale’s a great school, and here’s this idiot.
  875. You know what? I feel my book is kind of pointless. I didn’t want to do a book, but rather than tell the same old stories over and over when my wife Angie and I are out at parties, I could just hand out a bunch of books, and she won’t have to hear them ever again.
  876. When I’m done with something, I’m done. I don’t go back and listen to and pine for my old albums, or the Lollapalooza days, or ‘Psalm 69’ selling millions of records. Maybe I’m really just getting old and mellow.
  877. We’ll see if we ever do another Ministry gig again or not. I’m not saying yes or no yet. All I’m saying is I know there’s no new Ministry studio CDs coming ever again. I promise.
  878. We have to support our local artists. It’s just that simple. Otherwise, we will have no art.
  879. Today, if I could get a job, with face tattoos, being a professor, I would do that. I don’t know what university would hire me, but that’s my passion.
  880. This rock thing got in the way of my teaching career.
  881. This administration affects the everyday life of the common person.
  882. There’s a famous artist, Ron English, in New York, that just, or Andy Warhol for that matter, that did pop art that terrorized society. And that’s, for the last like 10, 15 years, that’s all I wanted to do, is terrorize society and make them look into a mirror and see what the hell we have wrought.
  883. There was one theory put forth by a journalist recently. I have a lot of friends that have died prematurely and a lot of friends that have died of natural causes. I’ve lost a lot of people over the years. This journalist basically recommended to me that God keeps me around because I amuse him.
  884. The very first pharmaceutical commercial I ever heard was 15 seconds of the product and 45 seconds of side effects, so I know that this cannot be good for you.
  885. The more you think, the more you ruin things. Art has to come viscerally; otherwise, forget it.
  886. The main thing in measuring integrity is someone’s motive and intent, not how many records they sell. Our intent in Ministry was never to be big. We just wanted to make enough money to live and to buy a studio, which we have done in Austin.
  887. Rock n’ roll is for the young idiots, not an old fart like me.
  888. Punk rock really influenced me, the basic metal bands, Zeppelin, Stones and Floyd, and Southern rock bands. I think I was pretty well-rounded.
  889. Obama might as well be president of Turkey or Brazil; it does not matter. It’s the system that is absolutely flawed, where 25 or 35 or 50 people make multi, multi-billions on building Olympic structures while people live in Barbados and have no roads or clean drinking water. There’s something pretty inequitable there.
  890. Nothing exceeds like excess.
  891. Ministry is just ZZ Top with technology.
  892. Listen, man: I am not the industrial godfather, king, whatever. I don’t relish that title. I don’t like it. I think it’s limiting. I do country, I do blues. I don’t just go straight.
  893. Let’s get with it, guys: You don’t need to hear a Ministry song to get political. You should be political on your own. We’re just a side project to society. So do I care what people think about me personally? No. I just do what I do.
  894. It’s typical of record companies. They sign you because you’re unique, and then they want to put you in a mold so they can sell records.
  895. It’s such a stupid thing to sign a band and then demand a hit right away to instantly recoup the money. The point is, you have to do it by building your own following, and that is not necessarily done by writing instant hits.
  896. In Ministry, we’ve only had one message: Think for yourself.
  897. If you remember the ’90s, you weren’t there.
  898. If you had a Ministry box set under your Christmas tree, wrapped in paper, ‘From Beer to Eternity’ is the bow that goes around the present, you know what I mean?
  899. If I did all the stuff I’ve been accused of – or credited with – there’s no way I could make all this music. I’d be drinking myself into the grave.
  900. I’ve seen 48 Stanley Cups in my life. I was about six or seven when I started going to games with my dad.
  901. I’ve never seen the Osbournes, I’ve never seen Paris Hilton. I’d rather read than watch reality TV. I’d rather live life than watch somebody else living it.
  902. I’m the biggest Blackhawks fan ever. I’ve been going to games since I was 6 years old.
  903. I’m still a recluse. I still hate everyone. I’m still a misanthrope.
  904. I’m not working at the Chevron, although I’d probably be the best person to work the night shift. Look at me. Nobody would try to steal a Snickers on my watch.
  905. I’m not a real Halloween kind of guy, because Halloween is every day.
  906. I’m not a malicious person. When you get past the tattoos and leather, I give people a fair shake. There are periods when I’ve sowed some wild oats, no doubt about it. And I can party with some of the heavyweights. There are some stories about me that, yeah, where there’s smoke there’s fire. But sometimes the smoke is just smoke.
  907. I’m getting a bunch more face tattoos, because it doesn’t look like I’m ever going to have to apply to a Walmart or Best Buy.
  908. I’m envious of people that can handle the press. No matter what I say or how articulately I say it, it always comes back to the same issues. And it’s getting kind of old.
  909. I’m done with industrial. Seriously, my iPod collection at home has no industrial music on it; it’s strictly jazz, blues and country.
  910. I’m an all-or-nothing guy. When I’m working, I work, work, work, work, work, and when I’m not, I’m the laziest sloth this planet has ever provided us.
  911. I’m a very reluctant frontman. I’ve seen reviews where they talk about my strong presence on stage, but it’s nothing I do. It’s like the person in a long grocery line who stands out because he’s so agitated. He’ll have presence, too.
  912. I’m a very firm believer in karma, and put it this way: I get a lot of good parking spots.
  913. I’m a studio rat. I like going in there as producer.
  914. I’d still prefer to do five nights at a club than one night at Allstate Arena.
  915. I was stupid when I started: the epitome of bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. It was like, ‘I get to live in L.A. and drive around in limos? Really?’ I didn’t realize I was owned. The more money gets pumped into you, the more you become a marionette. It made me a true redneck in attitude: I never wanted to wake up ever again feeling owned.
  916. I was a pretty delinquent little kid. My folks and I didn’t get along, so I basically moved out… put myself through high school and then college by working. I’m only a half-year short of a degree in history.
  917. I think we were colonized by aliens 250,000 years ago, and they genetically altered our DNA to be primates into homo erectus and humans. I’m very interested in how we evolved so suddenly, which obviously ties in with the alien thing.
  918. I scare the neighbors, the kids… They don’t come to my house for trick-or-treating, trust me. I had to buy exactly zero amount of dollars worth of candy for the past couple of years.
  919. I never want to be in that stage where a band ends up playing state fairs and casinos. I am not willing to go out shooting up Botox and eating corn dogs while judging pig contests.
  920. I never read comic books as a kid.
  921. I love doing film soundtracks and working with directors on how they want the scene to be portrayed on audio as opposed to visual. I like the collaborative effort of working with people.
  922. I just tell you what I feel. I go out there, you put a quarter on my tongue, twist my ear and I’ll spit out some hit for you.
  923. I hate bands that hang around, like, 10 years too long – they’re like the drunk at a party you can’t get rid of.
  924. I got my influences from ’70s bands – Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, blah blah blah. When I was growing up, we had all these crazy bands on the Top 40. Today, if Pink Floyd released ‘Money,’ it wouldn’t even get played.
  925. I get along great with all of my exes. That’s really cool. That’s a good sign.
  926. I don’t want people buying my records for this summer’s hit. I want people buying them because they’re interested in what Ministry will have to say in the future.
  927. I don’t think we have the right haircut or tattoos for politics.
  928. I don’t think I’ve ever done anything professionally.
  929. I can’t control what people think of me, and I stopped really caring a long time ago.
  930. Everything shapes you to be the person you are today. Sometimes hard lessons pay off dividends.
  931. Everyone reaches their point in time where either they die or they get sick of doing drugs. It started getting debilitating. I enjoy my music a lot better than my drugs.
  932. Eventually, when I sell enough units, as they say in the record business, I will stop touring. I’ll concentrate on what I like to do… stay in the studio.
  933. Being on stage is not creating, it’s re-creating.
  934. Basically, an artist should be a mirror, or a reflection of society or his or her environment. What you see is what you can articulate.
  935. Art is commenting on what’s going on around you in your life.
  936. Ah, man, if I could ever hook up with Tom Waits, I’d be the happiest camper in Yellowstone, alright? That’s the one guy.
  937. ‘Rock n’ Roll Animal,’ the live album, is one of the greatest live albums out there. It was a huge influence on me.
  938. You need some insecurity if you’re an actor. It keeps the pot boiling. I haven’t yet started to think about retiring. I was shocked when I heard about Paul Newman retiring at age 82. Most actors just fade away like old soldiers.
  939. You do get very tired sometimes, when you’re sitting around for hours in movies. You get depleted.
  940. When my mother got home from work, she would take me to the movies. It was her way of getting out, and she would take me with her. I’d go home and act all the parts. It had a tremendous influence on my becoming an actor.
  941. When I was younger, I would go to auditions to have the opportunity to audition, which would mean another chance to get up there and try out my stuff, or try out what I learned and see how it worked with an audience, because where are you gonna get an audience?
  942. When I was a younger actor, I would try to keep it serious all day. But I have found, later on, that the lighter I am about things when I’m going to do a big scene that’s dramatic and takes a lot out of you, the better off I am when I come to it.
  943. Vanity is my favourite sin.
  944. There has been a lot of self-doubt and unwelcome events in my life.
  945. There are a lot of roles in Shakespeare, basically. If I feel that the script is a movie, I would be interested in doing any role of Shakespeare’s.
  946. Theater for me at one point was a lifestyle, too.
  947. The truth is, you know, we need our anodynes. You know that word, anodynes? We need that in life some times. A good warm bath can be one for you, or a whatever.
  948. The problem with me is, I guess, the way I express myself, you have to be with me 50 years before you can get a sense of what I’m talking about.
  949. The hardest thing about being famous is that people are always nice to you. You’re in a conversation and everybody’s agreeing with what you’re saying – even if you say something totally crazy. You need people who can tell you what you don’t want to hear.
  950. The actor becomes an emotional athlete. The process is painful – my personal life suffers.
  951. That’s where humour lives for me. In the body. The Steve Martin kind of stuff or Jim Carrey, that’s what I like. I’ve always felt that’s what I would like to do.
  952. Some of the roles that are challenging are more in theater and TV. In movies, there’s a tendency to cast actors in roles that have been successful for them. It has to pay for itself.
  953. Shakespeare’s plays are more violent than ‘Scarface.’
  954. Playing a character is an illusion, and I feel that when you know too much about a person, possibly part of that illusion is disrupted.
  955. My weaknesses… I wish I could come up with something. I’d probably have the same pause if you asked me what my strengths are. Maybe they’re the same thing.
  956. My grandmother always came to my shows. She was always concerned about the way I dressed – even later on, when I was well known and I supported her.
  957. My first language was shy. It’s only by having been thrust into the limelight that I have learned to cope with my shyness.
  958. My dad was in the army. World War II. He got his college education from the army. After World War II he became an insurance salesman. Really, I didn’t know my dad very well. He and my mother split up after the war. I was raised by my maternal grandmother and grandfather, and by my mother.
  959. Most everybody who’s Italian is half Italian. Except me. I’m all Italian. I’m mostly Sicilian, and I have a little bit of Neapolitan in me. You get your full dose with me.
  960. Money makes your life easier. If you’re lucky to have it, you’re lucky.
  961. Jamie Foxx does a good rendition of me. It’s a real gift, mimicry of that kind, the tonal thing. It’s sort of like having a talent for playing an instrument.
  962. It’s never really that much fun for me to do movies anyway, because you – you know, you have to get up very early in the morning and you have to go in and you spend a lot of time waiting around.
  963. It’s easy to fool the eye but it’s hard to fool the heart.
  964. It would be hard to play a character you don’t like – for me anyway – or can’t find something in them to like.
  965. It surprised me, the feeling I got when I won the Oscar for ‘Scent of a Woman.’ It was a new feeling. I’d never felt it. I don’t see my Oscar much now. But when I first got it, there was a feeling for weeks afterward that I guess is akin to winning a gold medal in the Olympics.
  966. In America most everybody who’s Italian is half Italian. Except me. I’m all Italian. I’m mostly Sicilian, and I have a little bit of Neapolitan in me. You get your full dose with me.
  967. I’ve often said there’s two kinds of actors. There’s a more gregarious type and the shy type.
  968. I’ve never liked the recognition, the questions, the publicity. I have often felt like running away and hiding.
  969. I’ve never cared for guns. In fact, when I did ‘Scent of a Woman’ I had to learn how to assemble one.
  970. I’ve always been in the theater. I’ve always gone to it. That’s been my way to cope. Early on in my career, I remember running – fleeing – to the theater as a way of coping with all the meshugaas that was going on for me.
  971. I’m so shy now I wear sunglasses everywhere I go.
  972. I’m an actor, not a star. Stars are people who live in Hollywood and have heart-shaped swimming pools.
  973. I was not prepared for fame. It hit me hard, and I did not have the capacity to cope.
  974. I used to wear disguises, like hats and false beards, just to walk around and avoid attention.
  975. I remember acting in a school play about the melting pot when I was very little. There was a great big pot onstage. On the other side of the pot was a little girl who had dark hair, and she and I were representing the Italians. And I thought: Is that what an Italian looked like?
  976. I like, for instance, ‘Serpico.’ I enjoyed playing Serpico because Frank Serpico was there. He existed. He was a real life person and I could – I could embody him. I could, you know, I could work and get to know him and have him help me with the text, the script and become him. It’s almost like a painter having a model to become.
  977. I don’t think actors should ever expect to get a role, because the disappointment is too great. You’ve got to think of things as an opportunity. An audition’s an opportunity to have an audience.
  978. I don’t need bodyguards. I’m from the South Bronx.
  979. I don’t ever give my opinion. Opinions I have about anything are in my personal life.
  980. I do believe, and I will always believe, that Shakespeare on film is really something that should be tried more often because it is an opportunity to take the humanity that Shakespeare writes into characters and express it.
  981. Francis Ford Coppola did this early on. You tape a movie, like a radio show, and you have the narrator read all the stage directions. And then you go back like a few days later and then you listen to the movie. And it sort of plays in your mind like a film, like a first rough cut of a movie.
  982. Explain to me what Italian-American culture is. We’ve been here 100 years. Isn’t Italian-American culture American culture? That’s because we’re so diverse, in terms of intermarriage.
  983. Doing Shakespeare once is not fair to the play. I have been in Shakespeare plays when it’s not until the last two or three performances when I even understand certain things. In the old days star actors would travel the world doing the same parts over and over again.
  984. Did you know I started out as a stand-up comic? People don’t believe me when I tell them. That’s how I saw myself, in comedy.
  985. At this point in my career, I don’t have to deal with audition rejections. So I get my rejection from other things. My children can make me feel rejected. They can humble you pretty quick.
  986. All due respect and trying to be as modest as I can be, I am a dancer. But I don’t think I would be on ‘Dancing with the Stars,’ mainly because I would be too shy.
  987. You still have Top 40 radio now, but it’s 40 different stations. There aren’t many hits that everybody knows, and there aren’t many real superstars.
  988. You fake something until you’re good at it.
  989. You don’t need to be defined by your job.
  990. Whenever I do a parody it’s not meant to make you hate anybody’s music really.
  991. When I was a kid, I thought I was going to be an architect, because when I was 12 years old I had a guidance counselor that convinced me that that was the best career choice for me.
  992. When I go to my live shows it’s often a multigenerational audience, a family bonding experience.
  993. What kind of morons do you have working at newspapers in Austin that would base an entire review of an artist’s performance on whether or not they had a good seat?
  994. There aren’t that many superstars around anymore.
  995. There are probably a few library fines I haven’t paid yet, but I’m a pretty clean-cut guy overall.
  996. There are a lot of songs that would ostensibly be a good candidate for parody, yet I can’t think of a clever enough idea.
  997. The irony is of course that my career has lasted a whole lot longer than some of the people I’ve parodied over the years.
  998. Somebody will come up to me after a show and have me sign their arm, and the next time I see them my autograph has been permanently inscribed on their arm.
  999. Some people want to advertise their weirdness, and spread it out, that’s not me.
  1000. So that’s why one of my rules of parody writing is that it’s gotta be funny regardless of whether you know the source material. It has to work on its own merit.
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