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  3. 22/12/2017 (Fri, 22 Dec)

Articles Page 20

Articles Page 20

  1. With the attention I got on my wealth, I thought I would have become a source of resentment, but it is just the other way around – it just generates that much more ambition in many people.
  2. Wipro is one of the fastest growing companies regionally and globally, and I am personally very excited with our journey in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
  3. Wipro Arabia is a joint venture company with Dar Al Riyadh, a well-diversified group in Saudi Arabia.
  4. When you are under pressure, you make the bold steps faster; you don’t make the bold steps slower.
  5. When I took over the family business, it had already been a publicly traded company for 20 years. During one of the first annual meetings I attended, one shareholder stood up and advised me and everyone in attendance that I should resign.
  6. What we are doing is we are putting in significant training into the people we have currently to upgrade their skill resources, upgrade the presentation resources, and upgrade what we expect from them in terms of not business as usual.
  7. What is excellence? It is about going a little beyond what we expect from ourselves. Part of the need for excellence is imposed on us externally by our customers. Our competition keeps us on our toes, especially when it is global in nature.
  8. Western companies want access to Indian talent. That is why they outsource; that is why they come to India to set up base.
  9. We’ve always seen ourselves as Indian. We’ve never seen ourselves as Hindus or Muslims or Christians or Buddhists.
  10. We understand how to build and manage businesses that involve technology, engineering, and people at a large scale on a global platform.
  11. We run courses for government school teachers on Sundays. These teachers pay for their own food and stay; the kind of commitment you find in these people is remarkable.
  12. We get first-rate faculty members from the leading engineering and science institutes to train our people.
  13. We entered the global market only in the end-’80s, and that was because imports became more liberal.
  14. We believe that two people who have worked together for more than 10 years and been in the company for more than 15 years would be able to work very well as a team.
  15. We are partners to leading organizations across industries and have delivered marquee and transformational programs.
  16. To have strongly integrated managers who have a deep understanding of technology is a rare and difficult combination to build. You have to invest a lot in selecting and training these people.
  17. This whole issue of Hindu-Muslim in India is completely overhyped.
  18. There’s a reasonable amount of traction in college education, particularly engineering, because quite a lot of that is privatized, so there is an incentive to set up new colleges of reasonably high quality.
  19. There are three lessons in philanthropy – one, involve the family, especially the spouse. She can be a remarkable driver of your initiative. Two, you need to build an institution, and you need to scale it up. Choose a leader for philanthropy whom you trust. Three, philanthropy needs patience, tenacity and time.
  20. There are 600 districts in India. Every district in India has a teacher-training institute.
  21. The three ordinary things that we often don’t pay enough attention to, but which I believe are the drivers of all success, are hard work, perseverance, and basic honesty.
  22. The test of our social commitment and humanity is how we treat the most powerless of our fellow citizens, the respect we accord to our fellow human beings. That is what reveals our true culture.
  23. The success of Wipro has made me a wealthy person.
  24. The responsibility of philanthropy rests with us. The wealthier we are, the more powerful we get. We cannot put the entire onus on the government.
  25. The public/private partnerships are taking various forms in India. It is individuals who are socially oriented are setting up schools. They’re setting up colleges. They’re setting up universities. They’re setting up primary-education schools in the villages, particularly the villages their original families came from.
  26. The principal challenge we face is to go up the value- and domain-skill chain and build a strong consultancy front end and, also, to globalize our leadership much more.
  27. The old boys’ club of closed tennis court relationships is on the way out.
  28. The job of nation building, the job of nation leadership in a difficult, complex coalition has worked.
  29. The important thing about outsourcing or global sourcing is that it becomes a very powerful tool to leverage talent, improve productivity and reduce work cycles.
  30. The importance of this success of Wipro has become manifold more, because it’s the success of Wipro that enables the possibility of making a difference to some of the most disadvantaged people in the world.
  31. The customer is a remarkably selfish person: He takes the relationship to where the execution is in his favor.
  32. The concept of the strong linkage to the family is breaking down in Western nations.
  33. The Western world loves liberalisation, provided it doesn’t affect them.
  34. The West is not producing enough engineers.
  35. The U.S. is a complex country. It has a high predominance of immigrants who have been eminently successful.
  36. The U.K. and the U.S. are quite similar in that they have high-productivity, English-speaking workforces who don’t mind working long hours. Working in those countries is not a problem.
  37. The Indian community in Canada has integrated much better than the Indian community in United States. They’ve become really Canadian at the same time as keeping all their Indian characters and customs and social groups.
  38. Technical people tend to be more ‘techie,’ and management people are more ‘managerial.’
  39. Talent is in short supply everywhere. At Wipro, we are training nonengineers to be engineers.
  40. Saudi Arabia has proved to be the growth engine for Wipro.
  41. Private sector cannot substitute the role of the government in primary education.
  42. People have to take control of their own lives. Education is key because it also raises other social indicators like healthcare.
  43. People are the key to success or extraordinary success.
  44. People are realistic enough to appreciate what the market values of different people are.
  45. People are beginning to realize that education is power, that education is money, that education is an opportunity.
  46. Parents realize their wealth should be used for social good rather than children’s good.
  47. Over these years, I have irrevocably transferred a significant part of the shareholding in Wipro, amounting to 39% of the shares of Wipro, to a trust.
  48. Our managers need to have a strong integration of managerial skills and technical understanding. One cannot substitute for the other.
  49. Our experience is that it is not terribly difficult to do business in China. But the issue is, how much stability do you have in terms of what you negotiate up front and when you’ve got your feet and your investments on the ground.
  50. Our business model is primarily that of consulting, engineering, system integration, and managed services.
  51. My dad told me he wanted me to join in the business, but nothing was firm. He was quite young when he died, so we hadn’t talked about it in depth.
  52. It is the strength of our culture that we can have Sonia Gandhi, who is Catholic, a Sikh prime minister, and a Muslim president.
  53. Interestingly, many Indian companies where there’s a father-and-son combination are being run as joint CEO organizations because the father has not given up running the company and the son is actively involved in running the company, and there is division of responsibilities.
  54. Inflation is taking up the poverty line, and poverty is not just economic but defined by way of health and education.
  55. In any software work, you have IT consultancy competence required to build the systems.
  56. If there are differences of views or divergence of ideas, they can be resolved through discussion and dialogue.
  57. If the United States wants access to Chinese, Indian or Vietnamese markets, we must get access to theirs. U.S. protectionism is very subtle but it is very much there.
  58. If one has been blessed or have been fortunate enough to have got much more than normal wealth, it is but natural that one expects a certain fiduciary responsibility in terms of how that wealth is applied, used and leveraged for purposes of society.
  59. I.B.M. was not really bringing their best technologies to India. They were dumping old machines in the country that had been thrown away in the rest of the world 10 years before.
  60. I was studying at Stanford University with two quarters left to go before receiving an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering. Then, I got the telephone call from my mother. I had no choice. I went home, and I jumped into the company feet first, right from day one. There was no time to grieve my father.
  61. I think the most important reason for our success is that very early in our quest into globalisation, we invested in people – and we have done that consistently and particularly in the service business.
  62. I think the advantage of democracy is that it makes us less dependent on a group of leaders.
  63. I think that any wealth creates a sense of trusteeship… it is characteristic of the new generation which has created wealth to have some amount of responsibility for it.
  64. I strongly believe that those of us who are privileged to have wealth should contribute significantly to try and create a better world for the millions who are far less privileged.
  65. I inherited the company from my father after he died very unexpectedly from a heart attack in 1966. He was just 51 years old, and I was 21.
  66. I have never had the need or thrill for being wealthy.
  67. I have always felt intuitively that somehow such wealth cannot be the privy of any one person or any one family.
  68. I feel that business leaders with their ability to create businesses, with their ability to scale, need to play an important role in social service.
  69. I don’t think being a Muslim or being a non-Muslim has been an advantage or disadvantage.
  70. I can’t have my employees sitting in traffic when they should be in the office. Spending two-and-half hours in the car is a huge waste of productive time.
  71. I can speak English. I can speak Hindi. I can understand one or two other languages.
  72. I am particularly interested in primary education because the state of affairs in primary education in this country is a cause for concern.
  73. How can you contribute towards building the Indian society and the Indian nation? No better way than to upgrade the quality of young people in school, particularly the schools which are run by the state government in the villages.
  74. Frankly, I don’t know how many companies there are, globally, which are truly global.
  75. Excellence is a great starting point for any new organisation but also an unending journey.
  76. Excellence endures and sustains. It goes beyond motivation into the realms of inspiration.
  77. Excellence can be as strong a uniting force as solid vision.
  78. Even if a media of a TV is not available in a home, there’s this concept of community homes, where a reasonably well-off villager will have a TV – and a nice TV – and he’ll keep it outside the house in the evenings.
  79. Even if I was to give my children a small part of my wealth, it would be more than they can digest in many lifetimes.
  80. Ecology and economy are becoming inextricably entwined, and the world is becoming more conscious of this fact.
  81. Despite widely differing perspectives and agendas, there seems to be a remarkable global consensus that has built up over a fairly short period of time that climate change and ecology is one of the truly defining issues for humanity.
  82. Customers are now driven by trying to optimize value.
  83. Colleges produce more sports therapists than engineers. Perhaps because America is a sporty country: a lot of outdoors.
  84. Certain product lines are more suited to be manufactured in proximity with the customer, while others are more suitable to be manufactured in India.
  85. Being in the consumer business helps us groom talent in areas like marketing, finance and logistics. We can benchmark our outsourcing business to our consumer business and its best practices.
  86. All our hiring staff are trained to interview in English. They’re trained to look for Westernized segments because we deal with global customers.
  87. A girl child who is even a little bit educated is more conscious of family planning, health care and, in turn, her children’s own education.
  88. You go to any Jay-Z concert, and he plays his hits. Comedians don’t have hits. You have to have a whole brand-new hour. You have no hits to rely on. It’s the hardest thing.
  89. Writing your own jokes, you just kind of keep working on something until you think it might work, and then you try it out and hope for the best.
  90. With stand-up, it’s more interesting to hear about people’s failures than their successes.
  91. With stand-up, I can have an idea, go down the street to a comedy club and work on it, flesh it out, book a venue, people will come, then film it. I do all that myself; I never have to answer to anybody.
  92. Why would anyone get married and have babies? That’s the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard in my life. Or the scariest thing I’ve ever heard in my life.
  93. When I tour, it’s like, well, like a food tour as much as a comedy tour. I try to eat at all the weird places, the obscure barbecue joints, burger places. There are a few spots in L.A. that I’m obsessed with – one of them is the Taco Zone taco truck on Alvarado. There are secret off-menu items that are amazing.
  94. What’s cool about Twitter is that you can make a joke about something very of-the-moment or random that I wouldn’t be able to joke about in stand-up.
  95. The whole idea of love is scary – so is being with someone for the rest of your life and being happy with them for the rest of your life. There’s lots of research to suggest that, actually, love’s not really that simple.
  96. The most influential thing was the two Chris Rock specials that came out when I was in high school. I was obsessed with that stuff.
  97. Stand-up comedy is a raunchy profession.
  98. Some comedians will tour and do these classic bits all the time. But now with YouTube and Comedy Central, people see your stuff, and they don’t want to hear you do that again.
  99. Other than friends and family, my favorite things are New York and stand-up. I love doing comedy in New York – I can do way more stand-up here than in Los Angeles.
  100. One of the big things I miss about New York is not my friends so much; it’s Shake Shack, the burger place. I miss Shake Shack.
  101. Once you become a comedian, you accept that people are just going to yell stuff at you.
  102. Myself, Eric Wareheim, and Jason Woliner decided to start a Food Club where the three of us go to restaurants with a couple of other people. The three of us are the captains of the Food Club, so we have to wear the captains’ hats.
  103. Most single people I know, myself included, have a difficult time even meeting up with the people they like, be it busy schedules, texting games, or whatever.
  104. London seems to be a town with a lot of comedy fans and people that really enjoy stand-up.
  105. Like with ‘Parks and Recreation,’ it’s so much fun because the people writing it are funny and they’re open and you just go in there and have a good time. It’s pretty much the easiest job I’ve ever had.
  106. It’s the hardest thing to come up with an hour of material that can consistently keep people laughing.
  107. It’s hard to really get that excited about movies. Think about it like this: how many good comedy movies come out a year? Maybe one or two? And then, in those movies, what are the chances that there’s a character that I’m the best fit to play? It’s really small!
  108. I’m the kind of person, if I see something, like a funny video, I want to share it. With Twitter and Tumblr you can do that on a mass scale, and people get to know your personality.
  109. I’m so jealous of people who have crushes on people they go to school with or work with. That’s such a blessing. You actually get to see them all the time and spend time with them.
  110. I’m kind of obsessed with food. I like to eat. When I tour, it’s like, well, like a food tour as much as a comedy tour.
  111. I’m kind of obsessed with food. I like to eat.
  112. I’m always down to try a new burger, but Shake Shack is still my top. What makes them so special is for the bread they use Martin’s potato rolls which is just the best hamburger buns ever.
  113. I weirdly do consider myself an optimist about love.
  114. I was a dishwasher at one of those Japanese places that cook on your table. Not too fun.
  115. I was 18 when I started. I was hanging out with some friends and they asked if I had tried stand-up before. I hadn’t, but I thought: ‘What the hell?’ So I went to an open mic night, and I liked it.
  116. I like the brand Band of Outsiders. Their suits are cut really slim, for smaller framed gentlemen.
  117. I know my fan base is a smart group of people.
  118. I have an amazing metabolism. I’m sure that’ll be gone one day. But I like to exercise, too, so I don’t think I’ll ever get really fat.
  119. I guess my music taste is pretty predictable: I like new indie rock stuff, older stuff.
  120. I guess after college, I just got really into food. I also think going on the road doing stand-up makes you more into food. Because when you travel like that, one of the things to do is find really good places to eat.
  121. I don’t think you can describe your ideal girl. A big part of that is just meeting someone and really clicking with them and wanting to hang out with them all of the time.
  122. For the majority of the time, I may as well have been just a really tan white kid. You know, I may as well have just been, like, a fat kid.
  123. Every time I’ve done comedy in, like, traditional comedy clubs, there’s always these comedians that do really well with audiences but that the other comedians hate because they’re just, you know, doing kind of cheap stuff like dancing around or doing, like, very kind of base sex humor a lot, and stuff like that.
  124. Every single person, pretty much, is taught what they’re supposed to do: go to school, get a job, find someone to love, get married, have kids, raise the kids, and then die. Nobody questions that. What if you want to do something different?
  125. Even in my stand-up, there’s a lot more positivity and enthusiasm rather than negative, I-hate-everything vibes.
  126. Do It Under the Influence Yourself! That’s what we’re shooting for! Get drunk and make your dreams come true.
  127. Being a rapper is about being cool, but being a comedian, you’re not supposed to be the coolest guy.
  128. After you do a joke a few times, you have material that you know works. Although sometimes I have a joke that has worked a bunch of times, and then one night it’ll flop.
  129. After you do a joke a few times, you have material that you know works. Although sometimes I have a joke that has worked a bunch of times and then one night it’ll flop. And that’s when I really take a hard look at myself and say: ‘Well, that crowd is obviously wrong. That crowd has absolutely no idea what it’s talking about.’
  130. Acting is a plum gig, and then animation is an even more plum gig.
  131. A lot of people my age think stand up sucks.
  132. We have an obligation to spread amateur baseball both at home and abroad. Building up the game at all levels – Little League, Babe Ruth Leagues, the colleges – is in our own self-interest. That’s where the pool of talent is – and also of fans.
  133. Universities are not here to be mediums for the coercion of other people, they’re here to be mediums for the free exchange of ideas.
  134. To go from Yale to the National League is simply to go from one form of management to another.
  135. This is not the first time in my life where you know going into a job that you’re going to hear in stereo what was wrong with what you did.
  136. There’s nothing bad that accrues from baseball.
  137. There are many who lust for the simple answers of doctrine or decree. They are on the left and right. They are not confined to a single part of the society. They are terrorists of the mind.
  138. There are a lot of people who know me who can’t understand for the life of them why I would got to work on something as unserious as baseball. If they only knew.
  139. The university is our culture’s assertion that what is made by the mind has value and can convey values.
  140. The professionals must set a good example.
  141. Teaching is an instinctual art, mindful of potential, craving of realizations, a pausing, seamless process.
  142. Teachers believe they have a gift for giving; it drives them with the same irrepressible drive that drives others to create a work of art or a market or a building.
  143. Some of my academic friends think I’ve fallen from a very special grace.
  144. On matters of race, on matters of decency, baseball should lead the way.
  145. No one man is superior to the game.
  146. My goal has been to encourage jointness, to push people to think of affiliations rather than to operate as solo entrepreneurs.
  147. Major sports are major parts of society. It’s not anomalous to have people who love sports come from other parts of that society.
  148. I’m the world’s expert on sterotypes held by academics about athletes and held by athletes about academics. To me, both of them are caricatures.
  149. I’m not going to sit here now and say ‘do this,’ or ‘do that.’ But you must – must – expunge any vestige of racism.
  150. I think that the young people today feel a tremendous sense of responsibility to their brothers and sisters because of the sacrifices that most families make to send their children to college.
  151. For me, baseball is the most nourishing game outside of literature. They both are re-tellings of human experience.
  152. Baseball has undergone and absorbed a whole set of dislocations.
  153. Americans have been remarkably devoted to the capacity for belief, to idealism. That’s why we get into trouble all the time. We’re always viewed as naive.
  154. All I ever wanted to be was president of the American League.
  155. A tremendous social responsibility comes with being a successful public performer.
  156. A liberal education is at the heart of a civil society, and at the heart of a liberal education is the act of teaching.
  157. Who made the world I cannot tell; ‘Tis made, and here am I in hell. My hand, though now my knuckles bleed, I never soiled with such a deed.
  158. The troubles of our proud and angry dust are from eternity, and shall not fail. Bear them we can, and if we can we must. Shoulder the sky, my lad, and drink your ale.
  159. The laws of God, the laws of man he may keep that will and can; not I: let God and man decree laws for themselves and not for me.
  160. The house of delusions is cheap to build but drafty to live in.
  161. The average man, if he meddles with criticism at all, is a conservative critic.
  162. That is the land of lost content, I see it shining plain, the happy highways where I went and cannot come again.
  163. Shoulder the sky, my lad, and drink your ale.
  164. Nature, not content with denying him the ability to think, has endowed him with the ability to write.
  165. Malt does more than Milton can to justify God’s ways to man.
  166. In every American there is an air of incorrigible innocence, which seems to conceal a diabolical cunning.
  167. If a line of poetry strays into my memory, my skin bristles so that the razor ceases to act.
  168. I find Cambridge an asylum, in every sense of the word.
  169. Here dead lie we because we did not choose to live and shame the land from which we sprung. Life, to be sure, is nothing much to lose; but young men think it is, and we were young.
  170. Great literature should do some good to the reader: must quicken his perception though dull, and sharpen his discrimination though blunt, and mellow the rawness of his personal opinions.
  171. Experience has taught me, when I am shaving of a morning, to keep watch over my thoughts, because, if a line of poetry strays into my memory, my skin bristles so that the razor ceases to act.
  172. Even when poetry has a meaning, as it usually has, it may be inadvisable to draw it out… Perfect understanding will sometimes almost extinguish pleasure.
  173. And malt does more than Milton can to justify God’s ways to man.
  174. Ale, man, ale’s the stuff to drink for fellows whom it hurts to think.
  175. When I think about atheist friends, including my father, they seem to me like people who have no ear for music, or who have never been in love.
  176. When Christians start thinking about Jesus, things start breaking down, they lose their faith. It’s perfectly possible to go to church every Sunday and not ask any questions, just because you like it as a way of life. They fear that if they ask questions they’ll lose their Christ, the very linchpin of their religion.
  177. Watching a whole cluster of friends, and my own mother, die over quite a short space of time convinced me that purely materialist ‘explanations’ for our mysterious human existence simply won’t do – on an intellectual level.
  178. Truth comes to us mediated by human love.
  179. There is no doubt that, since 1977 and the launch of Apple II – the first computer it produced for the mass market – many things which used to be done on paper, or on the telephone, have been done easier and faster on a screen.
  180. The scribbler’s life is never done.
  181. The really clever people now want to be lawyers or journalists.
  182. The latest research has revealed that women have a higher IQ than men.
  183. The fact that logic cannot satisfy us awakens an almost insatiable hunger for the irrational.
  184. The death of any man aged 56 is very sad for his widow and family. And no one would deny that Steve Jobs was a brilliant and highly innovative technician, with great business flair and marketing ability.
  185. The approach of death certainly concentrates the mind.
  186. The United States is the ultimate land of optimistic promise, but it also gave birth to quintessentially pessimistic tragedy: ‘Moby-Dick.’
  187. The Royal Family are not like you and me. They live in houses so big that you can walk round all day and never need to meet your spouse. The Queen and Prince Philip have never shared a bedroom in their lives. They don’t even have breakfast together.
  188. Tennyson seems to be the patron saint of the wishy washies, which is perhaps why I admire him so much, not only as a poet, but as a man.
  189. Since Einstein developed his theory of relativity, and Rutherford and Bohr revolutionised physics, our picture of the world has radically changed.
  190. Reading about Queen Victoria has been a passion of mine since, as a child, I came across Laurence Housman’s play ‘Happy and Glorious,’ with its Ernest Shepard illustrations.
  191. Personally, I think universities are finished. So much rubbish gets taught.
  192. People become dons because they are incapable of doing anything else in life.
  193. On the rare occasions when I spend a night in Oxford, the keeping of the hours by the clock towers in New College, and Merton, and the great booming of Tom tolling 101 times at 9 pm at Christ Church are inextricably interwoven with memories and regrets and lost joys. The sound almost sends me mad, so intense are the feelings it evokes.
  194. Of all liars the most arrogant are biographers: those who would have us believe, having surveyed a few boxes full of letters, diaries, bank statements and photographs, that they can play at the recording angel and tell the whole truth about another human life.
  195. Nearly all monster stories depend for their success on Jack killing the Giant, Beowulf or St. George slaying the Dragon, Harry Potter triumphing over the basilisk. That is their inner grammar, and the whole shape of the story leads towards it.
  196. My kind publishers, Toby Mundy and Margaret Stead of Atlantic Books, have commissioned me to write the life of Queen Victoria.
  197. Like many people in Britain, I have an affectionate respect for the Queen, and am surprised that I should be having such republican thoughts.
  198. It would no doubt be very sentimental to argue – but I would argue it nevertheless – that the peculiar combination of joy and sadness in bell music – both of clock chimes, and of change-ringing – is very typical of England. It is of a piece with the irony in which English people habitually address one another.
  199. It seems astonishing to be paid for indulging in pure pleasure. For me to go to Coburg is rather as if a trainspotter was sent for a few weeks to Swindon or a chocoholic asked on holiday by Green and Black.
  200. It is the woman – nearly always – in spite of all the advances of modern feminism, who still takes responsibility for the bulk of the chores, as well as doing her paid job. This is true even in households where men try to be unselfish and to do their share.
  201. It is remarkable how easily children and grown-ups adapt to living in a dictatorship organised by lunatics.
  202. It is eerie being all but alone in Westminster Abbey. Without the tourists, there are only the dead, many of them kings and queens. They speak powerfully and put my thoughts into vivid perspective.
  203. Iris Murdoch did influence my early novels very much, and influence is never entirely good.
  204. In the past, I used to counter any such notions by asking myself: ‘Would you really want President Hattersley?’ I now find that possibility rather cheers me up. With his chubby, Dickensian features and his knowledge of T.H. Green and other harmless leftish political classics, Hattersley might not be such a bad thing after all.
  205. If you read about Mussolini or Stalin or some of these other great monsters of history, they were at it all the time, that they were getting up in the morning very early. They were physically very active. They didn’t eat lunch.
  206. If you know somebody is going to be awfully annoyed by something you write, that’s obviously very satisfying, and if they howl with rage or cry, that’s honey.
  207. If you imagine writing 1,000 words a day, which most journalists do, that would be a very long book a year. I don’t manage nearly that… but I have published slightly too much recently.
  208. If only Queen Elizabeth II had the intellectual, political and linguistic skills of Queen Elizabeth I, many people would support giving her some of the powers of an elected president.
  209. IQ in general has improved since tests first began. Psychologists think that this is because modern life becomes ever more complicated.
  210. I’ve never had a study in my life. I’m like Jane Austen – I work on the corner of the dining table.
  211. I’ve got nothing very original to say myself.
  212. I’m starting to realize that people are beginning to want to know about me. It’s a jolly strange idea.
  213. I’m like Jane Austen – I work on the corner of the dining table.
  214. I’m boring. My beliefs are neither here nor there.
  215. I wanted passionately to be a priest.
  216. I very much dislike the intolerance and moralism of many Christians, and feel more sympathy with Honest Doubters than with them.
  217. I think that if you can’t be loyal to the Church, it’s best to get out.
  218. I think one of the very frightening things about the regime of the National Socialists is that it made people happy.
  219. I think I became a Catholic to annoy my father.
  220. I suppose if I’d got a brilliant first and done research I might still be a don today, but I hope not. People become dons because they are incapable of doing anything else in life.
  221. I should prefer to have a politician who regularly went to a massage parlour than one who promised a laptop computer for every teacher.
  222. I might be deceiving myself but I do not think that I do have an inordinate fear of death.
  223. I had lost faith in biography.
  224. I don’t write books inadvertently.
  225. I don’t think you can tell the objective truth about a person. That’s why people write novels.
  226. I do not find it easy to articulate thoughts about religion. I remain the sort of person who turns off ‘Thought for the Day’ when it comes on the radio.
  227. I believe the collapse of the House of Windsor is tied in with the collapse of the Church of England.
  228. I am shy to admit that I have followed the advice given all those years ago by a wise archbishop to a bewildered young man: that moments of unbelief ‘don’t matter,’ that if you return to a practice of the faith, faith will return.
  229. Fear of death has never played a large part in my consciousness – perhaps unimaginative of me.
  230. Everyone writes in Tolstoy’s shadow, whether one feels oneself to be Tolstoyan or not.
  231. Brain power improves by brain use, just as our bodily strength grows with exercise. And there is no doubt that a large proportion of the female population, from school days to late middle age, now have very complicated lives indeed.
  232. Anti-Semitism is extremely common.
  233. A busybody’s work is never done.
  234. ‘In Memoriam’ has been my companion for all my grownup life.
  235. You have your identity when you find out, not what you can keep your mind on, but what you can’t keep your mind off.
  236. There’s something to be said in favor of working in isolation in the real world.
  237. The poet exposes himself to the risk. All that has been said about poetry, all that he has learned about poetry, is only a partial assurance.
  238. That’s a wonderful change that’s taken place, and so most poetry today is published, if not directly by the person, certainly by the enterprise of the poet himself, working with his friends.
  239. Questions structure and, so, to some extent predetermine answers.
  240. Probably all the attention to poetry results in some value, though the attention is more often directed to lesser than to greater values.
  241. Poetry leads us to the unstructured sources of our beings, to the unknown, and returns us to our rational, structured selves refreshed.
  242. Only silence perfects silence.
  243. Once every five hundred years or so, a summary statement about poetry comes along that we can’t imagine ourselves living without.
  244. Is it not careless to become too local when there are four hundred billion stars in our galaxy alone.
  245. In nature there are few sharp lines.
  246. If we ask a vague question, such as, ‘What is poetry?’ we expect a vague answer, such as, ‘Poetry is the music of words,’ or ‘Poetry is the linguistic correction of disorder.’
  247. If the greatest god is the stillness all the motions add up to, then we must ineluctably be included.
  248. If a poem is each time new, then it is necessarily an act of discovery, a chance taken, a chance that may lead to fulfillment or disaster.
  249. I take the walk to be the externalization of an interior seeking so that the analogy is first of all between the external and the internal.
  250. I must stress here the point that I appreciate clarity, order, meaning, structure, rationality: they are necessary to whatever provisional stability we have, and they can be the agents of gradual and successful change.
  251. I can’t tell you where a poem comes from, what it is, or what it is for: nor can any other man. The reason I can’t tell you is that the purpose of a poem is to go past telling, to be recognised by burning.
  252. I am grateful for – though I can’t keep up with – the flood of articles, theses, and textbooks that mean to share insight concerning the nature of poetry.
  253. For though we often need to be restored to the small, concrete, limited, and certain, we as often need to be reminded of the large, vague, unlimited, unknown.
  254. Everything is discursive opinion instead of direct experience.
  255. Even if you walk exactly the same route each time – as with a sonnet – the events along the route cannot be imagined to be the same from day to day, as the poet’s health, sight, his anticipations, moods, fears, thoughts cannot be the same.
  256. Each poem in becoming generates the laws by which it is generated: extensions of the laws to other poems never completely take.
  257. Definition, rationality, and structure are ways of seeing, but they become prisons when they blank out other ways of seeing.
  258. Besides the actual reading in class of many poems, I would suggest you do two things: first, while teaching everything you can and keeping free of it, teach that poetry is a mode of discourse that differs from logical exposition.
  259. Anything looked at closely becomes wonderful.
  260. A poem generated by its own laws may be unrealized and bad in terms of so-called objective principles of taste, judgement, deduction.
  261. You learn different things through fiction. Historians are always making a plot about how certain things came to happen. Whereas a novelist looks at tiny little things and builds up a sort of map, like a painting, so that you see the shapes of things.
  262. You learn a lot about love before you ever get there. You learn at least as much about love from books as you do from watching your parents.
  263. You can understand a lot about yourself by working out which fairytale you use to present your world to yourself in.
  264. Why do we take pleasure in gruesome death, neatly packaged as a puzzle to which we may find a satisfactory solution through clues – or if we are not clever enough, have it revealed by the all-powerful tale-teller at the end of the book? It is something to do with being reduced to, and comforted by, playing by the rules.
  265. Where would we be without inhibitions? They’re quite useful things when you look at some of the things humans do if they lose them.
  266. When I was a child – in wartime, pre-television – books were my life.
  267. What I need to write well is a combination of heat, light and solitude.
  268. We talk about feelings. And about sex. And about bodies, and their gratification, violation, repair, decoration, deferred, maybe permanently deferred, mortality. Feelings are a bodily thing, and respecting them is called, is, kindness.
  269. There is a certain aesthetic pleasure in trying to imagine the unimaginable and failing, if you are a reader.
  270. There are things I take sides about, like capital punishment, which it seems to me there is only one side about: it is evil. But there are two or three sides to sexual harassment, and the moment you get into particular cases, there is injustice in every conceivable direction. It’s a mess.
  271. The true exercise of freedom is – cannily and wisely and with grace – to move inside what space confines – and not seek to know what lies beyond and cannot be touched or tasted.
  272. The point of painting is not really deception or imitation.
  273. The more research you do, the more at ease you are in the world you’re writing about. It doesn’t encumber you, it makes you free.
  274. Reading a newspaper is like reading someone’s letters, as opposed to a biography or a history. The writer really does not know what will happen. A novelist needs to feel what that is like.
  275. One of the reasons I’ve gotten so attached to talking to scientists is that… they know there is a reality.
  276. On buses and trains, I always think about the inexhaustible variety of human genes. We see types, and occasionally twins, but never doubles. All faces are unique, and this is exhilarating, despite the increasingly plastic similarity of TV stars and actors.
  277. Never stop paying attention to things. Never make your mind up finally. Do not hold beliefs.
  278. My professional and human obsession is the nature of language, and my best relationships are with other writers. In many ways, I know George Eliot better than I know my husband.
  279. It’s because I’m a feminist that I can’t stand women limiting other women’s imaginations. It really makes me angry.
  280. It’s a terrible poison, writing.
  281. In our world of sleek flesh and collagen, Botox and liposuction, what we most fear is the dissolution of the body-mind, the death of the brain.
  282. In novels in general – and also on the television – we do live in a world where bodies is what we are. We do not talk about the spirit or the soul, and there is a sense that we no longer talk about beliefs, either Freudian or Marxist.
  283. In my mind’s eye, Shakespeare is a huge, hot sea-beast, with fire in his veins and ice on his claws and inscrutable eyes, who looks like an inchoate hump under the encrustations of live barnacle-commentaries, limpets and trailing weeds.
  284. In England, everyone believes if you think, then you don’t feel. But all my novels are about joining together thinking and feeling.
  285. If you want to teach women to be great writers, you should show them the best, and the best was often done by men. It was more often done by men than by women, if we’re going to be truthful.
  286. If a novelist tells you something she knows or thinks, and you believe her, that is not because either of you think she is God, but because she is doing her work – as a novelist.
  287. I’m quite interested in my own mental processes, simply because I’m a failed scientist, and because I’m interested in how the brain and the mind works, and I like to avoid easy descriptions.
  288. I’m not very interested in myself. I do have a deep moral belief that you should always look out at other things and not be self-centred.
  289. I’m more interested in books than people, and I always expect everybody else to be, but they’re not.
  290. I’d like to write the way Matisse paints.
  291. I watch a lot of sport on television. I only watch certain sports, and I only watch them live – I don’t think I’ve ever been able to watch a replay of a match or game of which the result was already decided. I feel bound to cheat and look up what can be looked up.
  292. I think vestigially there’s a synesthete in me, but not like a real one who immediately knows what colour Wednesday is.
  293. I think there are a lot more important things than art in the world. But not to me.
  294. I think the virtue I prize above all others is curiosity. If you look really hard at almost anybody, and try to see why they’re doing what they’re doing, taking a dig at them ceases to be what you want to do even if you hate them.
  295. I think that most of the children’s writers live in the world that they’ve created, and their children are kind of phantoms that wander around the edge of it in the world, but actually the children’s writers are the children.
  296. I think my characters with my fingers, I think my characters with my guts. But when I say I think them, that is what I do, I feel them with the sympathetic neurons and I work out with my brain what it is that I am trying to write about, or I can’t do it.
  297. I think literary theory has not been terribly good for English studies in a while. It’s not that theory isn’t interesting, but it isn’t about books, or the idiosyncrasies and complexities of putting language together.
  298. I sort of mind living in a time when most of the literature is terribly personal. I suppose it’s because I grew up on a love of history, philosophy, science and religion, but not to think too much about yourself.
  299. I like to write about painting because I think visually. I see my writing as blocks of color before it forms itself. I think I also care about painting because I’m not musical. Painting to me is not a metaphor for writing, but something people do that can never be reduced to words.
  300. I like feeling my way into different minds and experiences. It comes naturally and always has.
  301. I know that part of the reason I read Tolkien when I’m ill is that there is an almost total absence of sexuality in his world, which is restful.
  302. I have never been able to read Agatha Christie – the pleasure is purely in the puzzle, and the reader is toyed with by someone who didn’t decide herself who the killer was until the end of the writing.
  303. I have a dreadful fear that the more you try to prevent revealing the self, the more you do.
  304. I hated being a novelist when I was 20 – I had nothing to write about.
  305. I grew up with that completely fictive idea of motherhood, where the mother never strayed from the kitchen. All the women in my books are very afraid that if they do anything with their minds they won’t be complete women. I don’t think my daughters’ generation has that feeling.
  306. I find the attempt to find things out, which scientists are possessed by, to be as human as breathing, or feeding, or sex. And so the science has to be in the novels as science and not just as metaphors.
  307. I don’t understand why, in my work, writing is always so dangerous. It’s very destructive. People who write books are destroyers.
  308. I don’t think it is an easy thing to write and expect to be commercial, even if you are from Venus and a hermaphrodite.
  309. I don’t only write about English literature; I also write about chaos theory and… ants. I can understand ants.
  310. I don’t like gurus. I don’t like people who ask you to follow or believe. I like people who ask you to think independently.
  311. I did a lot of my writing as though I was an academic, doing some piece of research as perfectly as possible.
  312. I am suspicious of writers who go looking for issues to address. Writers are neither preachers nor journalists. Journalists know much more than most writers about what’s going on in the world. And if you want to change things, you do journalism.
  313. I am not sure how much good is done by moralising about fairy tales. This can be unsubtle – telling children that virtue will be rewarded, when in fact it is mostly simply the fact of being the central character that ensures a favourable outcome. Fairy tales are not, on the whole, parables.
  314. I am not an academic who happens to have written a novel. I am a novelist who happens to be quite good academically.
  315. I am a profound pessimist both about life and about human relations and about politics and ecology. Humans are inadequate and stupid creatures who sooner or later make a mess, and those who are trying to do good do a lot more damage than those who are muddling along.
  316. I always say I write my own novels and the characters don’t take control of me, but in fact, I look at the characters in the early stages and I think, ‘What is he or she like,’ and they slowly come together and they become the person they are.
  317. I acquired a hunger for fairy tales in the dark days of blackout and blitz in the Second World War.
  318. Human beings love stories because they safely show us beginnings, middles and ends.
  319. For a long time, I felt instinctively irritated – sometimes repelled – by scientific friends’ automatic use of the word ‘mechanism’ for automatic bodily processes. A machine was man-made; it was not a sentient being; a man was not a machine.
  320. Cyclists. I really hate them. I wish they would not be so self-righteous and realise they are a danger to pedestrians. I wish cyclists would not vindictively snap off wing mirrors on cars when they were trying to cross in front of the car at a danger to motorists and pedestrians.
  321. Books that change you, even later in life, give you a kind of electrical shock as the world takes a different shape.
  322. Biographies are no longer written to explain or explore the greatness of the great. They redress balances, explore secret weaknesses, demolish legends.
  323. As a little girl, I didn’t like stories about little girls. I liked stories about dragons and beasts and princes and princesses and fear and terror and the Four Musketeers and almost anything other than nice little girls making moral decisions about whether to tell the teacher about what the other little girl did or did not do.
  324. America is full of readers of all different sorts who love books in many different ways, and I keep meeting them. And I think editors should look after them, and make less effort to please people who don’t actually like books.
  325. A surprising number of people – including many students of literature – will tell you they haven’t really lived in a book since they were children. Sadly, being taught literature often destroys the life of the books.
  326. You’re only as old as you feel, and I feel pretty young. I’ve got one gear, and till it gets reversed, I’m going all out.
  327. You just remember back when you were watching as a kid and going, ‘Man, Sting’s so cool,’ and now I’m wrestling the guy. It’s breathtaking.
  328. You just can’t compare the WWE to anything else when it comes to sports entertainment. There is nothing like the WWE, nothing like this machine I am working for and I’m proud to work for.
  329. Wrestling in Japan, obviously, the fans are a little bit different – very quiet, very respectful in New Japan – but here in the WWE, these fans are going nuts.
  330. Who would have ever thought that, within a couple months of getting into the WWE, that I’d be wrestling in the main event for the world championship? Then, nine months after getting here, actually being the world champion.
  331. There’s plenty of people who’ve never gotten the opportunity to wrestle at WrestleMania. To perform there and do that, I never thought it would ever happen. I had learned to live with it. So to say I did, that is a big notch in my belt.
  332. There’s a lot of goals I’ve set in the WWE that I want to accomplish. I’m always setting goals for myself, and someday I want to be in the Hall of Fame.
  333. There’s a couple guys that I’d like to wrestle, but truthfully, I want to wrestle as many guys as I can.
  334. The WWE is based on, I think, reaction. You know, if you can’t get a reaction, that means you can’t put butts in the seats.
  335. That’s the great thing with the WWE. They want you to be like John Cena, they want you to be like The Rock, and they definitely give you that platform.
  336. Sometimes I feel like if I’m not getting people to boo me, then I’m not doing my job right.
  337. Shinsuke Nakamura is probably one of the best wrestlers I’ve ever been in the ring with. He’s very unorthodox. Everything he does is with knockout power. He’s a guy who is very flamboyant, so don’t let his Michael Jackson antics fool you. This guy is deadly.
  338. If we’re talking about guys who set the tone, you’ve got to go way back. But if we’re talking about guys who made it possible for guys like A.J. Styles, Shawn Michaels kind of opened that door, along with Daniel Bryan.
  339. I’ve never really felt like a veteran. I’ve never felt like the guy who’s like, ‘OK, everyone needs to look up to me and respect me.’ I’ve always just been one of the guys that people are excited to get in the ring with. That’s all I want.
  340. I’ve been a video game guy since I was eight years old and got my first Nintendo. I’ve been addicted to video games ever since.
  341. I’m not trying to be something that I’m not, and I think a lot of people can relate to that. They want something that’s real, and I think I give that to them.
  342. I would love to tell you that it’s been absolutely perfect, that I’ve been a man that’s been super Christian. But I’ve had mistakes, dumb things I’ve regretted, so it’s not a perfect life. But it’s one that has helped me make better decisions.
  343. I went to church when I was younger, but it was never something pushed down my throat or anything, which is a good thing. I found out for myself where I belonged.
  344. I want to be known as A.J. Styles, the WWE Superstar that he is, and have amazing matches, make memories – I think that’s the goal.
  345. I think the thing that I get most excited about is the fact that I know I’m gonna have a great match. That’s when I get the butterflies. When it’s just a regular match or something like that, I may not get that.
  346. I hope to have more than one main weapon. I have the Phenomenal Forearm as we’re calling it now, the Calf Crusher – the Styles Clash is still available. I like to have a lot of alternative moves to hit people with, and whatever seems to work is what I’ll go with.
  347. I busted my tail for so long, I’m just glad it’s getting recognized now as part of the WWE. Because let’s face it, the WWE is the biggest company out there when it comes to wrestling. I’m just happy that I’m being recognized as somebody who works hard, I guess.
  348. I always say when it comes to dream matches, that is not up to me: that’s up to the WWE Universe. That’s up to the fans. But there is a guy on ‘SmackDown’ that I have yet to wrestle yet that’s certainly gonna happen at some point, and that’s Randy Orton.
  349. Everything I do, I want to be A.J. Styles. When you see a guy come out with dry, long hair, I want you to be like, ‘Hey, that reminds me of A.J. Styles.’ That’s what I want.
  350. Everybody either hates or loves John Cena; there’s no medium. I feel like that I’ve accomplished something when I get people to cheer for John Cena. I feel like I’ve done something.
  351. Do I think Vince McMahon was looking at my matches in Japan going, ‘We need him?’ No. He wasn’t. He’s too busy. There’s no way. But somebody may have been looking and going, ‘All right, I like this guy. Let’s give him a shot.’
  352. At my house, it’s an, ‘If dad says it, you can say it’ kind of deal, so a lot of my slang words come off very childish at this point in my career.
  353. Although I am a Christian, I am not even close to perfect.
  354. You’ve just got to sing, do some kind of singing every day. Early mornings and cold weather can mess with that. I drink special teas with cayenne pepper, but I think you’re psyching yourself out, really.
  355. You try to do what you can to bring harmony wherever you go.
  356. You never know how much time you got.
  357. Working with the brothers can put pressure on my voice, so I choose to do my own solo thing so I can save my voice. I couldn’t do both now. The Neville Brothers is a funk band; they play loud, and I have a strong voice.
  358. Without faith, I don’t think I’d be here.
  359. When you were a kid, a day was a long time and a year was a long time.
  360. When I’m singing, it’s a mixture of my innocence in the projects, my mom and dad. It’s all the good and the bad, the laughs and the frowns that I went through and seen other people go through. Then you be trying to write it. Whatever’s coming out, you try and make it all cool.
  361. When I’m singing, I connect the dots with notes.
  362. When I was living in the projects, I had a mop stick for my horse. I wanted to be Gene Autry or Roy Rogers, so I would ride my mop through the projects.
  363. When I was growing in the Callope project, we had an oval parkway. Pavement ran around this whole thing. We’d skate or ride bicycles. There were benches and trees out there. It was paradise to us. They finished building it the same year I was born.
  364. When I sang, I couldn’t help making those little curves. People would say, ‘Why don’t you sing straight?’ But I have always had to put something in.
  365. When I record something, I’ll take a drive and just listen.
  366. When I get down to Louisiana, I get to have a taste of some of that great food.
  367. When I first went out on the road with Larry Williams, there was also, like, The Coasters, The Drifters, and The Flamingos.
  368. We used to play football on the levee, with no shirts on in the summer – August in New Orleans – and my skin would turn red. They’d call me Redskin, Red Apache, then it turned around to Apache Red.
  369. We lived together as kids, and now we’re taking care of each other as men.
  370. Until I went to rehab, I didn’t understand what it did.
  371. Through the years, I found we had Native American blood in us. My great-grandmother came from the island of Martinique, and they hooked up with the Native Americans of Louisiana.
  372. There are so many songs in my heart and in my brain. I wake up at 2 in the morning, and I have to get up and sing them. There are so many of them, it’s ridiculous.
  373. The music of the Clovers and Spaniels and the rest was like candy to me. I couldn’t get enough; my teachers probably thought I had attention deficit disorder.
  374. The gospel music and doo-wop is what has informed me personally.
  375. The first time I recorded without Allen Toussaint, I wanted to do doo-wop. Everything I’ve done since then has got some kind of doo-wop essence in it.
  376. The extras are a nice bonus feature, but the main incentive is the musical experience.
  377. That’s one thing you hear in my voice today. I could yodel from one octave to another octave. It always fascinated me.
  378. Sometimes in the middle of the night, I wake up with a song in my head, and I have to finish it so I can fall back asleep.
  379. So now I have a collection of poetry by Aaron Neville and I give it to people I want to share it with. I’d like to publish it someday.
  380. So I went in front of the judge, and I had my St. Jude prayer book in my pocket and my St. Jude medal. And I’m standing there and that judge said I was found guilty, so he sentenced me to what the law prescribed: one to 14 years.
  381. Singing is my entire life. I nearly lost that. I am so blessed to be able to do this. It’s the only thing I’ve ever wanted to do.
  382. Singing is a prayer to me.
  383. People are living a lot longer these days and not preparing for it. I’m in the gym and, you know, using my voice.
  384. New Orleans will always be in my heart. New Orleans raised me – it’s in my blood.
  385. My mother turned me onto St. Jude back in the days when I was wild and crazy. She took me to the shrine on Rampart Street.
  386. My friends and I were wild and we liked to joy-ride.
  387. My favorite prayer is Footprints in the Sand. You know that prayer? I know the times that he carried me, you know? I kind of wore him out.
  388. My drummer, bass player, and guitar player sing backgrounds. They play and sing. I can sing all the harmonies, but I can’t do it alone.
  389. My dad and my mom were big Nat King Cole fans, so they had everything he did.
  390. My brothers and I would sit out on the park bench and harmonize.
  391. My brother Art was a doo-wopper. He had a group that sat out on a park bench in New Orleans and sang harmonies at night, and they’d go around and win all the talent shows and get all the girls, you know.
  392. Me and my partners had been stealing cars for a while.
  393. Man, I was scared. I didn’t know what to think. All of a sudden, I got a record climbing the charts, and I’m out in the streets. You know, workin’ on the docks. And the first week, it sold something like 40,000 in New Orleans.
  394. It’s up to God to do the judging. You haven’t walked in my boots, so how are you going to judge me?
  395. It’s one of the greatest festivals in the world. New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Fest is the best all-around… It’s an honor to be closing it.
  396. It’s a 360-degree sound experience. Like you’re in the middle of the band. A lot of people have the technology to play the format, so why not put it out there. It sounds great.
  397. In New Orleans, music is part of the culture. You’re raised with it, from the cradle to the grave, and all in-between.
  398. If you had told me I’d be making 62 tomorrow, I’d say you were lying.
  399. If we were poor, we didn’t know it ’cause I guess you don’t miss what you never had. So, you know, we made do with whatever. We used to make our own toys, and we used to play with spinning tops and marbles. A pocket full of marbles, and you were rich – you didn’t worry about no money.
  400. I’ve had problems with my throat over the years, playing with loud bands for years, and I’ve had bruised vocal chords and nodules.
  401. I’ve done all different kinds of genres – doo-wop, pop, funk, gospel, country, jazz, you name it.
  402. I’ve been into every doo-wop there is. I think I went to the university of doo-wop-ology.
  403. I’m waiting for them to come up with a ‘Star Trek’ thing so they can beam me from my house to the gigs and back.
  404. I’m here now because of my faith. That’s what got me singing and what has kept me singing. That is what I have: what has kept me doing right and has provided me with the chances and the attitude and the skills to do this.
  405. I’ll be singing with The Blind Boys of Alabama, which is a great joy to me. I’ve done some work with them before, and they truly are amazing.
  406. I write poetry on my iPhone. I’ve got about 100 poems on there.
  407. I worked with the Neville Brothers for 40-some years on the highway, and up and down since I can remember – funk from New Orleans.
  408. I was very surprised when I heard that I had been chosen to receive the James Cardinal Gibbons Award.
  409. I was raised Catholic, but my father’s people were Methodist, so we went to both churches.
  410. I used to always sing my way into the movies and the basketball games or whatever. I’d sing for whoever’s on the door, and they’d let me in. I used to think I was Nat King Cole back in the day, you know. So I’d sing something like, ‘Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa, men have named you,’ and they’d let me in.
  411. I think things happened the way they did for a reason.
  412. I think the Creator renews me.
  413. I think St. Jude helped me achieve some miracles in my life – that’s why I wear the medallion in my left ear and never take it out.
  414. I started listening to gospel when I was a little boy and my grandmother used to rock me on her lap.
  415. I sing around the house, in the shower.
  416. I remember going up and doing ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’ with Paul Simon, Santana playing up there with us.
  417. I really like listening to music in my car.
  418. I owe it all to Jesus.
  419. I never really got paid for ‘Tell It Like Is,’ but I look back at it and say God knew what he was doing; he probably figured that if I had got money back in them days, I wouldn’t be here now. That’s okay. I’m here. And I’m still singing the song.
  420. I never left doo wop.
  421. I might see something on TV and get inspired to write about it. I can’t sit down and plan to write. It has to come to me in my head like someone telling me the words.
  422. I know the fact that I was born means I have to die, so my only aim is to reach out and help someone along the way.
  423. I know that God is good, and he saved me from hell and damnation.
  424. I just sing. You have to use it.
  425. I just sing what I feel in my heart. I ain’t trying to prove nothing, and I don’t think I ever did.
  426. I grew up singing Ray Charles and Jimmy Reed.
  427. I feel it was just a few years ago I was running around in short pants.
  428. I even done a doo-wop version of the Mickey Mouse march.
  429. I eat a lot of fish to stay healthy.
  430. I don’t want to be on the road all my life.
  431. I dig Steve Harvey: he’s the suit man. I be checking him out.
  432. I didn’t just get to 75 years by tiptoeing. I had to work hard sometimes.
  433. I buried Joel on our 48th anniversary. I had been with her since I was 16.
  434. I balance with prayer and music. I sing every day.
  435. I am very honored and excited to have ‘Devotion’ released as the first DVD Audio disc… surround sound is amazing… The music comes alive and is so vibrant – it’s unlike anything you’ve ever heard before!
  436. I always tell people I want to see the world through His eyes, and I want people to see Him in me.
  437. I always loved Sam Cooke, because he seemed very versatile. He sang gospel, soul, blues, pop music.
  438. I always feel I’m blessed, you know. I thank God for letting me use his voice. That’s how I see it.
  439. Growing up my mother played Sarah Vaughan and Nat Cole in the house regularly.
  440. God is waiting for us, to forgive us all, and what is broken, he’ll fix.
  441. Every morning I wake up and thank God.
  442. Every day, some act of kindness comes my way, even if it’s just someone opening the door. It happens every day if you keep an eye out for it. Keeping an eye out, that’s the key.
  443. Doo-wop is the true music to me, man. Doo-wop was what nurtured me and grew me into who I am, and I guess even when I was in school, the teacher probably thought I had ADD or something every day, because I’d be beating on the desks, singing like the Flamingos or the Spaniels or Clyde McPhatter or somebody.
  444. Don Was is a friend of mine; we’ve done projects together over the years.
  445. But I knew if I ran I’d never be able to sing, so I had to take my punishment.
  446. Beyonce is cool, and she can really sing.
  447. Being at the Apollo, I was always starstruck.
  448. Be honest, be nice, be a flower not a weed.
  449. Ain’t no place like New Orleans. It’s one of kind.
  450. Age and numbers are a concept made up by man.
  451. A lot of my solo albums were produced by different people who had their idea of what songs I should do, and they had me doing a lot of ballads.
  452. ‘Yellow Moon’ was a poem. My wife at the time, Joel – she’s dead now – it was our 25th anniversary. She had the chance to go on a cruise with her sister. And I’m home with the kids and looking up, and I saw the big moon, and I just started writing.
  453. You don’t start a company because you want to be an entrepreneur or the fame and glory that comes along with it. You become an entrepreneur, and you create a company to solve a real problem. And by real problem, I mean a problem that is going to exist down the line.
  454. Whenever I see a tree that is climbable, it must be climbed. Sometimes when I’m on a run, I’ll just run up a tree, jump on a branch and swing off. My favorite tree, in Saratoga, gets me a good 75 feet up.
  455. When I was 8 or 9, I started using bulletin board systems, which was the precursor to the Internet, where you’d dial into… a shared system and shared computers. I’ve had an email address since the late ’80s, when I was 8 or 9 years old, and then I got on the Internet in ’93 when it was first starting out.
  456. The way you dress or the car you drive or what you spend is to impress other people with how, I guess, successful and rich you are. But you’re not, and you shouldn’t, and who gives a damn what other people think anyway. So, that mentality, I think, is very destructive.
  457. The typical workday, particularly in startup mode, is from nine to six or nine to seven, then you take a two-hour break to work out and eat dinner. By that time, you’re relaxed, and then you work until midnight or one A.M. If there was no break with physical activity, you’d be more tired and less alert.
  458. The start-up life kept me busy and surfaced the problem of not being able to stay on top of my personal finances, which led me to invent Mint.com. I was working 80-hour weeks, and had done enough preliminary work and research to know I had a big idea: To make money management effortless and automated.
  459. The original idea before Mint was a life and goal planning system I called Carpe Viva. The idea was that all of life’s goals, from buying a house, getting an MBA, or learning Spanish could be quantified in both time and money.
  460. Tell your idea to whomever will listen, and you’ll get valuable market feedback before writing a single line of code.
  461. One third of the economy goes through ‘QuickBooks’ in terms of businesses invoicing other businesses. Each invoice contains a connection between vendors, suppliers, and customers, and also the price of that connection. Representing the payment graph is huge opportunity and something no other company can do.
  462. One of my top tips for aspiring entrepreneurs: Tell everyone you know about your idea. This runs contrary to the instinct that most people have, because they’re afraid someone is going to ‘steal my ideal.’ Ideas alone are worth very little; it’s in the execution and market feedback that companies are made.
  463. Most people don’t know what they spend in every single area, but they know they have a problem in particular areas.
  464. Mint’s business model became, ‘We’ll go for free, and then we’ll find these savings opportunities for you.’ You know, better interest rate on your credit cards, when should you consolidate your student loans, when does it mathematically make sense to refinance your mortgage, and Mint figures all that stuff out for you.
  465. Mint is designed to put your finances on auto-pilot. Whether you log in or not, it will send you a weekly summary of your balances and biggest purchases, and how your investments and budgets are doing, along with sending you alerts on unusual spending and low balances.
  466. Kevin Systrom of Instagram used to work for us as a consultant in the early days of Mint. I knew him a long time ago. Maybe I could have gotten in there. But with photo sharing, I don’t know if there’s an obvious business model. I don’t think there’s a competitive, sustainable advantage.
  467. In the first three years of Mint, from when it was founded to when it was sold, I can honestly say that in a sustainable way, I couldn’t have worked any harder on it.
  468. If you think about photo sharing sites, the mobile photo sharing and social, there’s no competitive advantage, there’s no obvious business model, so I never play with anything like that. I avoid it like the plague.
  469. If you pay your credit card off every month, get a rewards card. One that gives you airline miles or that will give you 1 percent cash back at least on every purchase.
  470. If you look on Amazon – if you do a search for personal finance, there are literally 20,000 books written on personal finance, and there’s no real reason for it. I mean, personal finance is pretty simple.
  471. I’ve been spending quite a bit of time in Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the U.K. as Mint is expanding globally, and I’m personally doing much of the research and business deals to make them happen.
  472. I’ve actually started a number of businesses in my career. So I’m 28 currently, but when I was about 16, I started building Websites, and that’s how I put myself through school. I went to Duke with a degree in electrical engineering, computer science, computer engineering, and then to Princeton.
  473. I’m typically a ‘just drink water’ kind of guy. I was a bodybuilder in high school, so I used to – food to me was, ‘there are this many grams of carbohydrates and proteins, and I need these micronutrients in order to grow and be fit,’ and I ate in order to live and not live in order to eat, and I think most people are the opposite.
  474. I wanted to build a tool for my generation: people 20 to 40 who don’t want to spend time balancing a checkbook or checking multiple financial institutions’ websites. Mint does just that, giving comprehensive, quick insights into a user’s finances from their computer, mobile phone and/or tablet.
  475. I wanted a personal-finance tool for people who didn’t want to be accountants: something you could set up in ten minutes and spend less than five minutes a week on. Mint is now that tool.
  476. I think sports and bodybuilding were the only things that saved me from getting beat up. People are not pleased, for whatever reason, when you can answer all the questions in class. If not for the respect I got from track, cross-country, wrestling and bodybuilding, it would have been a disaster.
  477. I pitch Mint to everyone from investors to engineers, young and old, and I do it pretty much the same way: Here’s the problem in the market place, here’s how we solve it, and here’s how we make money.
  478. I know it sounds weird, but the food that I eat, it doesn’t make a big difference, and it never has. So, I’ve saved a ton of money not buying a lot of alcohol, not going out to restaurants too much. So, I think it’s part of our culture, and it’s part of a social activity more than anything else.
  479. I have always thought of myself as an inventor first and foremost. An engineer. An entrepreneur. In that order. I never thought of myself as an employee. But my first jobs as an adult were as an employee: at IBM, and then at my first start-up.
  480. I consider myself an inventor first and an entrepreneur second. In real life, my hero is Thomas Edison. He was a great inventor, but also an outstanding entrepreneur who was able to sell his inventions to the masses. He didn’t just develop the light bulb; he invented the entire electric grid and power distribution system.
  481. I always knew I wanted to be a technologist, so I went to Duke and got a degree in computer science and electrical engineering. Really, I thought my goal in life was to be an inventor, a problem solver, so I thought I needed a Ph.D. to be good at inventions, but it turns out that you don’t.
  482. I actually don’t invest in anything that is social, mobile, deals or ad networks simply because those are areas where there are so many players and so many other smart people in the space, I feel like I don’t have a competitive advantage. So I tend to go after things that are e-commerce, like healthcare.
  483. Carefully calculate the potential size of your market to make sure you can grow. Before starting Mint, I knew that there were about 20 million people who had purchased ‘Quicken’ or ‘Microsoft Money’ over the years, and 80 million people using online banking in the U.S. alone.
  484. Before Mint.com, I was a long-time user of ‘Microsoft Money’ and Intuit’s ‘Quicken.’ Both were powerful tools, loaded with features and functionality around taxes, investment, budgeting – too feature-laden, in fact. They took hours to set up, forever to learn, and an hour a week to maintain.
  485. Because Mint has access to all of your bank accounts and credit cards, we can detect fraud or unusual spending patterns faster than your bank, then send an email or text message alert to users.
  486. Be careful not to start a company that really belongs as a feature of another company, like the 25 Twitter URL shortener companies out there. Pick a real problem that’s here to stay.
  487. At Mint, we developed five pending patents on our technology, ranging from categorization to the Ways to Save system that calculates how much a new financial product would save a user given their present financial situation.
  488. At 16, I started a web development business and had clients from the Netherlands, Caribbean, and across the country – none of whom knew my age because I could conduct all my business with a phone, scanner, and the Internet.
  489. After building most of Mint.com’s prototype by myself, I talked to anyone and everyone I knew about Mint. It’s counter-intuitive, because you might fear someone will steal your idea, but it’s the only way to make connections, be sure you’re on the right track, and provide a solution for an audience broader than yourself.
  490. You’ve got to be picky in this business – if you’re not, then I don’t think you have the option of longevity. You’ve got to be choosy and try and do something that’s outside of the box and dangerous. I love doing stuff that excites me, gives me that adrenalin rush.
  491. You feel like you’re really a part of a movement when you’re singing Journey at a karaoke bar.
  492. You can tell if you’re going to be into a script within the first five or ten pages – if I’m not completely engaged by page 20, I just have to give up on it.
  493. Yeah, I left Idaho at 17. You know, I graduated high school a year early and just, you know, the typical story, packed up my car and moved out.
  494. With this film, ‘Need For Speed,’ with this, we had a blank canvas to work with. What we had to do was have fast cars, and that’s it.
  495. When you’re mid-season, in very intense situations, it’s hard not to take that home with you. Especially when you’re sleeping, you can’t control what you dream about. And it sneaks into the unconscious.
  496. When I was a kid growing up, I used to watch ‘DuckTales.’
  497. When I first started, I just wanted to work. I wouldn’t necessarily do anything, but I’d pretty much almost do anything at the very beginning.
  498. What’s so great about Sundance is that they only accept such a small handful of films per year for dramatic competition, so you know when you’re going to Sundance that you’re going to see top-quality projects.
  499. There’s three networks you want to be on: It’s either AMC, HBO, or Showtime.
  500. The first part of my career, how I was paying the bills was commercials. I was just doing tons of commercials.
  501. The first album I ever bought with my own money was ‘Ten.’ Every single song reminds me of my childhood.
  502. That’s what’s so great about television. You’re able to tell this long story, where you couldn’t really do that in a film because you have to tell a story in an hour and a half or two hours.
  503. Thank you, Hollywood, for allowing me to be part of your group.
  504. People get in fights because they don’t communicate, because you don’t want to hurt the other person.
  505. On a big film, there’s almost no way you can meet everyone. On an indie, there are 30 people and no trailers to duck into.
  506. My wife and I do not argue. We communicate. We talk. But we’ve never fought in our entire relationship.
  507. My heart is in independent film-making. For me, it’s where the fun, gritty storytelling is being told.
  508. My first gig was a Corn Pops commercial. I did the first Vanilla Coke campaign. A Juicy Fruit commercial paid my bills for years.
  509. My favourite job hands down – and I think I can speak for everyone involved – was ‘Breaking Bad.’
  510. My father’s a Southern Baptist minister. I wasn’t lighting cars on fire; I just wasn’t.
  511. My family never owned a home. We leased.
  512. My dad didn’t want me to listen to Zeppelin, I think because it reminded him of his wilder days, and now he’s a retired Southern Baptist minister.
  513. It’s very exciting to be able to just work in this business, let alone on stuff you are extremely proud of. So it does make me a little nervous, because ‘Breaking Bad’ is so special. It’s great being part of something so great because people pay attention to you, hopefully because you’re doing good work.
  514. It’s so hard for me to kind of fall in love with comedy, but if something comes my way… I mean, I loved ‘Weird,’ I thought that was a really fun character.
  515. It’s so funny, I’ve done so many projects where I’ve been interrogated. I guest starred on almost every hour drama, and I’m always the guy they think is the bad guy but then they find out is not.
  516. It’s all about trying to be very careful about what your next role or what your next move is gonna be. It’s all about trying to have longevity in this business and make smart choices.
  517. It was the roughest day of my career, my final day of shooting on ‘Breaking Bad,’ knowing that I will never be able to kind of zip on that skin again.
  518. If everyone were a good person, it’d obviously be a better world.
  519. I’ve grown so much, not just as an actor, but as a human being.
  520. I’ve got to be honest and say that, growing up, I wasn’t a big sports guy, but I love the camaraderie. I just love people getting together, fighting for a team and getting super-emotional about it.
  521. I’ve been snowboarding my whole life. My wife’s really good, and I just try to keep up with her.
  522. I’ve been a fan of Burberry for a very long time and they’ve been so supportive of me for many years.
  523. I’m trying to have some longevity in this business. If that means not working for a while and just picking the right job, so be it.
  524. I’m obsessed with Radiohead. They’re just the greatest band on the planet.
  525. I’m not a leading man.
  526. I’m just in love with Burberry. Always have been, always will be.
  527. I’m a character actor.
  528. I was very driven in high school. I worked a bunch of odd jobs. I never partied. I never drank. I was just a theater geek who was obsessed with movies.
  529. I was on the snowboard team at my school, but that was the only sports team I was on. I played soccer growing up in elementary school.
  530. I took a whole stunt course and pretty much got certified as a stunt driver. It’s ridiculous how easy it is once you understand the car and know how to do it.
  531. I think that for some people faith is good – they have something to draw to.
  532. I think by eighth grade I knew I wanted to be an actor. I’d done church plays and stuff, but my first actual acting class was in eighth grade. I was obsessed with it.
  533. I saw a lot of people have success handed to them that then exploited it. They didn’t protect it or cherish it.
  534. I rode a shark once. I wouldn’t recommend it. It was fun, but I thought I was going to get eaten the entire time! Nothing against sharks. I love sharks. I just don’t think we are meant to ride them.
  535. I never really thought of myself as being an action hero or a leading man or any of that. I’m a character actor.
  536. I need to listen to chill music when I’m driving. It prevents road rage.
  537. I moved out to Los Angeles a fan of many people, and meeting people I put on a pedestal that just disappointed me. Without fans, this business would not exist, so I try and say that we’re all on the same level.
  538. I moved back to Idaho when I was 6 or 7 and then lived in a little town called Twin Falls and then moved to Boise. So quite different from L.A. I’d been to Disneyland a couple of times, and that was the closest I’d been to L.A.
  539. I mean, I’ve never really had much security, to be honest.
  540. I love playing odd roles.
  541. I love everyone over at Netflix. They’re all fantastic and an absolute joy to work with.
  542. I love diving into different skins, skins that make me feel deep emotions.
  543. I love coming of age stories that have struggle.
  544. I live a good life but a pretty simply life. I just store all my money under my mattress. My wife and I travel, and I bought my dream car, the Cobra.
  545. I knew that I tend to always gravitate to the indie side of things.
  546. I have 14 nieces and nephews.
  547. I hate musicals. There, I said it.
  548. I grew up all over Idaho – I was born in Emmett, a very small town.
  549. I gravitate toward edgy, intense, dark films that just grab you by the throat.
  550. I got spoiled on ‘Breaking Bad.’ Playing the same guy for four or five seasons, you get to really explore who the character is.
  551. I get random meetings, like, ‘Ron Howard would like to sit down with you.’ ‘Really?’ If ‘Breaking Bad’ hadn’t happened, Ron Howard probably wouldn’t want to sit down with me. Because he would have no idea who I was.
  552. I drive a 1965 Shelby Cobra. I love classic muscle cars.
  553. I don’t understand why every guy is not a romantic. I enjoy it.
  554. I don’t even draw on my life experiences when I’m acting. I just try and make it feel like I’m living through that person’s skin.
  555. I didn’t come from any money, but even when I was on ‘Big Love’ – people think you’re on a series and you’re making bank.
  556. I definitely had a very religious upbringing. My father was just instilling good morals into us at a very young age, and it wasn’t super-strict, but it was a loving, warm household.
  557. I consider myself absolutely a character actor, and that’s what I want as a career. I don’t need to be the lead star or any of that, as long as I’m doing stuff that I’m proud of, really.
  558. I always gravitate towards the independent side of things, just because those are the stories I always fall in love with, but you don’t really get paid, and living in Los Angeles is expensive, and I have a mortgage to pay. So it’s good to jump onto a studio film and then in all my other time do small passion projects.
  559. I always gravitate towards characters that are so opposite of me.
  560. From the very beginning, I’ve always just wanted to do something I’ve never done before. I’m still just trying to be on that path. It’s all about working with filmmakers that you believe in.
  561. A lot of people get emotional in movies that are cartoons, but not in TV shows.
  562. ‘Breaking Bad’ was such a high plateau.
  563. ‘Breaking Bad’ has definitely opened many, many doors for me.
  564. You talk all the time about being connected, being a unit, believing in each other. But if you have unnamed sources, people out there cutting you down, and then you find out it’s the person calling the plays – that would be really hard to deal with, to look at him the same way.
  565. You play it the way you always play it. You look for matchups, and you go through your progression, and you throw it to the guy who’s most open.
  566. You always have to be on at times, and occasionally people get upset if you say no to a picture when you’re eating dinner or something, and that’s kind of the hard part. Or if you get crazy rumors that swirl around you from time to time that are just silly.
  567. When you’re throwing the football the way you want to, you’re not thinking about it. You’re not thinking about your drop or your release point or the trajectory or where your feet are. It’s just coming off your hand exactly the way you want it to, fluid and confident.
  568. When you’re competitive, the last thing you want to do is come out of a game, regardless of what kind of injury it is – whether it’s an ankle, a knee, a rib, or a head injury.
  569. When you really start figuring things out as a quarterback, you realize you don’t have to be perfect every time, but you do have to be quick and decisive.
  570. When it comes to setting the market values, I let that stuff take care of itself. I know my value in this league, and I know the team appreciates me. I’m going to continue to make myself an indispensable part of this roster. When you do that, when your time comes up to get a contract, you usually get a contract extension.
  571. When I’m out there, you just have to react. That’s why you work on those throws. When you’re in the moment, you can’t think to yourself, ‘How do I get this to go 47 yards and be 2 yards inside the sideline?’
  572. We got to think of other ways to help these kids out because there’s a lot of kids who get hurt in college and then don’t make it to the NFL and don’t have insurance, and their entire lives are changed when they put their bodies on the line for their school.
  573. Touch is more important than arm strength. You want to really allow the receiver to run underneath the throw. It’ll give you a little margin for error if you undershoot it a bit.
  574. To me, the flag represents the greatest ideals of the United States of America, not the worst, but different people look at different things and have different feelings about it. That’s what freedom of expression is all about.
  575. This is what we get paid to do, is to bring it every week, and I hope the guys would say I bring it every week. I mean, I love this game, and I bring energy.
  576. There’s always going to be silly stuff out there in the media that you can’t worry too much about, and I don’t. We just keep on trucking, and I like the way my… I think there should be ‘professional is professional, and personal is personal,’ and that’s just how I’m going to keep it.
  577. There should be a minimum on the air pressure but not a maximum. Every game, they’re taking air out of the footballs I’m throwing, and I think that’s a disadvantage for the way that I like them prepped.
  578. The thing I love about Wisconsin is the people. We have such incredible people here. It’s fun to recognize the incredible athletes and coaches and sponsors and people we have here tonight. But we also have incredible fans.
  579. The majority of the time, they take air out of the football. I think that, for me, is a disadvantage.
  580. The beauty of our country is that when it was founded that they took some time to lay out civil liberties in the first 10 Amendments – the Bill of Rights. I’m a firm believer in those civil liberties and the ability to have your own opinion.
  581. The beautiful thing about the NFL season is to see a team come together after they get to know each other in the spring and summer. You then go through adversity together and see how you respond. The teams that can respond in a positive way are the teams that are going to be there in the end.
  582. The NCAA makes so much money off of their kids, and they put ridiculous – absolutely ridiculous – restrictions on everything that they can do.
  583. That’s what really motivates me: to make my coaches proud, my teammates proud, and the fans proud.
  584. Surround yourself with really good people. I think that’s an important thing. Because the people you surround yourself are a reflection of you.
  585. Playing the quarterback position, there are so many things you need to master that improvement ends up taking place on graduated levels.
  586. It takes a career, a lifetime, to build up a reputation, and only one misstep for it all to crumble away.
  587. In general, when you have success on the field, you’re more popular, and you have that fame that comes with it. You realize you’re in the public eye more, and you’ve got to be a little bit more careful about some of the things you’re doing out in public and make sure you’re smart about the things you say.
  588. I’ve spent years trying to time up my drops with my throws. You learn to listen to your feet and trust your positions.
  589. I’ve gotten to learn what’s important in life and what’s not important, and what to spend energy on and what not to. I don’t have a family like some of my teammates, but I have a lot of things pulling at me that I have to put my energy into.
  590. I’ve gotten to know a lot of great people here in all the different sports. It’s fun. It’s fun to get involved where you live. And this is where I live. I’m a registered voter here. I have my Wisconsin driver’s license.
  591. I’ve dealt with a lot of injuries over the years, and you just learn about pain management and how to keep yourself in the best shape to play on Sunday, and then playing with pain.
  592. I’m just going to say I’m not gay. I really, really like women. That’s all I can really say about that.
  593. I’m fulfilling my dreams that I had as a kid every single day. That’s why I’m trying to enjoy it so much.
  594. I’m fulfilling my dreams that I had as a kid every single day.
  595. I’m at a point where there isn’t any wasted movement in the throwing motion. Everything is consistent and smooth. When I first got into the league, I held the ball really high. That was the standard in college, and it messed up my timing a little bit – the draw, bringing it back, then the release.
  596. I went to University of Illinois team camp. And that was a big deal for me. I got MVP of the camp, but they offered another kid from the camp, which was fine. I laughed with the couple coaches I know who were there at the time, who were part of recruiting the other guy.
  597. I wanted to really ingrain myself in the culture and the people. And I apologize about having an allergy to dairy products that gives me some irritable bowels, but other than that, I mean, I’ve embraced just about everything else Wisconsin – especially when it comes to sports, but also the people and the interactions with our fans.
  598. I want to be the best. I want to be counted on by my teammates. I want to be counted on by this organization and the fans. I want to be someone they know is going to bring it every single week. I prepare to be the best.
  599. I think, because of the lack of guaranteed contracts in the league, there’s hesitancy to speaking your minds at times. But I feel like there could be a movement beginning where guys are feeling a little more comfortable talking about things that are important to them.
  600. I think you need to be intentional at times about your leadership – where you’re eating lunch, who you’re interacting with, making guys feel like you’re interested in what they’re doing. If it’s authentic, then it’s going to be an easy conversation and easy hangout time.
  601. I think there needs to be modified penalties in training camp because there’s severely modified compensation in training camp for all of us.
  602. I think that, as athletes, sometimes we have the opportunities to make an impact. When it’s authentic, I think there’s room to share your opinion in an appropriate way.
  603. I think some people forget sometimes I do have to go to the grocery store; I do enjoy going out to dinner. I have to get my oil changed from time to time. I do all the normal things. I cut my grass. People kind of forget that normal part, that we do a lot of the stuff that everybody else does, but we all have our talents, and mine is in football.
  604. I think it is all about finding ways to challenge yourself.
  605. I think being recognized more is something you have to get used to, whether it’s here or in California or when I’m traveling. It’s more a part of my life. People recognize me from my play or a commercial I’ve done. It’s just a normal part of life now.
  606. I think as you get older, you realize there’s always going to be critics. Critics are going to win every time because they can change their critique based on the stats and their own personal feelings. It’s less about proving people wrong, the critics wrong, and it’s more about challenging myself to keep this level up.
  607. I think as you get older, you realize there’s always going to be critics. Critics are going to win every time because they can change their critique based on the stats and their own personal feelings.
  608. I think Jesus was about bringing people together and connecting people in love, hanging out with the people who other people didn’t want to hang out with. Spending time with the worst of the worst because He knew those are the people who needed Him most.
  609. I still feel like I’ve got a lot of great football in front of me and the way that I’ve taken care of myself better the last few years. I think is going to put me in position to be able to play really well late in my 30s and even in my early 40s, possibly, if they’d like to keep me around that long and I can still play a little bit.
  610. I look for my opportunities, not trying to go outside of my genuine realm, because leadership has to be genuine and authentic.
  611. I like to push the limit to how much air we can put in the football, even go over what they allow you to do and see if the officials take air out of it.
  612. I know my role on this team, and I’m expected to prepare and to perform every week and play well. I relish that opportunity – to be somebody the guys can count on week in and week out, to play really well. That’s what really motivates me: to make my coaches proud, my teammates proud, and the fans proud.
  613. I know a lot is going to be on our shoulders, especially the way we’re starting games out. We have to start faster; I have to be sharper from the start, and I will be. And I’m confident that if we can get this thing started out a little better each week that we can get on that roll and be tough to stop.
  614. I just don’t think it’s appropriate talking about family stuff publicly.
  615. I feel like I’ve set the bar fairly high, and I want to keep living up to that bar.
  616. I don’t think God cares a whole lot about the outcome. He cares about the people involved, but I don’t think he’s a big football fan.
  617. How you deal with adversity says a lot about the kind of players you’ve got and the kind of team we’ve got.
  618. For me, it’s always been about preparation, and the more prepared I can be each week, the less pressure I feel and the more confident I am. As your confidence grows, it’s only natural that the pressure you feel diminishes.
  619. Five letters here just for everybody out there in Packer-land: R-E-L-A-X, Relax. We’re going to be OK.
  620. Everybody eats a little differently, but the more where you are aware of what you put in your body and how it affects your performance, the better opportunities you have. And that’s what I’m trying to do.
  621. Authenticity is everything! You have to wake up every day and look in the mirror, and you want to be proud of the person who’s looking back at you. And you can only do that if you’re being honest with yourself and being a person of high character. You have an opportunity every single day to write that story of your life.
  622. As you get older, the summer is less of a vacation and more of a training period by yourself away from the team. It’s exciting for me. I felt like I’ve been really getting better as far as my conditioning every single season as I get older.
  623. As you get older, and this is a young man’s game, and people say, ‘Well, there’s no way I can keep up running the way I’m running; there’s no way my arm is going to stay as strong as it is.’ It’s the challenge of trying to stay in my tip-top shape year in and year out so I can keep playing the way I want to play.
  624. Writing an encyclopedia is hard. To do anywhere near a decent job, you have to know a great deal of information about an incredibly wide variety of subjects. Writing so much text is difficult, but doing all the background research seems impossible.
  625. Without the ability to talk about government power, there’s no way for citizens to make sure this power isn’t being misused.
  626. With the death of bin Laden, it’s finally time for Congress to bring back the pre-9-11 legal norm, before we decided it was okay to toss out our civil liberties if the ‘bad guys’ were scary enough.
  627. When I go to a library and I see the librarian at her desk reading, I’m afraid to interrupt her, even though she sits there specifically so that she may be interrupted, even though being interrupted for reasons like this by people like me is her very job.
  628. What if there was a library which held every book? Not every book on sale, or every important book, or even every book in English, but simply every book – a key part of our planet’s cultural legacy.
  629. We need to download scientific journals and upload them to file-sharing networks.
  630. We must erase bin Laden’s ugly legacy, not extend it: by ending the Patriot Act’s erosion of our civil liberties, we can protect the freedoms that make America worth fighting for.
  631. Through the Internet, I’ve developed a strong social network – something I could never do if I had to keep my choice of peers within school grounds.
  632. There’s all sorts of stuff people want to publish anonymously.
  633. The world’s entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and locked up by a handful of private corporations.
  634. The library world is set up on this model where the library is a physical building and has a number of books and serves a geographical community.
  635. The Open Access Movement has fought valiantly to ensure that scientists do not sign their copyrights away but instead ensure their work is published on the Internet, under terms that allow anyone to access it.
  636. Social Security got passed because John D. Rockefeller was sick of having to take money out of his profits to pay for his workers’ pension funds. Why do that, when you can just let the government take money from the workers?
  637. Seriously, who really cares how long the Nile river is, or who was the first to discover cheese? How is memorizing that ever going to help anyone? Instead, we need to give kids projects that allow them to exercise their minds and discover things for themselves.
  638. Senator Wyden continues to be the Senate’s truest champion of an open Internet.
  639. Say yes to everything.
  640. Real education is about genuine understanding and the ability to figure things out on your own; not about making sure every 7th grader has memorized all the facts some bureaucrats have put in the 7th grade curriculum.
  641. Now, the typical way you make good things happen in Washington is you find a bunch of wealthy companies who agree with you.
  642. Now, as far as I know, nobody has ever put up the U.S.’s nuclear missiles on the Internet. I mean, it’s not something I’ve heard about.
  643. Normally, I just sit in my quiet little room and do the small things that bring me pleasures. I read my books, I answer email, I write a little bit.
  644. Nearly 75,000 Demand Progress members have urged Congress to fix the Patriot Act.
  645. Most people, it seems, stretch the truth to make themselves seem more impressive. I, it seems, stretch the truth to make myself look worse.
  646. Large corporations, of course, are blinded by greed. The laws under which they operate require it – their shareholders would revolt at anything less.
  647. Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves.
  648. I’m not such a nuisance to the world, and the kick I get out of living can, I suppose, justify the impositions I make on it. But when life isn’t so fun, well, then I start to wonder. What’s the point of going on if it’s just trouble for us both? My friends will miss me, I am told.
  649. I was around computers from birth; we had one of the first Macs, which came out shortly before I was born, and my dad ran a company that wrote computer operating systems. I don’t think I have any particular technical skills; I just got a really large head start.
  650. I have developed my most meaningful relationships online. None of them live within driving distance. None of them are about my own age.
  651. I first met Jimbo Wales, the face of Wikipedia, when he came to speak at Stanford.
  652. Even among those who I would not count as ‘friends,’ I have met many people online who have simply commented on my work or are interested by what I do.
  653. Computers will be able to do all the mundane tasks in our daily lives.
  654. Big stories need human stakes.
  655. Being around some of the bright lights of the technology world and having them expect great things helps you sit down and do it seriously.
  656. At the end of the day, we have an economy that works for the rich by cheating the poor, and unequal schools are the result of that, not the cause.
  657. Assume nobody else has any idea what they’re doing, either.
  658. You can talk about and think about Muslims as you want, but you can’t stop Muslims from building a mosque. You can hate Muslims from the comfort of your house or publicly, but when that becomes stopping Muslims from building a mosque or worshipping, then we are crossing the line into something else.
  659. When you’re brown and Indian, you get offered a lot of doctor roles.
  660. When you’re a standup comic, you get up and you try stuff, and you’re always kind of seeing how far you can push things.
  661. When I was 11 my friend’s mom made a peanut butter sandwich. I ate the sandwich and was like, ‘I’m never eating anything else again.’ And I still eat peanut butter every day. I would put peanut butter on a steak.
  662. When I got to Florida, I was a British kid, but I was also an Indian kid: a brown kid with an English accent. Talk about being an outsider. And that’s become the theme of a lot of the stuff I write about.
  663. What’s great about ‘The Daily Show’ is I can use satire and push the envelope. I couldn’t do that anywhere else. Even if I was a journalist.
  664. Traditional television as we have known it will make love to the Internet and have a child. That child will be the future. It’s already happening, and it’s hot!
  665. They wanted to audition people for the Middle East correspondent on ‘The Daily Show.’ They wanted to hire somebody ethnic for that slot. Helms had left, Cordry had left, and they felt that they needed an ethnic face. So, I went in and auditioned, and I got the job.
  666. The pleasure from acting comes from having great writing to work with. If it’s well written and the character is interesting, then, as an actor, that’s the raw material I need.
  667. The longer I spent time on ‘The Daily Show,’ standing in front of a green screen pretending to report from war zones and hot spots around the world – most often from somewhere in the Middle East – the more I began to realize that ‘The Daily Show’ was radicalizing me.
  668. The great joy of doing ‘The Daily Show’ for me is that I get to sit on the fence between cultures. I am commenting on the absurdity of both sides as an outsider and insider. Sometimes I’m playing the brown guy, and sometimes I’m not, but the best stuff I do always goes back to being a brown kid in a white world.
  669. The experience of being on a show that is very much in the center of popular culture is exciting. You really feel like you’re reaching people.
  670. The average Indian doesn’t care about Hollywood movies because they have far too many movies of their own to watch, to miss, and I hope a story like ‘Million Dollar Arm,’ that is actually about India and deals with these two Indian kids, resonates over there and makes people want to go and see the movie.
  671. The artist never really has any control over the impact of his work. If he starts thinking about the impact of his work, then he becomes a lesser artist.
  672. That’s the Indian in me – you must put spices on everything. As a kid, whenever we got sick, my mom would take milk and put turmeric in it. That was our medicine. That was the cure-all. Some people turn to Robitussin.
  673. Religion is so much more than the god you pray to. The religion that you associate with, it’s culture, it is family, it is background. That is something that I have always grown up with.
  674. People lament that there’s no roles being written for South Asian or Muslim characters. But their parents don’t want their children to go into the entertainment field. You don’t get it both ways.
  675. One thing I always did in my career was writing. I always was writing. I was trying to create things. For myself, for other people.
  676. One of the first auditions I had in New York was for a commercial where I had to go in and audition to be a snake charmer… It was either some bank commercial or something where they wanted a guy charming a snake… I remember they wanted to know if I actually knew how to snake charm.
  677. My tenure at ‘The Daily Show’ started during the decade after September 11, and fear of Muslims was at an all-time high. Politicians and the media seemed to dial the fright, mistrust, and animosity up to a fever pitch to gain votes and ratings.
  678. My family is Muslim. But I don’t consider myself a very devout Muslim, but a cultural Muslim, whatever that means.
  679. It is ironic that it doesn’t matter how successful I am in any other capacity: ultimately, my parents’ marker is ‘Do you have a wife?’ and ‘Do you have children?’
  680. In order to change the conversation about Muslims in American media, we need a diverse, unified movement of people who are willing to take a stand against anti-Muslim bias.
  681. In Britain, you never get away from the fact that you’re a foreigner. In the U.S., the view is it doesn’t matter where you come from.
  682. In America, people think being South Asian is still kind of exotic. When you go outside New York and Chicago and L.A., there are people who have never tried Indian food… they’ve never even tasted it!
  683. If you don’t acknowledge differences, it’s as bad as stereotyping or reducing someone.
  684. I’ve always said I’m the worst representative of Muslim-Americans that’s ever existed, because I’ve been inside more bars than mosques.
  685. I’ve actually changed my view of Los Angeles. When I was younger, I hated it, because I thought it was fake and superficial. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve found that to be absolutely true, but I don’t care.
  686. I’m not really a food connoisseur.
  687. I’m free to see things objectively because I don’t consider myself American, and I don’t consider myself British or Indian. I’m kind of an amalgam or mongrel of a lot of different places and experiences. In a lot of ways it’s been a good thing for me. It’s enabled me to do what I do on ‘The Daily Show.’
  688. I’m a little bit like a turducken: I’m sort of like an Indian person, wrapped in a British person, wrapped in an American kind of thing.
  689. I’m Muslim the way many of my Jewish friends are Jewish: I avoid pork, and I take the big holidays off.
  690. I worked with Ismail Merchant on ‘The Mystic Masseur,’ I did ‘Sakina’s Restaurant,’ I’ve done plays, I’ve been on Broadway, I’ve done movies, I’ve done TV… but nothing has had the pop culture penetrative impact as ‘The Daily Show’ has. It’s the nature of the beast.
  691. I was born in Mumbai, but I grew up in England, and then my adulthood has been in the States. I’m an American stuffed with an English person with an Indian person inside. I feel like those things kind of inform me in some way, which I think helps me as an actor.
  692. I was born in India – but never really lived there.
  693. I think Islam has been hijacked by the idea that all Muslims are terrorists; that Islam is about hate, about war, about jihad – I think that hijacks the spirituality and beauty that exists within Islam. I believe in allowing Islam to be seen in context and in its entirety and being judged on what it really is, not what you think it is.
  694. I think I would like to see more roles for South Asian performers that are more inclusive and part of the American Diaspora, the American tapestry, perhaps the way that African American and Hispanic roles have developed.
  695. I rarely went to the mosque, I never fasted, and I only prayed namaaz on the holy nights because my mom bugged me about it.
  696. I never consciously got into comedy. It was sort of one of those things where I was a theater student, I was acting, I was doing comedy, I was doing dramatic stuff, so it’s been something that I’ve always done and enjoyed doing and had an instinct to be relatively good at.
  697. I go to Buzzfeed and ‘Huff Po,’ IMDB, ‘Deadline.’ And then I just Google myself, like ‘Aasif Mandvi in a hat,’ and see what comes up.
  698. I figure if people don’t want to make the distinction between a Muslim and a terrorist, then why should I make a distinction between good scared white people and racists?
  699. I did a play called ‘Disgraced’ in 2012 at Lincoln Center, which ultimately won the Pulitzer Prize. I played the lead character, a Muslim American, who had renounced Islam and became very anti-Islam.
  700. I always used to watch ‘The Daily Show,’ and there were all these comedic geniuses there. I didn’t know if I was going to be hired full time or not. At the beginning, I was sort of hired as a part time, on and off guy. When I first got hired – it was August 2006 – and I was working on and off, and they’d call me whenever.
  701. I always focused on being an actor. I did stand-up briefly, but I also did a lot of dramatic work. But since I’ve been on ‘The Daily Show,’ people think I’m a comedian. That’s not how I see myself.
  702. For my parents’ generation, the idea was not that marriage was about some kind of idealized, romantic love; it was a partnership. It’s about creating family; it’s about creating offspring. Indian culture is essentially much more of a ‘we’ culture. It’s a communal culture where you do what’s best for the community – you procreate.
  703. Being American and being an outsider at the same time, it’s a perspective I often bring to a character.
  704. An artist’s job is simply to take the mirror in front of your face and hold it there. It’s not to give you any answers. It is simply to take that mirror and point it at you.
  705. ‘Halal in the Family’ will expose a broad audience to some of the realities of being Muslim in America. By using satire, we will encourage people to reconsider their assumptions about Muslims, while providing a balm to those experiencing anti-Muslim bias. I also hope those Uncles and Aunties out there will crack a smile!
  706. You know all those young people watching Comedy Central love ‘Frasier.’
  707. Why does ‘writer’ have no gender, but ‘actor’ has a gender? What is that?
  708. When we make the show, we are always talking about how the show is really in between what we make and what the viewer thinks of it.
  709. When I was in high school, my mom worked at Bed, Bath and Beyond, so I was always there.
  710. When I lived in Baltimore, I would come down fairly often to go to the Hirshhorn, and one of my good friends from high school went to Georgetown. I actually ended up going to Annapolis a lot. I had a car, and it was such a serene place to drive.
  711. We love to start from a real place, whether it’s us or our friends or working on a story from a writer’s friend.
  712. We just sort of thought a Web series would be a cool thing to be able to send to our parents to show them that we were, in fact, actually doing comedy.
  713. We couldn’t pitch the show without having created one, at least one 20 to 25 minute version of ‘Broad City.’ We wouldn’t know how to describe it.
  714. Someone like Amy Poehler, I don’t know, but I feel like I know her. I think everyone feels like they know her.
  715. If people watch ‘Broad City’ very closely, we just drop lines about people we love, just to say we like them.
  716. I’ve been watching ‘The Cosby Show’ and ‘Roseanne’ a lot right now, and those work so well because they’re not, like, jokey comedies; they are coming from real characters. We want our show to be like that. A family show.
  717. I’m so thankful for that struggling period. That time is really great where you have no idea what’s going to happen.
  718. I’m not super, super religious. If this is okay to say, I’m more culturally Jewish.
  719. I’m from outside Philadelphia, a town called Wayne, which is, like, 25 minutes northwest.
  720. I started getting really interested in comedy when I was in middle school.
  721. I love comedy, but I was just obsessed with ‘SNL’ growing up.
  722. I just got really into this one girl on Instagram and had her paint little pineapples on my nails during shooting.
  723. I had a weirdly awesome high-school experience.
  724. I feel like comedy had a boys’-club label when we were starting.
  725. I ended up going to college for visual arts but moved up to New York after I graduated from college in 2006 and started going gung ho to the Upright Citizens Brigade, and I realized that that was what I was really interested in and what I really wanted to do.
  726. I definitely relate so much to a lot of women in comedy, but I don’t love segregating the genders. I’m just as influenced by male comedians as I am female comedians.
  727. You measure a democracy by the freedom it gives its dissidents, not the freedom it gives its assimilated conformists.
  728. When decorum is repression, the only dignity free men have is to speak out.
  729. Understand that legal and illegal are political, and often arbitrary, categorizations; use and abuse are medical, or clinical, distinctions.
  730. To steal from a brother or sister is evil. To not steal from the institutions that are the pillars of the Pig Empire is equally immoral.
  731. The only way to support a revolution is to make your own.
  732. The key to organizing an alternative society is to organize people around what they can do, and more importantly, what they want to do.
  733. The first duty of a revolutionary is to get away with it.
  734. The ’60s are gone, dope will never be as cheap, sex never as free, and the rock and roll never as great.
  735. Structure is more important than content in the transmission of information.
  736. Sacred cows make the tastiest hamburger.
  737. Revolution is not something fixed in ideology, nor is it something fashioned to a particular decade. It is a perpetual process embedded in the human spirit.
  738. Once you get the right image the details aren’t that important.
  739. Never impose your language on people you wish to reach.
  740. I was probably the only revolutionary referred to as cute.
  741. I believe in compulsory cannibalism. If people were forced to eat what they killed, there would be no more wars.
  742. Free speech means the right to shout ‘theatre’ in a crowded fire.
  743. Expedience, not justice, is the rule of contemporary American law.
  744. Become an internationalist and learn to respect all life. Make war on machines. And in particular the sterile machines of corporate death and the robots that guard them.
  745. Avoid all needle drugs, the only dope worth shooting is Richard Nixon.
  746. A modern revolutionary group heads for the television station.
  747. When I have an idea, I’m like a pregnant woman. I just have to deliver.
  748. We no longer claim that a genuinely religious government can be democratic, but that it cannot be otherwise.
  749. We must break problems down into small, digestible bits. We must define the concepts that we use and explain what components they consist of. We must tackle small problems.
  750. We coin concepts and we use them to analyse and explain nature and society. But we seem to forget, midway, that these concepts are our own constructs and start equating them with reality.
  751. There are all sorts of cries that the leaders of the Green Movement should submit themselves to the supreme leader, but that won’t take place. Both sides have to be prepared for a serious negotiation.
  752. The clergy earns its living from religion. If your interests are secured through religion, then you will defend your interests first, and religion will become secondary.
  753. That President Mohammad Khatami’s policies have been blocked is the bitterest incident in the contemporary Iranian history. This means that the wishes of millions of people who voted for Khatami and called for freedom and justice have been ignored… Why should cultural activities and journalism be so risky in Iran?
  754. Religion forbids us from assuming a God-like character. This is especially true in politics and government, where limiting the power of the state, division of powers, and the doctrine of checks and balances are established in order to prevent accumulation of power that might lead to such Godly claims.
  755. People should know what they want, not just what they don’t want.
  756. People first concern themselves with meeting their basic needs; only afterwards, do they pursue any higher needs.
  757. One of the achievements of the reform movement is that people realize that they can be democrats and remain faithful Muslims. Democracy is now an established idea.
  758. It is up to God to reveal a religion, but up to us to understand and realise it.
  759. It is impossible to advance new theories… when you are under the influence of a particular view, or under the pressure of a particular dogma.
  760. Islam, or any religion, will become totalitarian if it is made into an ideology, because that is the nature of ideologies.
  761. In order for answers to become clear, the questions have to be clear.
  762. In many of the things that people do, they themselves are the centre of attention, but they inscribe some other name on their banner.
  763. If a group of people feels that it has been humiliated and that its honour has been trampled underfoot, it will want to express its identity and this expression of an identity will take different shapes and forms.
  764. Human beings can remain spiritual and religious while enjoying the benefits of rational administration of their affairs.
  765. God manifests himself in each historical period according to the understanding of the people of the era.
  766. Goals and objectives are based on theories and foundations.
  767. Establishing an equilibrium between the Islam of truth and Islam as an identity is one of the most difficult tasks of religious intellectuals.
  768. Energy is a concept that has been coined by physicists. There is no observable thing known as energy anywhere.
  769. Compromise has a negative connotation.
  770. As a result of the awareness and consciousness of decline, an awareness and consciousness of a national ethnicity or an Islamic identity also came into being.
  771. Arresting development, attacking science, and glorifying poverty is not the answer to the vices that attend prosperity.
  772. After the 9/11 incidents, Islam has become a big question mark among westerners, especially Americans. The mass media constantly raise the issue of relationship between Islam and terrorism.
  773. A realistic view of humanity will stop the proliferation of impossible injunctions.
  774. With ‘New Rose Hotel,’ I knew that I was getting paid a $100,000 fee to write, produce, and direct, and that’s all I was going to get.
  775. Where I come from you’re not raised to think on your own. It’s not that you’re pushed to read the Bible. The Bible is read to you.
  776. There’s no such thing as a non-final cut director.
  777. The secret is not to make a film that causes something like Virginia Tech to happen. The secret is to make a film that stops it happening.
  778. The more you get into any religion, it becomes the same. It really becomes how you treat other people and how you get outside yourself. How you look to help other people, and how you get out of this ‘I, me, mine’ type of thing.
  779. The last day of your life is still going to be a day.
  780. The actors that I love to work with, they’re hard on me. They’re pushing me.
  781. That’s the thing about making a movie: You never finish editing. They just take it away from you.
  782. No one can stop me from talking about my movie.
  783. My life is proof that I don’t need you to do what I do. If there’s no one to see it, I’ll watch it.
  784. My existence is about making movies, so I’ve just got to rock and roll with the punches. You want to make movies on telephones, I’m there.
  785. Mulberry Street was the beating heart of the Italian-American experience, but you don’t find those gangsters now. I live with a bunch of yuppies and models.
  786. Most filmmaking is about shaking hands and just starting.
  787. Making money is not gonna change anything about what I am, except I won’t answer the door.
  788. Listen, anybody who has a film festival has the right to show what they want.
  789. Life is what happens when you’re doing other things, right?
  790. It’s only Western civilization that, God forbid, you talk about dying, when it’s the only thing we know for certain, right? Everyone’s going to die, so what’s the big problem? ‘Oh, God. Don’t talk about it. Don’t think about it.’ I mean, I’m one of them. I’m not a big fan of talking about dying.
  791. It’s funny, the hardest thing to do is to make something look like it’s fast, loose and improvised, and get somebody to laugh.
  792. In the film business, it’s basically honor among thieves.
  793. I’m not a big fan of talking about dying. And then I make a movie where I kill everybody.
  794. I’m about my characters.
  795. I’m a lapsed Buddhist like I’m a lapsed Catholic. I take it to a point.
  796. I was raised a Catholic and when you’re raised a Catholic they don’t teach you to think for yourself. You’re taught not to think too deeply about things.
  797. I was born in the Bronx, and then my father moved us to the country at an early age.
  798. I live with a bunch of yuppies and models.
  799. I grew up in the ’60s, which was a creative time, so it wasn’t that big of a stretch to go from a baseball bat to a guitar to a film camera.
  800. I don’t know what DVD commentaries are about. I’d like to strangle the person who came up with that concept.
  801. I don’t have a problem with Werner Herzog.
  802. I don’t care if I get $50m to do a film.
  803. I don’t care if I get $50 million to do a film.
  804. I come from a world where you get the film done, that’s a success.
  805. Certain actors wanna get paid, they think working in a low-budget movie is being ripped off. But for others it’s like, ‘Yes, let’s do it.’
  806. But I’m never gonna get to a point in my life where what it costs to shoot a movie is going to determine what it is. The limits of my imagination is the only thing that’s gonna stop me.
  807. As barbaric is we are, it’s a miracle we haven’t blown ourselves off the face of the earth so far.
  808. As an old-time New Yorker, it’s not that I miss the ’70s and ’80s or whatever. I miss the fact that there was a certain kind of energy that exists when people can live for nothing.
  809. A script is not a piece of literature it’s a process.
  810. You have to understand that you are not making the film for yourself; you’re making it for the audience. If I am asking my audiences to buy tickets, I owe them the worth of their money, and I owe them entertainment.
  811. You can work really hard on your physicality, on your craft, on the films you do. You can choose the best of directors, the best of productions, get the best technicians, you can put your entire body and soul into the making of a film, but at the end of the day, it all depends on the mood of that one audience member that goes into that theater.
  812. When I was in school, sport was given utmost importance. I think it’s fantastic for character building, for team playing, and I think it’s a great profile for a nation. One in every six people on Earth is an Indian, and I look forward to the day when we can compete with the heavyweights of the sporting world and do well in the medal tally.
  813. There is one common thing in superstars – enthusiasm and humility towards their work. Off sets, they are big stars for others, and they carry themselves the way they want to. When they are working, they are not stars.
  814. There are no free lunches in life. You have to earn it. I am paying my dues. People have accused me of having it easy because I am Amitabh Bachchan’s son. Yes, I am his son, and I’ve never run away from it. I work hard to make him proud.
  815. The trade magazine and all was banned in my house. The first time I read a film magazine was when I was 18.
  816. The only fear I have is that I will wake up one day and nobody will allow me to do films. This is a fear every actor has.
  817. The main objective of our cinema is to entertain. If you can pass on a message at the same time, that is fantastic, but if the audience does not feel they are going to be entertained by the film, they are not going to watch it. There are many examples of very responsible and great films that are being made, but nobody goes to watch them.
  818. The joy and happiness it gives you or the emotions you go through when you hold your child in your arms for the first time are indescribable! I really thought that there was going be this moment when a ray of light from heaven would come pouring in, background music would start playing with angels singing, but none of that happens!
  819. The best gift for an actor is the love of the fans. Many make sweet cards, write letters and even come and meet me wherever I am in India. The love and blessings of your elders is also always cherished, but the extra mile that the fans go to is memorable.
  820. My films are of paramount importance to me, the same as my family. That’s not going to change. This is a balance I have to strike throughout my life.
  821. My daughter is not an object to flash around or a prized item to put on display.
  822. Movie-making is serious business. The director and the crew are already under a lot of pressure to give their best to the audience. Therefore, the best part for me as an actor is to act well in the movies and make a jolly atmosphere with the co-stars on the sets.
  823. Just because I don’t show six-pack abs doesn’t mean that I don’t have them.
  824. Indian weddings are elaborate. As a culture, we like to celebrate everything… Our weddings go on for sometimes a week, 10 days.
  825. In the Indian film industry, especially those of us who are in mainstream cinema, we invariably play a typical hero’s role. More often than not, we cater to the public perception. However, there is a latent desire in most actors to do a role where you can go all out and experiment.
  826. In England or America, actors do not have to cater to an image. In India, it is almost demanded of us. Very seldom do you get a film where you can walk away from your image.
  827. If people are looking forward to my films, then I am happy, and I must be doing something right.
  828. If I give five flops, I won’t get a job. You have to perform at the box office when you are at the top. No one is running a charity here. People are putting huge amounts of money to make movies, and they want the films to be successful. They have invested money in you, so it is your duty to make sure the film does well.
  829. I’ve always basically done everything that’s been offered to me. I’m one of the few actors who enjoy working a lot.
  830. I’m not a model; hence I don’t see the reason to have a six-pack abs. I can pull off a tough and rugged look of a cop in ‘Dhoom’ series without taking my shirt off. Cops don’t have to move around without a shirt to flaunt their machismo. What makes the character of a cop stand out is his attitude and not his six-pack abs.
  831. I’m an actor, paid to act. I don’t bring personal problems to the sets. Dad taught me that.
  832. I think it’s important for an actor to see the work they’ve done because every time you revisit a work you come up with a new way of improving it. It’s a good way to brush up your craft and your skills, so I think it’s a good thing to do, keep seeing your films.
  833. I think every school in the world should have a sports program.
  834. I think India is very passionate about films. It’s almost a second religion back home. Due to that, I think film stars are – are really held in great esteem. Not that we’re complaining, but I think with that comes a lot of responsibility.
  835. I still feel that in India we look upon sports as a recreational activity – which it is – but people have to understand that there is a career in sports. It’s not just necessary to be a doctor or a lawyer or an engineer, as most of us Indians appear to think that our children should grow up to be.
  836. I really believe at the end of the day, regardless of how noble you are or how patriotic the film might be, it has to serve as entertainment in order for your audiences to come into the theatre and watch it. Otherwise, audiences will wait and see it a few months later when it is premiered on television.
  837. I like working on my birthday, so I always do.
  838. I have no hang-ups in life. I don’t care about groups and camps. I have been brought up with certain values and ethics. I have never been egoistic about my stardom and lineage. I don’t have any qualms about breaking the ice with my colleagues. I can walk up to any actor and greet him, irrespective of what kind of equation I share with him.
  839. I feel that one of the hardest things in acting is the way you need to switch your emotions.
  840. I don’t think your personal life has anything to do with your professional life. They are separate things. Whatever is happening at home shouldn’t be carried to work. Everyone has his/her own journey. Some revel in the fact that they derive that from personal contentment, and others draw it from extreme sorrow.
  841. I don’t believe in asking God for anything. If I am worthy, He will give it to me. I think we should earn his blessings; I have never believed in mannats.
  842. I do films that I like. I have done comedy, romance, everything, and I always like to do it differently from the previous ones.
  843. I am not one of those people who will ever be comfortable mocking or making caricatures of the stereotypes attached to any community.
  844. I am happy with all the films I’ve done. I have not become the victim of an image. I have managed to do different roles, and I am proud of that.
  845. I am a sports enthusiast, and if given an opportunity, I want to be a sportsman, even today. I want to promote the sport that is indigenous to India. Kabaddi is a matter of national pride. Why can’t cricket, hockey, football and kabaddi be given equal platforms and co-exist? I believe that can happen.
  846. Honestly, I wish I could be a part of all the remakes of my father’s films. But on second thought, I wouldn’t want to be a part of any. The thought of being compared to him is unnerving. I’d rather do my films than live in the fear of living up to his standards.
  847. Honestly speaking, I don’t like my films. When I watch them, I see a lot of scope for improvement, so if I were to see any of my films, like ‘Dhoom,’ I might say… ‘It would have been better if…’ or ‘had it been…’ and this is all about evolving.
  848. Every film for every actor is a make-or-break film. I believe every film has the power to break you or make you. So, an actor will treat every film like his last film. That’s the way we need to work, and that’s the way you can drum up that passion needed to do good work.
  849. Every actor has his own identity. I don’t aspire to be Bond. My quest is to do something new, something different.
  850. Critics have a job to do. They do not criticise you without reason.
  851. By the grace of God, my parents were fantastic. We were a very normal family, and we have had a very middle-class Indian upbringing. We were never made to realise who we were or that my father and mother were huge stars – it was a very normal house, and I’d like my daughter to have the same thing.
  852. Basketball is my favorite sport, and I’m also a very passionate football fan.
  853. Anybody who has interacted with me will definitely find me to be a chirpy person.
  854. A successful film is a good film, and a non-successful film is a bad film. It’s as simple as that.
  855. A birthday is just another day where you go to work and people give you love. Age is just a state of mind, and you are as old as you think you are. You have to count your blessings and be happy.
  856. When you work as hard as you can and as much as you can to make your first album, and you don’t make any money, then you change things.
  857. When I was on a major label I felt obliged to say yes to every interview, tour and whatever else. The label is always telling you, ‘This ain’t going to last,’ so I worked myself half to death. I learnt from that and I like to pace myself now.
  858. To me, style is consistency.
  859. The touring was crazy, it was a lot of work. But I enjoyed it.
  860. The brain isn’t like the heart. They learned how to transplant a heart. The brain is more complex.
  861. Since the decline of record companies and music sales, I’ve always played live.
  862. Prison’s a walk in the park compared with being sectioned, mate, it really is.
  863. People weren’t buying as many records. My record company did not want me. I went through three record companies, went on tour at the wrong time. It destroyed me.
  864. People tend to keep their distance.
  865. My daughter, Lily Caitlin, means the most to me in the world.
  866. My daughter’s the greatest thing that’s happened to me in my life and she turned me into a more responsible man, as opposed to just someone who’s a perpetual teenager, thinking you’re a man when you’re not.
  867. Mental health needs a great deal of attention. It’s the final taboo and it needs to be faced and dealt with.
  868. Men look like pandas when they try and put make-up on.
  869. It’s good to play 100 per cent live – no tricks, no samples, no messing about.
  870. It may be a coincidence, but from the minute I took anti-depressants, I didn’t pick up a guitar or a pen for seven years.
  871. If you make a mistake, you should enjoy it.
  872. I’ve been told I sold 110m albums and singles. If that’s the case, I should’ve come here in a space rocket.
  873. I’m blind without my glasses.
  874. I’m a rock and roll singer.
  875. I’m a punk rocker. I don’t do Christian.
  876. I wanted to make good records. But my problem is I’ve got a low boredom threshold, so I wanted it to look and sound different with each album, which is really tantamount to suicide, cause people lose it, they lose it – they say: ‘I like that, and that’s not this.’
  877. I want to do a make-up line for men.
  878. I think what’s going on with gorillas is pretty bad. The fact is that you can buy gorilla meat in London any day you want it.
  879. I really knew I wanted to be Adam, because Adam was the first man. Ant I chose because, if there’s a nuclear explosion, the ants will survive.
  880. I loved being in a band.
  881. I like being infamous. I think it is safe being a cult.
  882. I just think, certainly for live music it should look as good as it sounds.
  883. I just became a vegetable for three months. I couldn’t talk to people. I was very ill and that was part of the reason I left college.
  884. I have suffered from depression for most of my life. It is an illness.
  885. I have loved eight women in my life. I remember every woman’s face.
  886. I got a little house in East L.A. and did the gardening. I was doing some acting here and there, doing my own thing… getting back to reality.
  887. I feel very grateful to be alive and well enough to make music.
  888. I became a man. Before that I was a little boy.
  889. I am quite an early riser – I usually get up between 5.30 and 6am and take the dogs out.
  890. I always like to tell a story.
  891. Depression is something that doesn’t just go away. It’s just… there and you deal with it. It’s like… malaria or something. Maybe it won’t be cured, but you’ve got to take the medication you’re prescribed, and you stay out of situations that are going to trigger it.
  892. Creative people are more prone to depression.
  893. Bipolar disorder, manic depression, depression, black dog, whatever you want to call it, is inherent in our society. It’s a product of stress and in my case over-work.
  894. Bad things happen sometimes.
  895. Antidepressants are very good, but it’s a clinical cosh, really. Sometimes you have to be knocked out, just to stop; when you’re in that state all you want to do is just sleep, and rest your body and your brain.
  896. Achievement results from work realizing ambition.
  897. You should feel good about yourself because of your accomplishments. Not because somebody yelled at you to feel good about yourself.
  898. You don’t realize how much you use your credit card not even to buy things. It’s a card you get so you can navigate society.
  899. You don’t cruise the Internet looking for your name and walk away with a good feeling. So, I never do it.
  900. Whoever is for higher taxes, feel free to pay higher taxes.
  901. When you’re picking a basketball team, you’ll take the brother over the guy with the yarmulke. Why? Because you’re playing the odds.
  902. When you’re doing a radio show, you can express yourself.
  903. When you have kids, you instantly feel that you do not want to do them wrong. Those dads that go off to Florida and start a new life, I couldn’t imagine that: seeing my kid once every Christmas, every three years. If I’m gone for six days it feels like too much.
  904. When I say things that sound insane, like only the smartest million people should have the right to vote, well, I mean that.
  905. Well, the post office is probably not the place you want to go if you want to be infused with patriotism and a renewed sense of vigor.
  906. Well, guys are better at mechanical stuff and women are better at emotional stuff.
  907. There are certain things women are better at than men.
  908. The very definition of ‘beauty’ is outside.
  909. The thing about a good podcast is you have to have a good host. If you don’t have a compelling host then you have nothing.
  910. The reason why you know more funny dudes than funny chicks is that dudes are funnier than chicks. If my daughter has a mediocre sense of humor, I’m just gonna tell her, ‘Be a staff writer for a sitcom. Because they’ll have to hire you, they can’t really fire you, and you don’t have to produce that much. It’ll be awesome.’
  911. The reason I hate publicists is because I think if we got rid of them everything would be on equal footing.
  912. The main thing that I learned from my horrible job experiences was how horrible they were.
  913. Rich people don’t pay taxes? Of course they pay taxes – they pay tons in taxes. They pay for everyone else who doesn’t pay taxes.
  914. People look at me, and they go, ‘You’re white, you’re smart, you must have went to college. You must have grown up with money.’
  915. People are stupid. There’s a lot of dumb stuff that’s successful.
  916. Of course on air I use occasional hyperbole to tell a story.
  917. No, I had not read any other comedian’s book. Not that I don’t enjoy other comedians; I’m just not a reader.
  918. My mom was on welfare and the occasional food stamp, but I have never participated in any of those governmental programs, even the ones that kind of work like education, scholarships and whatever, and I managed to do just fine.
  919. My first car was a motorcycle.
  920. Millions of guys play millions of basketball games every day of the week at the playground or the YMCA. But LeBron James gets $20 million a year because he can jam on all of those guys. We’re always going to want to see LeBron and Kobe go at it.
  921. Maybe I’m delusional but I’m usually funny. It’s not 100% but I have a pretty good batting average.
  922. It’s funny when you’re a kid how you can acclimate to almost anything.
  923. In my early 20s I was so miserable doing construction, I wanted something that paid money. I liked nice stuff. I liked cars and architecture, and things that cost money. I wanted to not swing a hammer, and make money… and not do stuff that was dirty. I attempted to get into comedy. I started to do stand-up, but I wasn’t very good at it.
  924. If you’ve driven over to the gay section of Los Angeles, it’s like a golf course… Real estate values go ‘boom!’
  925. If you’re conservative in Hollywood, you’re on a list of people who need to be put in their place.
  926. If you want to have a good life, you should focus on your family, on your business, on your dog, on your fun, and you’ll have a good life.
  927. If women built the bridges or were meant to build the bridges, then they would have done it.
  928. If the media isn’t slanted toward the Left, why is everyone so worried about my affiliation with Glenn Beck but not with Alec Baldwin?
  929. If in 1989 I said, ‘I have an idea: Bottle water and sell it. And charge more than a beer,’ they would have chased me around with a giant butterfly net. The same with paying to watch a television station.
  930. If Joy Behar or Sherri Shepherd was a dude, they’d be off TV. They’re not funny enough for dudes. What if Roseanne Barr was a dude? Think we’d know who she was?
  931. I’ve never really broken this down before, but, in movies, you almost have no connection to fans. And if you do TV, you’re kind of connected, but they know you as the TV name not your real name. If you do radio, there’s more of a bond there. And then if you do a podcast it’s like you’re literally inside of your fans.
  932. I’ve got a great eye for color. I’m like a chick.
  933. I’ve always boxed, I always taught boxing.
  934. I’m not sexist, I’m just a realist.
  935. I’m not comically oriented. I get angry and I start complaining and then people start laughing. I don’t even want them to laugh half the time.
  936. I’m not a Republican.
  937. I’m like John Q. Public. I represent what every guy wants and needs.
  938. I’m a sort of nuts-and-bolts guy. I’m into turning wrenches and swinging a hammer and wrenching on cars.
  939. I’m a doofus from the Valley, a blue-collar guy.
  940. I’m a comedian, not a politician.
  941. I’d never hurt another person.
  942. I was a horrible student.
  943. I want to work for myself, and I do work for myself. I make plenty of money working for myself.
  944. I used to be a Democrat, now I’m basically a Republican.
  945. I think we’re getting to the point where everyone’s getting fat and everyone’s getting allergic, or claims to be allergic to something and people can’t walk from their front door to their car without a bottle of water in their hand because they have to hydrate every three and half steps.
  946. I think people have a strong desire to push me and others into some sort of political box that they can wrap their minds around.
  947. I think if you create something and you get an audience for it, then the monetization part is really secondary.
  948. I think comedy has evolved like every art form, and people probably do less standing around and telling jokes, and more things that have to do with reality.
  949. I swear my car won’t run unless I’m picking my nose: At least, I’m that superstitious about it, so I don’t want to take any chances.
  950. I mean, we sit around and we go, you know, ‘Torture doesn’t work.’ Well, it’s been around for 5,000 years. Most stuff that doesn’t work goes the way of the dodo pretty quick, like waterbeds and 8-tracks and things like that.
  951. I like the freedom of podcasting. With podcasting you can really mess around with the form and the format. You can do as much time as you like without having to pause for commercials.
  952. I like radio and live performing stuff. I don’t like the television stuff as much.
  953. I like my parents but they are just not good parents. They are nice enough people. I’m not interested in hurting their feelings.
  954. I have no connection with Hollywood. I’m not interested. I don’t care.
  955. I have feelings that are to the right, and I have feelings that land on the left side of the aisle. The thing is if you have 10 views that land you on the left side of the aisle and two views that land you on the right side of the aisle, then people just put you on the right side of the aisle. I’m not sure why.
  956. I have a daughter who I love very much, I hire women, I’ve worked with women, I’ve never had an issue with women.
  957. I guess my feeling is is that if you’re going to make a joke, that’s fine, but you should also sort of stand behind it, you know? A joke should be more than a joke, it should be a point that you’re trying to make.
  958. I get depressed at airports.
  959. I don’t think healthcare’s a right. The only right you have is the ability to go out on an even playing field and work, and then purchase health insurance, or whatever it is.
  960. I don’t think I’ve ever seen pie advertised. That’s how you know it’s good. They advertise ice cream and other desserts. They advertise the bejeezus out of yogurt, but I haven’t seen one pie commercial.
  961. I don’t normally vote. I’m lazy and I never bought into the ‘Every vote counts.’
  962. I don’t know that I appreciate things more because of how I grew up, but I am very realistic with what I expect out of people and what they expect out of me.
  963. I don’t know anything about computers.
  964. I don’t have anything against my mom, but my family has no emotional connection to each other.
  965. I don’t have any ill will or ill thought towards anybody.
  966. I don’t burn any calories trying to be masculine; I just happen to be from that world.
  967. I didn’t have any success in show business until I was 30 to 31 years of age.
  968. I could definitely see myself making a serious movie or a drama in the future.
  969. I cook a little bit. I make a Hungarian dish called chicken paprikash that’s out of this world. I’ll give a heads-up to all of your readers that it doesn’t have to be between Thai and Mexican every night. Toss some Hungarian in every once in a while. You will not be sorry. Good, solid peasant food.
  970. I am not a good cue card reader.
  971. Honestly, I’ve always had difficulty relaxing, unwinding and going to bed – that kind of stuff.
  972. Everyone in Hollywood thinks like a Republican fiscally by leaving town to shoot everything; they just don’t vote that way.
  973. All’s the government should do is keep the taxes and regulations at a manageable rate, keep a decent standing army and get out of the way.
  974. A lot of guys and people in our society think that chicks just love dudes with money. Chicks love dudes who are successful who happen to have money – do you know what I mean? Chicks are attracted to dudes that are doing their own thing.
  975. With increased awareness should come greater caution about how confessions are used at trial – and a greater willingness to overturn convictions when it becomes clear that a confession was untrue.
  976. When tulip mania dies down, all that remains are pretty flowers. When bubbles burst, nothing is left but soapy residue. But the Internet revolution, for all its speculative excesses, really is changing the world.
  977. When the gun lobby fights gun-control legislation, its logic is clear: it does not like laws that prevent people from owning or using guns.
  978. When the government takes video of people in public places, the images should only be kept as long as they may reasonably be needed to investigate a crime. After a few days, if there has not been a report of a crime, they should be destroyed.
  979. When locational information is collected, people should be given advance notice and a chance to opt out. Data should be erased as soon as its main purpose is met.
  980. We should craft our laws to allow images of criminal suspects to be captured in public – but also to make sure that the government does not unduly infringe on the privacy rights of innocent citizens.
  981. Voting in presidential and congressional elections is a national right – and the national government should protect it.
  982. Voter ID laws have a disproportionate impact on groups that lean democratic – including blacks, hispanics and students.
  983. Vampires are sleek demons for good times. They suavely leech off society – like investment bankers who plunder outsize shares of deals for themselves or rapacious fund managers.
  984. Twitter, Facebook, and other social media outlets have a great deal of information about all of us – and the government wants to be able to see it.
  985. Too often, animal-rights supporters seem to care about animals to the exclusion of people.
  986. To be rejected on account of old age may or may not feel the same as being rejected on the basis of race or sex. But it is clearly unjust and dehumanizing, and the law should take it more seriously than it does.
  987. To a generation beaten down by skyrocketing unemployment, plunging retirement savings, and mounting home foreclosures, ‘Mad Men’ offers the schadenfreude-filled message that their predecessors were equally unhappy – and that the bleakness meter in American life has always been set on high.
  988. There was a rule, back when I was an education lawyer in Alabama, about visiting public schools: always go on a rainy day so you can see how badly the roofs leak.
  989. There is something not entirely satisfying about an online memorial.
  990. There is no way to undo what happened in the Zimmerman-Martin encounter, but some good can still come of it: it could lead states to repeal their misguided ‘Stand your ground’ laws.
  991. There is no room on the federal bench for a judge who does not treat all people as equal before the law.
  992. There is no need for neighborhood informants and paper dossiers if the government can see citizens’ every Web site visit, e-mail and text message.
  993. There is no actual need to tighten voter ID rules: there have been extraordinarily few instances of people committing fraud at the polls.
  994. There is a lot of talk in conservative circles about judicial modesty and deferring to the political branches. That view of judging often overlooks the important role that courts have in protecting people’s rights. But if there was ever a time to defer, it is when Congress is protecting voting rights in the exact way the Constitution directs it to.
  995. The worst excesses of the dot-com era are gone.
  996. The whole New Deal was in a sense just a series of public options, some more optional than others, that offered government as an alternative to the often-flawed private market.
  997. The remarkable thing about ‘Avatar’ is the degree to which the technology is integral to the story. It is important to show Pandora and its Na’Vi natives in 3-D because ‘Avatar’ is fundamentally about the moral necessity of seeing other beings fully.
  998. The public has a right to know what kind of monitoring the government is doing, and there should be a public discussion of the appropriate trade-offs between law enforcement and privacy rights.
  999. The press should not get special privileges – if they drive recklessly or put people in danger, they should be subject to every reckless driving and endangerment law on the books – but they should also not be singled out for special punishment.
  1000. The minimum wage can play a vital role in lifting hard-working families above the poverty line.
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