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  3. 22/12/2017 (Fri, 22 Dec)

Articles Page 29

Articles Page 29

  1. I’m not one for neon colors.
  2. I’m not a pretty princess, and I’m aware of that, so I like music that is really intense, really bold, and characters that in a way almost have a dark side and are kind of evil because, for me, that’s when I feel my strongest and fiercest, when I’m not necessarily the good girl.
  3. I’m not a crier.
  4. I’m always looking for a way to give myself something new as a person.
  5. I’m a strong-headed person, and you can always tell how I’m feeling in that moment.
  6. I’m a show pony, and I don’t get to skate with girls doing triple Axels every single day. I skate with little babies who are working on their single Axels while trying not to hit them on the ice.
  7. I went through my awkward teenage years. I don’t want to go back.
  8. I was very much a tomboy. I just couldn’t do the pink ballet tutus.
  9. I want to stay involved in sports in one way or another.
  10. I want people to see a real person on the ice. I want to seem tangible, hard-working, passionate about my skating, not just going out and doing something I’ve rehearsed a million times.
  11. I try to stay low-carb and high on lean protein. I’m lucky in that I love chicken and rice; it’s one of my favorite meals. I steam some vegetables and top them with olive oil for some flavor.
  12. I think the great thing about social media is it gives people access to you on a totally personal level that they didn’t have before, so it’s really important, and it’s a great way to get people involved and excited about what you’re doing.
  13. I think growing up in skating, I was surrounded by the LGBT community, so I grew up very aware because I was around it so often, and some of the kindest people I know are gay figure skaters.
  14. I might be more of a tomboy on the ice, but when it comes to fashion and things like that, I’m a total girlie-girl.
  15. I love to win, honestly… If you love to win, you should say it. And honestly, I’m hooked on it.
  16. I love hockey. That’s actually one of my favorite sports.
  17. I love hanging out with friends and family.
  18. I love Pinterest! Pinterest is absolutely phenomenal when you’re trying to come up with a costume design.
  19. I love ‘The Vampire Diaries!’ I can’t help it – it’s such a teeny-bopper show, but I think I just like it to stare at the guys.
  20. I live in California, so I do stand-up paddle board, which is a killer workout. I also run, about four miles every three days.
  21. I know roughly when I skate a good program where the score should end up.
  22. I just believe in equality for all.
  23. I haven’t mastered the art of sitting and smiling.
  24. I hate doing Tabatas – you do whatever you want at high intensity for 20 seconds, and then get a 10 second break and you repeat that for 8 minutes. So you can do jumping jacks for 20 seconds, you can do sprints for 20 seconds, etc. It’s supposed to help you get your endurance up really fast.
  25. I give myself a cheat day where I annihilate my diet. I’m an all-American girl, so I go for a burger and fries and a shake.
  26. I can adapt to change easily, but I’m not a fan of it.
  27. I by no means quit social media.
  28. I am going to get involved with giving back to military families.
  29. I always loved Michelle Kwan’s outfits. Most of them were designed by Vera Wang, and they’re just so simple, but the fabric that they used and the way that it was sewn together look so elegant and rich. You could tell that time had been put into it. It wasn’t just another spandex, stucco-covered costume.
  30. From a young age, I was viciously competitive.
  31. For me, I have gay family members, and I have a lot of friends in the LBGT community.
  32. Covergirl is my sponsor, and they have been so helpful in supplying me with their wonderful products. I love their blush, mascara and lip gloss.
  33. After a pretty amazing year that included more wins than I thought possible, I rang in 2013 by watching the Times Square ball drop on TV… and then heading directly to bed. It might not have been the typical New Year’s Eve for a 21-year-old, but what can I say? It was a training night!
  34. Adding an Olympic medal to everything that I have already accomplished would be so huge for me.
  35. A lot of people who watch figure skaters want us to look like pretty princesses. I want people to see the athlete, and I want to look like a woman among girls.
  36. You’re just constantly battling this thing that is telling you, ‘I don’t think I can do it.’ I think we all have it. When you’re fresh and alert, you can easily put those doubts down. But when you’re tired, they easily come up to the surface.
  37. You try to figure out the best way to throw the shot put, or the perfect way to long jump, and you don’t ever get it. You just chip away, chip away, chip away as time goes on.
  38. You see somebody on a football field make a great, athletic 70-yard run, but the athleticism is immeasurable. It’s undoubtedly athletic, but compared to somebody else who did something else, how do you compare it? That’s the great part of track and field. It’s a test, but with results that you can compare to others.
  39. When you’re doing any event on an elite level, you’re in tune with your body.
  40. When you have an injury, you are hindered a little bit.
  41. When I’m on the track, I like hearing the fans cheer me on.
  42. When I’m later in the competition, I get antsy. I’m seeing everybody else go and achieve things. It’s like I’m just twiddling my thumbs.
  43. When I was growing up, I used to watch ‘Power Rangers’ and ‘Ninja Turtles.’ It seemed like every movie had someone doing martial arts in it, so I would go around punching and kicking trees.
  44. When I was a junior and an up-and-coming athlete, I don’t think I looked to anyone for inspiration. I was so busy trying to improve myself and learning these new events and learning about the decathlon in general that I didn’t really have time to focus on anyone else.
  45. When I see my mom in the stands, it always pushes me to succeed.
  46. What you do is you’re using the other competitors to push yourself, because it’s so hard to push yourself.
  47. What I feel like I’m doing is showing people what is humanly possible when someone commits their entire life to something.
  48. We are competing against ourselves.
  49. We all understand that this isn’t about me beating you and you beating me. It’s about each individual competing against himself.
  50. Universities are like a utopia in a way, because you’re mentally stimulated, you’re challenged, and you have a lot of young, creative minds wanting to do new things, different things. Better things.
  51. Track and field is tougher physically, but golf is tougher mentally.
  52. To win two Olympic golds in a row like Daley Thompson is very special. One day, I’m going to have to meet Daley, shake his hand, and thank him for giving me something to chase after.
  53. To be with the other two-time gold medalists is great, but it’s great to just be a decathlete.
  54. There’s never going to be a decathlon that you’re going to have 10 events that your satisfied with. You’re always, always going to be dissatisfied in something, and that always draws you back to try to retry that the next time you do a decathlon. It’s like you go for the perfect 10.
  55. The world record is like you we went to the theater to see this movie, and it was really good, and it had an unexpected ending, and you left the theater saying, ‘Wow, that was such a great movie.’
  56. The thing I like about decathlon is also the thing I dislike: It’s the maximum challenge, but also the maximum frustration.
  57. The strong ones are the ones who realize that having a bad training day, those types of days are necessary.
  58. The questions to ask are, why was the decathlon so popular before, and what happened to make it fade? I notice a lot of things in general tend to follow that up-and-down trend.
  59. The opportunity to represent your country at the Olympic Games is earned, not given.
  60. The only thing I want to think about the moments before a race is competing. I don’t want the little things to distract me.
  61. The more you do, the more attrition you experience.
  62. The heptathlon world record is nice, but the decathlon is the event. I think the heptathlon is more like a practice. There is something completely different about the decathlon.
  63. The great thing about this is, and not to pump my own tires, but I feel like I’m not maximized yet. I feel like I can still run faster, jump higher, which I think makes it special. Hopefully, going to London, I’ll be welcomed into the decathlon community.
  64. The first sport I played was baseball. I remember being on the Little League team and someone pitching the ball to me for the first time. I was ready to no longer hit the ball off the tee, and an adult pitched it to me underhand.
  65. The first pet I remember was a cat called Baby. She would sleep with me, and I could call her from anywhere, and she would come running.
  66. The desire definitely comes from within. There are only a few people who make it to this level and those are the ones who have that innate desire.
  67. The decathlon is exclusive company.
  68. The Olympic gold was like going to a theater and seeing a movie that had the ending you expected. But you left the theater thinking, ‘You know, that was a good movie.’
  69. That’s what we want people to do. Select a goal or gold and go after it.
  70. That’s what has always been good about track. The goal is very clearly defined: Try to win. Get the gold medal. And I’m able to put my energy toward that.
  71. That is when the crowd really lifted me. That last 600 meters I was not running with my own legs. It was incredible.
  72. Rather than realizing immediate physiological gain, the challenge is more about reducing the mental attrition from the two days to maximize each event.
  73. Now that I’m older, I see the benefits of having free time to release energy.
  74. Nike came to me and said, ‘We’re interested in the decathlon and interested in seeing if we can help you get as close to 10,000 points as we can.’
  75. My mom took me to a taekwondo class, and I fell in love. I was seven years old.
  76. My mom and I have been through a lot. But when you think about it, whose life is perfect? It is just really good because we did this together.
  77. My local newspaper, the ‘Bend Bulletin,’ interviewed me while I was at high school after I had just signed with the University of Oregon. I remember I wore a University of Oregon hooded sweatshirt, and they took a picture of me in the long jump pit. I was freezing!
  78. My key to dealing with stress is simple: just stay cool and stay focused.
  79. My goal in Korea is to win. There’s no timetable when to set the American record.
  80. My biggest competitor? Myself, mentally.
  81. Know that even when you want to give up or throw in the towel, in the end it will all be worth the hard work.
  82. It’s hard for me to speak of my own development. I’m the one behind the steering wheel, and it is easier to see where the vehicle is going when you are looking at it. For me, it feels like I have been doing the same thing all along.
  83. It’s about not going to the well all the time. The body has limits. The mind has limits, too.
  84. It would be fantastic to spend your whole life trying to pursue something and then finally, at the last moment, you achieve it. You know, instead of getting it in the middle of the pursuit and spending the second half giving it meaning.
  85. It has been a pleasure being in the same era. I mean, the guy’s last name is Bolt, and he’s the fastest man ever. You can’t write a story like that, and so to be in the pages in there is nice.
  86. In our marriage, the success of our athletic dreams comes before everything. ‘Hey do you want to watch a movie?’ ‘No, I have a hard workout tomorrow.’
  87. In high school, I had a gold 1992 Ford Explorer. It was a gift. I used to have a terrible habit of locking the keys in the car when I used leave the car running to help it start on a cold morning. I think the local locksmith became used to me calling him.
  88. If somebody wants me to do something I’ve never done, I can do it more easily because of all of the years of sports I’ve played.
  89. If I won a second Olympic title, maybe I would be tempted to go after a third.
  90. If I really felt like I was the world’s greatest athlete, I’d get 10 great events. But I know that’s pretty much not possible. That’s the toughness of the decathlon.
  91. If I have to run to put myself in the hospital, if I have to run that hard, that’s how hard I’ll have to run.
  92. I’ve got to do Gotzis at least once.
  93. I’m very happy to have set a world record in Tallinn. Estonians sure do love athletics and combined events!
  94. I’m not much of a gym rat; I’d rather be running, but if it enables me to run faster, then I guess I can tough it out.
  95. I’m not maximized yet.
  96. I’m just happy to be part of the family, the decathlon family.
  97. I’m a second-degree black belt.
  98. I’m a ‘what’s next?’ guy. I don’t know what that is, but I’m excited to find out and put the same kind of energy into it as I put into track.
  99. I wouldn’t have gone to a Division I school if I didn’t have scholarship help. We couldn’t afford it.
  100. I would say 90 percent of the stuff we do is technical anyway. If you look at a two-hour training day, 12 minutes are probably spent running or gaining fitness.
  101. I would like to have a decathlon where all of my throws are really consistent and set the tone. That I’m good all-around, not just a speed and jump guy.
  102. I won’t back down. I get a satisfaction from being tested and defeating the test.
  103. I was one of those kids who, everything I tried sports-related, I liked.
  104. I was never interested in golf until someone brought up the Get Golf Ready program to me.
  105. I want to see where I measure up against everyone in the world and everyone who has ever competed in the sport, and there’s that innate sense of wanting to challenge myself. I’m competitive in all aspects.
  106. I thought it’d be cool to start my own university, in a way.
  107. I think when the competitions come, I am always ready to go. I don’t think I ever have not been.
  108. I think what’s at risk is kids losing touch with being a kid. Being a kid is being defined differently than it was when you didn’t have all this stuff you could put in front of your face.
  109. I think watching multi-events is much worse than competing. Especially when you have vested interests because you go through the emotional ups and downs.
  110. I think that titles are for, I don’t know, books and stuff. I just like doing what I’m doing.
  111. I think a challenge for myself is to see how many times I can get above 9,000. That would be a good challenge.
  112. I remember growing up, having sports to go to, having recess, those were the things I looked forward to. Yes, I’m an athlete, but I had buddies who weren’t, and they looked forward to it, too.
  113. I must refine my training every day to give myself the best opportunity to achieve my dreams during the Olympic Games in Rio.
  114. I haven’t seen kids in years who have holes in the knees of their jeans. Now you go buy jeans with holes in them.
  115. I haven’t played a full round of golf yet, but I did make two pars my first time out on a golf course.
  116. I had a dream, my dream came true, and my mom was there for me every step of the way. We didn’t do this for any other reason. I am so happy she is here to experience this with me. This would not be the same if she were not by my side.
  117. I guess the decathlon’s never an easy walkthrough.
  118. I don’t set goals. Competing with a number in your head can be limiting, and I don’t know what my capabilities are yet.
  119. I don’t have one specific person that I think is the most athletic person.
  120. I do the whole 10-event thing, but at the end of the day, it’s still track and field.
  121. I dated my first girlfriend for, like, two weeks in high school, and when you’re in high school, it’s so much different. I wanted to hang out with my friends and play video games and play paintball and do guy stuff. Girls were never around for my friends group.
  122. I could never be a distance runner, because I can’t run for more than ten minutes. There aren’t enough iPod gigabytes in the world to make that worth it for me.
  123. I compete against myself in competitions anyway, so I train against myself in practice.
  124. I can’t remember when I wasn’t running around doing some sort of a sporting activity.
  125. I am not the one who has to try to beat me.
  126. I am actually a huge supporter of the Canadian athletes, and they are all really nice people.
  127. I always try to do better than I have before, so I think it would be good to break the world record.
  128. I actually like indoor track and field more than outdoor.
  129. From the time I started the decathlon, I’ve loved the event. I didn’t know why. I still don’t know why.
  130. From the age of seven, I basically started practicing my hand-eye and foot coordination, balance, strength, endurance, discipline, and mental toughness three days a week until I was about 15.
  131. For me, I want 10 perfect events.
  132. Every day, we as athletes face several challenges during the training process, and it is imperative that we approach each situation carefully and with continued precision.
  133. Even though decathlon is really long, there’s always something different to look forward to, which is great for mental stimulation.
  134. Even if you see a great performance, it’s not always great getting there. There are injuries… Intrinsically or unconsciously, people understand that – people see those performances, and they know there are stories behind that.
  135. Coping with injuries is always difficult for athletes because all we want to do is, basically, to have our best performances unhindered.
  136. As you get older and gain more experience, you’re able to do multiple things. You don’t necessarily have to focus so hard on your performance in order to have a good one.
  137. As athletes, we love to say, ‘Just one more; I’m going to figure it out on this next one.’ It’s tough to pull back the reins and do what is smart physically, listening to your body and always ending a workout or session feeling like I could have done more.
  138. As an athlete, you really see a lot of the Instagram paradigm. Where it’s just like, ‘Me! Me! Me!’ When you realize you can ‘Give, Give, Give,’ it’s very interesting, and it’s good.
  139. As a decathlete, you take pride in saying, ‘The elements, I’m not going to let them affect me. It’s just the 11th event. Another thing you have to fight through.’
  140. After asking questions about current recovery techniques, the conversation prompted me to ask myself, ‘Why does it feel good after running to pour a bottle of water over your head?’ I don’t know the physiological answer, but the fact that it does feel better makes me perform better.
  141. A perfect scenario would be to feel like you’ve just started on every event.
  142. Writing was my route to creative expression, and I needed to write about the things that interested me.
  143. Writing is possibly an art, but crime writing is definitely a craft.
  144. Writing is incidental to my primary objective, which is spinning a good yarn. I view myself as a storyteller more than a writer. The story – and hence the extensive research that goes into each one of my books – is much more important than the words that I use to narrate it.
  145. Writing is a intensely personal activity. I can pen down my best thoughts when I’m alone. But when one is elevated into the stature of an author, you have to think about your books in terms of their business angle.
  146. Writing helps me create a different world that I can escape to.
  147. Writing a mystery is like drawing a picture and then cutting it into little pieces that you offer to your readers one piece at a time, thus allowing them the chance to put the jigsaw puzzle together by the end of the book.
  148. Write when drunk. Edit when sober. Marketing is the hangover.
  149. Would the fish have ever been caught if it had kept its mouth shut?
  150. While growing up, I always had to depend on foreign authors for page-turners. I think of myself as a commercial writer, and my job is simple to entertain you.
  151. While I can’t walk on water, I can certainly wobble on whisky.
  152. When working on a period, it is the finer details that evoke imagery that helps in cinematic adaptations.
  153. When I wrote ‘The Rozabal Line,’ I had no preconceived notions of what a commercial bestseller should be. I have always viewed ‘The Rozabal Line’ as my first love and probably my best work. The fact, however, is that it is my least read work.
  154. What is divine? Simply that which man has not yet been able to understand. Once understood, it ceases to be divine.
  155. What is divine? It is simply that which man has not been able to understand. Once you do, it loses its divinity.
  156. What I would not like is to be ignored. I write from the heart. I don’t write for me. I write for my readers.
  157. What I have found is that, in a family business structure, sometimes what is needed is a sense of discipline rather than creativity. You have to take everyone’s ideas and make it work. When you are dealing with money, there is a limitation on how creative you can be.
  158. We don’t need to dumb down our stuff. And it’s important to know how far we can push readers.
  159. We can’t deny that films have a bigger reach. After the popularity of the ‘Slumdog Millionaire,’ a lot of people started reading Vikas Swarup’s ‘Q & A’. From a business sense, films are a good tool to increase the number of readers.
  160. Unlike a typical professional, I can’t quit my job to become a full-time author; I don’t have that luxury. For me, writing is therapy; if I choose to write full-time, it might start feeling like work.
  161. Till the time I found a creative outlet, I was trying to be extra creative at business, which would always put me in a situation of conflict with other stakeholders. The moment I started writing, my creative impulses were finally channelised.
  162. Thrills are much more about anticipation than action. An unfired bullet is more dangerous than one that has already met its target.
  163. Though it is very easy to do valuations, eyeballs and brand prominence surveys, you should never allow any of them to influence the balance sheet.
  164. There is one person who can help solve ‘writer’s block’. His name is Mr. Johnnie Walker.
  165. There is a method to the madness of James Patterson’s success. Co-writing with him is a terrific learning experience, particularly in the art of crafting a perfect thriller. The collaboration also gives me an opportunity to access a wider global audience.
  166. There has to be a protagonist who has to overcome challenges, and there will be a race to finish.
  167. There are three things I look for in a story – it has to be a thriller; I cannot see myself writing literary fiction or a saga! There has to be a historical connection; otherwise, the adrenalin will not flow. And I will try to bridge the gap between ‘Rozabal’ and ‘Chanakya’.
  168. The relationship between critic and writer is similar to the one between the pigeon and the statue.
  169. The reality of the writer’s world is that you set yourself up for future disappointment with every success that you deliver because you end up raising your audience’s expectations.
  170. The reality of the writer’s world is that you set yourself up for disappointment with every success that you deliver because with every success you raise your readers’ expectations.
  171. The publishing scene in India is evolving rapidly, and the key challenge is to keep reinventing oneself so that one does not become formulaic. Sometimes it is safer to deal with the consequences of failure than the fruits of success. Remaining on one’s toes is critical, and often one finds that success makes one complacent.
  172. The first thriller ever? It was probably one from 1697. It was called ‘Little Red Riding Hood.’
  173. The first paragraph of my book must get me my reader. The last paragraph of a chapter must compel my reader to turn the page. The last paragraph of my book must ensure that my reader looks out for my next book.
  174. The decision to use a pen name was nothing more than a desire to compartmentalise my life. However, I had not thought about an appropriate pseudonym, and since there’s an abundance of anagrams in the novel, the idea struck me: why not use an anagram of my name? Hence, Shawn Haigins.
  175. The cleanest book on a dusty bookshelf is usually a dirty one.
  176. The average human attention span was 12 seconds in 2000 and 8 seconds in 2013. A drop of 33%. The scary part is that the attention span of a goldfish was 9 seconds, almost 13% more than us humans. That’s why it’s getting tougher by the day to get people to turn the page. Maybe we writers ought to try writing for goldfish!
  177. The Egyptians saw the sun and called him Ra, the Sun God. He rode across the sky in his chariot until it was time to sleep. Copernicus and Galileo proved otherwise, and poor Ra lost his divinity.
  178. That freedom of writing you don’t get in other formats, I’d rather leave it to someone else to deal with the headache of drafting my book into a screenplay.
  179. Take the first A out of Abraham and put it at the end. You get Brahama. There’s the ancient connection right there.
  180. Physicists explain creation by telling us that the universe began with the Big Bang, an intense energy singularity that continued expanding. But who created the singularity?
  181. Our country has the oldest tradition of storytelling, and this was much before writing stories even became a norm.
  182. Oral storytelling goes back so long ago, and those stories that were told orally were always layered and changed with time.
  183. Once upon a time, I was a workaholic clocking more than 80 hours per week. That changed after I began to write. I now work only around 35 hours per week. I do not work on weekends because these are the days that I use for research as well as for my writing.
  184. Omniscient, omnipotent, omnivorous and omnipresent all begin with Om.
  185. Of all the writers I have read, Vladimir Nabokov has made the biggest impression on me because he, despite living through the 1917 February Revolution, forced exile amidst the anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany, the two World Wars and quite a lot of controversy, was an author who never gave up.
  186. Mythopoeia has taken off in the Indian diaspora because there has been a change in readership from a mature audience to a younger one. This lot has a desperate yearning to reconnect. They want to consume mythology but in a well-packaged and easily digestible way.
  187. Mythology works… because Indians have been bred on myths.
  188. Mythology is like a game of Chinese Whispers. What goes in at one end of the human circle is rarely what emerges at the other end.
  189. Mythology is a set of primitive lies that people rarely believe. This is rather different from history, which is a set of lies that people actually believe.
  190. Mythology does not interest me. Nor does history. But the possible overlap between history and mythology excites me immensely.
  191. My wife is troubled by the things I forget. I am troubled by the things she recollects.
  192. My self-publishing adventure led to my work being picked up by a traditional publisher and eventually hitting the bestseller lists. That led to two more bestselling novels.
  193. My life is ruled by four W’s: my writing, my work, my wife, and my whisky. Not necessarily in that order.
  194. My greatest qualification for writing fiction was my ability to lie with a straight face as a child.
  195. My attention span is very limited, and I watch just one or two movies a year.
  196. Master storytellers like Jeffrey Archer and Arthur Hailey use simple language. But they manage to grab the attention of the readers right from page one. I’ll consider myself a good storyteller the day people believe it’s OK to be late for work or postpone deadlines just to finish reading my book.
  197. J. K. Rowling’s first ‘Harry Potter’ manuscript was rejected 12 times. Stephen King’s ‘Carrie’ was rejected 30 times. ‘Gone With The Wind’ was rejected 38 times. I was immensely proud to have beaten them all.
  198. It’s foolish to call Chanakya an Indian Machiavelli. Rather, Machiavelli was possibly an Italian Chanakya.
  199. It may sound very strange, but I love the freedom that writing a novel gives me. It is an unhindered experience. If I come after a bad day, I can decide that my protagonist will die on page 100 of my novel in a 350-page story.
  200. It is not history, theology or mythology that interest me. It is the fact that history, theology or mythology could have alternative interpretations or explanations. I try to connect the dots between the past and the present.
  201. It is no secret that I have read ‘The Da Vinci Code’ several times. I genuinely believe that ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and ‘Angels And Demons’ are, by far, Brown’s best works.
  202. It is easy to club people together, but there are bound to be influences of authors you’ve read. I grew up reading fast paced authors such as Sidney Sheldon and Jeffrey Archer, but to say I’m one of them isn’t true; my style is intrinsically my own.
  203. Initial work is on period research where the historical markers are absolutely non-negotiable. Once that is established, a writer can take creative liberties in terms of chronology to suit the story.
  204. In the Sanghi family, there is no one who has undertaken intellectual pursuits.
  205. In Kolkata is a temple where the deity worshipped is Amitabh Bachchan. The daily aarti is performed to the chanting of the Amitabh Chaleesa. And people still ask, ‘Could our mythological heroes be based on actual people who once lived?’
  206. In India, we never distinguished between history and myth. Our Puranas as well as Itihasas contain fantastical tales. They are lies that convey deeper truths.
  207. If there is one city apart from Mumbai where I would love to settle down, it has to be Chennai.
  208. If I use the word ‘khichdi’ in my novel, I don’t have to get into the trouble of explaining that it is a dish of rice and lentils. My Indian readers know it.
  209. I’ve always been fascinated by books. When I was young, my grandfather used to hand out a book – which would be anything from a biography to a classic – to me every week and ask me to write a piece on what I thought about it. On the other hand, my mother used to love reading thrillers and bestsellers.
  210. I would imagine that anyone picking up a book written by me would expect a fast-paced story that requires minimal effort to turn the pages. The reader would also be looking for some out-of-the-ordinary revelations along the way. At the end of the day, I’m a writer who simply loves revealing stuff that is out-of-the-ordinary.
  211. I work in a business environment forty hours a week, and writing is what I do to unwind. It allows me to transport myself to a happy place where I can indulge my hopes, beliefs, aspirations and fantasies. It also allows me to live and breathe a topic for eighteen months while I’m researching and writing.
  212. I was told that Ganesha sat between Lakshmi and Saraswati. My quest to attain the blessings of both goddesses explains my physique.
  213. I was passionate about reading from an early age, and I would always be carrying a different book each week.
  214. I was learning book-keeping at the age of 12, but it never stopped me from pursuing literature. Over the years, I grew to love the written word.
  215. I was always taught that book keeping was more relevant than book reading. The only thing worth reading was meant to be a balance sheet.
  216. I was a businessman for 16 years of my life, so when I started writing, I wanted to keep my literary identity separate.
  217. I want to make sure that my writing grips the reader from the word ‘go.’
  218. I want to be remembered as a storyteller more than someone who had something meaningful to say.
  219. I want my writing to reach people. I don’t write for a market. I write from my heart, something that appeals to me. The marketing, segmenting etc., can be done by your publisher, not you.
  220. I remember how a man once got in touch with me to tell me that he was so engrossed in my book that he had to take a day off from work just so that he could finish reading it. Such kind of responses from my readers is extremely endearing, and it keeps me going.
  221. I must admit that i am fascinated by the glories of ancient India. But when will the purveyors of Indian culture realise that not everything about our past was glorious?
  222. I love fiction that sounds like fact. As a matter of fact, I also like fact that sounds like fiction.
  223. I like to joke that I probably hold the world record for rejection letters. Yes, the truth is that I was fed up of being rejected repeatedly, and self-publication was an act of defiance at traditional publishing. But life works in strange ways.
  224. I have always been a bit of an introvert. In fact, my dad used to force me to meet people so that my interpersonal skills improve. As an individual, I was happiest when left alone.
  225. I feel luck plays a vey crucial role in determining the success of the book. Marketing a book is also very important. You need to try all tricks in the trade.
  226. I don’t want to be remembered as a writer. I would rather be remembered as a storyteller.
  227. I don’t start with the characters. I start with the series of events that will provide the conflict and how it can be resolved. Characters are incidental.
  228. I don’t care if my books don’t sell abroad; we have a large enough market in our country. I write for Indian readers.
  229. I believe that the day one stops being spiritual, one ends up being religious. I live by the adage that the only certainty in life is death. We should, therefore, learn to live for the day and be content.
  230. I believe that patterns tend to repeat themselves and there are connections between the past and the present. There is the old proverb that reads, ‘You can’t know where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been’. For me, history is like that. When you take history and combine it with myth, then you get mystery.
  231. I believe that every writer evolves with every successive novel. I view myself as work-in-progress.
  232. I am a part of the old school where I feel that purity of the language should be retained. But English is a constantly evolving language where new words are being added to the dictionary, so I don’t see any harm in experimenting with the language. Only poor editing standards need to be improved.
  233. I am a businessman at the end of the day. I have grown up with Excel sheets. I start out writing my novel with spreadsheets and the milestones in each chapter highlighted.
  234. Humankind would improve if we concentrated less on being human and more on being kind.
  235. Everyone talks about moderation. How about some moderation in moderation?
  236. Did God create man, or did man create God? Either way, the decision needs to be reviewed.
  237. Conspiracies fascinate me. When I visited the Rozabal shrine in Srinagar before writing my first book, I remember thinking that the person enshrined there was no ordinary mortal. History is rife with mysteries, and that visit ignited a fire to unveil some of them.
  238. Combine two words, Myth and History. What do you get? Mystery.
  239. At thirty-five, having spent over twenty years running varied businesses for my family, I decided to sit down and write my first novel. I had never written anything longer than a couple of pages till then and was foolishly attempting to write a hundred-thousand words.
  240. An author entices the readers with their words, and it is painful for them to even lose a sentence. But films and books are two different mediums and should be dealt differently. What works in a book might not work for a film. When I saw ‘Anna Karenina’ on screen, I didn’t like it at all, whereas ‘The Godfather’ was legendary.
  241. After writing each novel, I would spend days poring over suggestions from my editor.
  242. After preliminary research, I zero in on an idea, and then I spend at least four months exploring the topic and in plot-building. I jot down every single detail of the plot as bullet points per chapter, and only when the skeleton is complete do I start writing.
  243. Admiration from my readers inspire me, and the only ‘formula’ I believe in towards making a good writer is: ‘to thine own self be true!’
  244. A western audience might not appreciate ‘Chanakya’s Chant’ because of its dependence on history and ancient statecraft. My book is a modern-day thriller that draws on a bedrock of history. My primary object is to entertain, not educate.
  245. A myth is a lie that conceals or reveals a truth. But if it reveals even a strand of history or truth, that’s what gets my adrenaline going.
  246. A book and a movie are different animals. You need a cinematic perspective to be involved in the motion pictures. And this is something I lack.
  247. ‘Rozabal’ was theological while ‘Chanakya’ is political. Unlike ‘Rozabal,’ which was about research, the aim of ‘Chanakya’ is plot, plot, plot, which carries the character. The common DNA, of course, is history.
  248. You don’t have to be someone who likes walking a tightrope across the Twin Towers to watch ‘Man On Wire.’
  249. You can’t stop people watching on mobiles, but I hope the old fashioned idea of sitting in a dark room with a big screen with a group of strangers lives on forever.
  250. Why make a movie about Ayrton Senna? Someone who drove around in circles at 200mph in a car that looked like a giant cigarette packet? Why would anyone who isn’t already a fan of Formula 1 care?
  251. While still a young student at film school, I was lucky enough to get a golden ticket to a Martin Scorsese master class at BAFTA in Piccadilly: fancy, but technically still ‘the flicks’.
  252. When I was given the opportunity to direct ‘Senna,’ I decided the film had to work for audiences who disliked sport or had never seen a Formula One race in their lives. It had to thrill and emotionally engage people who had never heard of Ayrton Senna.
  253. Weirdly enough, I live in London – was born there and have lived there all my life – but I hadn’t made a film in London for a long time. I hadn’t found the right subject. I liked going away, to some far flung place.
  254. We were working on ‘Senna’ for a long time before we were fully financed, so we didn’t actually have an editor for a while.
  255. We were studying at Newport Film School, and I found that the only way for me to make films – because you need people and you need equipment – was that I had to be a student.
  256. We want to make movies for the big screen. We want people to go to the theater and feel like they’re watching a movie.
  257. We spent four days filming in a helicopter. I had never seen London from that viewpoint – you get a sense of how big it is and how easy it is to get lost. There was one day when we couldn’t find Brick Lane: we spent 25 minutes looking and then realised it was directly below us.
  258. To be teammates in Formula One actually means you are first rivals, not really mates.
  259. There’s this great TV show we have called ‘Later… with Jools Holland’, a live-music show on Friday nights. Anyone and everyone’s been on it.
  260. There are no drivers like Formula One drivers. They are engineers, in a way. They are driving manual cars one-handed at 200 miles per hour around streets in Monaco. These cars use the ultimate in technology.
  261. The worst thing ever for me is go see a movie, and the next day I go, ‘What did I do last night? I have no memory of this $300 million movie I watched because I felt nothing.’
  262. The thing people don’t get about Indian films is that the songs are the story.
  263. The subjects have to come with questions for me. I don’t make films where I’m a massive fan.
  264. The big thing for me is to make films that you feel, whether you feel happy, whether you feel sad, whether you feel sick; it’s to make the audience feel so that the next day they remember what they saw.
  265. The Tour de France would make a great movie. Drugs, corruption, political chicanery, guys risking their lives – everything you need for a great sports drama.
  266. The Monaco Grand Prix is in May right around the time of Cannes.
  267. Real life is far more complicated than fiction.
  268. People have always been recording what’s going on around them in one form or another.
  269. On ‘Senna,’ it got to the point where there was so much footage that our first editor had the wild suggestion that we only use the archive.
  270. My wife Victoria Harwood was art director on ‘Far North,’ and she had designed my student film, ‘The Sheep Thief.’
  271. My team and I used the actual footage to create a three-act story of the life of Ayrton Senna. There are no talking heads and no voiceover. Senna narrates his own epic, dramatic, thrilling journey.
  272. My interest in filmmaking was always very much the visuals and images.
  273. My films often have a spiritual dimension which comes from my Muslim background, and I’m happy to tackle that in cinema.
  274. My family didn’t film anything. But then you look deeper and realize, maybe there are photographs, there are things. It’s also context: You give something a context, and suddenly it becomes really deep or meaningful footage.
  275. My background is from India, and I always get asked, ‘When are you going to do an Indian film, a musical or Bollywood film?’
  276. My background is Indian, so I believe in a spiritual idea that there is another level, another layer or layers, if you will, above us. I believe that there are elements that allow things to be drawn together, a sort of energy.
  277. Martin Scorsese was being given an honorary doctorate, and one of the tutors asked if there was a student film he particularly liked. He mentioned our film. There was a dinner after the final show just for the tutors, but I was smuggled in to meet Scorsese over dessert.
  278. It’s always great to be able to go to a premiere with the actors there.
  279. In a film called ‘Senna,’ the clue is in the title, and we have a Brazilian badge on our sleeve as we were making it. We were making it from Senna’s point of view, with Senna narrating it.
  280. If I’m going to do something, I’m going to spend however long it takes to get it right.
  281. I’m an ordinary Hackney boy, and I can talk to people.
  282. I’m a sport fan. So, I have always watched everything, and I used to watch racing. Formula One was always on. The genius about it is that it’s on at lunchtime on a Sunday.
  283. I’d always intended to make ‘Far North’ straight after ‘The Warrior.’ We had the rights to the short story, the script was in development, and I knew where I wanted to shoot it. It just took a long time getting the script together and raising the finance.
  284. I worked with Michelle Yeoh on my last film, ‘Far North,’ and her partner is Jean Todt; at the time, he ran Ferrari. So I went as a VIP to the British grand prix.
  285. I worked in TV for a short time and couldn’t stand the fact that we’d always be filming someone talking, just giving information.
  286. I was a sports fan long before I had any interest in film-making.
  287. I wanted to study film at an art school – I loved the idea of being surrounded by designers and artists. We were encouraged to be experimental.
  288. I wanted to make a film that wouldn’t just appeal to Formula One fans. That’s what the great sports documentaries do – ‘Hoop Dreams,’ ‘When We Were Kings’ – they’re human dramas first, sport second, if at all.
  289. I want to make my own films from my own scripts based on stories I want to tell, but they take time to put together.
  290. I used to live in Pillgwenlly, and there was this old Italian pizzeria that used to be there with a really amazing character who ran it.
  291. I studied graphic design originally. I used to like drawing, and I was quite into technical drawing. I was always interested in the visual medium, but I thought I was going to be an architect or something like that, but it’s quite a lonely job.
  292. I often make films about subjects I don’t really know much about. Maybe it’s laziness, but I don’t go in there having done a tonne of research; the research happens while I’m making the film.
  293. I never realised ‘The Return’ would take so long to make – it was a very tough ‘political experience,’ and the post production in L.A. seemed to go on forever.
  294. I never know going in if I’ve even got a movie to make. Once you start making a film, you hope there’s going to be enough material! My job as a director is always to push for more.
  295. I made three short films of my own which I wrote, produced, directed… you did everything in those days. My favourite one was something I shot on VHS… a little documentary.
  296. I made several short films with very little dialogue. I’m still not a fan of talking heads. My stories are told with images as much as possible.
  297. I love telling stories with images. But I think there’s more to just saying a movie is great visually.
  298. I lived in Camden, Primrose Hill and Kentish Town for 10 years.
  299. I like to make films where I learn along the way, like the audience.
  300. I just loved films. I knew I wanted to work on film, not video.
  301. I don’t really rely on watching video monitors. They put you at a certain distance from your actors, and it makes me feel less a part of what’s really happening in the scene.
  302. I don’t normally make documentaries. I’m a drama director. I’ve made a few short docs, but I don’t like talking heads or ‘voice of God’ narrators.
  303. I don’t have these crazy deadlines. I don’t have this, ‘Oh it’s got to be out tomorrow.’ I don’t like working like that.
  304. Hopefully, when people see ‘Senna’, they will understand why this inspirational story needed to be told, why it had to be made as a movie for the big screen, and why it is a film for everyone.
  305. Hopefully with digital projection, a film will always look the way the filmmaker intended.
  306. For me, ‘Amy’ is a very dark film about love.
  307. Directing can be very lonely and quite intimidating.
  308. Boxing is made for film – there is corruption, violence, tragedy and the chance that the underdog can catch the champion with one lucky punch.
  309. As much as I love creating entertaining visuals, I love toying with the pace of a movie and trying to perfect that. It’s imperative to the impact: faster cuts, cuts at the right moments that meld with the tenor of a scene. Creating and maintaining that feeling.
  310. As far as I’m concerned, I make movies.
  311. As a kid, I thought movies were boring. My parents would hire VHS recorders for the weekend and watch Bollywood movies. I’d get bored and go out to Stoke Newington common to play football.
  312. As a filmmaker, you complete a film you have spent years obsessively making, and you know the release prints will never look quite the same; prints get scratched and dirty.
  313. After Newport, I worked in television for a while, and then I went to The Royal College Of Art and did a master’s degree. I really did study quite a lot!
  314. A lot of the time when I’m working, I’m abroad.
  315. A big part of my filmmaking is that I can go somewhere new and, visually, be excited by it.
  316. ‘Senna’ took five years, ‘Amy’ took three years. You try and say, ‘Look, there’s no deadline.’ That’s important. Just saying, ‘We’ve got to make the film. And once the film’s ready, it will be out there.’
  317. ‘Do the Right Thing’ has been a big influence on me. I saw it when it first came out in 1989. I was about 18, and it blew me away on many levels – I had never seen anything like it before.
  318. ‘Amy’ is somewhere in the middle of authorized and unauthorized.
  319. You can change friends but not neighbours.
  320. Who can forget that in critical times of war in 1962, 1965 and 1971, Naga underground organisations did not fire on the Indian Army? They showed restraint.
  321. While accepting donations, no one looks at the colour of money.
  322. Whatever understanding is reached with Pakistan has to be followed honestly, and everybody will have to rise above party politics and be actively committed to make India prosperous.
  323. We want peace to be permanent.
  324. We used to fight with Pakistan with bombs. Now we are fighting with them on the playing ground.
  325. We should always care for the minorities and be attentive towards their welfare.
  326. We need to convert the extraordinary goodwill between India and Russia into a thriving, visible, vigorous, and mutually beneficial economic relationship.
  327. We hope the world will act in the spirit of enlightened self-interest.
  328. We have given up office, but not our responsibility to serve the nation. We have lost an election, but not our determination.
  329. We have ended hunger, but now we have to end famine.
  330. We believe that the United States and the rest of the international community can play a useful role by exerting influence on Pakistan to put a permanent and visible end to cross-border terrorism against India.
  331. We believe in resolving all disputes peacefully.
  332. We believe in equal respect for all faiths.
  333. We are unnecessarily wasting our precious resources in wars… if we must wage war, we have to do it on unemployment, disease, poverty, and backwardness.
  334. Violence does not contribute to anything.
  335. Victory and defeat are a part of life, which are to be viewed with equanimity.
  336. Though I stay in Delhi, I often think about Himachal.
  337. This power of democracy is a matter of pride for our country, something which we must always cherish, preserve and further strengthen.
  338. There was an implicit conviction that the UN would be stronger than the sum of its constituent member-states.
  339. There can be no compromise regarding corruption.
  340. The spending in science and technology need to be to increased.
  341. The regional parties have emerged as a strong force, and they, too, deserve a place in national politics.
  342. The reality is that international institutions like the UN can only be as effective as its members allow it to be.
  343. The prime minister’s office is not something that one enjoys.
  344. The overwhelming public sentiment in India was that no meaningful dialogue can be held with Pakistan until it abandons the use of terrorism as an instrument of its foreign policy.
  345. The UN’s unique legitimacy flows from a universal perception that it pursues a larger purpose than the interests of one country or a small group of countries.
  346. The Bio-diversity Convention has not yielded any tangible benefits to the world’s poor.
  347. The BJP regards Muslims as Indians and human beings.
  348. The BJP is not a party dependent on a single individual, nor is it tied to the apron strings of a family.
  349. The BJP decides its own policies.
  350. Terrorism has become a festering wound. It is an enemy of humanity.
  351. Quiet diplomacy is far more effective than public posturing.
  352. Poverty is multidimensional. It extends beyond money incomes to education, health care, political participation and advancement of one’s own culture and social organisation.
  353. Population needs to be stabilised for sustainable development.
  354. People who ask us when we will hold talks with Pakistan are perhaps not aware that over the last 55 years, every initiative for a dialogue with Pakistan has invariably come from India.
  355. People want government to deliver – here and now.
  356. Ours is a multi-religious country, a multi-lingual country; we have many different modes of worship. We believe in peaceful and harmonious co-existence.
  357. Our words, actions, and diplomatic efforts should be aimed at trying to achieve pragmatic goals rather than creating rhetorical effect.
  358. Our objective should be to firmly deal with terrorism and its sponsors, financiers, and arms suppliers. At the same time, our doors should always be open for processes which would restore peace, development, and progress to societies which have been devastated by terrorism over many generations.
  359. Our nuclear weapons are meant purely as a deterrent against nuclear adventure by an adversary.
  360. Our nuclear scientists and engineers have done a splendid job, and naturally, the entire nation has risen to salute their professional excellence, discipline, and patriotism. They have had the benefit of having been led in the past by great men like Homi Bhabha and Vikram Sarabhai.
  361. Our frequent initiatives to normalise relations with Pakistan are not a sign of our weakness; rather, they are an indication of our commitment to peace.
  362. Our aim should be to make India a global R&D hub.
  363. Our aim may be as high as the endless sky, but we should have a resolve in our minds to walk ahead, hand-in-hand, for victory will be ours.
  364. No state should be allowed to profess partnership with the global coalition against terror, while continuing to aid, abet and sponsor terrorism.
  365. No one can be considered untouchable on political grounds.
  366. No guns but only brotherhood can resolve the problems.
  367. Neither India nor Russia perceives a threat from the strength of the other. Each sees a benefit for itself in the increased political and economic strength of the other.
  368. My poet’s heart gives me strength to face political problems, particularly those which have a bearing on my conscience.
  369. My message to the people and rulers of Pakistan is, ‘As neighbours, we want peace and friendship and cooperation with you so that together we can change the face of South Asia.’
  370. My government is committed to carrying out electoral reforms. It is our firm resolve to keep criminal elements away from power.
  371. Members of India’s diaspora, living in distant lands of the world, my good wishes to all of you. You may be far away from India, but you are always close to our hearts.
  372. Let no one challenge India’s secularism.
  373. Let me make one thing clear. I have never considered mere survival in power as any achievement, just as I have never seen coming to power as an achievement in itself.
  374. Labour reforms are not anti-worker.
  375. It requires an effort of logical acrobatics to believe that carnage of innocents is an instrument for freedom and elections are a symbol of deception and repression!
  376. It is true that of all the states in India, Nagaland has a unique history. We are sensitive to this historical fact. But this uniqueness has in no way diminished the spirit of patriotism among the Naga people.
  377. It is a matter of concern that science departments in India’s vast university system have suffered greatly due to lack of investments, both material and in terms of faculty.
  378. Indian democracy’s greatest strength is that we have always put the nation above politics.
  379. India was secular even when Muslims hadn’t come here and Christians hadn’t set foot on this soil. It is not as if India became secular after they came. They came with their own modes of worship, and they, too, were given a place of honor and respect. They had the freedom to worship God as per their wish and inclination.
  380. India is a proud and sovereign country. We do not take any decisions under pressure from the U.S. or any other power.
  381. India helped Bangladesh to achieve independence. The Bangladeshis should remain happy inside the territory of their own country.
  382. India has the sanction of her own past glory and future vision to become strong – in every sense of the term.
  383. India has never played politics with national security.
  384. India has a legitimate right to becoming a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council.
  385. India has a consistent and well-known position on terrorism. We oppose all acts of terrorism, wherever they occur. We have repeatedly said that no cause can justify violence and destruction, particularly aimed at civilians.
  386. India and the United States have taken a decisive step, away from the past. The dawn of the new century has marked a new beginning in our relations. Let us work to fulfil this promise and the hope of today. Let us remove the shadow of agitation that lies between us and our joint vision.
  387. In the euphoria after the Cold War, there was a misplaced notion that the UN could solve every problem anywhere.
  388. In Indonesia, Malaysia, wherever Muslims are living, they don’t want to live in harmony.
  389. If the elections are a mere fraud, why are terrorists being trained and infiltrated into India at the command of the Inter-Services Intelligence Agency of Pakistan to kill election candidates and to intimidate voters?
  390. If Pakistan had not accepted the demand to stop cross-border infiltration and the United States had not conveyed to us Pakistan’s guarantee to do so, then nothing could have stopped a war.
  391. If Pakistan claims to be a crucial partner in the international coalition against terrorism, how can it continue to use terrorism as an instrument of state policy against India?
  392. If India is not secular, then India is not India at all.
  393. If Advaniji did not want, I would never have been Prime Minister.
  394. I would like that no citizen of the state feels alone and helpless. The entire nation is with them.
  395. I try to indulge my muse whenever I am able to get away from it all.
  396. I prefer to die rather than eat beef.
  397. I have never been a traitor. I am not an informer; I never betrayed my nation.
  398. I have a vision of India: an India free of hunger and fear, an India free of illiteracy and want.
  399. I dream of an India that is prosperous, strong and caring. An India, that regains a place of honour in the comity of great nations.
  400. I believe the gun is no solution to problems.
  401. I believe that democracy is the best guarantor for peace and cooperation among nations.
  402. I believe India and Israel should focus on building bilateral relations on the basis of shared perspectives and commonalities between our two democracies. This has to be a forward-looking exercise rather than harking back to perceptions of the past.
  403. I am often accused of colluding with the British during the freedom struggle. I want to ask, how?
  404. I am contesting elections since 1952, but never did I throw mud.
  405. Himachal is my second home.
  406. Global interdependence today means that economic disasters in developing countries could create a backlash on developed countries.
  407. Free and fair elections have again demonstrated that Jammu and Kashmir is part of India, and the people want to remain with it.
  408. For the Bharatiya Janata Party, Gandhian socialism is what we want to achieve and make society free of exploitation and full of opportunities.
  409. For me, power was never an attraction.
  410. For development, peace is essential.
  411. Empowering the individual means empowering the nation. And empowerment is best served through rapid economic growth with rapid social change.
  412. During the 1942 Quit India Movement, I was a student at Gwalior High School. I was arrested by the British for participating in the movement. My parents then sent me off to my village where, again, I jumped into the movement.
  413. Creative universities are bedrock of every developed nation’s S&T strategy.
  414. As we talk with candour, we open the doors to new possibilities and new areas of cooperation in advance in democracy, in combating terrorism, in energy and environment, science and technology and international peacekeeping.
  415. To understand a science, it is necessary to know its history.
  416. The word ‘right’ should be excluded from political language, as the word ’cause’ from the language of philosophy.
  417. The only real life is the collective life of the race; individual life has no existence except as an abstraction.
  418. The dead govern the living.
  419. Men are not allowed to think freely about chemistry and biology: why should they be allowed to think freely about political philosophy?
  420. Know yourself to improve yourself.
  421. Indeed, every true science has for its object the determination of certain phenomena by means of others, in accordance with the relations which exist between them.
  422. Ideas govern the world, or throw it into chaos.
  423. Every science consists in the coordination of facts; if the different observations were entirely isolated, there would be no science.
  424. Each department of knowledge passes through three stages. The theoretic stage; the theological stage and the metaphysical or abstract stage.
  425. Demography is destiny.
  426. What feats of ingenuity have we not been forced to perform, at times, in order to meet our customers’ wishes? Those only who have had charge of a large, modern kitchen can tell the tale.
  427. The painter, sculptor, writer, and musician are protected by law. So are inventors. But the chef has absolutely no redress for plagiarism on his work; on the contrary, the more the latter is liked and appreciated, the more will people clamour for his recipes.
  428. Stock is everything in cooking, at least in French cooking. Without it, nothing can be done. If one’s stock is good, what remains of the work is easy; if, on the other hand, it is bad or merely mediocre, it is quite hopeless to expect anything approaching a satisfactory result.
  429. Novelty is the universal cry – novelty by hook or by crook! It is an exceedingly common mania among people of inordinate wealth to exact incessantly new or so-called new dishes.
  430. Jellies are to cold cookery what consommes and stock are to hot. If anything, the former are perhaps more important: for a cold entree – however perfect it may be in itself – is nothing without its accompanying jelly.
  431. Having realised that in cooking there was a vast field of study and development, I said to myself, ‘Although I had not originally intended to enter this profession, since I am in it, I will work in such a fashion that I will rise above the ordinary, and I will do my best to raise again the prestige of the chef de cuisine.’
  432. Great dangers give birth to great resolutions.
  433. Experience, which plays such an important part in culinary work, is nowhere so necessary as in the preparation of sauces, for not only must the latter flatter the palate, but they must also very in savour, consistence, and viscosity, in accordance with the dishes they accompany.
  434. Everything is so unstable in these times of progress at any cost, and social customs and methods of life alter so rapidly, that a few years now suffice to change completely the face of usages which, at their inception, bade fair to outlive the age – so enthusiastically were they welcomed by the public.
  435. Any sauce whatsoever should be smooth, light (without being liquid), glossy to the eye, and decided in taste. When these conditions are fulfilled, it is always easy to digest, even for tired stomachs.
  436. Sometimes democracy must be bathed in blood.
  437. I’m not a dictator. It’s just that I have a grumpy face.
  438. I regret and suffer those losses, but it’s God’s will. He will pardon me if I committed excesses, but I don’t think I did.
  439. Everything I did, all my actions, all of the problems I had I dedicate to God and to Chile, because I kept Chile from becoming Communist.
  440. During 65 years, I have walked the path of duty and discipline… And today, looking back at that long path of service, my soldier’s heart stirs and murmurs from deep within: Thank you. Thank you, my homeland.
  441. Young men, hear an old man to whom old men hearkened when he was young.
  442. I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble.
  443. Hasten slowly.
  444. Young people can create beautiful things.
  445. You simply have to accept that your demons are a part of you.
  446. You learn a lot from traveling around.
  447. When you’re outside, and everything is highland, it’s like nature has its own sound, and that’s one of my favorite sounds. I really loved sitting still silently outside, in a tree or in a bush, to just think.
  448. The world around me has changed, and I have learned to adapt but not change. But I’m changing into the woman I am meant to be.
  449. Talent is something that comes from within; it has nothing to do with age.
  450. Oh, I’ve always been very… Emotional. ‘Hypersensitive’ is what they call it, I think.
  451. My skin gets so dry and chapped, and the second I get off the plane, I apply so much sunscreen.
  452. My music seems to have a bigger mission than I have, which is very soothing but also very strange because people see more in me than I see, which can be terrifying.
  453. My body is quite tiny, but a lot of the emotions I feel are pretty explosive. They have to come out.
  454. My age is very insignificant to me. I don’t think about it, but the world does. The world likes young people in general.
  455. Music is this divine thing, the closest that we can get to something divine. It’s like this instinct we all own, and some of us have found a way to hear that music and write it down and share it with people.
  456. Metal, I love metal sounds. If I have a stick with me, I just drag it across a fence. And all fences make different sounds, just like people when they laugh.
  457. Many of my fans often tell me that they listen to my songs to get through things. And therefore, obviously, I hope that they can picture being in a place where things are better… I hope my songs can bring people to a calm place.
  458. Luckily for me, people don’t scream at me that much in my everyday life.
  459. Lots of songs aren’t even from my experiences, but they’re about accepting… the dark things about yourself.
  460. It’s very unnatural to be someone for so many people. But of course it’s very nice.
  461. It’s very strange to go to cities like London and New York. People walk so quickly, they seem to be in a hurry all the time. And you don’t say ‘Hi’ to everyone you meet, and you don’t smile to everyone you meet, because there’s just so many. Which is also very strange.
  462. It’s very fun to be the hunter of the sounds. The hunter of the right energy. And it’s not really about if every sound is correct; it’s more the energy – if it hits you in some way, it doesn’t really matter to me if it’s not perfect. I’m still very excited while hunting for songs.
  463. It’s a very strange thing being recognized or looked upon as someone special.
  464. It seemed like a very small possibility for me to become an artist. I didn’t have the need to be on the stage; I didn’t feel the need to be heard. I just needed to write.
  465. In this big ball of people, I’m just one grain of sand on this beach.
  466. If you try to protect yourself from pain, it becomes a stone in your heart. But the more you learn to face things, the more likely that stone can become a pearl.
  467. If I see a mountain, I just pick up and hike it.
  468. I’ve been a lot more into Facebook and Twitter and Instagram, which was a bit complicated for me to understand the language of each social media, because they all talk in different ways. It’s a nice way for me to tell people I appreciate them, which I forget to do sometimes.
  469. I’m very sensitive. I remember, as a kid at school, if someone in the classroom was sad or angry, it could have a great impact on me.
  470. I’m very picky; I’m never happy with anything. It’s so hard to give the record away and accept that you’re done.
  471. I’m such an emotional and sensitive person, so it only makes sense that my songs are as well.
  472. I’m so happy I discovered early how wonderful music makes me feel.
  473. I’m constantly trying to find new ways to get my hair out of my face.
  474. I usually write lyrics first, and then when I get home or close to any kind of instrument, I usually make a melody for those lyrics.
  475. I think that, whatever happens, I’m just happy I’ve written those songs and I’ve made an album. That’s really big for me, and I’m proud of that.
  476. I think I have the nicest fans in the world, and I quite like being surrounded by people if we’re all feeling the same emotion in the same room.
  477. I really want a pet, and I really love animals.
  478. I never dreamed of being a pop star when I was a child.
  479. I love to be alone, and I did as a child as well, especially if I was outside.
  480. I love all kinds of insects, and I’ve heard Australia has some really interesting bugs.
  481. I like being able to be on the inside of music, rather than on the outside listening to it.
  482. I just wanted to be a songwriter. I did really not like the sound of my own voice.
  483. I have this feeling that the world is not in balance. And people are afraid, but we’re also starting to be really brave.
  484. I have always enjoyed watching my songs make people cry.
  485. I don’t understand why or how we can bully each other.
  486. I don’t know, I feel desperate when I sing. And I look desperate – it feels like I’m singing for my life, which makes me twitch, if that makes sense.
  487. I can’t read the newspaper without crying. I’m easily affected by horrible events, you see.
  488. I absolutely adore Christmas.
  489. Gojira is my favorite band of all time; they’re lovely, I’ve seen them live two times. I also love Mastodon and the Refused as well.
  490. Everybody’s got that split between the beautiful and fragile, the hard and the dark.
  491. Even if my songs are quite sad or quite dark, I don’t want my songs to make people sad. It’s very important for me that all my songs have some kind of hope or light.
  492. Bob Dylan is like an alien on this earth, and I love him! I cried when I saw him play live because I was so close to him.
  493. Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen. They’re my biggest heroes. I love everything about Leonard Cohen: his lyrics and his voice. He seems like a really clever man, and Bob Dylan does as well. He’s just really cool.
  494. At first, I wasn’t really keen on the idea of me being on stage having to sing in front of people.
  495. When about to commit a base deed, respect thyself, though there is no witness.
  496. No man pleases by silence; many I please by speaking briefly.
  497. Let us never know what old age is. Let us know the happiness time brings, not count the years.
  498. If fortune favors you do not be elated; if she frowns do not despond.
  499. Forgive many things in others; nothing in yourself.
  500. You’ve got to invest your own time, invest your own resources into creating a better world, not only for yourself but for the people you surround yourself with.
  501. You troll me, I’m going to troll you.
  502. You have setbacks in your life, and adversity. You can be discouraged about it or have courage to get through it and be better.
  503. When you lose things like football, which is the game I love – and this is the most important thing in my life – it really puts everything in perspective.
  504. When I get out on the field, it’s all about football. I love football.
  505. There’s a lot of people in this world, and it’s important to learn about them.
  506. The idea that I can provide for my mother and play at the highest level in the world for football and compete against the best guys in the world – it’s a very exciting idea.
  507. Texas is a great program. The respect they gave me was amazing.
  508. Sometimes I get emotional. I let my emotions get the best of me.
  509. Someone has to be the villain. I’m the most villainized player right now. People don’t like me.
  510. Quite frankly, I just want to be playing at the highest level of football. That’s the most important thing to me.
  511. Preparation starts after the game before.
  512. Playing on Saturdays, seeing 75,000 people yell your name, 88, ASJ, and all of that stuff is great.
  513. People in Seattle and Tacoma know who I am as a person, and I don’t think I am a character risk or have a character issue at all.
  514. Once you get into the NFL, it doesn’t matter what draft pick you are, what round you are, if you’re undrafted or not. It’s football time again. The draft, all of that doesn’t matter anymore.
  515. My thing of not playing offensive tackle is the health issue. I don’t want to be that big. That could end up not being good for your health.
  516. My dad showed me a football and would throw it up and have my dog – a German Shepherd – chase me around when I went after the ball. I caught it because I was scared of that dog. The next year, my dad talked to the commissioner of a local league and convinced him to let me play as a first grader with third graders.
  517. Last time I checked, no one is perfect.
  518. It’s one-of-a-kind, because some people would die to have the family I do.
  519. It’s not about me. I think people are too caught up with what I’m doing. It’s just numbers. I’m trying to win.
  520. It’s everything to me. This is my life. I love football so much.
  521. If you don’t do it the way coaches ask you to do something, and someone else does it the way it’s supposed to be done, that’s just natural life.
  522. If someone has to be the villain, I’ll be the villain. I have no problem with it. The movies still say, ‘Starring… the villain.’
  523. I’ve split out, played receiver, I’ve been a fullback, I’ve been in-line.
  524. I’ve played this game since I was in second grade, and there’s nothing more important to me than playing football.
  525. I’ve done everything I can at the University of Washington… I know I’m ready for the NFL.
  526. I’m who I am. I’m confident. I think it’s weird if you’re not confident.
  527. I’m really blessed to have an amazing family.
  528. I’m not trying to get in good graces of anybody. I just want to be myself and be the guy that helps out in the community, because that’s who I am.
  529. I’m me: I’m a fun, easy-going guy that likes to work hard, who’s very driven and determined.
  530. I’m going to take full advantage of my opportunities.
  531. I’m a villain. But hey, villains have fans, too. They might have more fans than the heroes, and I’m OK with that.
  532. I’m a player, the coaches coach.
  533. I’m a normal person. You say something about me, I’m going to say something back, funny or not. I’m just going to be me. It’s nothing against them. I’m just doing what you do to me.
  534. I’m Austin Seferian-Jenkins. He’s Tony Gonzalez. He’s the best tight end to ever play the game. So that’s a real strong comparison. I’m just going to do my job and leave the comparisons up to the coaches and the media.
  535. I won the John Mackey Award, so I did something right.
  536. I want to play defense. I want to get sacks.
  537. I want to be great at everything. I want to be the best at everything.
  538. I want to be a dominant pass rusher. I think I can do that with my body type and my work ethic.
  539. I think that people that don’t really understand the game of football and are just fans that think people just show up on Saturday and go, I don’t think they understand the work that we put in here and what our schemes are and what we’re trying to do.
  540. I think people make a really big deal that I’m this big character-issue guy, and I’ve got red flags. I’m not.
  541. I think guys that play basketball really understand how to go up and get a ball. Because in a rebound situation, you’ve got to go up and fight for a ball. Just boxing out. There are a lot of things that transfer.
  542. I think I just need more time to refine my skills, and I can be a dominant pass rusher.
  543. I really have a love and passion for football. I enjoy basketball, but it’s not something I love. You have to let things go that are not for you.
  544. I really don’t care about my numbers.
  545. I played basketball my whole life. It definitely helps. It translates to going up for rebounds and going up for balls in the end zone. Quick feet. It helps with getting in and out of your cuts. It definitely all translates to football.
  546. I need to take care of my mom and making sure she’s financially OK. She’s done so much for me, it’s the least thing I can do.
  547. I love my coaches. Coaches love me.
  548. I love donating my time and serving other people. Just seeing the faces of people in need light up when they see you… There is no way I can put it into words. You feel like you did something right.
  549. I love Coach Koetter.
  550. I kind of knew. I said, ‘Yeah, I’m not going to be able to play in the NBA. That’s just not going to happen. Let that dream go.’
  551. I just want to support my mom. I have everything I need. I don’t need to buy anything.
  552. I just want to be the best version of me.
  553. I hold myself to a very high standard. But you’re going to make mistakes. You’ve got to erase it and move forward.
  554. I have to hold up my end of the bargain and do what’s expected of me.
  555. I had to go to jail, which was probably the most humbling thing I’ve ever had to deal with in my life.
  556. I fail every once in a while, but failing is your first attempt at learning. I’m not worried about it.
  557. I don’t want to try to sell myself or portray something that I’m not.
  558. I don’t really care where I go because wherever I go, they’re going to get a very talented, driven guy that’s going to get every inch of his potential out, max everything I have in my body out.
  559. I don’t pay attention to stats or anything like that. I just pay attention to how I play and the intensity that I play with.
  560. I don’t care what the depth chart is. I don’t care what I’m on. I’m going to enjoy it, and I’m going to seize every opportunity that I get, because that’s the most important thing.
  561. Granted, everybody is different, but I think it’s real important to know all the people that you are around, and how they operate their history, and things like that. You know where they are coming from a little bit, and you don’t insult them, or take something for granted.
  562. Foot work, hand-eye coordination. There’s a lot of things. If you just watch basketball, you can tell where it would help someone who’s receiving the ball.
  563. Every single day since Day 1, to Day 2, to Day 3, to Day 4, to Day 5, to Day 6, to Day 7 to Day 8, whatever day it is now, I’ve gotten better.
  564. Ever since I was growing up, I knew I was going to play in the NFL. I never thought anything else.
  565. Being able to play basketball at a high level, adjusting to the ball in the air, quick feet, quick hands and all that stuff definitely translates to playing tight end in the National Football League.
  566. Being 300-some pounds is not always healthy. You can say what you want about it, I don’t want to do it.
  567. All I’m trying to do is be me.
  568. You see women struggling to keep it all together while a loved one is in jail. But we don’t hear about them or their struggles in a way that resonates with others. Their stories are so compelling. It’s as if they are in their own little world and no one else sees them.
  569. You know, often films that are deemed positive, nobody wants to see them.
  570. You gotta follow the white guys. Truly. They’ve got this thing wired. Too often, we live within their games, so why would you not study what works? Take away the bad stuff – because there’s a lot – and use the savvy interesting stuff and figure out how they can apply. It’s a good one for the ladies.
  571. You could make the most beautiful film, and that weekend it’s raining too hard on the East Coast, and no one goes out. Artists should have a chance to do it again. That’s the challenge: Women artists don’t get a second chance. People-of-color artists don’t get a second chance. You’re put in director’s jail, and that’s a wrap.
  572. Women have been trained in our culture and society to ask for what we want instead of taking what we want. We’ve been really indoctrinated with this culture of permission. I think it’s true for women, and I think it’s true for people of color. It’s historic, and it’s unfortunate and has somehow become part of our DNA. But that time has passed.
  573. With the Black Lives Matter movement, a lot of the focus is on the protest and dissent. I’m hoping to dismantle the public notion – for folks outside of the community – of what Black Lives Matter means. It’s really about saying that black lives matter: that humanity is the same when you go inside people’s homes.
  574. Why do we always have to see black people in hindsight? Why are the Hollywood movies always historical? What about the contemporary image of black people?
  575. When we’re talking about diversity, it’s not a box to check. It is a reality that should be deeply felt and held and valued by all of us.
  576. When we say there’s a dearth of women directors, it’s not that there’s a lack of women who direct: it’s a lack of opportunities and access for women to direct and be supported in that.
  577. When I’m marketing a film, whether its mine or someone else’s, I work with a great deal of strategy and elbow grease until the job is done.
  578. When I was out promoting ‘Selma,’ I became aware of so many other films that ought to be getting distribution. And this is a problem I can do something about because of my experience.
  579. We’re told that independent film lovers… folks that are used to watching art house films, won’t come out and see a film with black people in it – I’ve been told that in rooms, big rooms, studio rooms, and I know that’s not true.
  580. We know there needs to be diversity in storytellers telling their own stories. I think there’s a beautiful forward movement in that direction with McQueen telling ’12 Years A Slave,’ with Coogler telling ‘Fruitvale,’ and with Daniels telling ‘The Butler.’
  581. Today, when you look at social media, you see that the narrative can be overtaken by people just from Twitter and Instagram. I know when Ferguson was going down those first few nights, I was watching feeds on the ground on Twitter, not CNN.
  582. To win Best Director at Sundance was beyond anything I could have imagined for myself. It’s still an incredible feeling to know I won. But as happy as I am about winning, I also know many other women of color have directed amazing films over the years that were equally deserving and didn’t win.
  583. There’s something very important about films about black women and girls being made by black women. It’s a reflection as opposed to an interpretation.
  584. There’s really no precedent for someone like me gaining clout in the space that I’m in – a black woman directing films in Hollywood.
  585. There’s been no major motion picture released by a studio, no independent motion picture, in theaters, with King at the center, in the 50 years since these events happened, when we have biopics on all kinds of ridiculous people. And nothing on King? No cinematic representation that’s meaningful and centered.
  586. There’s a big difference between the independent film world and the Hollywood film world, and I don’t know that I understood that until I got into certain rooms, and people’s faces go blank when you talk about Sundance.
  587. There’s a belonging problem in Hollywood. Who dictates who belongs? The very body who dictates that looks all one way.
  588. There was a time when I was knocking on doors and concerned with being recognized in dominant culture. I’ve found a space where the terrain is different, where I’m embraced by people like me, and where I’m building new ways of doing things, as opposed to trying to insert myself in a place that might not be welcoming.
  589. There can be a progression to the dream; there can be steps to it. When you dissect any successful person’s story, it’s really rare that it was all or nothing. It’s steps, and I just try to remind myself of that in terms of the things that I want; it’s like, everything is a step, leading you to where you need to go.
  590. The way that we’re consuming what we watch. Netflix, binge-watching, destination agnostic were not terms. It was about networks, times, dates. Even with feature films, you had to see it this way, in this capacity, at this time. All that has changed. Now it’s really about the story. It’s a gift that I became a storyteller at this time.
  591. The studios aren’t lining up to make films about black protagonists, black people being autonomous and independent.
  592. The consumer is deciding what they want to see and when and how, and filmmakers are more aware and accepting of the fact that success is not predicated on your movie showing in a traditional theater for a certain amount of time.
  593. The best art is realized when you can share the experience of making of it and not just the presentation of it, so that the audience is part of the creation and not just part of the consumption. Then it becomes much more full-bodied and robust.
  594. Positive characterizations are complex characterizations. That’s all we need to know. They shouldn’t be saccharine. They shouldn’t feel like medicine.
  595. Oprah Winfrey is a big role model for me from a business capacity and a creative capacity. She is an incredible interviewer who cultivated a certain style by inserting her own personhood into a show on national television at a time when no one was talking about empowerment, spirituality, or our inner lives.
  596. One of the reasons why I created the podcast called the ‘The Call-In’ that we do through Array – because as a black artist, every time I sit down with mainstream media, I’m asked about issues of race, identity and culture. No one asked what they ask my white male counterparts, which is: ‘Where do you like to put the camera?’
  597. Oh, Diane Nash deserves her own film. Diane Nash is a freedom fighter who is still alive and kicking. She was one of the leaders of the desegregation of Nashville, basically. She was a student at Fisk University who was one of the founding members of SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.
  598. Oh gosh, I’m completely allergic to historical dramas. Particularly those around the civil-rights movement. It’s not my favorite thing to watch. So often they feel like medicine. Or not even a history lesson, because I really like history. Just… obligatory.
  599. Nonviolence is pretty ballsy, pretty advanced weaponry.
  600. My next project is ‘Venus Vs,’ which is a documentary that follows tennis star Venus Williams and her effort to get equal-award pay for women at Wimbledon. Most people don’t realize that Venus fought for years to make sure women and men winners of that tennis championship received the same amount in award money.
  601. My mother is from Compton, California, but my father is from Hayneville, Alabama, and that’s less than 20 miles from Selma.
  602. My interest as an artist is to illuminate the lives of black folks. I definitely am focused on films that illustrate all that we are and all our nuance and all our complicated beauty and mess, and when you’re telling those stories, you gotta have black actors.
  603. Many hated ‘Selma.’ Just because my voice and the voice of the people I come from is antithetical to so much of what Hollywood produces. I don’t think what I’m saying is in particular radical or anything; it’s just different from what they want to sell.
  604. It’s not enough even to have one black Barbie… because black women are not a monolith.
  605. It’s emotional for artists who are women and people of color to have less value placed on our worldview.
  606. In documentaries, there’s a truth that unfolds unnaturally, and you get to chronicle it. In narratives, you have to create the situations so that the truth will come out.
  607. In Hollywood, there is one dominant voice. It is a white, male, straight gaze. When I talk about positive portrayals of black people and women, I’m saying complexity. I’m not saying goody-two-shoes, everything’s okay. No. The positive view of me is to see me as I am: the ‘good,’ the ‘bad,’ the gray. That is a positive portrayal.
  608. If, in 2014, we’re still making ‘white savior movies,’ then it’s just lazy and unfortunate. We’ve grown up as a country, and cinema should be able to reflect what’s true. And what’s true is that black people are the center of their own lives and should tell their own stories from their own perspectives.
  609. If your dream is only about you, it’s too small.
  610. If you’re doing something outside of dominant culture, there’s not an easy place for you. You will have to do it yourself.
  611. If you walk into a room, and there is no one that’s not like you there, whether it’s a woman or a person of color, anyone that’s different from you, you should be able to say this is a problem. We need allies in that room to say that video, this room, this company, these ideas, this film, this whatever, this is not right – this is not good enough.
  612. If I can be in a place where my image is encouraging people to see different people behind the camera, and my image and the images I make can help open up a certain world view, I think that’s all a part of a larger spirit of change and progress, and I’m happy to be part of it.
  613. I’ve been to Sundance eight times as a publicist and thought I was very prepared. I mean, who could’ve been more prepared for me? A publicist who’s been there eight times. Getting there as a filmmaker was a completely surreal, different, unexpected experience.
  614. I’m not signing on to direct ‘Black Panther.’ I think I’ll just say we had different ideas about what the story would be. Marvel has a certain way of doing things, and I think they’re fantastic, and a lot of people love what they do. I loved that they reached out to me.
  615. I’m interested in seeing artists whom I respect who are very focused on the Black Lives Matter moment, bringing that into storytelling in a way that really amplifies the beauty and the humanity of people of color, and does it without having to wave a big sign that says, ‘This is what we’re doing.’
  616. I’m a prison abolitionist because the prison system as it is set up is just not working. It’s horrible.
  617. I’m a filmmaker to my bones.
  618. I’m a big people watcher and a people talker. The beautiful thing about being an artist and a creative person is that you can get an idea from anywhere, and I’m always on the hunt for them.
  619. I’d be absolutely happy to go back and make a smaller picture. I never want my choices to be dictated by budget. That’s one of the reasons why I take so much pride in being able to make films for $2 and a paper clip – because I can always get my hands on $2 and a paper clip. I never have to ask for permission for that.
  620. I wish I could be the black woman Soderbergh, and put the camera on my shoulder and shoot beautifully while I directed.
  621. I was a publicist for other people’s movies.
  622. I want to be an old lady, with my cane, shouting, ‘Action!’ and ‘Cut!’
  623. I want more girls to be able to see themselves behind the camera creating images we all enjoy, and I want to call attention to the fact that women directors are here all over the world.
  624. I usually make films with $2 and a paper clip.
  625. I think that women definitely have a special bond as friends that is hard to describe to men, and we don’t often see that portrayed narratively.
  626. I think that if we really want to break it down, that non-black filmmakers have had many, many years and many, many opportunities to tell many, many stories about themselves, and black filmmakers have not had as many years, as many opportunities, as many films to explore the nuances of our reality.
  627. I think that black people making art, women making art, and certainly black women making art is a disruptive endeavor – and it’s one that I enjoy extremely.
  628. I think good publicists are just like good mommies – always looking out, making sure folks are comfortable and making sure that folks are on time and making sure that folks are getting what they need and know what they need to do.
  629. I think for female filmmakers a big issue is making their second and third films.
  630. I think any black woman is a queen. It’s just, do you know it? Do you see it in yourself? Do you recognize it, do you abide by that, do you define yourself as that? Based on who we are and what we’ve been through and how we survive and where we stand, we are on kind of sacred ground. We stand on the backs of our ancestors.
  631. I think I am a little jealous of women who have great girlfriends as adults.
  632. I tell the stories that are of interest to me.
  633. I spent a whole 12 years helping other people tell their stories as a publicist, so just to be able to go and write and get behind the camera, that’s my thing.
  634. I really admire Werner Herzog and Spike Lee. They’re amazing documentarians. If you took away all the narratives, they’d just be amazing documentarians.
  635. I never had a desire to be a filmmaker. As a child and a teenager and in college, I was not aware of black women making films.
  636. I make films about black women and it doesn’t mean that you can’t see them as a black man, doesn’t mean that he can’t see them as a white man or she can’t see them as a white woman.
  637. I made my first film when I was 35, so I firmly believe that you don’t have to be one thing in life. If you’re doing something, and you have a desire to do something different, give it a try.
  638. I love to see people just being regal in their own skin; it’s just when they know who they are.
  639. I love community, I love to be around other people. I love to be around other people when everyone’s feeling good and doing their best. Not to just be the only one in the room that’s shining.
  640. I like silence. Aesthetically, I feel strangled by the fast cutting and a wall of sound. And I think showing black people thinking onscreen is radical.
  641. I just don’t think there’s a lot of support for the woman’s voice in cinema, and it becomes really difficult to raise that money and start again every time.
  642. I intend to be making films until I’m an old lady. So, if God willing I get there, I need to create a paradigm for myself where I can make it regardless of whether or not they still like what I’m making.
  643. I financed and made my own films from the start. My path has been autonomous and independent, so I don’t have any horror stories about glass ceilings and expectations and tense studio meetings.
  644. I don’t understand the iPhone. I just don’t get it. Don’t ya’ll have to write serious emails throughout the day? How can you possibly manage detailed missives on a phone with no keys?
  645. I don’t even really see sit-ins and marches as passive. I see them as quite assertive. I see those as emotionally aggressive tactics. I see people putting their lives on the line and being bold and brave.
  646. I didn’t start out thinking that I could ever make films. I started out being a film lover, loving films, and wanting to have a job that put me close to them and close to filmmakers and close to film sets.
  647. I didn’t have to learn Selma to make ‘Selma.’ I didn’t have to research what kind of place this is. The people I love most in the world live in that part of the country.
  648. I didn’t go to film school. I got my education on the set as a niche publicist in the film industry.
  649. I am honored to be one of this year’s Urbanworld ambassadors for the festival’s 20th anniversary, joining my friend David Oyelowo. I have always had a special relationship with Urbanworld, back to my days as a festival publicist to previewing my earlier films and now as an ambassador.
  650. For female directors, there’s a whole other set of things we have to think about, particularly when we are casting men, because there are some actors who have never been directed by a woman. Crew members, too.
  651. For a film to be made is a small miracle. And sometimes it’s a large one.
  652. Filmmakers need to realize that their job isn’t done when they lock picture. We must see our films through.
  653. Film school was a privilege I could not afford.
  654. Film is a mirror. I want to see more filmmakers. We all want to see ourselves.
  655. Every filmmaker imbues a movie with their own point of view.
  656. Especially when we’re dealing with issues of race, culture, identity, and history, the time has passed for the ‘white savior’ holding the black person’s hand through their own history.
  657. Diversity is not one in the room. Diversity is not two in the room. Diversity is not three in the room. True diversity is half the room.
  658. Creativity is an energy. It’s a precious energy, and it’s something to be protected. A lot of people take for granted that they’re a creative person, but I know from experience, feeling it in myself, it is a magic; it is an energy. And it can’t be taken for granted.
  659. Be passionate and move forward with gusto every single hour of every single day until you reach your goal.
  660. As long as you’re in an environment where the worth of the project isn’t based on the project but what its predecessors did, it’s not truly inclusive.
  661. As a filmmaker, you put the film out there, and you just want it to be okay. You don’t want to let people down; you don’t want to embarrass yourself.
  662. Artists should be free to create what we want. I believe there’s a special value in work that is a reflection of oneself as opposed to interpretation. When I see a film or a TV show about black people not written by someone who’s black, it’s an interpretation of that life.
  663. Art morphs with what’s going on in the world. We say ‘Ferguson’; we don’t say ‘Mike Brown.’ Just like we say ‘Selma,’ not ‘Jimmie Lee Jackson.’ There is something startling about the people in a particular place, a city or a small town, rising up and taking to the streets.
  664. Art is something that grows and breathes and lives, and it shouldn’t be predicated on the success of box office – but it is. But within that, you have to give people a chance to find their voice, to play, to continue to create.
  665. Any film that you see that has any progressive spirits that is made by any people of color or a woman is a triumph in and of itself. Whether you agree with it or not. Something that comes with some point of view and some personal perspective from a woman or a person of color is a unicorn.
  666. All the traditional models for doing things are collapsing; from music to publishing to film, and it’s a wide open door for people who are creative to do what they need to do without having institutions block their art.
  667. All the films I do, I write the scripts, I direct.
  668. All black women aren’t sassy, loud, difficult, or subservient. We are, in fact, very complex and very diverse, living very complex and diverse lives. That point cannot be made enough.
  669. ‘Selma’ is a story about voice – the voice of a great leader; the voice of a community that triumphs despite turmoil; and the voice of a nation striving to grow into a better society. I hope the film reminds us that all voices are valuable and worthy of being heard.
  670. ‘Queen Sugar’ is a drama about family. It’s something that allows us to be ourselves and see the ways that we interact with our own families.
  671. ‘Diversity’ is like, ‘Ugh, I have to do diversity.’ I recognize and celebrate what it is, but that word, to me, is a disconnect.
  672. You cannot stop an Islamist tsunami by building a small island somewhere in the ocean.
  673. Yisrael Beiteinu is a party that puts on the table all the problems that people are afraid to speak about.
  674. Yisrael Beiteinu has no objection to the nonviolent expression of opinion. It is violent speech that forms a clear and present danger that we refuse to tolerate.
  675. Without any doubt, the Iranian threat is the biggest threat facing the Jewish people since the Second World War.
  676. When there is a Palestinian state, it will absorb hundreds of thousands of refugees from Syria and Lebanon, because these states will simply expel all of these refugees.
  677. When Jews are sacrificed, you have to ask yourself who will be next.
  678. What you have in the Middle East is tension not between Jews and Arabs, not between Israelis and Palestinians, but between the radical wing and the moderate people.
  679. What I really – and I would like to clarify my position, to topple Hamas. And I think it’s possible to bring reasonable people, moderate people to take power in Gaza Strip.
  680. We see what Hamas, what kind of this organization, how radicals, their ideology, and we see the consequences every day. You know, the rockets on Israel – and I don’t know any other countries that they will accept reality with, every day, rockets on their towns, cities.
  681. We established Israel as a Jewish country. I want to provide an Israel that is a Jewish, Zionist country.
  682. We do not ask Israeli Arabs to share in the Zionist dream. We are asking them to accept that Israel is a Jewish state – the only one in the world.
  683. Unfortunately, the international community is not ready to deal with Iran’s repeated provocations.
  684. Those who want peace should prepare for war and be strong.
  685. Those who think that through concessions they will gain respect and peace are wrong. It’s the other way around; it will lead to more wars.
  686. There is no country that has made as many concessions as Israel. Since 1967, we gave up territory that is three times the size of Israel. We showed willingness.
  687. The threats against Israel are growing.
  688. The security of the citizens of Israel, the future of the state of Israel, this is the Israeli government’s responsibility.
  689. The last thing Israel is interested in is an escalation or some military action against Iran.
  690. The dividing line for Yisrael Beiteinu is who supports terror and who fights terror.
  691. The Swedish government needs to understand that relations in the Middle East are more complicated than a piece of furniture from IKEA that you assemble at home.
  692. Terrorism attacks Jews, but it targets all countries and Western values. Israel is just an hors d’oeuvre.
  693. People can choose between the sweet lie or the bitter truth. I say the bitter truth, but many people don’t want to hear it.
  694. Nothing has come from this whole ‘peace industry’ except for conferences in five-star hotels and a waste of money.
  695. It’s their choice, the choice of the people of Gaza, to create the real peace or at least to create conditions of coexistence.
  696. It’s impossible to impose peace, only to create it.
  697. It’s impossible always to be with the majority in coalition government, especially when it’s a very complicated coalition.
  698. It is unacceptable that a senator or a representative in the American House of Representatives assist Afghanistan during the war and meet with Bin Laden and al-Qaeda leaders, express his support for their war against the U.S., and be allowed to return to serve in Congress.
  699. It is to be regretted when internal considerations determine a counterproductive and irresponsible foreign policy.
  700. It is hard to find a country friendlier to Israel than Canada these days. No other country in the world has demonstrated such a full understanding of us.
  701. Israeli Arabs don’t have to go. But if they stay, they have to take an oath of allegiance to Israel as a Jewish Zionist state.
  702. Israel’s relations with the United States are a cornerstone, and without them, we cannot make our way in the current global climate.
  703. Israel’s behavior when it comes to Egypt is that of a battered wife. Nothing but apologies.
  704. Israel won’t be secure so long as Hamas is in power, and therefore, we need to come to a decision that we will break the will of Hamas to keep fighting.
  705. Israel never interferes in the domestic issues of any other country. It’s not our matter; it’s not our policy.
  706. Israel is under a dual terrorist attack, from within and from without. And terrorism from within is always more dangerous than terrorism from without.
  707. Israel has the right to demand full allegiance from all its citizens.
  708. Israel has been absent for many years from entire regions in the world.
  709. Israel cannot afford a war of attrition.
  710. Iran is the base of an axis of evil which is a problem for all the world.
  711. Iran can exist without Hamas, but Hamas can’t exist without Iran.
  712. In the U.S., those requesting a Green Card must take an oath that they will fulfill the rights and duties of citizenship.
  713. In Israel politics, four years is like 400 years in Europe.
  714. In 1999, I established my political party.
  715. If, God forbid, a war with Iran breaks out, it will be a nightmare. And we will all be in it, including the Persian Gulf countries and Saudi Arabia. No one will remain unscathed.
  716. I’ve always been controversial because I offer new ideas. For me to be controversial, I think this is positive.
  717. I’m a settler, and I live in the Judean desert.
  718. I will not support any peace deal that will allow the return of even one Palestinian refugee to Israel.
  719. I want the State of Israel to remain a Zionist, Jewish and democratic state. There is nothing ‘far’ or ‘ultra’ about those ideals. I also advocate the creation of a viable Palestinian state.
  720. I very much favor democracy, but when there is a contradiction between democratic and Jewish values, the Jewish and Zionist values are more important.
  721. I think the biggest problem of the 21st century is how to deal with minorities.
  722. I think I can hold every portfolio – defense, finance and Foreign Ministry. I think personally I’d like the foreign office.
  723. I don’t believe in the polls. I try to concentrate on the day of elections.
  724. I am waiting for the day when the German Bundestag debates the violation of human rights in Saudi Arabia.
  725. I am the mainstream.
  726. I am at peace with all my actions.
  727. Hamas is really a problem for the Palestinians and for Egypt more than Israel.
  728. Friendly governments do not act so as to undermine the national security of their friends, and do not presume to know better than their friends how they should contend with the many challenges they face. The Swedish government would do well to rethink its intention to act in this way towards its friend Israel.
  729. For some, I will always be ‘Ivet the Terrible.’
  730. Every place in the world where there are two peoples – two religions, two languages – there is friction and conflict.
  731. Every day, every week, you have another case of Israeli Arabs that are taking part in terrorist activity.
  732. Even between the best of friends, mistakes and misunderstandings can happen.
  733. Damascus is the center of world terror. All these organizations, Jihad and Hamas, their headquarters are in Damascus. Syria supports Hezbollah.
  734. Cooperation with the U.S. is the basis on which all Israeli foreign policy is built.
  735. At the end of the day, Americans know that the ones they really can trust, in all the Middle East, it’s only Israel.
  736. Any political process has to secure an improvement in the Palestinians’ quality of life and education. Attempts to bring about a political arrangement before securing peace to the Israelis and economic improvement for the Palestinians are likely to fail.
  737. Any negotiation on the basis of land for peace is a fatal mistake.
  738. Anti-Semitic insults by ‘Svoboda’ have caused outrage on number of occasions both in Ukraine and in Israel.
  739. Although my stance on responsible citizenship made sense to many Israelis, the intelligentsia could not, as you say in English, get their heads around it. ‘Racist’ and ‘fascist’ were the knee-jerk reactions.
  740. Al Jazeera has abandoned even the semblance of a credible media outlet, and it broadcasts – both within Gaza and outside it, to the world – anti-Semitic incitement, lies, provocation, and encouragement to terrorists.
  741. A final agreement between Israel and the Palestinians has to be based on a program of exchange of territory and populations.
  742. You get built up and put on a pedestal and then people want to bring you down. It can be hurtful. Some people try to make me look bad or not a nice person but it’s completely false.
  743. You can’t complain about the pressures, the paparazzi, the madness. Because that is the job. I’ve always understood that’s the deal.
  744. Why should I care what other people think of me? I am who I am. And who I wanna be.
  745. When people come to a concert, they wanna hear the hits, the big radio songs, and they wanna hear them how they’re used to hearing them. I like playing them how they were recorded.
  746. When I tour, I stuff fridges full of organic food and stick to that.
  747. Well, a lot of people don’t know this about me, but I’m actually shy around people I don’t know. I would just say with my first concert, my first tour, I didn’t really talk onstage. I was like, ‘Thank you, I love you guys,’ or whatever. But now I’ve just kind of learned to work a crowd.
  748. We have parties at my house. My girlfriends and I play our iPods, with all of our favorite songs. We pick our songs and jump up on the counter and dance, and do runway stuff, and we take video with my camera. When I’m with my girlfriends, I act like I’m 19.
  749. To understand me, you have to meet me and be around me. And then only if I’m in a good mood – don’t meet me in a bad mood.
  750. The mall tour was right off of my second record, before it came out. It was very different. I did an acoustic performance every day in a different mall! One interesting thing I remember is playing ‘My Happy Ending’ a lot, and that song was so new that I remember getting emotional.
  751. People are like, ‘Well, she doesn’t know the Sex Pistols.’ Why would I know that stuff? Look how young I am. That stuff’s old, right?
  752. On my first album I was wearing a lot of guys pants, baggy clothes and stuff like that. I was 17 and I was a little tomboy. And you would never see me wearing a dress or heels on my first record.
  753. No one really knows what I’m really like, and you won’t unless you spend a day with me, or if you’re my friend. No one ever knows what anyone is really like. Read all the interviews you want on them, it’s just the media talking and you can’t really get to know someone that way, obviously.
  754. My songs aren’t bubble gum pop dance songs and I don’t have background dancers on every single song.
  755. Life is like a roller coaster, live it, be happy, enjoy life.
  756. It’s so easy for me to do a boy-bashing pop song, but to sit down and write honestly about something that’s really close to me, something I’ve been through, it’s a totally different thing.
  757. It’s so different now coming out as a new artist today than it was when I came out almost ten years ago. Now, it’s all about singles, it’s really quick, it’s online. I came out when people sold records and they still do today but – I don’t know what the key is.
  758. It’s been really fun to see with each album when I change to see the fans of the show emulate my style and with the first record a lot of the kids in the crowd were wearing neck ties like I was and now you’ll see a lot of girls with pink hair. It’s cool, it’s actually really neat.
  759. Inspiration for my music just comes from, you know, my life experiences.
  760. I’m very free-spirited and crazy. I love to have fun, and I like doing stupid things. At the same time, I’m like a 35-year-old. I have a house. I have a car. I have a steady job. I have a business, and I have to make serious decisions.
  761. I’m very comfortable with how I look. I always have been. I think I look pretty good. There’s nothing I want to change. I’m pretty happy with what I’ve got.
  762. I’m the kind of person who always likes to be doing something.
  763. I was signed by L.A. Reid on Arista Records when I was 16. He understood me and believed in me. Arista folded and I got put on RCA or whatever, then there were new people there, and every six months it changes and more new people come in.
  764. I was eating bad stuff. Lots of sugar and carbs, junk food all the time. It makes you very irritated.
  765. I think I would probably die without my eyeliner, but besides that I’m pretty basic.
  766. I started singing in church and I was probably around seven and I started singing anywhere that I could. I used to sing at my school. I was in musicals and then it kind of got to a point where I started to – wanted to do my own songs.
  767. I lost my voice for the first time. I was so bummed out, but it happens to every singer at some point in their career. I don’t think most people understand, but I sing every night and sometimes we do five shows in a row, which is really bad for your voice.
  768. I liked being a minor because you can’t get into trouble. Now I just have to try and behave myself.
  769. I have to fight to keep my image really me… I rejected some gorgeous publicity shots because they just didn’t look like me.
  770. I have always looked for ways to give back because I think it’s a responsibility we all share.
  771. I don’t want to have kids for like 10 years. I still have a lot to do. I don’t even know if I could handle a dog right now. I’m so not ready. Someday I’ll be a mom but not until I’m in my 30s.
  772. I don’t fight. I don’t believe in it.
  773. I don’t believe war is a way to solve problems. I think it’s wrong. I don’t have respect for the people that made the decisions to go on with war. I don’t have that much respect for Bush. He’s about war, I’m not about war – a lot of people aren’t about war.
  774. I decorated my house like a medieval gothic castle, European-style. Chandeliers and red velvet curtains. My bedroom is pink and black, my bathroom is totally Hello Kitty, I have a massive pink couch and a big antique gold cross.
  775. I created Punk for this day and age. Do you see Britney walking around wearing ties and singing punk? Hell no. That’s what I do. I’m like a Sid Vicious for a new generation.
  776. You can’t really label me as a musician, a comedian, or a rapper – you know, it’s different.
  777. When I went to college, it became more of a hobby, and that’s when I think I got the realest music education. It wasn’t something that I had to do. It wasn’t an obligation.
  778. When I was 15, I talked to Liam Neeson because I was the only one of my friends ballsy enough to engage him.
  779. They’re not going to have a homeless person on a poster representing New York.
  780. Rap was started by black people and, thus, is at the foundation of black culture. So people cannot always wrap their minds around someone like me being inspired by it. But if you listen to the things we’re saying, they’re authentically us.
  781. Other female rappers are overly sexual, have no wit, and their lyrics are so generic. I want to change the game to make rap that shows I’m not a normal female rapper – it’s not about how rich I am, how much sex I have, or how many boyfriends I have. That’s just not me.
  782. My mom passed away when I was 4 years old, and she came from a very conservative Korean background. I feel like my life would’ve been incredibly different had she still been alive.
  783. My grandmother can never really teach me anything because she skips steps.
  784. My grandma was very traditional, but she herself is a rebel of that culture.
  785. My every birthday wish was, ‘I want to someday be on TV.’
  786. More than anything, I’m an American kid, and my music reflects that more so than being an Asian-American. I think it’s important but also something that can detrimental to your career if celebrated too much.
  787. Let’s take Taylor Swift. She lives in a huge beautiful apartment; she gets limo-ed everywhere. She’s not seeing what it means to live in New York.
  788. It’s not nice to say it – I know female musicians, but not so many rappers. I can’t think of one I idolize, which is sad, but I’m hoping that will change.
  789. It’s definitely a privilege to be able to do what you love to do; it’s not something that everyone gets to do, so I feel really good about that.
  790. If you don’t address race, then people are like, ‘Why don’t you talk about the elephant in the room?’ But you have to do it right. It can’t be gimmicky.
  791. If women dabble in rap but they’re not rappers, to get from dabbling to doing it is really difficult, confidence-wise.
  792. I’m torn between wanting to connect with what I grew up with and what’s available, living in Brooklyn. I don’t have a grimy supermarket that decapitates frogs’ heads nearby.
  793. I’m not trying to unite Asian people with my music.
  794. I was working a corporate job, but I really wanted to do music.
  795. I was physically addicted to ‘Tony Hawk’s American Wasteland’ for PS2.
  796. I was always that kid. When I got ice cream, I put it in my eye. When I got my license, I got pulled over so many times for playing ‘Les Mis’ too loud.
  797. I used to chop up C-Span soundbites or interviews with politicians like John Kerry or Bill Clinton into a radio-esque show hosted by Awkwafina and her producer, Mookie. I would pitch down my vocals to have male guests and would send them to a small circle of friends after they were done.
  798. I think there are barriers, but I think for me specifically, my barrier is being rejected from the kind of hip-hop elitists that think I’m not appropriating it, but just not serious about it. They think I’m a Lonely Island, Weird Al, you know – like a parody rapper. So that alienates me from a lot of things.
  799. I think the people get that I’m just kind of an anomaly in a certain way.
  800. I think that’s why I was able to do well in the beginning: because it was such a foreign thing. People frame it in a negative way, like, ‘For Asian-Americans there’s no one out there, so that must be really bad for you.’ No, I benefited from it.
  801. I think rap in general allows you to be more lyrically expressive. It’s a lot easier to state your identity, as opposed to with a guitar making all these weird metaphors.
  802. I think people always want to hear that there are barriers that exist for us. But the more I started to realize artists that are kind of like me in my lane, like, if they were white or African-American, they often had trouble because it wasn’t the quality of their music: they just didn’t stick out.
  803. I think it’s important for people to understand that as a woman, I can only rap about the parts I have.
  804. I studied my craft at the same place as Nicki Minaj.
  805. I started with me as Awkwafina reciting ‘Othello’ monologues, and I’d send those to my friends. It started like that, and then it went into more music-y stuff.
  806. I started by producing, and the rapping came second to that, because I wanted to fill out the beat.
  807. I remember watching Margaret Cho with my grandmother on TV. She was my hero, not only because she was funny, but because she showed me that it’s okay to be yourself, that it’s okay to be a brash yellow girl and to be a strong and brave woman.
  808. I really like gross Chinese things.
  809. I like to rap about things that are funny but mostly things that are relatable. I remember there was this one song with Ja Rule, and I forgot, exactly, but it was with Ashanti, and there’s a line in it that was like, ‘She hit me up on AIM.’ But that wasn’t the actual line; it was something else, but I was like, ‘Oh my God, he uses AIM!’
  810. I like to make songs that are based on concepts.
  811. I legitimately wanted to know if Mayor Bloomberg was going to ban large margaritas that I cry over while on a date alone at Dallas BBQ as a part of his controversial soda ban.
  812. I have lived in this city my whole life and have seen the way gentrification has changed it. I’m not necessarily against transplants, as 75 percent of my good friends, roommate, and boyfriend are not native New Yorkers.
  813. I guess, like, I’ve always listened to rap, and I remember I specifically started listening to, like, pop-rap when I was, like, 11, you know, like Shaggy. I love Shaggy. And then I discovered, like, underground rap when I got to high school, and really, that’s when it kind of blossomed. I don’t feel like my love for rap blossomed off of Shaggy.
  814. I grew up two train stops from where A Tribe Called Quest grew up, and one stop from Nas.
  815. I grew up thinking Margaret Cho and Lucy Liu were my idols because that’s it.
  816. I feel that its important for me to be out there and to represent the face. At the same time, for me as an individual, I think the Asian-American face can be crowded with the American identity.
  817. I can’t tell if I want to be a rapper who’s funny because I kind of enjoy just doing really stupid songs about nothing. But I want to have a career that’s long-lasting, and I don’t think people want to listen to a straight-up comedy rapper all the time.
  818. I am American. If you drop me in Seoul, I don’t think I’m going to thrive there.
  819. Eventually, I started to actually enjoy rapping.
  820. ‘Welcome To New York’ is one of those songs that, with just one single radio play, will make at least 10 New Yorkers move to Marfa, Texas.
  821. We have a saying in Guns N’ Roses: ‘When somebody’s gonna get yelled at, they’re gonna get the corn.’
  822. There was a much more self-destructive nature in ‘Appetite.’ It was a going-for-it-at-all-cost thing that worked then.
  823. Sometimes your friends are your lovers, or have been at one time.
  824. Regarding social media, I really don’t understand what appears to be the general population’s lack of concern over privacy issues in publicizing their entire lives on the Internet for others to see to such an extent… but hey it’s them, not me, so whatever.
  825. Mick Jagger is one of the greatest athletes who ever lived, just for how much he puts into it onstage.
  826. In general, I usually don’t really go by or live my life by a clock, and outside of touring, I don’t really ask anyone else to. It’s not out of lack of respect for anyone or intentional.
  827. I’m in California, and that usually leans Democratic, and that’s usually where I lean anyway… I would lean Democrat; I would lean Obama.
  828. I write the vocals last, because I wanted to invent the music first and push the music to the level that I had to compete against it.
  829. I try to be respectful about getting an honor or recognition, but I don’t really know what the Rock Hall actually is. In my experience with the people who run it, I don’t see it having to do with anything other than them making money.
  830. I sing in five or six different voices that are all part of me. It’s not contrived.
  831. I really liked the Seattle movement.
  832. I like to be real private; you don’t always want everyone around you – even when they like you.
  833. I like Nine Inch Nails, and I like hip-hop.
  834. I go to movies, go out with friends, go to car shows. I have a zoo.
  835. I could beat my mike stand into the stage, but I was still in pain. Maybe fans liked it, but sometimes people forget you’re a person and they’re more into the entertainment value. It’s taken a long time to turn that around and give a strong show without it being a kamikaze show.
  836. ‘Appetite for Destruction’ was the only thing written with lyrics and melody fitting the guitar parts at the same time. After that, I got a barrage of guitar songs that I was supposed to put words to, and I don’t know if that was the best thing for Guns.
  837. You know, I feel like my job is to write a book. Then filmmakers come and they make a movie. And they’re two really different art forms.
  838. You can take the babushka off the Jewish mother and dress her up in a pair of Seven jeans and Marc Jacobs sling-backs, but she’s still going to expect a passel of grandkids.
  839. Yes, I have four children. Four children with whom I spend a good part of every day: bathing them, combing their hair, sitting with them while they do their homework, holding them while they weep their tragic tears. But I’m not in love with any of them. I am in love with my husband.
  840. Where would the memoir be without bipolar writers? I mean, that’s what – that whole oversharing thing is really a very clear symptom of bipolar disorder. And I’m not saying that every, you know, I’m not accusing every memoirist of being bipolar. But I think in a way it’s kind of a gift.
  841. When we choose to have an abortion, we must do so understanding the full ramifications of what we are doing. Anything less feels to me to be hypocritical, a selfish abnegation of reality and responsibility.
  842. When the babies were very young, I found it difficult to write. I told myself each time that it would be different, I was used to it now, but with every child, for the first four months, I would accomplish nothing.
  843. When my first daughter was born, my husband held her in his hands and said, ‘My God, she’s so beautiful.’ I unwrapped the baby from her blankets. She was average size, with long thin fingers and a random assortment of toes. Her eyes were close set, and she had her father’s hooked nose. It looked better on him.
  844. Well, you know, I was raised by a 1970s feminist. My mom had a consciousness-raising group. I used to sit at the top of the stairs and listen to them.
  845. There’s nothing I find quite as annoying as the phrase ‘I told you so.’
  846. There are times as a parent when you realize that your job is not to be the parent you always imagined you’d be, the parent you always wished you had. Your job is to be the parent your child needs, given the particulars of his or her own life and nature.
  847. The thing is, my fantasies about being a parent always involved fighting for my unpopular child, doing for her what my own parents couldn’t do for me when I was a girl. I am so ready to be that little girl’s mother.
  848. The thing about youthful offenders is that no one seems to care about them. Most people don’t like adolescents – even the good ones can be snarky and unpleasant. Combine the antipathy we feel toward the average teenager with the fear inspired by youth violence, and you have a population that no one wants to deal with.
  849. The stereotypical gay man is someone whose company I enjoy, someone who makes me laugh, someone I’d want my kid to be. The stereotypical gay woman makes me insecure, conscious of my failings as a feminist.
  850. The first inkling my husband had that I was thinking about suicide was when he checked my blog.
  851. The capacity for extravagant emotion that my husband finds so attractive in me can be exhausting, especially to a child. My moods are mercurial, and this can be terrifying. I know, because I was a daughter of a mother with a changeable temperament.
  852. The biggest challenge for any craft person or artist is to accept the constraints of their medium and make something beautiful despite them. That’s kind of fun, actually.
  853. The Q I loathe and despise, the Q every single writer I know loathes and despises, is this one: ‘Where,’ the reader asks, ‘do you get your ideas?’ It’s a simple question, and my usual response is a kind of helpless, ‘I don’t know.’
  854. So many women today have become so focused on their children, they’ve developed these romantic entanglements with their children’s lives, and the husbands are secondary. They’re left out. And the romantic focus is on the children.
  855. Roaring like a tiger turns some children into pianists who debut at Carnegie Hall but only crushes others. Coddling gives some the excuse to fail and others the chance to succeed.
  856. Personally, I think four is the perfect number of children for our particular family. Four is enough to create the frenzied cacophony that my husband and I find so joyful.
  857. One of the darkest, deepest shames so many of us mothers feel nowadays is our fear that we are Bad Mothers, that we are failing our children and falling far short of our own ideals.
  858. My own husband was divorced when we met, but without kids. I don’t know what I would have done if he’d had them. I got the message very early on that the worst mistake a woman can make is marrying a man with children.
  859. My new novel ‘Red Hook Road’ began many years ago as a short article in the newspaper.
  860. My kids are incredibly secure. More and more of their friends’ parents are divorcing, but my kids have absolute confidence that we’ll stay together forever. That goes a long, long way.
  861. My father is sure that Israel keeps the Holocaust from happening again. I worry that it might hasten its recurrence.
  862. Most writers spend their lives standing a little apart from the crowd, watching and listening and hoping to catch that tiny hint of despair, that sliver of malice, that makes them think, ‘Aha, here is the story.’
  863. Look, if you ask a child, ‘Would you rather have a fulfilled mother or a stay-at-home Sylvia Plath,’ they’ll pick Sylvia Plath every time. But I think it’s really important that children don’t feel their parents’ emotional lives depend on their success.
  864. Listen to the pregnant woman. Value her. She values the life growing inside her. Listen to the pregnant woman, and you cannot help but defend her right to abortion.
  865. It’s hard to separate your remembered childhood and its emotional legacy from the childhoods that are being lived out in your house, by your children. If you’re lucky, your kids will help you make that distinction.
  866. Is Valentine’s Day a day to make cupcakes with your children? No, Valentine’s is supposed to be a day about romantic love.
  867. In every union roles are assumed, some traditional, some not. My husband used to pay his own bills, I used to call my own repairman. But as marriages progress, you surrender areas of your own competence, often without even knowing it.
  868. In a perfect world, probably we’d never yell, we’d just be firm and dispassionate. But of course, everyone yells at their children.
  869. If producing a regular column is living out loud, then keeping a daily blog is living at the top of your lungs. For a couple of months there, I was shrieking like a banshee.
  870. If only shame were a reliable engine for behavior modification. All it does is make me feel bad, which inspires me to bust open a bag of cheese popcorn, which then makes me feel crappy about my weight.
  871. If a good mother is one who loves her child more than anyone else in the world, I am not a good mother. I am in fact a bad mother. I love my husband more than I love my children.
  872. I’ve sometimes thought that it’s only by recalling that desperate devotion my kids once felt for me that I can maintain my own desperate devotion in the face of their adolescent sneering.
  873. I’m sure there are people who survive tragedy without humor, but I’ve never met any of them. Nor would I be particularly interested in writing about them if I did meet them.
  874. I wrote three novels in six months, with a clarity of focus and attention to detail that I had never before experienced. This type of sublime creative energy is characteristic of the elevated and productive mood state known as hypomania.
  875. I wish I could view the belly that oozes over the top of my pants as a badge of maternal honor. I do try. I make sure that the women whose looks I admire all have sufficient fat reserves to survive a famine, and I make a lot of snide comments about the skeletal likes of Lara Flynn Boyle and Paris Hilton.
  876. I went from resenting my mother-in-law to accepting her, finally to appreciating her. What appeared to be her diffidence when I was first married, I now value as serenity.
  877. I was born in Israel, to Canadian parents. My father immigrated in 1948, part of a wave of young men and women who came as pioneers, to fight for a Jewish homeland. Their motive was in large part a reaction to the Holocaust, and their slogan was ‘Never Again.’
  878. I was a lesbian for a semester at Wesleyan – it was a graduation requirement.
  879. I used to refer to myself as a ‘theoretical anorexic,’ just as crazy when it came to body image, but saved by a lack of self-discipline. My daughters do everything better than I do – they’re smarter, more beautiful, happier. What if they end up better at anorexia, too?
  880. I think I wish I had never spanked my children, but I have. And they remember every instance like they tattooed it on their palms. I think it’s a terrible lesson, to use physical punishment to make a point about not behaving, not being kind to their siblings, to other people. I mean that’s just absurd. But I’ve lost it, I understand it.
  881. I tend to approach giving interviews with the same sense of circumspection and restraint as I approach my writing. That is to say, virtually none. When asked what I made of blogs like my own, blogs written by parents about their children, I said, ‘A blog like this is narcissism in its most obscene flowering.’
  882. I tell myself that after four children my belly is already so stretched and flabby that I have to do origami to get my pants buttoned. One more pregnancy and I’d be doomed to elastic waists for the rest of my life.
  883. I pity the young woman who will attempt to insinuate herself between my mama’s boy and me. I sympathize with the monumental nature of her task. It will take a crowbar, two bulldozers and half a dozen Molotov cocktails to pry my Oedipus and me loose from one another.
  884. I mean, I do actually think there is a qualitative difference between aborting in the early part of the first trimester and in, you know, the middle or later part of the second trimester, in a way that you feel about it in that you grow attached.
  885. I mean, I absolutely call myself a feminist. And by that, I mean a woman who believes that your opportunities should not be constrained by your gender, that women should be entitled to the same opportunities as men.
  886. I love the novel of ‘The English Patient’; I think it’s a profoundly beautiful novel. I love the movie of ‘The English Patient’; I think it’s a profoundly beautiful movie. And they’re totally different. You accept each on its own terms, and that’s kind of the ideal.
  887. I love reader mail, and I do read it, but I won’t read hate mail.
  888. I learned that I suffered from bipolar II disorder, a less serious variant of bipolar I, which was once known as manic depression. The information was naturally frightening; up to 1 in 5 people with bipolar disorder will commit suicide, and rates may even be higher for those suffering from bipolar II.
  889. I have two daughters and I have done everything in my power to prevent them from assimilating, even being aware of, my idiocy about my weight.
  890. I have made so many mistakes as a mother. But the one thing that I know I do is I make sure my children know how much I love them and they are absolutely secure in that.
  891. I hate homework. I hate it more now than I did when I was the one lugging textbooks and binders back and forth from school. The hour my children are seated at the kitchen table, their books spread out before them, the crumbs of their after-school snack littering the table, is without a doubt the worst hour of my day.
  892. I had a second trimester abortion. I was pregnant with a much-wanted child who was diagnosed with a genetic abnormality. I made a choice to terminate the pregnancy. It was my third pregnancy, and I was very obviously showing. More important, I could feel the baby move.
  893. I feed my kids organic food and milk, but I’ve also been known to buy the odd Lunchable. My kids are not allowed to watch TV during the week, but on weekends even the 2-year-old veges out to ‘The Simpsons.’
  894. I expend far too much of my maternal energies on guilt and regret.
  895. I did not want to raise a genetically compromised child. I did not want my children to have to contend with the massive diversion of parental attention, and the consequences of being compelled to care for their brother after I died. I wanted a genetically perfect baby, and because that was something I could control, I chose to end his life.
  896. I certainly don’t think it’s inevitable that we don’t love children who don’t carry our own DNA. If that were true we wouldn’t have millions of successful adoptions to consider. I do think that it’s harder to love a child when you come into that child’s life after the unrequited passion of infancy and early childhood has passed.
  897. I believe that mothers should tell the truth, even – no, especially – when the truth is difficult. It’s always easier, and in the short term can even feel right, to pretend everything is okay, and to encourage your children to do the same. But concealment leads to shame, and of all hurts shame is the most painful.
  898. I am consumed, or I have been consumed, with these issues of motherhood and the way we act out societal expectations and roles. So both my nonfiction and my fiction have been pretty much exclusively about that.
  899. I am an adamant feminist. It never occurred to me to take my husband’s name when we married. I am a supporter of abortion rights, of equal pay for equal work, of the rights of women prisoners, of all the time-honored feminist causes, and then some.
  900. I always tell my kids that as soon as you have a secret, something about you that you are ashamed to have others find out, you have given other people the power to hurt you by exposing you.
  901. How many straight men maintain inappropriately intimate relationships with their mothers? How many shop with them? I want a gay son. People laugh, but they assume I’m kidding. I’m not.
  902. Gym class was, of course, where the strongest, best-looking kids were made captains and chose us spazzes last. More important, it was where the figures of supposed authority allowed them to do so. Forget the work our parents did molding our minds and values. Everything fell apart as soon as we put on those maroon polyester gym suits.
  903. Everyone knows now how early a fetus becomes a baby. Women who have been pregnant have seen their babies on ultrasounds. They know that there is a terrible truth to those horrific pictures the anti-choice fanatics hold up in front of abortion clinics.
  904. During the periods in my marriage when I chose to stay home with my kids rather than work as an attorney, it caused me no end of anxiety. Despite the fact that I knew I was contributing to our family by caring for our children, I still felt that my worth was less because I wasn’t earning.
  905. Despite the fact that in America we incarcerate more juveniles for life terms than in any other country in the world, the truth is that the vast majority of youth offenders will one day be released. The question is simple and stark. Do we want to help them change or do we want to help them become even more violent and dangerous?
  906. By the time the children go to bed, I am as drained as any mother who has spent her day working, car pooling, building Lego castles and shopping for the precisely correct soccer cleat.
  907. By presenting a faithful and honest record of my experience as a mother, I hope to show both my readers and my children how truth can redeem even what you fear might be the gravest of sins.
  908. But I really feel strongly that our kids do way too much homework. The research is on my side. It’s easy to make a fuss when you’re right. That can be the tagline of my life: ‘It’s Easy To Make A Fuss When You’re Right.’
  909. Before I was married, I didn’t consider my failure to manage even basic hand tools a feminist inadequacy. I thought it had more to do with being Jewish. The Jews I knew growing up didn’t do ‘do-it-yourself.’ When my father needed to hammer something he generally used his shoe, and the only real tool he owned was a pair of needle-nose pliers.
  910. Because of my bipolar disorder, I tend to these mixed states, which are depressed but loud and agitated. So I can be terribly irritable. I go to cognitive behavioral therapy in order not to yell at my children.
  911. As a parent, the only thing I am absolutely certain of is my own fallibility.
  912. As a novelist, I mined my history, my family and my memory, but in a very specific way. Writing fiction, I never made use of experiences immediately as they happened. I needed to let things fester in my memory, mature and transmogrify into something meaningful.
  913. Another parent’s different approach raises the possibility that you’ve made a mistake with your child. We simply can’t tolerate that because we fear that any mistake, no matter how minor, could have devastating consequences. So we proclaim the superiority of our own choices. We’ve lost sight of the fact that people have preferences.
  914. Aborting my baby is the most serious of the many maternal crimes I tally in my head when I am at my lowest, when the Bad Mother label seems to fit best. Rocketship was my baby. And I killed him.
  915. A good mother remembers to serve fruit at breakfast, is always cheerful and never yells, manages not to project her own neuroses and inadequacies onto her children, is an active and beloved community volunteer. She remembers to make play dates, her children’s clothes fit, she does art projects with them and enjoys all their games.
  916. We must see what in the Israeli identity – in the Israeli – we can give to other people rather than speaking so often of taking, expanding territory.
  917. We always knew how to honor fallen soldiers. They were killed for our sake, they went out on our mission. But how are we to mourn a random man killed in a terrorist attack while sitting in a cafe? How do you mourn a housewife who got on a bus and never returned?
  918. Traveling is one expression of the desire to cross boundaries.
  919. The weapon of suicide bombing is so desperate that you aren’t even left with the possibility of taking revenge or punishing anyone; the terrorist is killed along with his victims, his blood mixing with theirs.
  920. The question of boundaries is a major question of the Jewish people because the Jews are the great experts of crossing boundaries. They have a sense of identity inside themselves that doesn’t permit them to cross boundaries with other people.
  921. The most difficult and complicated part of the writing process is the beginning.
  922. So with truth – there is a certain moment when one can say, this is the truth and here I put a dot, a stop, and I go to another thing. A judge has to put an end to a deliberation. But for a historian, there’s never an end to the past. It can go on and on and on.
  923. One of the dreams of Zionism was to be a bridge. Instead, we are creating exclusion between the East and the West instead of creating bridges; we are contributing to the conflict between East and West by our stupid desire to have more.
  924. Intimate relationships are a gold mine for literature to explore, to understand, to describe.
  925. I don’t think that when Zionism began there was a claim that we were losing – even in part – our capacity to contribute to other peoples.
  926. And this is one of the major questions of our lives: how we keep boundaries, what permission we have to cross boundaries, and how we do so.
  927. My work is not directly about the social or political.
  928. In India, nobody really talks about works of art; they always talk about the appreciation of art. You buy this for 3,000 rupees, it’ll become 30,000 in two months.
  929. I think artists are really the root of a tree. They can search for truth or reality in their own way, and the gallery can support them – the outside part of the tree, where it is more about reaching the outside world, connecting with the outside world. That is the role of the gallery, no? Why does the artist have to do that?
  930. I remember, in my first show in New York, they asked, ‘Where is the Indian-ness in your work?’… Now, the same people, after having watched the body of my work, say, ‘There is too much Indian philosophy in your work.’ They’re looking for a superficial skin-level Indian-ness, which I’m not about.
  931. I enjoy doing my work, and I don’t want to deal with the other things. When you enjoy doing your work so much, why deal with where to show, how to show, what to do? If the artist finds the right gallery which respects their work and gives them that freedom to do whatever they want to do, the artist can focus on his work.
  932. You know, one of the things I think you understand as president is you’re held responsible for everything, but you don’t always have control of everything, right?
  933. You know, my faith is one that admits some doubt.
  934. You have young men of color in many communities who are more likely to end up in jail or in the criminal justice system than they are in a good job or in college. And, you know, part of my job, that I can do, I think, without any potential conflicts, is to get at those root causes.
  935. You can choose a future where more Americans have the chance to gain the skills they need to compete, no matter how old they are or how much money they have. Education was the gateway to opportunity for me. It was the gateway for Michelle. And now more than ever, it is the gateway to a middle-class life.
  936. Yes, we’ve still got more work to do. More work to do for every American still in need of a good job or a raise, paid leave or a decent retirement; for every child who needs a sturdier ladder out of poverty or a world-class education; for everyone who has not yet felt the progress of these past seven and a half years.
  937. With the changing economy, no one has lifetime employment. But community colleges provide lifetime employability.
  938. With patient and firm determination, I am going to press on for jobs. I’m going to press on for equality. I’m going to press on for the sake of our children. I’m going to press on for the sake of all those families who are struggling right now. I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself. I don’t have time to complain. I am going to press on.
  939. Why can’t I just eat my waffle?
  940. While I understand the passions and the anger that arise over the death of Michael Brown, giving into that anger by looting or carrying guns, and even attacking the police, only serves to raise tensions and stir chaos.
  941. Whether our forebears were strangers who crossed the Atlantic or the Pacific or the Rio Grande, we are here only because this country welcomed them in and taught them that to be an American is about something more than what we look like, or what our last names are, or how we worship.
  942. Where the stakes are the highest, in the war on terror, we cannot possibly succeed without extraordinary international cooperation. Effective international police actions require the highest degree of intelligence sharing, planning and collaborative enforcement.
  943. When we think of the major threats to our national security, the first to come to mind are nuclear proliferation, rogue states and global terrorism. But another kind of threat lurks beyond our shores, one from nature, not humans – an avian flu pandemic.
  944. When states like Alabama and Arizona passed some of the harshest immigration laws in history, my Attorney General took them on in court and we won.
  945. When BP was not moving fast enough on claims, we told BP to set aside $20 billion in a fund – managed by an independent third party – to help all those whose lives have been turned upside down by the spill.
  946. What makes us Americans is our shared commitment to an ideal – that all of us are created equal, and all of us have the chance to make of our lives what we will.
  947. What is a danger is that we stay stuck in a new normal where unemployment rates stay high, people who have jobs see their incomes go up, businesses make big profits. But they’re learned to do more with less, and so they don’t hire.
  948. What do you think a stimulus is? It’s spending – that’s the whole point! Seriously.
  949. What Washington needs is adult supervision.
  950. What I’m asking for is hard. It’s easier to be cynical; to accept that change isn’t possible, and politics is hopeless, and to believe that our voices and actions don’t matter. But if we give up now, then we forsake a better future.
  951. What I worry about would be that you essentially have two chambers, the House and the Senate, but you have simply, majoritarian, absolute power on either side. And that’s just not what the founders intended.
  952. What I think is fair to say is that, coming out of the Republican camp, there have been efforts to suggest that perhaps I’m not who I say I am when it comes to my faith – something which I find deeply offensive, and that has been going on for a pretty long time.
  953. What I believe unites the people of this nation, regardless of race or region or party, young or old, rich or poor, is the simple, profound belief in opportunity for all – the notion that if you work hard and take responsibility, you can get ahead.
  954. What I believe is that marriage is between a man and a woman, but what I also believe is that we have an obligation to make sure that gays and lesbians have the rights of citizenship that afford them visitations to hospitals, that allow them to be, to transfer property between partners, to make certain that they’re not discriminated on the job.
  955. We, the People, recognize that we have responsibilities as well as rights; that our destinies are bound together; that a freedom which only asks what’s in it for me, a freedom without a commitment to others, a freedom without love or charity or duty or patriotism, is unworthy of our founding ideals, and those who died in their defense.
  956. We’ve protected thousands of people in Libya; we have not seen a single U.S. casualty; there’s no risks of additional escalation. This operation is limited in time and in scope.
  957. We’ve persevered because of a belief we share with the Iraqi people – a belief that out of the ashes of war, a new beginning could be born in this cradle of civilization. Through this remarkable chapter in the history of the United States and Iraq, we have met our responsibility. Now, it’s time to turn the page.
  958. We’re not a fragile people. We’re not a frightful people. Our power doesn’t come from some self-declared savior promising that he alone can restore order as long as we do things his way. We don’t look to be ruled.
  959. We worship an awesome God in the Blue States, and we don’t like federal agents poking around our libraries in the Red States. We coach Little League in the Blue States and have gay friends in the Red States.
  960. We will keep the promise of Social Security by taking the responsible steps to strengthen it – not by turning it over to Wall Street.
  961. We welcome the scrutiny of the world – because what you see in America is a country that has steadily worked to address our problems and make our union more perfect.
  962. We want everybody to act like adults, quit playing games, realize that it’s not just my way or the highway.
  963. We proved that we are still a people capable of doing big things and tackling our biggest challenges.
  964. We need to steer clear of this poverty of ambition, where people want to drive fancy cars and wear nice clothes and live in nice apartments but don’t want to work hard to accomplish these things. Everyone should try to realize their full potential.
  965. We need to reject any politics that targets people because of race or religion. This isn’t a matter of political correctness. It’s a matter of understanding what makes us strong. The world respects us not just for our arsenal; it respects us for our diversity and our openness and the way we respect every faith.
  966. We need to recognize that the situation in Ferguson speaks to broader challenges that we still face as a nation. The fact is, in too many parts of this country, a deep distrust exists between law enforcement and communities of color. Some of this is the result of the legacy of racial discrimination in this country.
  967. We need to keep making our streets safer and our criminal justice system fairer – our homeland more secure, our world more peaceful and sustainable for the next generation.
  968. We need to internalize this idea of excellence. Not many folks spend a lot of time trying to be excellent.
  969. We need somebody who’s got the heart, the empathy, to recognize what it’s like to be a young teenage mom, the empathy to understand what it’s like to be poor or African-American or gay or disabled or old – and that’s the criterion by which I’ll be selecting my judges.
  970. We need earmark reform, and when I’m President, I will go line by line to make sure that we are not spending money unwisely.
  971. We know that the nation that goes all-in on innovation today will own the global economy tomorrow. This is an edge America cannot surrender.
  972. We have real enemies in the world. These enemies must be found. They must be pursued and they must be defeated.
  973. We have now just enshrined, as soon as I sign this bill, the core principle that everybody should have some basic security when it comes to their healthcare.
  974. We have an obligation and a responsibility to be investing in our students and our schools. We must make sure that people who have the grades, the desire and the will, but not the money, can still get the best education possible.
  975. We didn’t become the most prosperous country in the world just by rewarding greed and recklessness. We didn’t come this far by letting the special interests run wild. We didn’t do it just by gambling and chasing paper profits on Wall Street. We built this country by making things, by producing goods we could sell.
  976. We cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives that we’ve set. We’ve got to have a civilian national security force that’s just as powerful, just as strong, just as well-funded.
  977. We can’t have special interests sitting shotgun. We gotta have middle class families up in front. We don’t mind the Republicans joining us. They can come for the ride, but they gotta sit in back.
  978. We can’t get to the $4 trillion in savings that we need by just cutting the 12 percent of the budget that pays for things like medical research and education funding and food inspectors and the weather service. And we can’t just do it by making seniors pay more for Medicare.
  979. We can’t drive our SUVs and eat as much as we want and keep our homes on 72 degrees at all times… and then just expect that other countries are going to say OK. That’s not leadership. That’s not going to happen.
  980. We can choose a future where we export more products and outsource fewer jobs. After a decade that was defined by what we bought and borrowed, we’re getting back to basics, and doing what America has always done best: We’re making things again.
  981. We are not at war against Islam.
  982. We also can’t try to take over and rebuild every country that falls into crisis. That’s not leadership; that’s a recipe for quagmire, spilling American blood and treasure that ultimately weakens us. It’s the lesson of Vietnam, of Iraq – and we should have learned it by now.
  983. We all remember Abraham Lincoln as the leader who saved our Union. Founder of the Republican Party.
  984. We all knew this. We all knew that it would take more time than any of us want to dig ourselves out of this hole created by this economic crisis.
  985. Unlike my opponent, I will not let oil companies write this country’s energy plan, or endanger our coastlines, or collect another $4 billion in corporate welfare from our taxpayers.
  986. Understand, our police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. They’ve got a tough job to do to maintain public safety and hold accountable those who break the law.
  987. Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago.
  988. Tonight, we gather to affirm the greatness of our nation – not because of the height of our skyscrapers, or the power of our military, or the size of our economy. Our pride is based on a very simple premise, summed up in a declaration made over two hundred years ago.
  989. Today we are engaged in a deadly global struggle for those who would intimidate, torture, and murder people for exercising the most basic freedoms. If we are to win this struggle and spread those freedoms, we must keep our own moral compass pointed in a true direction.
  990. To avoid being mistaken for a sellout, I chose my friends carefully. The more politically active black students. The foreign students. The Chicanos. The Marxist professors and structural feminists and punk-rock performance poets.
  991. Through every victory and every setback, I’ve insisted that change is never easy and never quick; that we wouldn’t meet all of our challenges in one term, or one presidency, or even in one lifetime.
  992. Those who oppose reform will also tell you that under our plan, you won’t get to choose your doctor – that some bureaucrat will choose for you. That’s also not true.
  993. This is the moment when we must come together to save this planet. Let us resolve that we will not leave our children a world where the oceans rise and famine spreads and terrible storms devastate our lands.
  994. This is the moment when we must build on the wealth that open markets have created, and share its benefits more equitably. Trade has been a cornerstone of our growth and global development. But we will not be able to sustain this growth if it favors the few, and not the many.
  995. There’s not a liberal America and a conservative America – there’s the United States of America.
  996. There is probably a perverse pride in my administration… that we were going to do the right thing, even if short-term it was unpopular. And I think anybody who’s occupied this office has to remember that success is determined by an intersection in policy and politics and that you can’t be neglecting of marketing and P.R. and public opinion.
  997. There is not a liberal America and a conservative America – there is the United States of America. There is not a black America and a white America and latino America and asian America – there’s the United States of America.
  998. There are patriots who opposed the war in Iraq and there are patriots who supported the war in Iraq. We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes, all of us defending the United States of America.
  999. There are millions of Americans outside Washington who are tired of stale political arguments and are moving this country forward. They believe, and I believe, that here in America, our success should depend not on accident of birth, but the strength of our work ethic and the scope of our dreams.
  1000. The thing about hip-hop today is it’s smart, it’s insightful. The way they can communicate a complex message in a very short space is remarkable.
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