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  3. Posted on Mon, 1 Jan, 2018 at 7:37 PM

I Articles Page 6

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  1. I often feel very guilty because of the time that I spend outside of my home and the little time that sometimes I have for my kids.
  2. I often find that pundits are quite negative… not just in tennis, but in sport in general. I just don’t like that. Obviously, the job of a pundit is to create interest and a bit of controversy. I get that. Listeners like that. But I do think there’s a duty there to promote the sport and talk about how good these people are at what they do.
  3. I often get letters, quite frequently, from people who say how they like the programmes a lot, but I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature.
  4. I often heard Latvians compare Russia and America. Latvians find both countries and their leaders possessed of the same mysterious confidence.
  5. I often joke that 100 years from now I hope people are saying, ‘Dang, she looks good for her age!’
  6. I often joke that I’ve just become a professional schmoozer. Like, nobody cares how well I can rock climb anymore. It just has to do with how well I can schmooze.
  7. I often look ridiculous in Japan. There’s really no way to eat in Japan, particularly kaiseki in a traditional ryokan, without offending the Japanese horribly. Every gesture, every movement is just so atrociously wrong, and the more I try, the more hilarious it is.
  8. I often make films about subjects I don’t really know much about. Maybe it’s laziness, but I don’t go in there having done a tonne of research; the research happens while I’m making the film.
  9. I often quote myself. It adds spice to my conversation.
  10. I often read poetry to ‘warm up’ before I write.
  11. I often think how lucky we were with ‘Jesus Christ Superstar.’
  12. I often think of random melodies. And I pretty much hear in my head what I want to do with the orchestra as I’m writing on the piano.
  13. I often think that a slightly exposed shoulder emerging from a long satin nightgown packs more sex than two naked bodies in bed.
  14. I often think that woman is more free in Islam than in Christianity. Woman is more protected by Islam than by the faith which preaches monogamy. In AI Quran the law about woman is juster and more liberal.
  15. I often think that woman is more free in Islam than in Christianity. Woman is more protected by Islam than by the faith which preaches monogamy.
  16. I often try to tell kids to think about all the people who love you, don’t cry over the one person who doesn’t.
  17. I often visited a particular plant four or five miles distant, half a dozen times within a fortnight, that I might know exactly when it opened.
  18. I often wake up in the night, and I like to have something to think about.
  19. I once asked the most fabulous couple I know, Madonna and Guy Ritchie, how they kept things fresh despite having been married for almost seven months. ‘It’s a job, Al,’ Guy told me. ‘We work at it every day.’
  20. I once had a rose named after me and I was very flattered. But I was not pleased to read the description in the catalogue: no good in a bed, but fine up against a wall.
  21. I once had an Early Girl tomato at my friend Jay’s house, and I thought that was the best thing I’d ever had. But then I visited friends in Senegal, and I ate sea urchin pulled fresh out of the sea. It tasted like the ocean.
  22. I once received a cape that was made from the little purple bags that Crown Royal Whisky comes in.
  23. I once wanted to be a personage. Now I am comfortable being a person.
  24. I once wanted to prove myself by being a great actress. Now I want to prove that I’m a person. Then maybe I’ll be a great actress.
  25. I once won a second prize in a history concert. My parents came to the ceremony. Somebody else had won the prize for best all-around student. Afterwards my father said to me, ‘Never, ever disgrace me like that again.’ When I tell my Western friends, they are aghast. But I adore my father. It didn’t knock my self-esteem at all.
  26. I once wrote a short story called ‘The Best Blues Singer in the World,’ and it went like this: ‘The streets that Balboa walked were his own private ocean, and Balboa was drowning.’ End of story. That says it all. Nothing else to say. I’ve been rewriting that same story over and over again. All my plays are rewriting that same story.
  27. I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free.
  28. I only ever give praise to elite fighters.
  29. I only ever involve myself with brands I truly adore.
  30. I only get fat when I eat food cooked by other chefs. At home, my wife does all the cooking. She makes simple things like soups and salads. We both like steamed tofu.
  31. I only hope that we don’t lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse.
  32. I only made one mistake in my life; that’s when I thought I was wrong.
  33. I only make storyboards for action scenes. Once you make a storyboard, you don’t film; it can be a stiff move.
  34. I only really fake it anymore with sommeliers who are being really snotty to me and I don’t want to take their grief and so I try to do something to kind of throw them off or put them on the defensive, even if I don’t know what I’m talking about.
  35. I only think about the choices I want to make and act responsibly – not say or do stupid things, like break the law or get caught doing stupid things.
  36. I only type every third night. I have no plan. My mind is a blank. I sit down. The typewriter gives me things I don’t even know I’m working on. It’s a free lunch. A free dinner. I don’t know how long it is going to continue, but so far there is nothing easier than writing.
  37. I only used a cell phone for the first time after I was released. I had difficulty coping with it because it seemed so small and insubstantial.
  38. I only want to make music because I have a passion for it.
  39. I only watch the last 40 seconds. Watching a whole marathon over time, the beginning, middle and end look very slow. I want to see action! I can’t help it.
  40. I opened Union Square Cafe when I was just 27 years old, and my first hope was simply that it would stay in business. My higher hope was that in its lifetime, it might grow to play an essential role in the lives of its stakeholders.
  41. I operate with this sense of needing to live up to what I am asking of people. I am, by far, my own worst critic.
  42. I opposed the Defense of Marriage Act in 1996. It should be repealed and I will vote for its repeal on the Senate floor. I will also oppose any proposal to amend the U.S. Constitution to ban gays and lesbians from marrying.
  43. I ordered each man to be presented with something, as strings of ten or a dozen glass beads apiece, and thongs of leather, all which they estimated highly; those which came on board I directed should be fed with molasses.
  44. I originally passed on ‘Girls’ because I thought TV was evil.
  45. I outlasted my problems.
  46. I overheard people saying, ‘She thinks she’s so great because she’s Debbie Reynolds’ daughter!’ And I didn’t like it; it made me different from other people, and I wanted to be the same.
  47. I owe all of this to the guys I’ve played with and all the coaches that have helped me get to where I’m at right now. I’m honored to be here.
  48. I owe everything to Nirvana. But I can’t let that overshadow the future. For the first few years, I didn’t even want to talk about Nirvana. Partly because it was just painful to talk about losing Kurt but also because I wanted the Foo Fighters to mean something.
  49. I owe it all to Jesus.
  50. I owe much to my friends; but, all things considered, it strikes me that I owe even more to my enemies. The real person springs life under a sting even better than under a caress.
  51. I owe my solitude to other people.
  52. I own a guitar, a piano, a bass.
  53. I own buildings. I’m a builder; I know how to build. Nobody can build like I can build. Nobody. And the builders in New York will tell you that. I build the best product. And my name helps a lot.
  54. I own over four ties.
  55. I own that I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive.
  56. I paid my dues; I certainly did.
  57. I paint and I draw and I write and I do other things too, and recently some people at school were asking if I’d ever publish any of my work. But I almost feel like I would have to publish it under another name because there’s a definition of me out there that feels kind of stuck in the moment when it was formed.
  58. I paint flowers so they will not die.
  59. I paint mostly from real life. It has to start with that. Real people, real street scenes, behind the curtain scenes, live models, paintings, photographs, staged setups, architecture, grids, graphic design. Whatever it takes to make it work.
  60. I paint my own reality. The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to, and I paint whatever passes through my head without any other consideration.
  61. I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best.
  62. I pass my life in preventing the storm from blowing down the tent, and I drive in the pegs as fast as they are pulled up.
  63. I passionately believe that’s it’s not just what you say that counts, it’s also how you say it – that the success of your argument critically depends on your manner of presenting it.
  64. I perhaps ought to say that individually I never was much interested in the Texas question. I never could see much good to come of annexation, inasmuch as they were already a free republican people on our own model.
  65. I personally believe that any country that has a nuclear program should conform to international regulations and should have international regulatory bodies that check to make sure that any nuclear program moves in the right direction.
  66. I personally have a philosophy around authenticity and vulnerability.
  67. I personally hope and wish that Britain will stay part and parcel of the European Union.
  68. I personally made a decision many years ago that I wanted to crawl into portraiture because it had a lot of latitude.
  69. I personally pledge myself to openly counsel, aid, and abet youth, both black and white, to quarantine any Jim Crow conscription system.
  70. I personally tend to be drawn to stories that aren’t paid much attention to, or stories that aren’t on people’s radar.
  71. I personally think that you have to get lost to find something really worthwhile, at least sometimes.
  72. I, personally, think there is a really danger of taking food too seriously. Food should be part of the bigger picture.
  73. I photograph artists, and some of them are very well known, but if you ask the average man on the street, ‘Do you like Anselm Kiefer?’ He would stare at you with a blank stare, because these are not celebrities. They are celebrated in a specific circle.
  74. I pick and choose my battles, but I overthink everything because I have to think about everything.
  75. I pitch Mint to everyone from investors to engineers, young and old, and I do it pretty much the same way: Here’s the problem in the market place, here’s how we solve it, and here’s how we make money.
  76. I pity the young woman who will attempt to insinuate herself between my mama’s boy and me. I sympathize with the monumental nature of her task. It will take a crowbar, two bulldozers and half a dozen Molotov cocktails to pry my Oedipus and me loose from one another.
  77. I plan on taking athletics as far as I can.
  78. I play fantasy basketball and fantasy football, soccer.
  79. I play games on-set at work. Sometimes I can’t remember people’s names, so I start throwing out clues. Like if I can’t think of George Clooney, I’ll say, ‘You know, drop-dead gorgeous, was on a big TV show… ‘ Until someone says his name, I can’t finish my story!
  80. I play guitar a bit. I’m trying to learn drums – I feel like I can play violin. I’ve never tried, but I just feel like I can.
  81. I play in a band, I write songs, I sing, you know, perform on stage.
  82. I play my Xbox and PlayStation at home. Then, when I’m on the road, I’ll bring my Vita with me to play games like ‘Snake Eater.’
  83. I play piano every day. I enjoy that.
  84. I play saxophone, I play tenor sax.
  85. I play to win, whether during practice or a real game. And I will not let anything get in the way of me and my competitive enthusiasm to win.
  86. I play with doing a forehead bun a lot, just a bantu knot right in front of the forehead and keep it in with a clip. And I like doing real pinup styles but based on my natural hair.
  87. I played a little basketball. Some football in junior high.
  88. I played basketball in high school, and I love watching sports – I’ll watch everything except maybe hockey.
  89. I played basketball my whole life. It definitely helps. It translates to going up for rebounds and going up for balls in the end zone. Quick feet. It helps with getting in and out of your cuts. It definitely all translates to football.
  90. I played characters with villainous aspect. But out-and-out villain? No.
  91. I played golf with my friends, and then I started to play with the hustlers. And I learned a lot. I learned about golf; I learned about gambling. I learned about everything.
  92. I played one year of fantasy football in high school. You really get into it. It makes more fans of the NFL, and people love talking about it. They’ll come up to me and say, ‘Why did you throw an interception? You ruined my fantasy team!’ Or they’re happy because they got you for a bargain.
  93. I played volleyball, basketball, softball, and I started to love soccer the most around 7-8 years old because it was a physical game. I could use my speed and strength to my advantage.
  94. I played with different words like ‘home run,’ ‘megahit,’ and they just all sounded kind of ‘blah.’ So I put in ‘unicorn’ because they are – these are very rare companies in the sense that there are thousands of startups in tech every year, and only a handful will wind up becoming a unicorn company. They’re really rare.
  95. I played with two lines of action figures when I was a kid: G.I. Joe and Star Wars.
  96. I plead for conservation of human culture, which is much more fragile than nature herself. We needn’t destroy other cultures with the force of our own.
  97. I pledge allegiance to the Christian flag, and to the Savior, for whose Kingdom it stands, one Savior, crucified, risen, and coming again, with life and liberty for all who believe.
  98. I pledge to you today that as president, in my first budget, I will introduce the largest increase in special education ever.
  99. I postpone death by living, by suffering, by error, by risking, by giving, by losing.
  100. I pray as follows: May justice reign, may the laws not be broken, may the wise men be poor, and the poor men rich, without sin.
  101. I pray every day for my little girls. It’s hard out there for the younger generation.
  102. I pray every night before I go to sleep and every morning when I wake up.
  103. I pray, read the word, and then creative stuff happens here. Problem-solving and all of that comes into that space. So ‘Da Box’ actually represents my sanctuary and that time. I might look trapped in a box, but I’m actually more free in that box than anyone on the outside looking in or in any other space in my life.
  104. I pray to God that I shall not live one hour after I have thought of using deception.
  105. I prayed for twenty years but received no answer until I prayed with my legs.
  106. I prefer ‘cooling foods’ for the summer – lots of fruits like watermelons, a few strands of kesar with raisins that have been soaked overnight, and lots of coconut water. Dinner is usually dahi chawal. I am a big foodie, so depending on my cravings, I indulge – maybe pasta or risotto.
  107. I prefer doing TV, where it can be different every time.
  108. I prefer insomnia to anaesthesia.
  109. I prefer musicals, because I am the best dancer who ever lived. The best plies, the best sashays, and by far the best-smelling Capezios.
  110. I prefer rogues to imbeciles, because they sometimes take a rest.
  111. I prefer the folly of enthusiasm to the indifference of wisdom.
  112. I prefer to be a dreamer among the humblest, with visions to be realized, than lord among those without dreams and desires.
  113. I prefer to be able to identify what I’m eating. I have to know.
  114. I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence.
  115. I prefer to die rather than eat beef.
  116. I prefer to praise people and the world rather than criticize them and it.
  117. I prefer to stay with Likud. I think I have to be in the party I managed to build.
  118. I prefer to work for my country in a free and independent way. I was born free, and I want to die free. I am always suspicious of ideology. Instead, I respect men with ideas.
  119. I prefer using cream-based products on my skin. I love having that summery dewy skin – I like using cream blushers as well.
  120. I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape. Something waits beneath it; the whole story doesn’t show.
  121. I prefer working on films. I like the variety. There is nothing better than playing a bad girl for two months, then playing someone sweet for the next two. Films give you this opportunity.
  122. I probably have a club in my hands 360 days a year, one way or another, playing with friends or just fiddling around or hitting balls.
  123. I probably hold the distinction of being one movie star who, by all laws of logic, should never have made it. At each stage of my career, I lacked the experience.
  124. I probably learned, being in ‘Taxi Driver’ before I made my first film, I would come to the set every day just to watch how that film came about. It’s like a graduate course: it’s terrific. You talk to the cinematographer during the breaks. You ask the electrician why they are doing this.
  125. I probably never would have been hired on Broadway had I not moved out to L.A. and pursued acting and film, which is sad, really.
  126. I probably would have retired years ago if I hadn’t found interesting things to do.
  127. I probably would never be caught wearing a baseball cap. Hats are difficult to me because they tend to be too big for my head. They don’t fit right, and I feel ridiculous.
  128. I promise to be an excellent husband, but give me a wife who, like the moon, will not appear every day in my sky.
  129. I promised myself that I would write as well as I can, tell the truth, not to tell everything I know, but to make sure that everything I tell is true, as I understand it. And to use the eloquence which my language affords me.
  130. I promised myself that I’d never actually admit to listening to ‘New Kids on the Block.’
  131. I propose to construct a new chart for navigating, on which I shall delineate all the sea and lands of the Ocean in their proper positions under their bearings; and further, I propose to prepare a book, and to put down all as it were in a picture, by latitude from the equator, and western longitude.
  132. I push myself in a lot of aspects when I write a song. I write a piece and where most people would stop and say, ‘Oh, that’s the hook right there,’ I’ll move that to the first four bars of the verse and do a new hook.
  133. I put a hell of a lot of myself into ‘Love Never Dies,’ and I felt quite drained afterwards.
  134. I put a list together. It was like: Get health insurance, get a car, get a bigger apartment, travel more, get a record deal, get a publishing deal, sell 10,000 units, be a part of a No. 1 album, make a million dollars. I got to check off 90 percent of the stuff last year. I hit some serious landmarks in 2015.
  135. I put a lot of pressure on myself, but I also have what I call an X-factor.
  136. I put a piece of paper under my pillow, and when I could not sleep I wrote in the dark.
  137. I put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my works.
  138. I put cocoa butter all over my face and my iconic belly and my arms and legs. Why live rough? Live smooth.
  139. I put everyone in my school on to Nicki Minaj before she blew up. I was obsessed with her and I was like, ‘If she’s the best female rapper then I’ve got to be better than her.’
  140. I put on the canvas whatever comes into my mind.
  141. I put out tapes, but I always kept saying, ‘Why am I putting all this energy into these tapes?’ I was like, ‘I’d rather make just an album because I have a vision; I know how I want to do my records.’ I always felt like an artist as well.
  142. I put so much pressure on myself to be perfect. Between homework and sports and drama and being social, I slept about four hours a night through high school and college.
  143. I put together amazing records, whether that’s finding the beat or putting the right hook on there, and picking the right artists on the record. That’s me being an A&R. And I’m making sure that they give me their best.
  144. I putt like I did when I was a kid. When you’re a kid, you’re not scared of anything.
  145. I question myself every day. That’s what I still find motivating about this. I don’t have the answers, I don’t pretend that I do just because I won the match. Just keep fighting and maybe something good happens.
  146. I questioned the blind faith demanded by my religion, which was Islam.
  147. I quit flying myself last year and that was difficult for me because I enjoy it as much as playing golf. It was an adjustment sitting in the back of the plane, rather than at the controls, but I’ve grown accustomed to it and enjoy reading a book, doing some work or challenging my wife to a game of dominos.
  148. I quit my last real job, as a writer at a magazine, when I was twenty-one. That was the moment when I lost my place of prestige on the fast track, and slowly, millimeter by millimeter, I started to get found, to discover who I had been born to be, instead of the impossibly small package, all tied up tightly in myself, that I had agreed to be.
  149. I ran for president in 1996.
  150. I rarely asks people for advice or permission when I’m planning on doing something I feel strongly about. That only opens the plan up to be crapped on.
  151. I rarely drink, I don’t smoke, so my vice is probably creating. I’m addicted to creating. And women.
  152. I rarely felt or noticed any real divide between girls and boys when I was growing up. Maybe it was because I was so involved in sports and competed with the boys. Maybe it was my mom and dad, who constantly instilled confidence in me and never made me feel as though there were boy activities and girl activities.
  153. I rarely get recognised. It’s always a shock when someone notices me. I always think they must be confusing me with someone else.
  154. I rarely went to the mosque, I never fasted, and I only prayed namaaz on the holy nights because my mom bugged me about it.
  155. I rate Morrissey as one of the best lyricists in Britain. For me, he’s up there with Bryan Ferry.
  156. I re-invented my image so many times that I’m in denial that I was originally an overweight Korean woman.
  157. I read a book a day when I was a kid. My family was not literary; we did not have any books in the house.
  158. I read a lot of obscure books and it is nice to open a book.
  159. I read a lot when I’m travelling and always have a couple of books on the go.
  160. I read academic books on courtesan culture at the turn-of-the century in Shanghai such as Gail Hershatter’s ‘The Gender of Memory’. The diaries were mostly in the form of letters from courtesans to a lover who had disappeared or taken their savings.
  161. I read all the time, and I’m often struck by something I’m reading.
  162. I read and walked for miles at night along the beach, writing bad blank verse and searching endlessly for someone wonderful who would step out of the darkness and change my life. It never crossed my mind that that person could be me.
  163. I read every book there was on jazz, about the original players – King Oliver, Buddy Bolden and all those groups. At one time I was fairly well schooled in that… I could tell you who played where and when, historically, way before my time.
  164. I read ‘Game Change.’ If you want to relive the campaign, that book is unbelievable. It’s great. It’s the book of that campaign. It brought all the memories back of everything with Clinton and Obama, and Sarah Palin and McCain, and choosing her, and John Edwards. It was an interesting book.
  165. I read God’s word when I am not suffering. And then I don’t have to all of a sudden establish this habit when I am hurting.
  166. I read just endlessly, ceaselessly, almost every book, it seems!
  167. I read poetry to save time.
  168. I read round the subject, I make a skeleton outline, and then I start work in the relevant archives. During the marshaling of the material, I copy the material from each archive file across to the relevant chapter in the skeleton outline.
  169. I read science, because to me, that’s extremely exciting. It’s like a great detective story, and it’s happening right in front of us.
  170. I read the Bible to myself; I’ll take any translation, any edition, and read it aloud, just to hear the language, hear the rhythm, and remind myself how beautiful English is.
  171. I read the newspapers avidly. It is my one form of continuous fiction.
  172. I read The Old Curiosity Shop before I began Blackwood Farm. I was amazed at the utter madness in that book.
  173. I read the papers every day just to discover if one mentions Anna Held.
  174. I read the same amount of nonfiction and fiction.
  175. I read the ‘Times’ and ‘Post,’ but I have nothing against the ‘Daily News.’ I also fish around the Internet for entertainment news but find most of what I read to be untrue or partially true.
  176. I read to my kid, but I can’t stand reading.
  177. I read very little contemporary anything… I don’t think I read what other people read, but then why would I, considering what I do?
  178. I read very little contemporary anything.
  179. I read very one-note. Teacher’s pet, Goody Two-shoes. I’d hate to be annoying. Who wants to see movies with someone annoying in them? But it’s hard for me to paint myself as anything but whatever it is I come across as – which is pretty together.
  180. I realise I’m still a child, though I do feel older. I recently did an on-line test called ‘What’s Your True Age?’ My result was 50-60 years old.
  181. I realise I’m still a child, though I do feel older.
  182. I realised that I could either fight and get into trouble on the street or I could fight and get paid in the ring. I chose the ring.
  183. I realize I don’t do a very good job in keeping up to date, but I try to.
  184. I realize I’m very fortunate to hopefully make a lot of money playing football. I don’t know if I want to abuse that privilege and make myself a larger figure than I am.
  185. I realize that as the quarterback, you have to assume some sort of leadership role because you have to talk in the huddle on every play, and you’re essentially giving out orders to the team. But in my mind, I have to prove myself on the field before I can start asserting a leadership role.
  186. I realize that I’m black, but I like to be viewed as a person, and this is everybody’s wish.
  187. I realize that I’m in the top one percent of the world. I’ve traveled a lot. I’ve seen immense poverty in the world, and I can’t live with everything I’ve had and be comfortable with everything I have unless I do something for the rest of the world.
  188. I realize that men and women of the military go out and sacrifice their lives and put their selves in harm’s way for my freedom of speech and my freedoms in this country, and my freedom to take a seat or take a knee, so I have the utmost respect for them, and I think what I did was taken out of context and spun a different way.
  189. I realized – and I am probably the last person in the world to realize this – that we live our lives with no editing.
  190. I realized I couldn’t be a journalist because I like to take a side, to have an opinion and a point a view; I liked to step across the imaginary boundary of the objective view that the journalist is supposed to have and be involved.
  191. I realized I didn’t want there to be anything left unsaid with my mom. I didn’t want there to be questions that I still had about who she was and what her life was like. And I didn’t want her to have questions about me as an adult.
  192. I realized I was a country person – I’m just not used to small spaces.
  193. I realized just how much exercise and eating right make a difference in how you feel now and when you get older.
  194. I realized quickly what Mandela and Tambo meant to ordinary Africans. It was a place where they could come and find a sympathetic ear and a competent ally, a place where they would not be either turned away or cheated, a place where they might actually feel proud to be represented by men of their own skin color.
  195. I realized that anything to do with Fermat’s Last Theorem generates too much interest.
  196. I realized that social media can be powerful force for good in the world and that acts of kindness can be scaled globally.
  197. I realized that, while I would never be my mother nor have her life, the lesson she had left me was that it was possible to love and care for a man and still have at your core a strength so great that you never even needed to put it on display.
  198. I realized the other day that I’ve lived in New York longer than I’ve lived anywhere else. It’s amazing: I am a New Yorker. It’s strange; I never thought I would be.
  199. I realized, ‘Yo, I can’t do anything in moderation. I don’t know how.’
  200. I really admire Werner Herzog and Spike Lee. They’re amazing documentarians. If you took away all the narratives, they’d just be amazing documentarians.
  201. I really am at a place where I think we need to feed every child at school for free and feed them a real school lunch that’s sustainable and nutritious and delicious. It needs to be part of the curriculum of the school in the same way that physical education was part of the curriculum, and all children participated.
  202. I really appreciate Frank Ocean’s lyrical style, I appreciate the way that he can kind of draw you into this personal space, but it’s still lyrical. It’s almost poetic, in a way, but it’s very personal at the same time.
  203. I really appreciate that: to walk into an environment where everyone is serious and dedicated to creating the best performance possible and challenging themselves to figure out the most interesting way to approach the work.
  204. I really appreciate the many neighbourhoods of Berkeley. There is still the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker. And it has the University of California, which is the greatest gift, to my mind, to be close to it. It keeps the place alive.
  205. I really believe at the end of the day, regardless of how noble you are or how patriotic the film might be, it has to serve as entertainment in order for your audiences to come into the theatre and watch it. Otherwise, audiences will wait and see it a few months later when it is premiered on television.
  206. I really believed that I was on the right track, but that did not mean that I would necessarily reach my goal.
  207. I really can’t be bothered going to a barber. And shaving every morning, that’s nightmarish. I spent my teenage years covered in tiny little bits of toilet paper.
  208. I really care about people, and I would need someone to also genuinely value other human beings and want to be connected with people in the world and to know about other cultures. That might not be a high standard for someone else, but for me, it’s really important to try and stick to that.
  209. I really chess-play culture shifts. I’m really good at understanding what worldwide cell-phone use means. That’s what I do. I try to picture it three to four to five steps ahead.
  210. I really consider myself a writer, and a writer who is sometimes a social critic. I’m not an ideologue, I don’t join a party. I follow along and take notes. Sometimes I throw in my two cents.
  211. I really cringe at the sight of pattypan squash. So pretty and cute and having no taste or exciting texture. Dull.
  212. I really didn’t consider myself happy or unhappy.
  213. I really didn’t want to become branded as ‘that multistructural guy.’
  214. I really do encourage other manufacturers to bring electric cars to market. It’s a good thing, and they need to bring it to market and keep iterating and improving and make better and better electric cars, and that’s what going to result in humanity achieving a sustainable transport future. I wish it was growing faster than it is.
  215. I really do know football.
  216. I really do listen to all types of music, not only rock, but everything from good pop music – which is usually older pop music – to R&B and indie rock. I love indie rock more than a lot of the commercial stuff that you’d expect.
  217. I really do not make deals.
  218. I really do see that anywhere I am, whether it’s doing interviews a hundred in a row, that every situation I’m in, I’m at choice in the matter.
  219. I really do think I can make a contribution in helping eliminate the disparity here in Australia and doing my small bit to help eliminate slavery around the world. These are huge issues for our fellow countrymen and our fellows in the world, where slavery is growing at an alarming rate, and it needs to be arrested.
  220. I really don’t care about my numbers.
  221. I really don’t have any shelf music.
  222. I really don’t have much respect for the people who live their lives motivated by an exit strategy existing, being performed. There was no option that we were trained in that says, ‘If it gets too hard, get up and leave.’
  223. I really don’t like going out. I don’t like restaurants because I don’t like the idea of someone, a waitress, being responsible for my evening. I like seconds, and more, and lots of conversation, and I’ve always hated the idea that in a restaurant an evening just ends. I find that incredibly depressing.
  224. I really don’t like plays or movies that service propaganda.
  225. I really don’t work to a plan, but I just do what interests me and what I like to do.
  226. I really enjoy connecting with the audience.
  227. I really enjoy helping people out, and I enjoy time spent with kids.
  228. I really feel like my goal, and I don’t always achieve it, is to do the best work I can do, and stay out of the results. Because ultimately, the result is not what the work is about. There are other people whose jobs are to focus on those results and maximize them, and that’s great. Let them do their job.
  229. I really feel like the gift is also the curse. It’s always half-and-half. Whatever brings you the most joy will also probably bring you the most pain. Always a price to pay.
  230. I really feel that most things are difficult at the beginning and they become fun, something you love, only after you’ve worked at them. Making children do something hard can, in the long run, be a great parental service.
  231. I really felt good after working in a film like ‘Piku,’ as many people could relate to my character. I got letters from my fans telling me how my character resembles to their grandparents.
  232. I really had a lot of dreams when I was a kid, and I think a great deal of that grew out of the fact that I had a chance to read a lot.
  233. I really hate the people in power. I hate them with every fiber of my being. That is what drives me in almost everything I do.
  234. I really have a love and passion for football. I enjoy basketball, but it’s not something I love. You have to let things go that are not for you.
  235. I really have become very interested at working with and helping entrepreneurs at the early stages of their growth.
  236. I really have been enjoying performing more lately than I have in a long time and you know, it’s all about that sort of centered feeling that I have now. You know, thanks to, not just my kid, but her father before her. You know, I have a kind of a grounding through them that I really relish, and I think is also good for my work, you know.
  237. I really knew I wanted to be Adam, because Adam was the first man. Ant I chose because, if there’s a nuclear explosion, the ants will survive.
  238. I really learned to sing in church, I think, really with emotion.
  239. I really like action movies. The ‘Die Hard’ franchise. And the ‘Bourne’ movies.
  240. I really like coming-of-age dramas. It’s probably the most intense period in anyone’s life, those years before you become an adult. Dramatically, there’s so much to explore there. And it’s nice to be around young talent coming through.
  241. I really like feeling connected to people and feeling like I have a good, solid sense of empathy.
  242. I really like gross Chinese things.
  243. I really like having someone who knows about food and what goes well together make a meal for me.
  244. I really like involvement with an audience.
  245. I really like jazz and soul, but I also love so many other types of music, and I didn’t want to be afraid to blend and experiment.
  246. I really like listening to music in my car.
  247. I really like my legs because I’ve worked hard for them. With soccer, that’s the one thing you’re working all the time.
  248. I really like Rag & Bone because they make simple pieces that last.
  249. I really like to live my life in a low-key fashion.
  250. I really liked the Seattle movement.
  251. I really love animals and enjoy working with them.
  252. I really love being busy because I am – feel like I am at my best when I am busy.
  253. I really love muscle cars. I don’t think people might realize that about me. I really want to go to an auto auction and blow my life savings on a Camaro. They have such design around them, such panache.
  254. I really love New York, but I have to say, the humidity during the summer is a nightmare for a cartoonist. Not only am I sweating in my studio, my bristol board is curling up, the drafting tape is peeling off the board, my Rapidograph pens bleed the minute I put them to paper… it’s a disaster.
  255. I really love storytelling, and I love the stories as they reveal themselves. It’s an incredibly nourishing process; it’s probably the closest I come to having a religion.
  256. I really love the internet. They say chat-rooms are the trailer park of the internet but I find it amazing.
  257. I really love yoga.
  258. I really only play shooters, which is a nice way to restrict the amount of gameplay in the house.
  259. I really started to enjoy Instagram more recently because it’s something that shows people what I’m doing and what I’m going through, but it’s so simple. I don’t have to come up with something witty; it’s just a funny photo, and you can be as artistic or as plain Jane as you want.
  260. I really started writing music to challenge myself, to see what I could write.
  261. I really think that if there’s any one enemy to human creativity, especially creative writing, its self-consciousness. And if you have one eye on the mirror to see how you’re doing, you’re not doing it as well as you can. Don’t think about publishing, don’t think about editors, don’t think about marketplace.
  262. I really think that technology has the greatest potential to accelerate happiness of most things in the world. The companies that will ultimately do well are the companies that chase happiness. If you find a way to help people find love, or health or friendship, the dollar will chase that.
  263. I really think that you have to find a partner that compliments you and is somebody that pushes you and is better at some things than you are, so they can push you to improve yourself as a person. That’s my take.
  264. I really think that you have to find a partner that compliments you and is somebody that pushes you and is better at some things than you are, so they can push you to improve yourself as a person.
  265. I really thought I was on the way out. My husband Blake saved my life. Often I don’t know what I do, then the next day the memory returns. And then I am engulfed in shame.
  266. I really try, at least consciously, not to be cynical or ironic.
  267. I really try to make smart choices about my fashion and really live a life on the carpet that’s the same as the life I live normally.
  268. I really try to take a step back from the soccer world and going a thousand miles an hour every day. I like to do some sort of either meditation or mental visualization or breathing exercises – something to calm my mind down because a lot of times, it’s just going faster than it should.
  269. I really want a pet, and I really love animals.
  270. I really want to do the unexpected, and I think that’s what I did when I executed ‘Long.Live.A$AP.’ I wanted people to really see the message and that I’m an artist who not only has the capability of rapping, but of composing great music both for people of my generation and for people with different backgrounds.
  271. I really want to speak for young women, especially because I feel like we’re constantly brainwashed in everyday life.
  272. I really want to write a novel. I also want to learn to play the mandolin.
  273. I really wanted ‘NH10’ to be made, and being associated with it eased the entire process.
  274. I really wanted to make the worst thing: the thing that even people who liked bad, terrible music wouldn’t like – the stuff that people would ignore, always. Something really, really stupid. Something that is destined for failure.
  275. I really wanted to retire and rest and spend more time with my children, my grandchildren and of course with my wife.
  276. I recently went to a new doctor and noticed he was located in something called the Professional Building. I felt better right away.
  277. I recognise why I have such a strong inability to forgive certain people who betray me. It’s chiselled in, like a name on a tomb stone.
  278. I recognize the Republican party as the sheet anchor of the colored man’s political hopes and the ark of his safety.
  279. I recognized… very, very early on that ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and Fox News were dependent on The Associated Press and Reuters. So my daily intake of information is from watching the newswires.
  280. I recommend that people try new stuff or take new fitness classes all the time. It’s important to mix up your routine, not only for your body, but also for your mental state.
  281. I refuse to accept Pluto’s resignation as a planet.
  282. I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality… I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word.
  283. I refuse to allow any man-made differences to separate me from any other human beings.
  284. I refuse to take shortcuts.
  285. I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.
  286. I regret and suffer those losses, but it’s God’s will. He will pardon me if I committed excesses, but I don’t think I did.
  287. I reject any religious doctrine that does not appeal to reason and is in conflict with morality.
  288. I reject your reality and substitute my own.
  289. I rely on myself very much. I just think that you have an instinct and you go with it. Especially when it comes to deal-making and buying things.
  290. I remain convinced that obstinate addiction to ordinary language in our private thoughts is one of the main obstacles to progress in philosophy.
  291. I remain just one thing, and one thing only, and that is a clown. It places me on a far higher plane than any politician.
  292. I remember acting in a school play about the melting pot when I was very little. There was a great big pot onstage. On the other side of the pot was a little girl who had dark hair, and she and I were representing the Italians. And I thought: Is that what an Italian looked like?
  293. I remember as a boy when the conversation on civil rights was won in the South. I remember a time when one of my friends made a racist joke and another said, ‘Hey man, we don’t go for that anymore.’
  294. I remember being in Japan when Destiny’s Child put out ‘Independent Women,’ and women there were saying how proud they were to have their own jobs, their own independent thinking, their own goals. It made me feel so good, and I realized that one of my responsibilities was to inspire women in a deeper way.
  295. I remember coming to New York in 1974 to do a play here called ‘Equis.’ And I remember the first morning getting up and walking around the streets, and I thought, ‘I’m home.’ I felt really at peace here.
  296. I remember during my lifetime I would meet women, and it was almost like God would say to me, ‘Now, this woman here is not the one you are going to end up with, but she is going to be a lot like this woman; look at this woman, study this woman.’ And when my wife showed up, He was like, ‘You recognize her now?’
  297. I remember early on, in my very, very early days, I had a makeup artist tell me that I needed to get an attitude. I had no idea what he was talking about.
  298. I remember every goal I’ve scored!
  299. I remember going to university, and the people who’d left home for the first time looked at the food and were horrified. Whereas, my view was that if it was vaguely edible, then it’s fine.
  300. I remember going up and doing ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’ with Paul Simon, Santana playing up there with us.
  301. I remember growing up, having sports to go to, having recess, those were the things I looked forward to. Yes, I’m an athlete, but I had buddies who weren’t, and they looked forward to it, too.
  302. I remember hearing someone say that good acting is more about taking off a mask than putting one on, and in movie acting, certainly that’s true. With the camera so close, you can see right down into your soul, hopefully. So being able to do that in a way is terrifying, and in another way, truly liberating. And I like that about it.
  303. I remember how a man once got in touch with me to tell me that he was so engrossed in my book that he had to take a day off from work just so that he could finish reading it. Such kind of responses from my readers is extremely endearing, and it keeps me going.
  304. I remember how being young and black and gay and lonely felt. A lot of it was fine, feeling I had the truth and the light and the key, but a lot of it was purely hell.
  305. I remember I had a fight with my friend when I touched a boy for the first time and I didn’t tell her. She got mad with me, not because I didn’t tell her but because I’d done it in the first place.
  306. I remember I used to sleep on my records. In a room with no furniture. I remember I used to sleep in my car.
  307. I remember in ‘Law of Desire,’ where I played a homosexual, that people were more upset that I kissed a man on the mouth than I killed a man. It’s interesting to see how people can pardon you for murdering a man, but they can’t pardon you for kissing one.
  308. I remember, in my first show in New York, they asked, ‘Where is the Indian-ness in your work?’… Now, the same people, after having watched the body of my work, say, ‘There is too much Indian philosophy in your work.’ They’re looking for a superficial skin-level Indian-ness, which I’m not about.
  309. I remember kind of doing early acting and thinking, ‘God, they don’t paint behind the sets.’ It’s a bit of a shame, really – ‘Oh, what’s on the other side of this wall? Oh, you can see the plywood.’ I was really disappointed. I just thought that these things were real, from watching things as a kid.
  310. I remember leaving the first ‘Matrix’ movie feeling completely radicalized, completely changed. I think we all, from our ordinary lives, like to think about putting ourselves into these extraordinary situations and wonder how we’d respond.
  311. I remember leaving the hospital – thinking, ‘Wait, are they going to let me just walk off with him? I don’t know beans about babies! I don’t have a license to do this.’ We’re just amateurs.
  312. I remember making a ‘thank you’ video when one of my videos got to 50 views!
  313. I remember, May 1944: I was 15-and-a-half, and I was thrown into a haunted universe where the story of the human adventure seemed to swing irrevocably between horror and malediction.
  314. I remember my mother’s prayers and they have always followed me. They have clung to me all my life.
  315. I remember, once I was going through Nice airport with Roger Moore, and these kids came up and asked for our autographs. Afterwards, Roger said, ‘It must be very strange for you. I’m an actor, and signing autographs is part of what I do. But you’re a public figure who people don’t really know.’ He was right.
  316. I remember one of the first gigs I played with that amp was at a local church. They wanted someone to fill in with the guitar and my friend say, ‘Ah, he can play.’ And so I dragged the amplifier down and started playing and everybody started yelling ‘turn it down!’
  317. I remember one time I went to Craigslist to find something; that’s how bad I wanted it. It was a pair of Raf Simons – this was like 2010. But Raf said he was going to make them for me.
  318. I remember playing a high school basketball game where I didn’t eat anything for breakfast. I ate, you know, like a PB and J and some chips for lunch and nothing before the game. I didn’t make it through the first quarter. I wish I hadn’t have learned that way, but it did leave a lasting impression.
  319. I remember singing around the house to records that were playing. All kinds of music. And the great James Cleveland was often in our house, and I grew up with his sound as well.
  320. I remember tap-dancing and singing in front of the TV when I was a kid, telling my dad to stop watching Ed Sullivan or Milton Berle and watch me.
  321. I remember they used to tell me, they said, ‘Khaled, you can’t get a Rolls-Royce; you need to get one of them small ones.’ So I went and bought a Phantom.
  322. I remember thinking during those times that I wanted to write in a way where there are no rules.
  323. I remember thinking quite logically that I didn’t want to spoil my children with wealth and so that I would create a foundation, but not knowing exactly what it would focus on.
  324. I remember thinking when I was in college that a lot of these known Chomsky-like, verbose, high-lefty thinkers made absolutely no sense, but I thought that was my problem.
  325. I remember very little about writing the first series of ‘Hitchhiker’s.’ It’s almost as if someone else wrote it.
  326. I remember watching Margaret Cho with my grandmother on TV. She was my hero, not only because she was funny, but because she showed me that it’s okay to be yourself, that it’s okay to be a brash yellow girl and to be a strong and brave woman.
  327. I remember watching the Three Tenors at the World Cup in 1990, and it was amazing. They made opera accessible to the man in the street.
  328. I remember what I was like as a teenager, with an enormous amount of energy and hormones. You have to be able to release it, and dancing is really an innocent way.
  329. I remember when I was in high school I didn’t have a new dress for each special occasion. The girls would bring the fact to my attention, not always too delicately. The boys, however, never bothered with the subject. They were my friends, not because of the size of my wardrobe but because they liked me.
  330. I remember when I was starting out as a young actress, thinking, ‘Oh my God, I have the fattest face.’ Now I look at those pictures and I think, ‘So much collagen!’
  331. I remember when I was that girl crying because I was so excited to finally meet Lita. To have girls crying over me is surreal.
  332. I remember when Meryl Streep did an ad for American Express, the press harassed her.
  333. I repeat… that all power is a trust; that we are accountable for its exercise; that from the people and for the people all springs, and all must exist.
  334. I represent the kids who come from nothing but who understand it all and love it all. That’s what I represent – those are the cool kids, you know, the kids of tomorrow, because who would’ve known that I’d be who I am today? We are the kids of tomorrow.
  335. I research every part thoroughly. I talk it out with my actor friends, but then I throw it all away when I get to the set. You have to be spontaneous.
  336. I researched children’s rights, divorce law, and parental kidnapping. Millions of children and parents are touched by the inadequacy of the legal system to deal with the human heart.
  337. I resolved to stop accumulating and begin the infinitely more serious and difficult task of wise distribution.
  338. I respect Chris Brown. I’d like to call myself a friend – I don’t know if I’m allowed to do that.
  339. I respect Drake not only as a creative person but as a business mind as well. I think Drake’s important.
  340. I respect every religion.
  341. I respect myself and insist upon it from everybody. And because I do it, I then respect everybody, too.
  342. I respect people that find writing easy, because I have focus problems. I’ll spend five days eating cereal and YouTubing and two hours writing the article.
  343. I respect the fact that many denominations have different points of view with respect to gay marriage and they can hold that in the sanctity in the place of their religion and not bless them or solemnize them.
  344. I respect the state workers and I respect their unions, but we simply can’t afford to pay benefits and pensions that are out of line with economic reality.
  345. I respect very much my public and also the music I perform.
  346. I restore myself when I’m alone.
  347. I retain what’s interesting to me, but I don’t have a lot of strategic depth.
  348. I rewrote the ending to ‘Farewell to Arms,’ the last page of it, thirty-nine times before I was satisfied.
  349. I ride a recumbent bike for half an hour every day.
  350. I rode a shark once. I wouldn’t recommend it. It was fun, but I thought I was going to get eaten the entire time! Nothing against sharks. I love sharks. I just don’t think we are meant to ride them.
  351. I rolled the second car that I ever owned, a Toyota 4 Runner. This was winter in Colorado, two weeks before the 2002 Olympic trials. I was driving in the outside lane, and my rear tire caught some black ice, and we totally turned sideways to the point where we were heading right toward the median.
  352. I run a modest-sized laboratory that’s looking specifically at what we call ‘the pathogenic mechanisms of HIV disease, or AIDS.’
  353. I run from Horatio Street down just past Battery Park City and back. It’s amazing to run and see the Statue of Liberty and the ferries coming in. People think if you’re not near Central Park, there’s nowhere to go, but there’s a whole ecosystem happening down here.
  354. I run in London, in San Francisco – any city that’s got a waterfront or park.
  355. I run New York City!
  356. I sacrificed six years in L.A. I did my job out here. I made contacts and did the work I had to do.
  357. I said I was ‘The Greatest,’ I never said I was the smartest!
  358. I said, look, do you think you could bring Gerry through, and they said yeah, absolutely, they thought that. Joel was very keen to cast him. If all my music team were happy, I was happy.
  359. I said that America’s role would be limited; that we would not put ground troops into Libya; that we would focus our unique capabilities on the front end of the operation, and that we would transfer responsibility to our allies and partners.
  360. I said, yet again, for Germany, Europe is not only indispensable, it is part and parcel of our identity. We’ve always said German unity, European unity and integration, that’s two parts of one and the same coin. But we want, obviously, to boost our competitiveness.
  361. I sang a lot as a little girl and entered competitions. I loved singing in choirs, but it was as I got older that I really found my voice.
  362. I sang a song at my sister’s wedding. My mother forced me into that, too. But that one felt all right.
  363. I sang the National Anthem at Dodger Stadium – at a baseball game – which was crazy; there was, like, 60,000 people there, which is a huge deal in America – singing the National Anthem.
  364. I sat next to a young woman on a plane once who bombarded me for five hours with how she had decided to be born again and so should I. I told her I was glad for her, but I hadn’t used up being born the first time.
  365. I save every Christmas card. I keep them all.
  366. I save my dreams and hopes for my kids. When I’m making a wish under a bridge or tunnel, it’s always for them.
  367. I save the best of myself for novels, and I believe it shows.
  368. I saw a boy of the crew purchasing javelins of them with bits of platters and broken glass.
  369. I saw a lot of people have success handed to them that then exploited it. They didn’t protect it or cherish it.
  370. I saw a picture of myself when I came out of the hospital. I didn’t recognize myself.
  371. I saw a report yesterday. There’s so much oil, all over the world, they don’t know where to dump it. And Saudi Arabia says, ‘Oh, there’s too much oil.’ They – they came back yesterday. Did you see the report? They want to reduce oil production. Do you think they’re our friends? They’re not our friends.
  372. I saw a Shakespeare play when I was – I guess I was in junior high. And I just fell in love with the theater because, for me, it was a combination of big ideas and feeling.
  373. I saw a woman wearing a sweatshirt with Guess on it. I said, Thyroid problem?
  374. I saw ‘Birth’ at the Sundance Film Festival with a thousand other strangers, and I couldn’t believe that was me in the film. I didn’t recognize myself.
  375. I saw Cheap Trick play ‘In Color,’ and it was awesome.
  376. I saw Deep Purple live once and I paid money for it and I thought, ‘Geez, this is ridiculous.’ You just see through all that sort of stuff. I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin.
  377. I saw few die of hunger; of eating, a hundred thousand.
  378. I saw many aspects of the country which I needed to see in order that I might know what we need to do.
  379. I saw music as a way to entertain people and take them away from their daily lives and put smiles on their faces, as opposed to what I see it being now, which is a way for me to actually communicate, and a way for me to tap into my subconscious.
  380. I saw my mother in a different light. We all need to do that. You have to be displaced from what’s comfortable and routine, and then you get to see things with fresh eyes, with new eyes.
  381. I saw my parents come over. They were immigrants, they had no money. My dad wore the same pair of shoes, I had some ugly clothes growing up, and I never had any privileges. In some ways, I think the person that I am now, I think it’s good that I had that kind of tough upbringing.
  382. I saw some musicals at dinner theaters where I grew up. But I didn’t go to a big theater to see one until probably after I graduated from high school when I took myself to see ‘Tommy’ when it was on tour. I absolutely loved it.
  383. I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked.
  384. I saw the Count lying within the box upon the earth, some of which the rude falling from the cart had scattered over him. He was deathly pale, just like a waxen image, and the red eyes glared with the horrible vindictive look which I knew so well.
  385. I saw the pilot for ‘Girls’ about six months before it aired.
  386. I saw the Supremes when they were still singing in little black skirts and white blouses.
  387. I say always follow your passion, no matter what, because even if it’s not the same financial success, it’ll lead you to the money that’ll make you the happiest.
  388. I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.
  389. I say grace. I’m a big believer in grace. I happen to believe in a God that made all the food and so I’m pretty grateful for that and I thank him for that. But I’m also thankful for the people that put the food on the table.
  390. I say ‘I love you’ to my daughters every day.
  391. I say, ‘If somebody steals something of yours, then it’s good; he loves what you do.’
  392. I say it often, that I feel like I’m just living out the Story Mode in ‘Smackdown vs. RAW’ that I always used to play.
  393. I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its Churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world.
  394. I say something, and then it usually happens. Maybe not on schedule, but it usually happens.
  395. I say there is no darkness but ignorance.
  396. I say there’re no depressed words just depressed minds.
  397. I say things I get away with, and it becomes a joke.
  398. I say what I want to say and do what I want to do. There’s no in between. People will either love you for it or hate you for it.
  399. I say whatever I think and whatever is on my mind, and I just hope that it comes out good. I just try to have a lot of fun.
  400. I say, ‘Yeah, Taylor Swift.’ I think she is a smart, beautiful girl. I think she’s making all the right moves. She’s got a good head on her shoulders. She’s surrounded with wonderful people. Her songs are great. She keeps herself anchored. She knows who she is, and she’s living and standing by that.
  401. I say you must not win an unjust case by oaths.
  402. I scare the neighbors, the kids… They don’t come to my house for trick-or-treating, trust me. I had to buy exactly zero amount of dollars worth of candy for the past couple of years.
  403. I, schooled in misery, know many purifying rites, and I know where speech is proper and where silence.
  404. I search for items that have history, like vintage finds – I love fur kitten-heel house slippers from the 1950s – and pieces from fashion houses that have been around for a long time, like Chanel and Dior.
  405. I search for the realness, the real feeling of a subject, all the texture around it… I always want to see the third dimension of something… I want to come alive with the object.
  406. I see a future where American companies lead the world in the production of hybrid-plug in cars and electric vehicles.
  407. I see a future where getting to work or to school or to the store does not have to cause pollution.
  408. I see a future where states compete with one another to see which can be the most efficient, and where businesses seek out efficient states in which to locate so they can reap the economic and environmental benefits for their businesses and employees.
  409. I see a lot of connections between folk and punk music just because they’re both subcorporate music – I mean, traditionally.
  410. I see a lot of homes that are supercool, and everything is very tasteful, but it’s not warm. I’m really scared of rooms that look too serious.
  411. I see a lot of young kids hit me on Twitter all the time, like, ‘I want to be famous! Listen to my mixtape! I wish I could be like you!’ But a lot comes with it. It’s not easy.
  412. I see Americans of every party, every background, every faith who believe that we are stronger together: black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American; young, old; gay, straight; men, women, folks with disabilities, all pledging allegiance under the same proud flag to this big, bold country that we love. That’s what I see. That’s the America I know!
  413. I see children, all children, as humanity’s most precious resource, because it will be to them that the care of the planet will always be left.
  414. I see everybody arguing about what the value of music should be instead of what I think the bigger conversation is, which is that music has value, it’s subjective and we’re moving to a new era where the audience is taking more responsibility for supporting artists at whatever level.
  415. I see fighters make funny videos about me and stick them on Facebook and get 20 likes. When I make a video, I sell it to Fox and make seven figures. That’s the difference.
  416. I see Libya as a member of the Non-Aligned Movement and a sovereign State of the nearly 200 members of the United Nations.
  417. I see my body as an instrument, rather than an ornament.
  418. I see my upbringing as a great success story. By disciplining me, my parents inculcated self-discipline. And by restricting my choices as a child, they gave me so many choices in my life as an adult. Because of what they did then, I get to do the work I love now.
  419. I see myself as a traveller.
  420. I see myself as an intelligent, sensitive human, with the soul of a clown which forces me to blow it at the most important moments.
  421. I see myself as sexy. If you are comfortable with it, it can be very classy and appealing.
  422. I see myself in all the people in the world who are suffering and who are very badly treated and who are often made to feel that they have no place on this Earth.
  423. I see myself in the mold of Rin Tin Tin. It didn’t go to his head either.
  424. I see myself starring in and producing major feature films.
  425. I see no difference between Islam and Islamism. Islam is defined as submission to the will of Allah, as it is described in the Koran. Islamism is just Islam in its most pure form.
  426. I see no way out of the problems that organized religion and tribalism create other than humans just becoming more honest and fully aware of themselves.
  427. I see nothing that points to a recession in Germany. But I see considerable long-term tasks ahead of us that have to do with markets regaining confidence in Europe and that have a lot to do with reducing debt.
  428. I see Obama as Sisyphus in the first four years. And nobody would speak about the size of the rock, or the elevation of the hill. All you hear people talk about is what he didn’t do.
  429. I see only one requirement you have to have to be a director or any kind of artist: rhythm. Rhythm, for me, is everything. Without rhythm, there’s no music. Without rhythm, there’s no cinema. Without rhythm, there’s no architecture.
  430. I see religion as a storehouse of lots of really good ideas that a secular world should look at, raid, and learn from.
  431. I see sometimes how guys may make a buffoon of themselves to sell a few more tickets. They create this image, and when it’s all said and done, it’s like everything falls out from under them. They have no stability. I never wanted to be one of those guys.
  432. I see songs in colors; I see days of the week. Each day of the week I relate to a gender, and it’s very weird. I can taste words sometimes. It’s very strange.
  433. I see that a man cannot give himself up to drinking without being miserable one half his days and mad the other.
  434. I see that children fill the existential hollowness many people feel; that when we have children, we know they will need us, and maybe love us, but we don’t have a clue how hard it is going to be.
  435. I see that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man.
  436. I see the Beijing National Stadium as an architectural project. I accepted Herzog and De Meuron’s invitation to collaborate on the design, and our proposal won the competition. From beginning to end, I stayed with the project. I am committed to fostering relationships between a city and its architecture.
  437. I see the first ‘Bourne’ movie as really kind of a fulcrum in changing the modern action film, where things are really gritty and really character-driven. Think about how the entire Bond franchise was completely radicalized by Bourne.
  438. I see the merit in religion, and I see the need for faith and hope and sometimes people who are more snide look at people who are religious, particularly people in rock bands, and they’ll say, ‘Oh that’s dumb, you believe in whatever,’ but I think everybody believes in something.
  439. I see the war problem as an economic problem, a business problem, a cultural problem, an educational problem – everything but a military problem. There’s no military solution. There is a business solution – and the sooner we can provide jobs, not with our money, but the United States has to provide the framework.
  440. I see the whole concept of Generation X implies that everyone has lost hope.
  441. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness; I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too. I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more.
  442. I see upon their noble brows the seal of the Lord, for they were born kings of the earth far more truly than those who possess it only from having bought it.
  443. I see what happens when one gets very attached to material things. That’s just not what my life is.
  444. I see when men love women. They give them but a little of their lives. But women when they love give everything.
  445. I seek constantly to improve my manners and graces, for they are the sugar to which all are attracted.
  446. I seem to always start a collection by designing outerwear and jackets.
  447. I seem to be getting a lot of things pushed my way that are strong women. It’s like people see Hackers and they send me offers to play tough women with guns, the kind who wear no bra and a little tank top. I’d like to play strong women who are also very feminine.
  448. I seem to turn out stories that violate the discipline of the short story form and don’t obey the rules of progression for novels. I don’t think about a particular form: I think more about fiction, let’s say a chunk of fiction.
  449. I seldom end up where I wanted to go, but almost always end up where I need to be.
  450. I seldom think about my limitations, and they never make me sad. Perhaps there is just a touch of yearning at times; but it is vague, like a breeze among flowers.
  451. I sent American troops to Iraq to make its people free, not to make them American. Iraqis will write their own history and find their own way.
  452. I sent my flowers across the hall to Mrs Nixon but her husband remembered what a Democrat I am and sent them back.
  453. I seriously hate pop music and all things super-commercial.
  454. I set records that will never be equaled. In fact, I hope 90% of them don’t even get printed.
  455. I shake hands very gladly politically. I don’t think you could be a politician if you didn’t shake hands.
  456. I shall allow no man to belittle my soul by making me hate him.
  457. I shall argue that strong men, conversely, know when to compromise and that all principles can be compromised to serve a greater principle.
  458. I shall, in due time, be a Poet.
  459. I shall lend credit to nothing against my people which parents would not believe against their own children.
  460. I shall make that trip. I shall go to Korea.
  461. I shall never believe that God plays dice with the world.
  462. I shall not grow conservative with age.
  463. I shall the effect of this good lesson keeps as watchman to my heart.
  464. I share a very good rapport with Shah Rukh, so I was at ease working with him, and Imtiaz is a dream director for any actor.
  465. I shook up the world, I shook up the world.
  466. I shoot a little bit, maybe two rolls, medium format, which is 20 pictures, and if it’s not working, I change the position.
  467. I shop at the market, and that informs what I make.
  468. I should be a postage stamp, because that’s the only way I’ll ever get licked. I’m beautiful. I’m fast. I’m so mean I make medicine sick. I can’t possibly be beat.
  469. I should have no objection to go over the same life from its beginning to the end: requesting only the advantage authors have, of correcting in a second edition the faults of the first.
  470. I should like to be able to love my country and still love justice.
  471. I should like to know if, taking this old Declaration of Independence, which declares that all men are equal upon principle, you begin making exceptions to it, where will you stop? If one man says it does not mean a Negro, why not another say it does not mean some other man?
  472. I should only look back at moments that were disparaging, look down upon, negative for me – moments where I could learn something. And if I have been able to use that learning in future, then I am happy about it.
  473. I should prefer to have a politician who regularly went to a massage parlour than one who promised a laptop computer for every teacher.
  474. I should tie myself to no particular system of society other than of socialism.
  475. I shouldn’t be near Vegas and have money in my pocket.
  476. I shouldn’t feel awkward or feel disconnected to myself or my body while wearing the clothes or a particular fashion. This is very important.
  477. I shouldn’t make fun of the blacks: President Obama is a personal friend of mine. He was over to the house yesterday, but the mop broke.
  478. I showed people Republicans in Florida can do more than talk.
  479. I sign a film based on the story, the role I play, and the maker.
  480. I signed a very modest $3,000 bonus with the Braves in Milwaukee. And my old man didn’t have that kinda money to put out.
  481. I signed ‘Aurangzeb’ because I loved the story. I thought it was an untold tale. For whatever reason, the audience did not like the film. Fair enough, but I still enjoyed the process.
  482. I simply can’t build my hopes on a foundation of confusion, misery and death… I think… peace and tranquillity will return again.
  483. I simply do the things that inspire me, be that snowboarding, designing clothing, or dancing.
  484. I sincerely believe… that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies.
  485. I sing around the house, in the shower.
  486. I sing everywhere. I have a very patient husband. He says he doesn’t mind. But we’ve only been married a year and a half!
  487. I sing in five or six different voices that are all part of me. It’s not contrived.
  488. I sing seriously to my mom on the phone. To put her to sleep, I have to sing ‘Maria’ from West Side Story. When I hear her snoring, I hang up.
  489. I sing to the realists; people who accept it like it is.
  490. I sleep people. I put people unconscious. I’m stating facts.
  491. I slept with faith and found a corpse in my arms on awakening; I drank and danced all night with doubt and found her a virgin in the morning.
  492. I sold a bunch of stuff. I sold Omaha Steaks, vacation packages… the worst, though, was Time Life Books, because no one wants Time Life Books. No one wants an ‘Encyclopedia Brittanica’ showing up at their house.
  493. I sold door to door for a couple years. As the years recede from the event, I remember less about it, which is probably good for my mind. It was home improvement in Cerritos California, Buena Park, that area.
  494. I sold steaks over the phone in Omaha, Nebraska. Marbling, fantastic. That’s what makes a great steak; a lot of people don’t know.
  495. I sometimes ask people, ‘Can you be aware of your own presence? Not the thoughts that you’re having, not the emotions that you’re having, but the very presence of your very being?’ You become aware of your own presence by sensing the entire energy field in your body that is alive. And that is the totality of your presence.
  496. I sometimes detect that a type of regional divide is setting in, and there is a lack of real Caribbean connection among the islands, and I am concerned about this.
  497. I sometimes feel that I have been born to attract controversy.
  498. I sometimes find the surface interesting. To say that the mark of a good portrait is whether you get them or get the soul – I don’t think this is possible all of the time.
  499. I sometimes lament the fact that I do not have the benefit of a complete and ailment free body structure.
  500. I sometimes think that God in creating man somewhat overestimated his ability.
  501. I sometimes wish I were suffering in a good cause, or risking my life for the good of others, instead of just being a gravely endangered patient.
  502. I sometimes wish that people would put a little more emphasis upon the observance of the law than they do upon its enforcement.
  503. I sometimes wonder whether all pleasures are not substitutes for joy.
  504. I soon realised that what had happened on a small scale cannot necessarily be repeated on a larger scale. The stones were so big that the amount of heat required was prohibitively expensive and wasteful.
  505. I soothe my conscience now with the thought that it is better for hard words to be on paper than that Mummy should carry them in her heart.
  506. I sort of feel like people are not that honest about their own parenting. Take any teenage household; tell me there is not yelling and conflict.
  507. I, sort of, got into comedy accidentally, and it got bigger than I wanted it to.
  508. I sort of mind living in a time when most of the literature is terribly personal. I suppose it’s because I grew up on a love of history, philosophy, science and religion, but not to think too much about yourself.
  509. I spar in the gym, and I take pride in my sparring. But I’m a better fighter when the lights come on because it’s right now – there is no tomorrow.
  510. I spar with Nick and Nate Diaz… those boys know what they’re doing; they can throw their hands.
  511. I speak a number of languages, but none are more beautiful to me than English.
  512. I speak directly to the people, and I know that the people of California want to have better leadership. They want to have great leadership. They want to have somebody that will represent them. And it doesn’t matter if you’re a Democrat or a Republican, young or old.
  513. I speak English, so I am no longer cute. My tongue itches for French.
  514. I speak to God every day.
  515. I speak to the black experience, but I am always talking about the human condition.
  516. I specialize in murders of quiet, domestic interest.
  517. I spend a great deal of time with the President. We have a very close, personal, loyal relationship. I’m not, as they say, a potted plant in these meetings.
  518. I spend a lot of my spare time with my family. My sisters, parents, and in-laws all live nearby.
  519. I spend a lot of time reading.
  520. I spend a lot of time working by myself developing songs, but I really need some other counterpart to help me pull it all together, because you go nuts working if I had to finish an entire project all within my own head.
  521. I spend about a year between novels.
  522. I spend around three hours on the track and two hours in the weight room, five or six days a week.
  523. I spend around two and half hours on the track every day running and another 2 hours in the weight room lifting weights with my strength coach.
  524. I spend most of my days pacing around, muttering that I have no ideas, feeling like I’m walking a plank.
  525. I spend most of my money in Prada or plane tickets.
  526. I spend my life writing fiction, so reading fiction isn’t much of an escape. That’s not always true, but I don’t read much contemporary fiction.
  527. I spend my time backstage at the Lanvin shows, and when I come out at the end, all I see are people’s eyes.
  528. I spent 22 years in the United States military, so I’m a pretty strategic level thinker.
  529. I spent a college semester in a small town in Italy – and that is where I truly tasted food for the first time.
  530. I spent a lot of time on my own working out the physical vocabulary for how Gollum moved. As I say, I drew on a lot of Tolkein’s descriptions of how he moves, but also the conceptual artist sketches.
  531. I spent a lot of years trying to outrun or outsmart vulnerability by making things certain and definite, black and white, good and bad. My inability to lean into the discomfort of vulnerability limited the fullness of those important experiences that are wrought with uncertainty: Love, belonging, trust, joy, and creativity to name a few.
  532. I spent a whole 12 years helping other people tell their stories as a publicist, so just to be able to go and write and get behind the camera, that’s my thing.
  533. I spent a year in a 12-step program, really committed, because I could not believe what had happened – that I might have killed myself.
  534. I spent my junior year in Switzerland. On the way back home, I spent some time in England, and I remember going to Hyde Park Corner. And there was a Roman Catholic priest in his collar, standing on a soapbox, preaching the Catholic faith and being heckled by a group. And I thought, ‘My goodness.’ I thought that was admirable.
  535. I spent my whole life helping my mother carry around her psychic trunks like a bitter bellhop. So a great load was lifted when she died, and my life was much easier.
  536. I spent three of the best years of my life in 10th grade.
  537. I spent two and a half years in the Philippines in World War II.
  538. I spent two years in the military service, then I trudged around in repertory for quite a while. I somehow wound up at the National Theatre, though, and then I was definitely on my way.
  539. I spoke to a million in one service, in Korea, in Seoul. And that was the largest audience I ever have had.
  540. ‘I Spy’ represents the absence of the tension of the black man or black woman or anyone of that color walking in, so that the white racist person can become entertaining to a viewer.
  541. I stand by all the misstatements that I’ve made.
  542. I stand here before you not as a prophet, but as a humble servant of you, the people.
  543. I start drawing, and eventually the characters involve themselves in a situation. Then in the end, I go back and try to cut out most of the preachments.
  544. I start each book when it’s ready and never before.
  545. I start warming up before training an hour before at the hotel. That’s not because I feel old and my body needs it. It’s because it’s prehab. It’s preventing those injuries.
  546. I started a second novel seven times and I had to throw them away.
  547. I started, actually, in journalism when I was – well. I started at the ‘New York Times’ when I was 18 years old, actually, but really got into journalism when I was 15 years old and had started a sports magazine which was trying to become a national sports magazine.
  548. I started, actually, to make my first animated cartoon in 1920. Of course, they were very crude things then and I used sort of little puppet things.
  549. I started as a lyrical singer. But it was through the pop universe that I reached international fame.
  550. I started auditioning when I was about 10 and I didn’t get my first job until I was 12, and two years at that age is really hard.
  551. I started by producing, and the rapping came second to that, because I wanted to fill out the beat.
  552. I started developing ‘The Revenant’ before ‘Birdman.’
  553. I started flying because I had a fear of it early on. I figured if I learned to fly, I would understand better what was happening and started taking lessons in the late 1950’s, once I had made some money on tour.
  554. I started getting really interested in comedy when I was in middle school.
  555. I started in action, and then I went to comedy school.
  556. I started LearnVest with a tiny savings account where I paid designers, technologists, and even bartered… Because I started with paying for things myself with my own savings, it sharpened my focus of how to spend money.
  557. I started listening to gospel when I was a little boy and my grandmother used to rock me on her lap.
  558. I started my career so early and developed in print for better or for worse, so I think there’s a sense some of my earliest readers are kind of copilots on this voyage with me.
  559. I started my second company in 1999. BodyMedia was set up to take advantage of the future of wearables – sensors and computing worn on our bodies in any and all ways that could make our lives better.
  560. I started my teenage years singing in churches across America, and finally wound up on a big stage.
  561. I started off playing sports when I was five years old. I played three or four sports all throughout the year.
  562. I started off writing TV adverts. I saw those as rehearsals for a feature film.
  563. I started on television. I had five years of network television before I ever got up on a stage. The first thing I ever did was in 1967. This guy Bill Keene had a little talk show at noon, and Gary Owens took over for a week. He knew about this dummy bit I used to do, this ventriloquist thing, and I was on ‘Keene at Noon.’
  564. I started out as a poet. I’ve always been a poet since I was 7 or 8. And so I feel myself to be fundamentally a poet who got into writing novels.
  565. I started out as an actor, where you seek to understand yourself using the words of great writers and collaborating with other creative people. Then I slid into show business, where you seek only an audience’s approval whether you deserve it or not.
  566. I started out being a stand up and writing my own material. That took me to ‘Talk Soup,’ where I was writing and performing for TV.
  567. I started out doing my mother’s nightclub act, and I had stage fright.
  568. I started out really into musical theater. So you can imagine I was super popular. I wasn’t awkward looking at all.
  569. I started out when I was 29 – too young to write novels. I was broke. I was on unemployment insurance. I was supposed to be writing a Ph.D. dissertation, so I had a typewriter and a lot of paper.
  570. I started playing piano when I was 6. And I knew that wanted to be involved in that form of expression, whether it was through music, or acting, or dancing, or painting, or writing.
  571. I started publishing my comic while I was still living with my parents.
  572. I started rejecting the proper way to sing and I started singing.
  573. I started running outside when I was at ‘Biggest Loser.’ Then I got runner’s knee, and thought I was never going to be able to shake it. When I overcame that and ran the L.A. Marathon, it was such an amazing thing, and now running is such a part of my routine.
  574. I started singing by default, I think. Because there was a guy in the group that thought the group wasn’t going to ever be anything. And I was getting ready to record, and I’d never recorded my voice. It was always other people that I featured because I thought they did a much better job.
  575. I started singing in church and I was probably around seven and I started singing anywhere that I could. I used to sing at my school. I was in musicals and then it kind of got to a point where I started to – wanted to do my own songs.
  576. I started to call myself a rational therapist in 1955; later I used the term rational emotive. Now I call myself a rational emotive behavior therapist.
  577. I started to itch to do a play again and ‘Macbeth’ came to the surface in my mind. I never thought I would do it in a conventional way. A sweaty Macbeth with blood on his arms coming in fresh from the battle doesn’t interest me.
  578. I started to make a study of the art of war and revolution and, whilst abroad, underwent a course in military training. If there was to be guerrilla warfare, I wanted to be able to stand and fight with my people and to share the hazards of war with them.
  579. I started to realize I wasn’t like every other boy.
  580. I started walking at night with my sister in law which has been amazing. It really does something for you. It just kind of clears the mind, it just makes you feel better, things start to tighten a little bit.
  581. I started with me as Awkwafina reciting ‘Othello’ monologues, and I’d send those to my friends. It started like that, and then it went into more music-y stuff.
  582. I started with Tamil film, then Hindi. Now, I am also doing a Telugu film. The journey has been wonderful so far.
  583. I started working at Bravo in 2005, when I was offered a job by Lauren Zalaznick, the network’s chairman. She encouraged me to start a blog. I wrote behind-the-scenes gossip about ‘Battle of the Network Reality Stars,’ the first show I took on as head of current programming.
  584. I started writing as a child. But I didn’t think of myself actually writing until I was in college. And I had gone to Africa as a sophomore or something – no, maybe junior – and wrote a book of poems. And that was my beginning. I published that book.
  585. I started writing in my 20s. I just wanted to write, but I didn’t have anything to write about, so in the beginning, I wrote entertainments – mainly murder mysteries.
  586. I stated that I’m a libertarian Republican, which means I believe in a series of issues, such as smaller government, constraint on budget deficits, free markets, globalization, and a whole series of other things, including welfare reform.
  587. I stay away from straight bench; all the work I do is with dumbbells to protect my rotator cuffs. Then I’ll do a bunch of different pull moves like inverted rows before finishing with some simple internal or external rotations with a band to strengthen my shoulder.
  588. I stay out of politics because if I begin thinking too much about politics, I’ll probably… drop writing children’s books and become a political cartoonist again.
  589. I stay true to myself and my style, and I am always pushing myself to be aware of that and be original.
  590. I stayed focused, and I never surrendered, and now I’ve been blessed. now I take care of my mother, my father, and my entire whole family.
  591. I stayed in Baghdad every summer until I was 14. My dad’s sister is still there, but many of my relatives have managed to get out. People forget that there are still people there who are not radicalized in any particular direction, trying to live normal lives in a very difficult situation.
  592. I stayed in New York City for the first time, I’d always wanted to do that.
  593. I stick with what I know, makeup-wise.
  594. I still can’t believe I’m the girl who got to play Fantine.
  595. I still close my eyes and go home – I can always draw from that.
  596. I still derive immense pleasure from remembering how many hod-carrying brickies were encouraged to put on lurex tights and mince up and down the high street, having been assured by know-it-alls like me that a smidgen of blusher really attracted the birds.
  597. I still don’t think the world has seen the best Andre Ward. Initially, I just wanted to get in there and win.
  598. I still enjoy watching a batter successfully cross home plate, but nothing thrills me more than seeing the Holy Spirit at work in hearts as the Gospel is carried into stadiums, across the airwaves, and around the world.
  599. I still fall back a lot on my Les Paul, and there is just no getting away from a Les Paul and a hot pickup.
  600. I still feel I am that 14-year-old kid, hungry and trying to find a way through life. That’s what I’m trying to develop, trying to be good at something through boxing. But I feel like that young kid who’s trying and trying.
  601. I still feel like I’m learning a lot and have a lot to learn and improve on.
  602. I still feel like I’ve got a lot of great football in front of me and the way that I’ve taken care of myself better the last few years. I think is going to put me in position to be able to play really well late in my 30s and even in my early 40s, possibly, if they’d like to keep me around that long and I can still play a little bit.
  603. I still feel that in India we look upon sports as a recreational activity – which it is – but people have to understand that there is a career in sports. It’s not just necessary to be a doctor or a lawyer or an engineer, as most of us Indians appear to think that our children should grow up to be.
  604. I still get very scared when I step in front of a live audience.
  605. I still had a normal childhood with my friends from school.
  606. I still have dreams in which someone is coming to the door.
  607. I still have drive, but everything is relative.
  608. I still have energy and some degree of youth, which is what a filmmaker needs.
  609. I still have friends from primary school. And my two best girlfriends are from secondary school. I don’t have to explain anything to them. I don’t have to apologize for anything. They know. There’s no judgment in any way.
  610. I still have my first paycheck. It was just, I think, a dollar or two that I got when I started as a songwriter with BMI, and I had some songs there that I had through the company, and in the mail I got this big old check for, like, a dollar and a half or something. Somebody had recorded one of my songs.
  611. I still have perfect diction!
  612. I still have the shirt I wore my first time on Johnny Carson’s show. Only now I use it as a tablecloth at dinner parties. It was very blousy.
  613. I still haven’t found the humor in getting hit by a cement truck. My knees still hurt when I think about it, so no jokes about that yet.
  614. I still indulge in a glass of wine or chocolate – treats are mandatory. Without deviating from the day-to-day healthy diet once in a while, it wouldn’t be sustainable for me, and that’s what I wanted: an approach to eating to last my entire life.
  615. I still kind of believe this absurd line that if you have to write it down, it’s not worth remembering.
  616. I still like George W. Bush. A lot.
  617. I still live, I still think: I still have to live, for I still have to think.
  618. I still love finding the soul of the characters I play and defining who they are. This to me is my paint set, and the colors are always exciting to choose.
  619. I still make sure to go, at least once every year, to a country where things cannot be taken for granted, and where there is either too much law and order or too little.
  620. I still meet old-school scientists who are like, ‘Oh honey, women aren’t good at science.’ You kind of dismiss them as insane.
  621. I still need the camera because it is the only reason anyone is talking to me.
  622. I still play that guitar. It’s a Martin D-18 with a clear pick guard. I’ve played that guitar on and off my TV shows for nearly 50 years.
  623. I still remember the five points of salesmanship: attention, interest, conviction, desire and close.
  624. I still think I’m like the poor girl from Colorado who worked three jobs to buy a car. That’s still my mentality, so I’ll be walking down the street, and I forget what I do and who I am.
  625. I still think like a Marxist in many ways.
  626. I still very much appreciate the storytelling of the best rappers.
  627. I still wake up every day and take my kids to school. It’s supposed to be this way.
  628. I still work out on a daily basis.
  629. I stole a little snow globe from the set of the first ‘Pitch Perfect’ that I don’t think ever made it on-screen, so it’s not like fans would be tickled by that information, but I still have it.
  630. I stole a piece of the chess set on the first film. I took a piece of the treasure out of Bellatrix’s vault on this film. And I’ve taken my wand and I’ve got my cloak.
  631. I stole comic books from my brother when I was a kid, but I was never like an avid fan. I can’t claim to be like a comic book geek.
  632. I stopped doing drugs when I was 20. I was finished with drugs before Nirvana even started.
  633. I stopped loving my father a long time ago. What remained was the slavery to a pattern.
  634. I stopped smoking. But my personality I still have. I get up in the morning, and not everybody loves me, so if you want to call that a bad habit, there’s that.
  635. I stopped smoking. When I stopped smoking, my voice changed… so drastically, I couldn’t believe it myself.
  636. I stopped watching TV because of ‘The Wire.’ Like, ‘The Wire’ ruined everything for me because I don’t even want to watch anything else now.
  637. I strive for perfection, but I’m not perfect. But what I can say is my morals are totally different than any other 24-year-old rapper my age now. I look at life totally different. A whole other aspect. I have different views and morals on life in general. And opinions.
  638. I strongly believe that those of us who are privileged to have wealth should contribute significantly to try and create a better world for the millions who are far less privileged.
  639. I struggled academically in high school because it was hard to focus. It was hard to focus on those things that were other than artistic stuff.
  640. I struggled for a while, but when I was cast in an Off Broadway show called ‘Once Upon a Mattress,’ that kind of put me on the map.
  641. I studied acting at Carnegie Tech in Pittsburgh because I figured a good comedian certainly could act.
  642. I studied for three years in the theater, and it was a very, very scary experience to direct live, being so vulnerable without the possibility to control things, to be so exposed.
  643. I studied graphic design originally. I used to like drawing, and I was quite into technical drawing. I was always interested in the visual medium, but I thought I was going to be an architect or something like that, but it’s quite a lonely job.
  644. I studied Japanese language and culture in college and graduate school, and afterward went to work in Tokyo, where I met a young man whose father was a famous businessman and whose mother was a geisha. He and I never discussed his parentage, which was an open secret, but it fascinated me.
  645. I studied Morse code.
  646. I studied my craft at the same place as Nicki Minaj.
  647. I studied physics 12 in summer school after I completed grade 12. Did I enjoy it initially? No, I had found physics difficult since grade 11, and I struggled a lot. Did I learn from it? Yes, and as I improved, I started enjoying it more.
  648. I studied to be a lawyer, and after that I did something, obviously, completely different. With change, you learn something. If you do the same thing over and over again, you never learn anything.
  649. I style my hair so frequently that I need a really good conditioner to keep it moisturized.
  650. I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and who willingly accepts the penalty of imprisonment in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the highest respect for law.
  651. I suffer from anxiety attacks a lot.
  652. I suffer much less than many of my colleagues. I am perfectly able to go to Australia and film within three hours of arrival.
  653. I suggest that ten thousand Negroes march on Washington, D.C., the capital of the Nation, with the slogan, ‘We loyal Negro American citizens demand the right to work and fight for our country.’
  654. I support health care for people. I want people well taken care of. But I also want health care that we can afford as a country. I have people and friends closing down their businesses because of Obamacare.
  655. I support transitioning from the progressive tax to a flat tax system – both individual and corporate/business.
  656. I supported myself by delivering the ‘Wall Street Journal’ and doing odd jobs. I love plumbing and carpentry.
  657. I suppose all fictional characters, especially in adventure or heroic fiction, at the end of the day are our dreams about ourselves. And sometimes they can be really revealing.
  658. I suppose being a bit of an antisocial weirdo definitely honed my skills as a soloist. It gave me a lot more opportunities to solo lots of easy routes, which in turn broadened my comfort zone quite a bit and has allowed me to climb the harder things without a rope that I’ve done now.
  659. I suppose for me as an artist it wasn’t always just about expressing my work; I really wanted, more than anything else, to contribute in some way to the culture that I was living in. It just seemed like a challenge to move it a little bit towards the way I thought it might be interesting to go.
  660. I suppose I had my rock star fantasies while I was singing into my hairbrush in the bathroom mirror, but I never really consciously said, ‘OK, this is what I’m going to do for a living and I’m going to be Weird Al.’
  661. I suppose I have a really loose interpretation of ‘work’, because I think that just being alive is so much work at something you don’t always want to do. The machinery is always going. Even when you sleep.
  662. I suppose if I’d got a brilliant first and done research I might still be a don today, but I hope not. People become dons because they are incapable of doing anything else in life.
  663. I suppose if you’ve never bitten your nails, there isn’t any way to explain the habit. It’s not enjoyable, really, but there is a certain satisfaction – pride in a job well done.
  664. I suppose I’m happy to sell my time and energy, but I’m not happy to sell my initial creative time.
  665. I suppose, in a way, this has become part of my soul. It is a symbol of my life. Whatever I have done that really matters, I’ve done wearing it. When the time comes, it will be in this that I journey forth. What greater honor could come to an American, and a soldier?
  666. I suppose leadership at one time meant muscles; but today it means getting along with people.
  667. I suppose society is wonderfully delightful. To be in it is merely a bore. But to be out of it is simply a tragedy.
  668. I suppose that every one of us hopes secretly for immortality; to leave, I mean, a name behind him which will live forever in this world, whatever he may be doing, himself, in the next.
  669. I suppose that I am ambitious.
  670. I suppose that’s one of the ironies of life doing the wrong thing at the right moment.
  671. I suppose the common idea of me is that I’m going to be someone who’s hyper and cracking jokes all the time, but people who meet me are soon disabused of that notion.
  672. I suppose there are actors who are worried about their public image. But I’ve never had any trouble playing unpleasant characters. It is only a part. Which is why you do it -because you are interested in exploring something you never could or would be.
  673. I suppose when I was writing ‘V for Vendetta’ I would in my secret heart of hearts have thought: ‘Wouldn’t it be great if these ideas actually made an impact?’ So when you start to see that idle fantasy intrude on the regular world… It’s peculiar.
  674. I suppose with any good writing and interesting characters, you can have that awfully overused word: a journey.
  675. I sure lost my musical direction in Hollywood. My songs were the same conveyer belt mass production, just like most of my movies were.
  676. I surrendered to a world of my imagination, reenacting all those wonderful tales my father would read aloud to me. I became a very active reader, especially history and Shakespeare.
  677. I surround myself with a talented group of people that are opinionated and interesting. I try to remain very open to what others have to say.
  678. I surround myself with people who make me laugh.
  679. I survived because I was tougher than anybody else.
  680. I suspect that here theists and atheists would agree: Human beings have within them the ability to choose evil or good. We wake up each day facing the age-old struggle of good and evil. In some situations, mental illness clouds our judgment.
  681. I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.
  682. I swear I want to be a food model.
  683. I swear my car won’t run unless I’m picking my nose: At least, I’m that superstitious about it, so I don’t want to take any chances.
  684. I take a very practical view of raising children. I put a sign in each of their rooms: ‘Checkout Time is 18 years.’
  685. I take anything other than ‘you big pig!’ as a compliment.
  686. I take cabs if I need to get somewhere or I take car service. I don’t drive, I wouldn’t mind riding a bike… People think that because you become an entertainer you gotta have this rock star thug image. I’m an artist, man. I’m going to live like an artist.
  687. I take full responsibility for the mistakes that led to my suspension for the 2014 season.
  688. I take inspiration from everyone and everything. I’m inspired by current champions, former champions, true competitors, people dedicated to their dream, hard workers, dreamers, believers, achievers.
  689. I take issue with those who criticize ‘The Biggest Loser’ for pushing contestants too hard. The whole point is to push them hard. Otherwise, there’s no change.
  690. I take my kids to school. And if I go to work, I go to work, and they visit me on set. I come home. I have dinner with my family. I have breakfast with my family. I have a very solid, very warm home.
  691. I take no pleasure in the fact that the scientific predictions I’ve relayed to popular audiences turn out to be true.
  692. I take pride in saying that I am an army officer’s daughter even more than being an actor.
  693. I take Sudafed to combat my congestion, so I always carry some with me because I like to be prepared and make sure I’m ready whenever symptoms strike. It’s also a really good idea to figure out what your triggers are.
  694. I take the walk to be the externalization of an interior seeking so that the analogy is first of all between the external and the internal.
  695. I talk about a Christianity that is enlightened enough to separate spirituality from the rest of life. Not just church and state, but knowledge and church.
  696. I talk like I know what I’m saying, but I don’t.
  697. I talk to amateurs, up-and-coming guys, fighters older than me, and we compare notes to teach each other how to leave this game on top from a legacy and financial standpoint.
  698. I talk, watch TV, spout opinions, schmooze, negotiate, talk some more, play games, and have a little cocktail.
  699. I talk with my hands. Some people don’t like that. That’s who I am.
  700. I taught high school for one year in Deerfield Beach, Fla., and in the end, it was such an enjoyable experience breaking up fights daily, that I decided to return to the combat zone of Afghanistan.
  701. I taught myself how to play the guitar, I taught myself how to play the drums, and I kind of fake doing both of them. But drumming comes more natural to me, and it just feels better.
  702. I taught myself to play the guitar by listening to Paul Simon records, working it out note by note. He is an incredibly intelligent musician. He’s not someone who has a natural outpouring of melody like McCartney or Dylan, who are just terribly prolific with musical ideas.
  703. I teach at Caltech and oversee a research laboratory there. In general, I find that the majority of young people are excited by the prospects of research, but they soon discover that in the current market, many doctorate-level scientists are holding temporary positions or are unemployed.
  704. I teach people that no matter what the situation is, no matter how chaotic, no matter how much drama is around you, you can heal by your presence if you just stay within your center.
  705. I tell jokes, chat with people, and make stuff.
  706. I tell my children what I think myself: That religion is not necessarily convincing, but it is still interesting and not to be laughed at or denigrated.
  707. I tell my students, if you ever become comfortable with your role as criminal defense lawyer, it’s time to quit. It should be a constant source of discomfort, because you’re dealing with incredible moral ambiguity, and you’ve been cast into a role which is not enviable.
  708. I tell myself every day I love my Jacuzzi, I love my marble floors, I love my high ceilings.
  709. I tell myself that after four children my belly is already so stretched and flabby that I have to do origami to get my pants buttoned. One more pregnancy and I’d be doomed to elastic waists for the rest of my life.
  710. I tell myself that if I start to listen to these people and start to let them decide how I should behave and what I should do, then this is not my life – it’s theirs.
  711. I tell people a lot of times, if you want to be a part of something, you never know, you kind of just have to be around. A lot of people don’t really have the patience for it, and they don’t stick around. Dre and I are still working together, and we have plenty of music for the future.
  712. I tell people all the time – I’m a very spiritual person, so I pray over everything that I do including creating music, a new song.
  713. I tell stories. Because I believe you can do things that joke tellers can’t do, and that is, bring your audience along.
  714. I tell the players that the bus is moving. This club has to progress. And the bus wouldn’t wait for them. I tell them to get on board.
  715. I tell the stories that are of interest to me.
  716. I tell you, it is easier to build a grand opera or a city center than to build a personal house.
  717. I tell you the groans of the damned in hell are the deep bass of the universal anthem of praise that shall ascend to the throne of my God for ever and ever.
  718. I tend not to argue about things that I don’t believe in.
  719. I tend to approach giving interviews with the same sense of circumspection and restraint as I approach my writing. That is to say, virtually none. When asked what I made of blogs like my own, blogs written by parents about their children, I said, ‘A blog like this is narcissism in its most obscene flowering.’
  720. I tend to approach things from a physics framework. And physics teaches you to reason from first principles rather than by analogy.
  721. I tend to be really pragmatic, but ultimately tend to be attracted to people who pull me into more spontaneity. I’ve really learned that, through surrender, the best experiences of my life have happened.
  722. I tend to believe that audiences are relatively well-balanced people.
  723. I tend to believe that religious dogma is a consequence of evolution.
  724. I tend to build bulk and muscle easily, and running seems to make sure I stay kind of stringy, if that makes sense.
  725. I tend to get bored quickly, which means I must be boring.
  726. I tend to have a lot of jokes about ex-girlfriends. They always ask me if they will be the subject of a joke, and I always tell them they won’t. Unless they do something crazy. They all tend to, so you know where that goes. There are no closed doors. The ‘art’ will suffer.
  727. I tend to like the most basic pieces with the perfect fit and fabric, like a simple tank.
  728. I tend to relate more to people on television who are just themselves, for good or for bad, than I do to someone who I believe is putting on some sort of persona. The anchorman on ‘The Simpsons’ is a reasonable facsimile of some anchors who have that problem.
  729. I tend to splurge on fancy dresses because I always think I’ll get a lot of wear out of them, but it’s false logic. You should really spend more money on the things you wear every day, like jeans.
  730. I text a lot people, because it’s how I stay connected with all my family and friends when I’m on set and traveling.
  731. I thank fate for having made me born poor. Poverty taught me the true value of the gifts useful to life.
  732. I thank God for my failures. Maybe not at the time but after some reflection. I never feel like a failure just because something I tried has failed.
  733. I thank God I’m myself and for the life I’m given to live and for friends and lovers and beloveds, and I thank God for knowing that all those people have already paid for me.
  734. I thank you God for this most amazing day, for the leaping greenly spirits of trees, and for the blue dream of sky and for everything which is natural, which is infinite, which is yes.
  735. I the heir of all the ages, in the foremost files of time.
  736. I think 9/11 affected everybody in one way or another.
  737. I think a badly crafted, great idea for a new film with a ton of spelling mistakes is just 100 times better than a well-crafted stale script.
  738. I think a beautiful quality that’s a biological, hormonal imperative for women, whether they have children or not, is that we’re built to be empathic. For me, it was finally being maternal in an appropriate way instead of trying to mommy ex-boyfriends.
  739. I think a certain amount of stress in life is good. The stress of just working, which takes effort – I think it keeps you going.
  740. I think a certain degree of pessimism is actually helpful to love.
  741. I think a challenge for myself is to see how many times I can get above 9,000. That would be a good challenge.
  742. I think a common misperception about attuning and tending to a child’s needs so constantly is that they don’t grow in their independence, but I think that the opposite is true.
  743. I think a firm grip helps you control the club and prevents it from turning in your hands. Another thing about feel is, if you make a change in your grip, it takes time for your brain to adapt.
  744. I think a gentleman is someone who holds the comfort of other people above their own. The instinct to do that is inside every good man, I believe. The rules about opening doors and buying dinner and all of that other ‘gentleman’ stuff is a chess game, especially these days.
  745. I think a good designer can exist everywhere and anywhere and all the time. It’s all about being good, and I think that our job basically is to make women and men look good.
  746. I think a good script is a rare thing, and I think no matter who you are you have to fight for the good ones.
  747. I think a lot of African-American kids don’t have fathers to teach them how to dress, so you end up being taught by pictures in magazine and movies. You see cowboys, Indians, old Hollywood films, Cary Grant. It has an effect on you.
  748. I think a lot of food shows, especially when we started ‘Good Eats’ back in the late ’90s, they were still really about food. ‘Good Eats’ isn’t about food, it’s about entertainment. If, however, we can virally infect you with knowledge or interest, then all the better.
  749. I think a lot of people do big movies not because they are talented artists but because they can function in the circumstances.
  750. I think a lot of the American people feel more than a little disappointed that the high-water mark for human exploration was 1969. The dream of human space travel has almost died for a lot of people.
  751. I think a lot of times people who jump from one movie to another don’t enjoy their private life. It’s a great way to escape reality. But I enjoy my life.
  752. I think a lot of times we don’t pay enough attention to people with a positive attitude because we assume they are naive or stupid or unschooled.
  753. I think a lot of times, when people who get a chance to meet me and be around me, they understand that I’m not the person that the media make me out to be.
  754. I think a lot of us responded intensely to ‘True Detective’ because it was so incredibly earnest. That’s what made it heartbreaking and involving.
  755. I think a major element of jetlag is psychological. Nobody ever tells me what time it is at home.
  756. I think a movie is a media that is evoking feelings.
  757. I think a number of the leaders are, whether you like it or not, in the hip-hop generation. And when they understand enough, they’ll do wonders. I count on them.
  758. I think a poet is anybody who wouldn’t call himself a poet.
  759. I think a punt can be a big play in a game. If it’s anything like a real game, then you realize that a Pat McAfee punt that downs someone inside the 2-yard line can really swing a game. I’m all for punting in video games.
  760. I think a theater show is a pure version of me doing my material. The theater crowd is a bit more polite, there really aren’t hecklers, and there are a lot of people there to see me, and they’re excited about the jokes and hanging out with me for a show.
  761. I think a woman can have all of the ideas and mental pictures. She can be a real planner and a motivator. But in the end, I think a woman does best when she responds to a man.
  762. I think a writer is a describer. She describes society and human nature as she sees it. She has to be both typical of that society and alone within it.
  763. I think about how much I used to work and how much I used to make that the priority.
  764. I think about my own sons and my own daughters, and I’m sure that many parents are concerned about what their children are exposed to.
  765. I think about that all of the time and I have this fantasy that I am going to work at a museum someday! I would love to do something like that!
  766. I think about the automobile, I think about like, when I was a kid, you know, the invention of the answering machine, which I was like, ‘Wow.’ Or call waiting, which was, like, very big. It was a very big thing. Call waiting was a very big thing. And these incremental innovations happen constantly.
  767. I think acting really helps as a director. It’s just no question, because you totally understand the acting process.
  768. I think all documentaries leave out areas of people’s lives. Which is good. There are areas that need not be explored.
  769. I think all in all, one thing a lot of plays seem to be saying is that we need to, as black Americans, to make a connection with our past in order to determine the kind of future we’re going to have. In other words, we simply need to know who we are in relation to our historical presence in America.
  770. I think all of us certainly believed the statistics which said that probably 88% chance of mission success and maybe 96% chance of survival. And we were willing to take those odds.
  771. I think all teenagers feel a lot of things at once; everything’s going crazy in our brain.
  772. I think all those actors from that generation, like Bogart – they were wonderful actors. They didn’t act. They just came on and they did it, and the characters were wonderful.
  773. I think all women go through periods where we hate this about ourselves, we don’t like that. It’s great to get to a place where you dismiss anything you’re worried about. I find flaws attractive. I find scars attractive.
  774. I think all writers are armchair psychologists to some degree or another, and I think a character’s sexuality is fascinating. It’s a great way to really get at the root of their identity, because it’s such a personal thing.
  775. I think America has always been polarized.
  776. I think American actors are much more intimidated by Shakespeare.
  777. I think Americans are very patriotic.
  778. I think Americans generally are not used to working very hard, in terms of working for the collective. I think in our country we have taken individualism to its farthest reaches, possibly.
  779. I think America’s food culture is embedded in fast-food culture. And the real question that we have is: How are we going to teach slow-food values in a fast-food world? Of course, it’s very, very difficult to do, especially when children have grown up eating fast food and the values that go with that.
  780. I think Amsterdam is to Holland what New York is to America in a sense. It’s a metropolis, so it’s representative of Holland, but only a part of it – you know, it’s more extreme, there’s more happening, it’s more liberal and more daring than the countryside in Holland is.
  781. I think and think for months and years. Ninety-nine times, the conclusion is false. The hundredth time I am right.
  782. I think anger and laughter are very close to each other, when you think about it.
  783. I think anger is a normal response to something horrible that someone has done, another human being has done, and to rob people of life, and that’s actually healthy to have, to feel that. At some point you have to figure out, ‘How do I let that go?’
  784. I think any black woman is a queen. It’s just, do you know it? Do you see it in yourself? Do you recognize it, do you abide by that, do you define yourself as that? Based on who we are and what we’ve been through and how we survive and where we stand, we are on kind of sacred ground. We stand on the backs of our ancestors.
  785. I think any life can be interesting, any surroundings can be interesting. I don’t think I could have been so brave if I had been living in a town, competing with people on what can be called a generally higher cultural level.
  786. I think any statement about stock prices is always suspect unless it’s made by Warren Buffett.
  787. I think anybody who looks at my record will say I’ve been trying to cut government spending and make government live more like families do.
  788. I think anybody who wants to be president has to be a politician, but I would like to find somebody who’s coming from a loving place instead of a political place.
  789. I think art comes out of meaningful experiences, and it’s hard to make art when your meaningful experience is getting into your electric car and driving from your fancy house in the Hills to your fancy job in the Valley.
  790. I think art is inherently nonviolent and it actually occupies your mind with creation rather than destruction.
  791. I think artists are really the root of a tree. They can search for truth or reality in their own way, and the gallery can support them – the outside part of the tree, where it is more about reaching the outside world, connecting with the outside world. That is the role of the gallery, no? Why does the artist have to do that?
  792. I think as you get older, you realize there’s always going to be critics. Critics are going to win every time because they can change their critique based on the stats and their own personal feelings. It’s less about proving people wrong, the critics wrong, and it’s more about challenging myself to keep this level up.
  793. I think as you get older, you realize there’s always going to be critics. Critics are going to win every time because they can change their critique based on the stats and their own personal feelings.
  794. I think, as you grow older, you have figure out the best way to utilize not only your body but your skill.
  795. I think, at a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift should be curiosity.
  796. I think at all social networks, be it Facebook or Twitter or whatever it is, there’s an ecosystem that exist there. But there’s also an ego system that exists there.
  797. I think back at the time, if it had been 1988, I would have thought Michael and Sarah probably would have been cast but I don’t think, I think it’s much better that the girl is younger and if Sarah would have been 26 or 27 then.
  798. I think bad movies are made around the world, not just in Hollywood. There are as many bad art films in the whole world as there are bad commercial films.
  799. I think beauty is not just about what we put on our heads or on our faces or what we wear: it’s deeper than that, and if we can celebrate that, celebrate the women, not just the superficiality… I think it would be really gorgeous.
  800. I think, because of the lack of guaranteed contracts in the league, there’s hesitancy to speaking your minds at times. But I feel like there could be a movement beginning where guys are feeling a little more comfortable talking about things that are important to them.
  801. I think being able to age gracefully is a very important talent. It is too late for me.
  802. I think being an atheist is something you are, not something you do.
  803. I think being on a constraint with money makes you much more creative.
  804. I think being on a TV show is amazing but also, people get kind of used to seeing you a certain way and so it becomes a challenge to break free from that in a way.
  805. I think being recognized more is something you have to get used to, whether it’s here or in California or when I’m traveling. It’s more a part of my life. People recognize me from my play or a commercial I’ve done. It’s just a normal part of life now.
  806. I think being shy or a little bit more mild-mannered is more how you treat people and how you go about your business, not necessarily how you dress or things of that nature.
  807. I think Ben Bernanke and Tim Geithner shared the view that they shouldn’t be in the business of bailouts, but you know, you’re not in the business of bailouts until you frankly think you need to be.
  808. I think, between the tattoos, the way I dress, the way I talk, people don’t think it should go together with a franchise quarterback or someone that’s leading the team or representing the organization.
  809. I think by eighth grade I knew I wanted to be an actor. I’d done church plays and stuff, but my first actual acting class was in eighth grade. I was obsessed with it.
  810. I think by now I have made it fairly clear that I am not very happy with the word hope. I don’t believe in people just hoping.
  811. I think Caesar is one of the most empathetic characters that I’ve played. I think that’s the key to a successful leadership. Being able to keep your ears open at all times.
  812. I think children should be vaccinated because that affects the health of all the other children.
  813. I think Chinese leadership is trying to tell the world they have another set of logic or reasoning or values which are different from yours. Of course, I don’t think they believe that. It’s just an argument that’s made when you can’t confront the truth and facts. They really want to maintain power.
  814. I think chocolate in moderation is not bad for you, but I eat way too much. I tell myself I’m going to eat two squares, and then I end up eating half a big bar.
  815. I think Chris Burden is terrific. I really do.
  816. I think Clinton, after getting into office and into Washington, was shocked at being bludgeoned. So he spent time trying to be all things to all people – one way guaranteed not to be successful or respected in a lion’s den. You can’t just play around with all those big cats – you’ve got to take somebody on.
  817. I think Clinton fatigue was a real thing. It’s just hard to get comfortable with Gore – it was hard for him to project who he is, the person people know in private.
  818. I think, collectively, we should be paying more attention to what is going on around us in the world among people who don’t have the advantages that we have.
  819. I think comedy has evolved like every art form, and people probably do less standing around and telling jokes, and more things that have to do with reality.
  820. I think comics can be the basis for great films, but I think the focus of such a project should be on making the film as good as possible, not on painstakingly replicating the comic.
  821. I think compassion is important but love fizzles out eventually. But if there is compassion in a relationship, things can always be worked out.
  822. I think computer viruses should count as life. I think it says something about human nature that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. We’ve created life in our own image.
  823. I think cookery shows have become so sophisticated, and everyone’s so marvellous at it, but there are people like me who aren’t into the cooking malarkey, who still don’t know how to boil an egg for three minutes.
  824. I think country music is popular – has been popular and will always be popular because I think a lot of real people singing about a lot of real stuff about real people. And it’s simple enough for people to understand it. And we kind of roll with the punches.
  825. I think ‘Crouching Tiger’ is a genre of its own, and it’s extremely well done, and God bless them for it.
  826. I think cynicism lasts. Sentimentality ages, dates quickly.
  827. I think definitely ‘Robot 2’ is a milestone in my career.
  828. I think directing in a team is a really good idea because it stops the cult of the director as God straight away, and also you’re discussing things on set so it opens it out to everyone and it becomes a totally collaborative thing. And you have someone who supports you when you’re feeling a bit insecure.
  829. I think ‘Dirty Harry’ was probably sensitive toward the victims of violent crime.
  830. I think doing period piece is easier, because after a certain distance, everybody is equal, I think. The relative contemporary is harder. I think that’s the way it is.
  831. I think each character is different for me, but I am a director’s actor. So if I get the right vision and right guidance from my director, I think sky is the limit for me.
  832. I think each movie-making process is a very exhausting and satisfying and fulfilling experience for me.
  833. I think even back as far as ‘Lord of the Rings,’ there was always the chance that ‘The Hobbit’ would be made, even way back then. Of course at that point, Peter Jackson didn’t probably think at that point that he’d be directing it.
  834. I think even before I knew I wanted to be a rapper, I wanted to be an entertainer. I was really into Michael Jackson as a kid.
  835. I think Everclear is a weird combination of a singer-songwriter and a hard-rock band. That’s why some people really dig the band, and some don’t.
  836. I think every actor would wish there is some challenge that is left. I would consider to be creatively dead if I were to say that I am satisfied now.
  837. I think every English actor is nervous of a Newcastle accent.
  838. I think every entertainer’s had nights when things go wrong. I mean you can’t remember everything all the time, and especially if you’re having hard times personally, things going on that you – you know, and then people make it worse. And that makes you feel worse.
  839. I think every school in the world should have a sports program.
  840. I think every time in your life is valuable, and you need to exist in that moment. Because if you don’t – you lose it.
  841. I think every woman should be using a foundation, whether it’s liquid or compact.
  842. I think everybody can get along.
  843. I think everybody has something that they’ve been obsessed about in their lifetime.
  844. I think everybody should have the same anger towards the injustice that’s happening and the hatred that’s happening, and just fight it with love and compassion.
  845. I think everybody should like everybody.
  846. I think everyone knows the news has become ridiculous. It’s entertainment driven.
  847. I think everyone shares a fear of failure – that you’re only as good as your most recent collection. That’s definitely a fear, but it’s a fear that fuels me, that makes me want to work harder, that makes me take on more challenges.
  848. I think everyone should be with who they love.
  849. I think everyone should have social media – all young people, at least.
  850. I think everything has its own pros and cons.
  851. I think everything I’ve tried to do, whether or not it’s come off that way immediately, is for the greater good. I’ll take the jabs I need to in order to help us all in the long run.
  852. I think everything starts with an idea. No matter how crazy it is, you should always try to bring it to life.
  853. I think extremists within the base may very well move the Democratic party away from its pro-Israel position.
  854. I think fame became exciting for me in the late ’90s because I could actually use it as a means to an end. I could actually have it help me serve my vocationfulness.
  855. I think fame can come and go.
  856. I think fame is such a scary thing, and it’s something I can never understand. It’s terrifying, but it’s the only way I get to do what I love every day, you know?
  857. I think fashion and artistry go hand in hand.
  858. I think fashion is a lot of fun. I love clothes. More than fashion or brand labels, I love design. I love the thought that people put into clothes. I love when clothes make cultural statements and I think personal style is really cool. I also freely recognize that fashion should be a hobby.
  859. I think films are bigger than structure.
  860. I think fine dining is dying out everywhere… but I think there will be – and there has to always be – room for at least a small number of really fine, old-school fine-dining restaurants.
  861. I think fish is nice, but then I think that rain is wet, so who am I to judge?
  862. I think for a woman, the hardest thing about growing old is becoming invisible. There’s something very front and center about being young.
  863. I think for all of us, as we age, there are always a few moments when you are shocked.
  864. I think, for different types of things, more rehearsal is very important.
  865. I think for female filmmakers a big issue is making their second and third films.
  866. I think, for the majority of my twenties, I was always so concerned with what I didn’t have, or what I still wanted.
  867. I think, from a woman’s perspective, that my interest as an investor and the way that I relate to entrepreneurs is a little bit different.
  868. I think, generally, I just cannot really envision life without writing and producing records and singing.
  869. I think generally the Japanese players have more intensity in practice but generally I do the same things.
  870. I think George W. Bush has a warm, engaging personality. But, you know, the presidency is more than just a popularity contest.
  871. I think George Will is somebody that said recently that the Republicans will not lose, as a Republican, that the Republicans will not win the election. I think it was a terrible statement.
  872. I think getting drunk is the key to flying comfortably. A couple of bloody marys or several glasses of champagne, and suddenly it’s like you’re on a roller coaster.
  873. I think good publicists are just like good mommies – always looking out, making sure folks are comfortable and making sure that folks are on time and making sure that folks are getting what they need and know what they need to do.
  874. I think governments can’t do much.
  875. I think gratitude is a big thing. It puts you in a place where you’re humble.
  876. I think great romance needs great obstacles and textures.
  877. I think growing up in skating, I was surrounded by the LGBT community, so I grew up very aware because I was around it so often, and some of the kindest people I know are gay figure skaters.
  878. I think growing up is difficult and it’s a process that I’m always interested in, with kids and adults, they are often on two different universes.
  879. I think guys that play basketball really understand how to go up and get a ball. Because in a rebound situation, you’ve got to go up and fight for a ball. Just boxing out. There are a lot of things that transfer.
  880. I think ‘Hail to the Chief’ has a nice ring to it.
  881. I think having kids has been the biggest influence on my work since I started publishing.
  882. I think having land and not ruining it is the most beautiful art that anybody could ever want to own.
  883. I think health is the outcome of eating well.
  884. I think health is the outcome of finding a balance and some satisfaction at the table.
  885. I think Heaven and afterlife is for the living; it’s for the people that continue on and remember that person, and if you’ve done something that is substantial in your life then you can leave a legacy and do something positive.
  886. I think Hell exists on Earth. It’s a psychological state, or it can be a physical state. People who have severe mental illness are in Hell. People who have lost a loved one are in Hell. I think there are all kinds of different hells. It’s not a place you go to after you die.
  887. I think hidden underneath a lot of teachers are very sexy women.
  888. I think Hillary Clinton is going to do very well in New York, because there’s one basic advantage. New Yorkers know Hillary Clinton. She was here for senator. We’ve seen her work. We’ve seen her performance.
  889. I think humor can be an effective way of getting the point across, but there are definitely times where I just write very earnestly.
  890. I think I am a good running back, but I’m really not that fast. There is only one thing I can do, that is throw a cross-body block. Picture perfect. I love it. Not that good at pass blocking.
  891. I think I am a little jealous of women who have great girlfriends as adults.
  892. I think I am more determined than ever in my future plans, and I have quite made up my mind that nothing must be suffered to interfere with them. I intend to make such arrangements in town as will secure me a couple of hours daily (with very few exceptions) for my studies.
  893. I think I am the greatest fighter in any class. I know I can hold two, maybe even three belts.
  894. I think I became a Catholic to annoy my father.
  895. I think I became more productive through not having children. I never really had the desire to have them. My husband didn’t want them either, so it worked out well.
  896. I think I can get away, sometimes, with walking in the streets and not getting noticed. I like that. I want my work to get noticed, not me. And it’s slowly getting there, which is good.
  897. I think I can hold every portfolio – defense, finance and Foreign Ministry. I think personally I’d like the foreign office.
  898. I think I can work with any type of actor.
  899. I think I do overshare. It’s my way of trying to understand myself.
  900. I think I do want to go into politics. I really, really do. And I don’t know if I will.
  901. I think I don’t want to use drugs or medicine, so nothing. The only way is to go on stage and to hope.
  902. I think I feel fortunate to have been very well educated in terms of strength and training while I was at school at Stanford, and I think our strength coaches here on the Colts do a great job. A big part of being able to withstand hits is making sure that you’ve got a good base.
  903. I think I grew up really fast; I grew up in this really fast-paced business, and I never understood what it meant to take a break or take time off or recover, and I paid for it.
  904. I think I have a dualistic nature.
  905. I think I have a lot of internal energy, which does need to come out.
  906. I think I have a lot of room for improvement. My serve is okay, but I need to work on a lot of things: return, transition game, backhand.
  907. I think I have a very American desire and willingness to divulge everything. I would divulge more if I didn’t know it wasn’t smart.
  908. I think I have always had a little humor.
  909. I think I have grown impatient with just being a writer.
  910. I think I have had so much blessing – I’ve had my brother, who was brilliant – I think my family came closest to making a genius when they made my brother – Bailey was just all of that. He loved me.
  911. I think I have something tonight that’s not quite correct for evening wear. Blue suede shoes.
  912. I think I have the nicest fans in the world, and I quite like being surrounded by people if we’re all feeling the same emotion in the same room.
  913. I think I honestly invented my own genre, the historical spy novel.
  914. I think I just need more time to refine my skills, and I can be a dominant pass rusher.
  915. I think I lived those years very impersonally. It was almost as though I had erected someone outside myself who was the president’s wife. I was lost somewhere deep down inside myself. That is the way I felt and worked until I left the White House.
  916. I think I look better in a suit than a loincloth. So that may define some of the parts I play.
  917. I think I prefer 3D to 2D now.
  918. I think I present a different side of a male character: a side that is not John Wayne-like, a side that is, in fact, destructible. To some people, that is refreshing, and to other people, especially if they don’t know me, it may be disturbing.
  919. I think I probably think about myself as an actor, which is the way most people do. I think I’m good, I don’t think I’m great. I think I would hire somebody else to play me in the movie about me.
  920. I think I should be a president. President of the United States.
  921. I think I should be active politically. Because I look upon myself as a politician. That’s not a dirty work you know. Some people think that there are something wrong with politicians. Of course, something wrong with some politicians.
  922. I think I should learn French and be a better cook – basic, really good life stuff.
  923. I think I spend most of my time not living in reality, actually.
  924. I think ‘I Spy,’ still when you look at it, speaks volumes in terms of propaganda for equality. It’s just magnificent.
  925. I think I succeeded in getting the Egyptian people excited about the importance of science, and this is the only way Egypt can get out of this dark ages.
  926. I think I take on a little more responsibility when push comes to shove. I’m not scared to fail.
  927. I think I understand something about space. I think the job of a sculptor is spatial as much as it is to do with form.
  928. I think I used to be lower maintenance. I think I’m slowly becoming higher maintenance.
  929. I think I want to talk about life from the point of view of death.
  930. I think I was born with the drive for success because I have a certain gene.
  931. I think I was probably that kid in the neighborhood who you could expect once or twice a year to be knocking on your door trying to sell you something stupid.
  932. I think I was the healthiest prisoner of conscience in the world.
  933. I think I will be a great president having to do with the military and also having to do with taking care of our vets.
  934. I think I will never stop having mentors.
  935. I think I wish I had never spanked my children, but I have. And they remember every instance like they tattooed it on their palms. I think it’s a terrible lesson, to use physical punishment to make a point about not behaving, not being kind to their siblings, to other people. I mean that’s just absurd. But I’ve lost it, I understand it.
  936. I think I would have done very well as a writer in the Forties. I think the last time America was a great country was then or not long after. It was before Vietnam, before Watergate.
  937. I think I would like to see more roles for South Asian performers that are more inclusive and part of the American Diaspora, the American tapestry, perhaps the way that African American and Hispanic roles have developed.
  938. I think I would probably die without my eyeliner, but besides that I’m pretty basic.
  939. I think I write in a fairly self-confident manner.
  940. I think I write very good songs. But I don’t know if anybody could record my songs with as much fervor. They sound good sung by me, and they especially sound good with my band.
  941. I think I’d like to be a lion tamer, actually. That – that would provide the most audience entertainment if something went really badly.
  942. I think if a 30-year-old Bill Cosby sat on stage with a 72-year-old Bill Cosby, they would enjoy each other.
  943. I think if I believe in something strongly enough, I’m pretty outspoken about it.
  944. I think if I took therapy, the doctor would quit. He’d just pick up the couch and walk out of the room.
  945. I think if I’m guilty of anything, I’m guilty of always being incredibly focused on the task at hand. So wherever I’ve worked, I’ve just always tried to do my best, achieve my best, build a great team around me.
  946. I think if the Vatican is smart, someday they’ll collect my work.
  947. I think if there’s any difference between me and a traditional CEO, it’s that I’ve been unwilling to change myself or shape my personality around what’s expected.
  948. I think if we get freedom for women, then they are probably going to do a lot of things that I wish they wouldn’t do. But it seems to me that isn’t our business to say what they should do with it. It is our business to see that they get it.
  949. I think if you accept the Left’s premise of a living Constitution, then you accept the Left’s premise of a living America, meaning that they think that America’s history is rotten.
  950. I think if you buy from people who are taking care of the land, you’re supporting the future of this country.
  951. I think if you can get people to laugh, you can get people to listen.
  952. I think if you create something and you get an audience for it, then the monetization part is really secondary.
  953. I think if you don’t feel passionate about the first movie you’re doing, in the end the project will lack something because you don’t have enough experience to make the movie something special.
  954. I think if you follow anyone home, whether they live in Houston or London, and you sit at their dinner table and talk to them about their mother who has cancer or their child who is struggling in school, and their fears about watching their lives go by, I think we’re all the same.
  955. I think, if you have enough inner resources, then you can live in isolation for long periods of time and not feel diminished by it.
  956. I think if you make a good movie, people walk away arguing.
  957. I think if you only work, then you won’t have a life. It’s tough to have a life when you’re working a lot.
  958. I think if you want to do something, then you should go all out completely and be fearless.
  959. I think if you watch most of my films with the sound off, you could still tell what’s going on.
  960. I think if you’re a ‘tiger parent’ early on, you don’t need to be a ‘helicopter parent’ in high school.
  961. I think I’m a global citizen. My parents came from China, were educated in France and emigrated to the United States. And I think that opened up my mind to be able to live and work anywhere.
  962. I think I’m a pretty nice fella.
  963. I think I’m a romantic person, yeah.
  964. I think I’m a very solitary person. To actually not be anonymous is a bit claustrophobic for me.
  965. I think I’m alright as a lyricist, you know? But then what will happen every couple of months or so is that I’ll hear a song I’ve never heard before and feel I’ve gone right back to square one.
  966. I think I’m better than Mamet, I would say.
  967. I think I’m just like a lot of people who had nothing. We had to amuse ourselves, so we had to become amusing.
  968. I think I’m just like a lot of people who had nothing.
  969. I think I’m past the age of getting lost.
  970. I think I’m sort of method in a sense, and I enjoy, you know, trying to find that reality in fake emotion.
  971. I think I’m still a little too intense for my own good sometimes.
  972. I think I’m still figuring out how to be a little less selfish.
  973. I think I’m trouble-adjacent. I remember hearing once that good girls don’t get caught. I think that’s sort of a lot of what my teen years were like. I skirted the stuff that other kids were doing because the idea of actually getting in trouble was not appealing to me, but I still wanted to have adventures.
  974. I think I’m very good at reading coverage and knowing where I want to go with the ball before the ball is snapped.
  975. I think, in any profession, what you fear most is not being able to perform, about not being able to meet new challenges. The fear of non-acceptance, particularly if in creative art. What happens if the audiences do not like you anymore!
  976. I think in any situation, so much of effective leadership is when it comes from your own personality. And I feel very fortunate to be comfortable in the Colts locker room, where people can be who they are, and they don’t have to change it when they show up to work that day.
  977. I think in art, but especially in films, people are trying to confirm their own existences.
  978. I think in both of those situations, it’s important as an actor to learn, despite the success I had as a kid, that it’s important to understand what it means to be a small fish in a big pond.
  979. I think in England you eat too much sugar and meat and not enough vegetables.
  980. I think in some instances that the death penalty is required.
  981. I think in some ways what Snowden is, is he’s a mix of a cold war spy novel and post-9/11 spy novel.
  982. I think in the ’70s that there was a general feeling of chaos, a feeling that the idea of the ’60s as ‘ideal’ was a misnomer. Nothing seemed ideal anymore. Everything seemed in-between.
  983. I think in the end there are only 20 or 30 tenets of basic cooking. It’s going at perhaps the same issue from different angles, from different points of view, from different presentation styles, that really makes things sink in and become embedded.
  984. I think in the future we need to look at our youth department to provide more players for the first team think it is important for a club to have a good amount of players that have roots with the club and region.
  985. I think in the immediate days after 9/11, the administration acted very, very well. I liked the decisiveness of it.
  986. I think in the past, around the time that method acting became so prevalent, it used to be that American actors were thought to be the kind that would work more from the inside out, and that the English actors worked more from the outside in.
  987. I think India is very passionate about films. It’s almost a second religion back home. Due to that, I think film stars are – are really held in great esteem. Not that we’re complaining, but I think with that comes a lot of responsibility.
  988. I think intelligence basically can be in a way defined by the possibility of having two opposite ideas living together and at the same time functioning. That’s why I think a smart script has two things living in the same place, and they’re absolutely contradictory.
  989. I think Islam has been hijacked by the idea that all Muslims are terrorists; that Islam is about hate, about war, about jihad – I think that hijacks the spirituality and beauty that exists within Islam. I believe in allowing Islam to be seen in context and in its entirety and being judged on what it really is, not what you think it is.
  990. I think it all comes back to being very selfish as an artist. I mean, I really do just write and record what interests me and I do approach the stage shows in much the same way.
  991. I think it has been a tremendous feat on the part of East Germans since 1990 to adapt to everything changing.
  992. I think it is a good thing to have woman friends at every stage of life. We confide in each other, we support each other, we understand each other most of the time. Of course, sometimes we are competitive or angry or distant, too. But I do think it is important not to let the main friendships slip away in the sweep of the days.
  993. I think it is a sin to look at another person as inferior to yourself because of race or because of ethnic background, and I think the greatest thing to do is to pray that God will give you love for them, and I do.
  994. I think it is a wonderful process of transformation from an actress to a producer.
  995. I think it is absolutely crazy in this day and age that I have to go through a trial and error method to see if my child is allergic to an antibiotic or peanuts. I should just know.
  996. I think it is all about finding ways to challenge yourself.
  997. I think it is important for Europe to understand that even though I am president and George Bush is not president, Al Qaeda is still a threat.
  998. I think it is important to begin with a statement in your speech that grabs the attention of the audience. I try to make my opening line 15 words or less.
  999. I think it is important to have a balance of science and arts to be able to be accessible in either fields.
  1000. I think it is perfectly natural for any artist to admire intensely and love a young man. It is an incident in the life of almost every artist.
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