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  3. Posted on Mon, 1 Jan, 2018 at 10:54 PM

M Articles Page 2

Articles: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ M Articles Page 2 My daughter became a teacher right out of college. My daughter, Grace, was not killed by a gun. She died suddenly at age 5 from a virulent form of strep. As I stood stunned in a church at her memorial, one of the hardest things I heard someone say […]

  1. M Articles Page 2
  1. My daughter became a teacher right out of college.
  2. My daughter, Grace, was not killed by a gun. She died suddenly at age 5 from a virulent form of strep. As I stood stunned in a church at her memorial, one of the hardest things I heard someone say was, ‘I’m going to go home and hug my child a little tighter.’ ‘Well, good for you,’ I thought. ‘I’m going to go home and scream.’
  3. My daughter is a very adventurous eater. I’m not the guy who sits around lamenting that all my kid will eat it is Tater Tots and chicken nuggets. With my kid, it’s more a capricious and whimsical decision-making.
  4. My daughter is not an object to flash around or a prized item to put on display.
  5. My daughter, Lily Caitlin, means the most to me in the world.
  6. My daughter’s the greatest thing that’s happened to me in my life and she turned me into a more responsible man, as opposed to just someone who’s a perpetual teenager, thinking you’re a man when you’re not.
  7. My daughters think I am a terrible cook, but I try really hard. I would really like to be a better cook.
  8. My day typically starts with an early-morning walk through Central Park. It’s a nice moment of calm before my routine starts.
  9. My days are whatever I want them to be.
  10. My days, my years, my life has seen up and downs, lights and darknesses. If I wrote only and continually of the ‘light’ and never mentioned the other, then as an artist, I would be a liar.
  11. My dear wife has, I would say, probably never opened a religious book, and seems to be one of those people to whom the whole idea is utterly remote and absurd.
  12. My decision to start a new one is just that, a decision, since I never get inspirations.
  13. My definition of winning at squash is playing and surviving, and I’ve never lost a match.
  14. My desire to devolve authority has nothing to do with a wish to shirk responsibility.
  15. My desire was not to pass any island without taking possession, so that, one having been taken, the same may be said of all.
  16. My different personalities leave me in peace now.
  17. My difficulties belong to me!
  18. My dignity and good television – they’ll never meet.
  19. My dinner options are kept simple during Wimbledon. I have either salmon with rice, roast chicken with vegetables and potatoes, or steak with salad. My girlfriend Kim will cook, and I know each night that it will be one of those three.
  20. My dinners at home are startlingly simple. Every night, I stop at the market near my hotel and pick up a steak, lamb chops or some liver, which I broil in the electric oven in my room. I usually eat four or five raw carrots with my meat, and that is all. I must be part rabbit; I never get bored with raw carrots.
  21. My discovery that black holes emit radiation raised serious problems of consistency with the rest of physics. I have now resolved these problems, but the answer turned out to be not what I expected.
  22. My divorce wasn’t fun.
  23. My dream is of a place and a time where America will once again be seen as the last best hope of earth.
  24. My dream is to be a doctor. I’m almost working in a laboratory, because I’m trying new techniques, new directions and fabrics, new weaving.
  25. My dream is to be World Lightweight Champion in the UFC. Have more money than I know what to do with. And have a great life for my kids, grandkids, and everyone in my family.
  26. My dream is to go big someday internationally.
  27. My dream was bigger than anything else. My fight and me wanting to fulfill what I wanted to be in life. That was enough to keep me strong enough to endure anything.
  28. My drummer, bass player, and guitar player sing backgrounds. They play and sing. I can sing all the harmonies, but I can’t do it alone.
  29. My duty is to make probable the improbable. If I tell you how I did it, I will ruin your experience.
  30. My DVR says that I watch a lot of TV my husband likes.
  31. My early comics are really reflective of being kind of a befuddled, single loser in the Bay Area, and I think having kids has been by far the most profound impact on me as a person and as an artist.
  32. My ego every day is more and more polite. I tame it.
  33. My elder brothers were all put apprentices to different trades. I was put to the grammar-school at eight years of age, my father intending to devote me, as the tithe of his sons, to the service of the Church.
  34. My eldest sister Beth is a doctor who studied at Harvard and Columbia and played basketball for Harvard. She set the athletic and academic standard for the rest of us to follow.
  35. My entire business model is to go on offense.
  36. My entire career, I’ve been a worker.
  37. My every birthday wish was, ‘I want to someday be on TV.’
  38. My evidence that I am saved does not lie in the fact that I preach, or that I do this or that. All my hope lies in this: that Jesus Christ came to save sinners. I am a sinner, I trust Him, then He came to save me, and I am saved.
  39. My existence is about making movies, so I’ve just got to rock and roll with the punches. You want to make movies on telephones, I’m there.
  40. My experience as a refugee had made me strong; I could survive anything, even the world of fashion.
  41. My experience has been that work is almost the best way to pull oneself out of the depths.
  42. My experience of being on the public platform got more multi-faceted, multi-dimensional, and my place in the public eye, I think, has always been a little more than just what is going on in that time in my life.
  43. My experience of malaria was just taking anti-malarials, which give you strange dreams, because I don’t want to get malaria.
  44. My faith always has been and always will be important to me.
  45. My faith helps me overcome such negative emotions and find my equilibrium.
  46. My faith in human decency was sorely tested at times during my captivity; however, after my release, I am humbly reminded that mankind is inherently good by the tremendous efforts and support of fellow Canadians.
  47. My faith inspires me so much. It is the very reason that I run. I feel that my running is completely a gift from God and it is my responsibility to use it to glorify him.
  48. My faith was eventually what helped me face myself, tell the truth about everything I had done, face criticism, cope with guilt, pain, and grow from all of it.
  49. My family and I were some of the first people to be genotyped.
  50. My family belongs to a tennis club in Valencia, California, so I always go there. I play a lot of tennis with my dad and swim. And I like to go to the gym there.
  51. My family came to Newark in the ’20s. We’ve been there a long, long time. My father’s name was LeRoi, the French-ified aspect of it, because his first name was Coyette, you see. They come from South Carolina.
  52. My family can always tell when I’m well into a novel because the meals get very crummy.
  53. My family didn’t film anything. But then you look deeper and realize, maybe there are photographs, there are things. It’s also context: You give something a context, and suddenly it becomes really deep or meaningful footage.
  54. My family, frankly, they weren’t folks who went to church every week. My mother was one of the most spiritual people I knew but she didn’t raise me in the church, so I came to my Christian faith later in life and it was because the precepts of Jesus Christ spoke to me in terms of the kind of life that I would want to lead.
  55. My family has had to become quite understanding about me not returning phone calls when I’m filming.
  56. My family has never been there for me. They expect things because we’re blood.
  57. My family is from the south of Italy in this little place called Calabria. It’s a big part of my family, the Italian culture. I grew up around it. My parents speak Italian, and I speak Italian.
  58. My family is Muslim. But I don’t consider myself a very devout Muslim, but a cultural Muslim, whatever that means.
  59. My family is my strength and my weakness.
  60. My family is the most important thing to me.
  61. My family is very good about visiting me, and other friends as well.
  62. My family joke that I’m really a very senior person who accidentally happens to be 11.
  63. My family never owned a home. We leased.
  64. My family was a poor farming family, and we lived under absolute segregation.
  65. My family wasn’t in the music business, but they loved music.
  66. My family’s lineage, we are warriors. The McGregor clan, we are warriors all through. We are famous all through the world for our fighting capabilities of all generations. So I have no doubt that’s stood to me and that led me down this path and gave me what I have.
  67. My fans are going to be there for me.
  68. My fans are truly my friends.
  69. My fans kept asking where they could get clothes like ‘Destiny’s Child’s’, so it was only natural for us to do a clothing line. I was adamant about not putting my name on something that I didn’t love.
  70. My fans kept asking where they could get clothes like Destiny’s Child’s, so it was only natural for us to do a clothing line.
  71. My fantasy breakfast is just a really good egg scramble. Maybe I’ll add a little feta, so, uh, obviously not totally dairy-free. Definitely some vegetables, maybe some really nice tortillas; something to make it like a Mexican-style breakfast. I just really love breakfast.
  72. My fascination with letting images repeat and repeat – or in film’s case ‘run on’ – manifests my belief that we spend much of our lives seeing without observing.
  73. My fastest time in high school was a 4:29 mile. I think cross-country has something to do with my longevity in my business. When you’re in an eight-mile race, you never give up.
  74. My fat never made me less money.
  75. My fate cannot be mastered; it can only be collaborated with and thereby, to some extent, directed. Nor am I the captain of my soul; I am only its noisiest passenger.
  76. My father actually moved out from Chicago just so he could play tennis 365 days a year, so it was – it was a place we played every day. We played before school. We played after school. We woke up. We played tennis. We brushed our teeth in that order.
  77. My father and I have a very good relationship. We always got along. But I always scold him.
  78. My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.
  79. My father died when I was young, and my mother, Ruth, went to work in an office selling theater and movie parties. She put me through private school, Horace Mann, in Riverdale. She sent me to camp so that I would learn to compete. She was a lioness, and I was her cub.
  80. My father had a dairy farm. He employed three black families and one white family, and I used to play with black children.
  81. My father had a difficult relationship with success, maybe because he never obtained it. But he was very wise about it because he observed how you can become rotten fruit once you get power.
  82. My father had a piano that was a nickelodeon – put a nickel, and the roller would play.
  83. My father had died, and very swiftly, too, of cancer of the esophagus. He was 79. I am 61. In whatever kind of a ‘race’ life may be, I have very abruptly become a finalist.
  84. My father helped me leave. He said, ‘It’s all out there, it’s not here.’
  85. My father? I never knew him. Never even seen a picture of him.
  86. My father is 100% Japanese and came to the United States when he was only 18 years old. My grandmother still resides in Japan, which has allowed me to travel to the roots of my ancestors with my father.
  87. My father is a genuinely nice guy and very generous to anybody and everybody. He likes to live life kingsize, and he doesn’t know any other way, and I love that about him.
  88. My father is a poet. He’s a literary giant of this country – writes in Hindi – and also quite unique because he has a Ph.D. in English Literature. He taught at Harvard University, which is one of the most prominent universities in the country.
  89. My father is Hungarian and moved to Britain during the uprising, and my Spanish mum comes from Galicia; they moved here at the end of the Fifties.
  90. My father is sure that Israel keeps the Holocaust from happening again. I worry that it might hasten its recurrence.
  91. My father loved music. He loved Motown and R&B, and my mother loved Journey and Fleetwood Mac, so they were always listening to it and playing it.
  92. My father made sure of discipline, but my mum, she was serious business.
  93. My father paid for my education; then he made it clear that I was on my own.
  94. My father played baseball. That’s what I know to do. That’s my gift. God has given me the greatest gift. And that’s what I love to do.
  95. My father probably thought the capital of the world was wherever he was at the time. It couldn’t possibly be anyplace else. Where he and his wife were in their own home, that, for them, was the capital of the world.
  96. My father rebelled ferociously against his conservative upbringing where his father physically abused him.
  97. My father… removed from Kentucky to… Indiana, in my eighth year… It was a wild region, with many bears and other wild animals still in the woods. There I grew up… Of course when I came of age, I did not know much. Still somehow, I could read, write, and cipher… but that was all.
  98. My father sang well, and he was a handsome man. When he walked down the street, people sometimes mistook him for Cary Grant and asked for his autograph.
  99. My father taught me how to draw horses – for this I shall be eternally grateful.
  100. My father used to say that it’s never too late to do anything you wanted to do. And he said, ‘You never know what you can accomplish until you try.’
  101. My father used to wear the same pants for like a week.
  102. My father was a doctor, an army cardiologist.
  103. My father was a dreamer – my hero. He was a smart, tough guy from Poland, a cutter of lady’s handbags, an old socialist-unionist who always considered himself a failure. His big line was: ‘Don’t end up like me.’
  104. My father was a first reader in the Christian Science Church, which is similar to being a preacher. There was no drinking, smoking or cursing.
  105. My father was a joyous, joyous spirit, he really was. He was a hedonist, that was just – he enjoyed life, thrust up to the elbows with it. He was a terrible father. I don’t know that he was parented that well.
  106. My father was a monster. A monster! I cut with my family when I was 23 and I never see them again.
  107. My father was a newspaper editor, so I was surrounded by journalists my entire life. I think the fact that he was so well known may be why I chose to go into magazines and move to the States at a young age.
  108. My father was a painter. There was a lot of singing. We hung around with a lot of folk musicians. My family knew a lot of great folk musicians of the time, like Woody Guthrie, Paul Robeson, Leadbelly. They were all people we knew.
  109. My father was a professional artist all his life who encouraged my path as an artist.
  110. My father was a research scientist in tropical medicine, so I always assumed I would be a scientist, too. I felt that medicine was too vague and inexact, so I chose physics.
  111. My father was a successful real estate developer, and he was a very tough man but a good man. My father would always praise me. He always thought I was the smartest person.
  112. My father was against the death penalty, and that was hard in the Son of Sam summer when fear was driving the desire for the death penalty.
  113. My father was an atheist, absent. He was a salesman; I was four years old when he told me that the end of life was death.
  114. My father was an immigrant who literally walked across Europe to get out of Russia. He fought in World War I. He was wounded in action. My father was a great success even though he never had money. He was a very determined man, a great role model.
  115. My father was an insurance man and a small-time gambler. He was a good man, but he had an eye for the racehorses, and I saw how it used to bother my mother. I’ve never gambled a dime. Never, in all those years in Vegas.
  116. My father was grounded, a very meat-and-potatoes man. He was a baker.
  117. My father was interested in justice, always working for people who needed to be supported.
  118. My father was the center of the family, and everyone tried to please him.
  119. My father was very energetic; my mother was very energetic. He lived to a very old age, and so did my mother. I believe that I just have it from my father, from my parents. They had wonderful energy.
  120. My father was very sick around the time I was born. The doctors thought he wouldn’t live. He did recover, but I don’t remember him as very active. I do remember lots of schtick around the dinner table. Generally, he and my brothers and I were all laughing at the same thing my mother did not find funny, whatever that was.
  121. My father wasn’t a cruel man. And I loved him. But he was a pretty tough character. His own father was even tougher – one of those Victorians, hard as iron – but my dad was tough enough.
  122. My father wasn’t perfect. He had a temper. I took some of that. He would snap, but the older he got, he started calming down. He learned about life, but the thing that he taught my whole family was that family was the most important thing and, no matter what, if a family member needs you, you go and help them out; you get there.
  123. My father, who was a hair colourist, died when I was young, so my mother had to work very hard. But at the same time, I do believe that if you have everything, it is easy to make a dinner. When you only have flour and water and olives and potatoes, you have to be much more creative, and that’s what my mother is all about.
  124. My father will anticipate everything. He will leave you and me no chance to do a great and brilliant deed.
  125. My father worked for a children’s home called Dr. Barnardo’s Homes. They’re a charity.
  126. My father worked on assembly lines in Detroit while I was growing up. Every day, I watched him do what he needed to do to support the family. But he told me, ‘Life is short. Do what you want to do.’
  127. My father would chaperone at high-school dances, and the toughest guy in the high school used to want to fight my father. My father broke his hand on a guy’s head once in school.
  128. My father’s a Southern Baptist minister. I wasn’t lighting cars on fire; I just wasn’t.
  129. My favorite anything is always relative to the context of present time, place and mood. When I finish a book and want to immediately find another by the same author and no other, that author is elevated to my favorite.
  130. My favorite artist in the world is Michael Jackson, and he revolutionized the music video aspect of music.
  131. My favorite artists always documented emotion. Marvin Gaye and Al Green and Sade and Aaliyah.
  132. My favorite comedians are basically themselves onstage.
  133. My favorite drive is Highway 101 in California between Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo. I love the 101; Highway 1 is too windy, and 5 is too boring – the 101 is just right. It’s like the Mama Bear of scenic drives.
  134. My favorite go-to is Topshop. They have great stuff.
  135. My favorite goals are the ones when there’s so much pressure. I focus more when the game is on the line.
  136. My favorite is doing the television show, as a variety show, every week. If the show wasn’t that great one week, we could always come back and apologize, you know?
  137. My favorite literature to read is fairly dry history. I like the framework, and my imagination can do the rest.
  138. My favorite memories were with my dad, throwing a football around when he came home from work. As long as kids are having fun, that’s the biggest deal at the end of the day.
  139. My favorite movie is ‘The Women’ from 1939. It’s been my favorite movie since I was like 12 years old. I love the dialogue, really. It’s just a lot of really strong female performances. Rosalind Russell kills it, you know.
  140. My favorite movies of all times is ‘Doctor Zhivago,’ and I love ‘Gone With the Wind.’ I’d love to play some Southern belle or something where I owned a plantation.
  141. My favorite part is the preparation because you read on the page, you get this character.
  142. My favorite place is where I live in Jacksonville.
  143. My favorite place is whichever sidewalk is beneath my feet because I am just constantly fascinated by walking and looking and learning. If I’ve already walked a street five times, then the next five times I walk it looking up, and I learn something about the cornices.
  144. My favorite prayer is Footprints in the Sand. You know that prayer? I know the times that he carried me, you know? I kind of wore him out.
  145. My favorite sequels are basically all Mike Myers films – ‘Wayne’s World 2,’ ‘Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me,’ ‘Shrek 2.’ Anything he does, it’s best the second time around. He needs to do ‘So I Married an Axe Murderer 2.’
  146. My favorite spot to hang out is my home.
  147. My favorite subject was English or creative writing. We did poems and making a magazine, and I did one on celebrities. I called it ‘Celebrity Life Magazine.’ I interviewed my good friend Kaley Cuoco.
  148. My favorite thing about making movies is that it’s the only area of human life that I’ve ever discovered where I can walk away from somebody in the middle of a conversation with somebody and they won’t be offended.
  149. My favorite thing is to be working with people I enjoy working with. I’ve reached the point where, emotionally, I don’t need to act any more. Financially, I do. But emotionally, it wouldn’t matter to me if I never acted again.
  150. My favorite things in life don’t cost any money. It’s really clear that the most precious resource we all have is time.
  151. My favorite things often have a story behind them and are usually handmade or discovered at a flea market.
  152. My favorite time in the cycles of public life is the time when the Pope is dead and they haven’t elected a new one. There’s no one in the world who is infallible for those weeks. And you know, I don’t miss it.
  153. My favorite way to spend Saturday is in and out of bed, watching sports on TV and eating.
  154. My favourite comedian, of course, is Tim Conway. He has a way about him – being that belly-laugh kind of funny, and he has the improvisational skills, too. I’ve never seen anybody better.
  155. My favourite dance is the Foxtrot. It’s a proper dance with proper music. It has class.
  156. My favourite job hands down – and I think I can speak for everyone involved – was ‘Breaking Bad.’
  157. My favourite movie of all-time is ‘Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.’ I love Kate Winslet.
  158. My favourite pastime used to be sitting on a park bench watching people. But after ‘Jagged Little Pill,’ the eyeballs turned, and I was the watched one.
  159. My favourite thing is to be somebody else, no longer be me.
  160. My favourite thing to wear is a saree.
  161. My ‘fear’ is my substance, and probably the best part of me.
  162. My feeling about growing up in New Jersey was, ‘How come I’m not in New York?’ That being said, I’m older and I have a better worldview now, and so I think I grew up in an incredibly privileged position. The town I grew up in is beautiful. I got a great education, and I’m very grateful for it.
  163. My feeling about work is it’s much more about the experience of doing it than the end product. Sometimes things that are really great and make lots of money are miserable to make, and vice versa.My feeling about work is it’s much more about the experience of doing it than the end product. Sometimes things that are really great and make lots of money are miserable to make, and vice versa.
  164. My feeling has always been that ‘Good Eats’ would have never happened had it been left to a committee.
  165. My feeling is, personally, I want to die first… because I believe that when you die, your soul goes immediately up for judgment – and I don’t want my wife up there first. No, the judgment will be horrendous.
  166. My feeling is that you don’t go looking for troubles. The cross ought to find you. And so I never go out of my way. I figure I only get involved in things that I can’t get around.
  167. My feelings about myself have been terrible.
  168. My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.
  169. My fellow Americans, I am pleased to tell you I just signed legislation which outlaws Russia forever. The bombing begins in five minutes.
  170. My fellow Americans, we are and always will be a nation of immigrants. We were strangers once, too.
  171. My films are about embarrassment.
  172. My films are completely new. I am not similar to anybody in the history of movies.
  173. My films are like clouds: their meaning keeps changing every minute.
  174. My films are of paramount importance to me, the same as my family. That’s not going to change. This is a balance I have to strike throughout my life.
  175. My films often have a spiritual dimension which comes from my Muslim background, and I’m happy to tackle that in cinema.
  176. My first album was completed in three months.
  177. My first big mission for UNICEF in Ethiopia was just to attract attention, before it was too late, to conditions which threatened the whole country. My role was to inform the world, to make sure that the people of Ethiopia were not forgotten.
  178. My first book is really about heat. That book, for me, was an exploration of heat as ingredient. Why we don’t talk about heat as an ingredient, I don’t quite understand, because it is the common ingredient to all cooking processes.
  179. My first book was an open letter to my three daughters.
  180. My first car was a motorcycle.
  181. My first car was a Toyota 4Runner when I was 17. I paid for it myself. I was very happy.
  182. My first event was in Nottingham, aged 11, and the prize was a bike. I thought, ‘Wow.’ I had no idea what to wear. I think I did it in swimming trunks, then just put on a T-shirt and shoes for the bike part. Triathlons felt exotic. There was a technical and tactical aspect to it as well as the endurance challenge. I was hooked.
  183. My first experience in the Netherlands was very pleasant, extremely pleasant. I mean, I got my residence permit, refugee status, within four weeks of arrival. People treated me extremely well.
  184. My first film, ‘Ishaqzaade,’ did well, and I got four damn good films because of it.
  185. My first gig was a Corn Pops commercial. I did the first Vanilla Coke campaign. A Juicy Fruit commercial paid my bills for years.
  186. My first instinct was to cast as close to the short story as possible, but then I realized that I needed actors who could go for it and that they had to function well as a couple in a love story.
  187. My first job was singing on the Cas Walker radio show in Knoxville, Tennessee. I was about 10 years old, and I thought it was big time.
  188. My first job when I got my equity card was acting in 14 plays back-to-back. Playing that many roles, you look for ways of differentiating the characters physically, which goes hand in hand with understanding them psychologically.
  189. My first joke was about a company called Five Star Parking that was all over Philadelphia: ‘Who’s reviewing parking lots?’
  190. My first language was shy. It’s only by having been thrust into the limelight that I have learned to cope with my shyness.
  191. My first love was, and remains, manual labor; sowing and harvesting, the pastures, the flock, and the cattle.
  192. My first phone was two tin cans tied together with string, and it worked pretty good.
  193. My first pictures are from 1972, and my first proper camera dates back to 1973. During the first year I used my father’s camera. It had a flash on it, which I don’t like, but I didn’t know anything about photography back then, so it was just what I did.
  194. My first popular book, ‘A Brief History of Time,’ aroused a great deal of interest, but many found it difficult to understand.
  195. My first recollection is that of a bugle call.
  196. My first serious attempts at writing were made in 1868, and I took up two very different lines of composition; I wrote some short stories of a very flimsy type, and also a work of a much more ambitious character, ‘The Lives of the Black Letter Saints.’
  197. My first show sold within the first 3 minutes, and I came back to the studio and spent the next two and a half years making almost nothing.
  198. My first toy was a box of transistors.
  199. My first TV job was on an episode of ‘Hannah Montana’… Since then, I’ve been fortunate to end up on shows that are just such a high quality, where the writing and material is incredible.
  200. My first wife is a good woman, I still can’t say nothing bad about her other than the fact that we had a difference on religion. She wanted someone who was a Muslim who shared those values. And I was like a heathen. I had to stay home on Sundays and watch the football game.
  201. My fitness trainer’s English, my physio’s English, some of my friends are English. I don’t have a problem with English people at all.
  202. My flag is always flying. My shingle is always out. I’m always looking for movie ideas.
  203. My focus is my art, and that’s what I love to do. I have to be really passionate in order to do something. I’ve turned down many things that I just didn’t believe in.
  204. My focus is to not focus too much on one genre.
  205. My fondest hope is that ‘Roots’ may start black, white, brown, red, yellow people digging back for their own roots. Man, that would make me feel 90 feet tall.
  206. My former wife is a truly wonderful person.
  207. My freshman and sophomore years in high school, I spent a lot of time trying to get back on the right track. I was arrested multiple times by the time I was 16, so I had a little harder time trying to adjust like a lot of us do in high school.
  208. My friend Harry Nilsson used to say the definition of an artist was someone who rode way ahead of the herd and was sort of the lookout. Now you don’t have to be that, to be an artist. You can be right smack-dab in the middle of the herd. If you are, you’ll be the richest.
  209. My friend James Cameron and I made three films together – True Lies, The Terminator and Terminator 2. Of course, that was during his early, low-budget, art-house period.
  210. My friend, the Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh, was murdered in 2004 for having been insufficiently reverent toward Islam.
  211. My friend… used to tease me about a tattoo I had right here, but it was so big, and what he was teasing me about – he said it looked like a flying monkey. It’s supposed to have been a grim reaper holding a ball. But it did look like a monkey.
  212. My friends always joke that I run on batteries.
  213. My friends and I were wild and we liked to joy-ride.
  214. My friends are all really nice about my fame, they’re just curious really, they ask lots of questions.
  215. My friends are my estate.
  216. My friends found out that I was writing a book on Twitter. It didn’t seem worth mentioning over dinner. They’re all so successful themselves.
  217. My friends like to remind me that I have relatively weak fingers. Aerobic strength and general endurance have come easy, but finger strength has always been my biggest weakness.
  218. My friends, no matter how rough the road may be, we can and we will, never, never surrender to what is right.
  219. My friends once told me I remind them of the main character from the American comedy series ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm.’ I thought they must mean a sunny, affable girl-next-door, but instead I was confronted with Larry David! Crabby, moody, perversely neurotic Larry David. And the thing is, my friends were right.
  220. My friends, there are no friends.
  221. My friends, whoever has had experience of evils knows how whenever a flood of ills comes upon mortals, a man fears everything; but whenever a divine force cheers on our voyage, then we believe that the same fate will always blow fair.
  222. My frustration has always been that I’m a Christian, but I don’t buy into, never have bought into, the belief that Jesus and God are these men who just dictate that this is how you have to live your life or you are going to burn in hell.
  223. My future is righteousness.
  224. My general plan is good, though in the detail there may be faults.
  225. My generation, we came along, we had to really know our craft.
  226. My genetic make-up is one of physicality. I’m a visceral guy.
  227. My girlfriend has been the ice.
  228. My girls are great at making fun of Dad. They’re never impressed with anything I do. I love that. I hope that never changes.
  229. My girls have been a great support to me. I come to them when I need to make a decision; they love to watch me work.
  230. My go-to karaoke? ‘Alone’ by Celine Dion.
  231. My ‘go to’ workout is called the Asylum from Beach Body. It’s intense training with lots of intervals, core work. It’s hard! I travel a lot, so I can take it on the road with me and do it in a hotel room.
  232. My goal against Italy in the World Cup qualifier was probably my most memorable: we had to go to Italy and had to win, or we wouldn’t go to the World Cup, and I scored in stoppage time.
  233. My goal all along has just been to work and support myself. I’ve been really lucky to walk away from the ‘Twilight’ series unscathed. Somebody asked me recently what it’s like to be a star. I thought that was the strangest question. If you saw my day-to-day life, the word ‘star’ just doesn’t apply.
  234. My goal has been to encourage jointness, to push people to think of affiliations rather than to operate as solo entrepreneurs.
  235. My goal in Korea is to win. There’s no timetable when to set the American record.
  236. My goal is always to keep support for Israel a bi-partisan issue and never make a national election any kind of referendum on Israel.
  237. My goal is definitely to direct features – action movies, that’s my favorite genre. So I would love to do the ‘Halo’ movie.
  238. My goal is simple. It is a complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.
  239. My goal is to be exactly how I am offstage – although I realize I’m supposed to punctuate it with jokes.
  240. My goal is to be number one in MMA.
  241. My goal is to be the best quarterback I can be for the Colts, and hope that it’s good enough.
  242. My goal is to be the best TV presenter, the best entertainer, the best singer. I still want to be the best dancer. I want to be the best at everything I do.
  243. My goal is to do cartwheels for the rest of my life.
  244. My goal is to embrace the people, the ‘natural resources’ of Israel, and to build businesses with the creative Israelis.
  245. My goal is to make my kids as happy as possible.
  246. My goal is to show girls that I’m fighting so they don’t have to, so they don’t have to fight the same battles, so they don’t have to fight for wage equality or whatever it may be.
  247. My goal isn’t to wake up in the morning and hurt people’s feelings.
  248. My goal was always to take a talk show to the network. I never wanted to be on MSNBC.
  249. My goal was never to be the loudest or the craziest. It was to be the most entertaining.
  250. My goal was to become the best dancer in the world and, because I started late, I always had this feeling I was playing catch-up, so I’ve been a bit of a maniac most of my life, sort of striving.
  251. My godfather was a man named Justin Dart. Some of you may remember Justin Dart. My younger son’s name is Justin, named after Justin Dart. I was executor of his estate, and he was my godfather. I first really got time to spend with Ronald Reagan with Justin Dart personally, one-on-one.
  252. My government is committed to carrying out electoral reforms. It is our firm resolve to keep criminal elements away from power.
  253. My grandchildren just know me now as Mr. Potato Head.
  254. My granddad passed away a month before I started shooting for ‘Ishaqzaade,’ and my mom died just before the film’s release, both within a year of each other.
  255. My granddad was an evangelist, and my grandma, she was as tough as nails. She watched ‘American Bandstand’ every day when she was in her 80s, 90s. She loved rock music. I never had anyone in my family that was anti-rock n’ roll.
  256. My grandfather and my father had wheat ranches, so we had quite a few trucks around and a lot of mules. Talk about horsepower – we had mule power.
  257. My grandfather came over from Puerto Rico and raised his kids speaking English so that it would be easier for them to assimilate.
  258. My grandfather is from Peshawar; he was born there.
  259. My grandfather lived to be late 90s on one side and on the other side, 70s or something. And my father died young, at 63. But he didn’t take very good care of himself.
  260. My grandfather once ventured upon publishing a volume of hymns. I never heard anyone speak in their favour or argue that they ought to have been sung in the congregation. In that volume, he promised a second if the first should prove acceptable. We forgive him the first collection because he did not inflict another.
  261. My grandfather was a politician and lived in Washington, D.C., so as a kid, I used to go to D.C. every other weekend.
  262. My grandfather was a very mystical guy who travelled from Argentina to Chile, across the mountains with a donkey, carrying the Torah.
  263. My grandfather was facing this terror, my parents, myself.
  264. My grandfather was one of the very, very first, if not the first, Samoan wrestlers to become known on a worldwide basis.
  265. My grandfather was smart and had a whole lot of pride. He didn’t speak a terrible amount, but you could tell there was a ton on his mind – like a quiet acceptance of how life had turned out.
  266. My grandma said – when I was really young and I’d sing along to the radio – why do you sing in an American accent? I guess it was because a lot of the music I was listening to had American vocalists.
  267. My grandma was very traditional, but she herself is a rebel of that culture.
  268. My grandmother always came to my shows. She was always concerned about the way I dressed – even later on, when I was well known and I supported her.
  269. My grandmother and I followed my mother here, to a house a block north of Hollywood Boulevard but a million miles away from Hollywood, if you know what I mean. We would hang out behind the ropes and look at the movie stars arriving at the premieres.
  270. My grandmother and I saw an average of eight movies a week, double features, second run.
  271. My grandmother and I would go see movies, and we’d come back to the apartment – we had a one-room apartment in Hollywood – and I would kind of lock myself in this little dressing room area with a cracked mirror on the door and act out what I had just seen.
  272. My grandmother can never really teach me anything because she skips steps.
  273. My grandmother did all the cooking at Christmas. We ate fattened chicken. We would feed it even more so it would be big and fat.
  274. My grandmother had a lilac bush at her home in Long Island. I always associate the scent of it with her and try to have lilacs in my home.
  275. My grandmother. She’s someone I never met, and I would’ve loved to have met her. She’s been a huge influence on our entire family, not just me. She is a mystery. It’s not clear exactly what about her is truth and myth.
  276. My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was sixty. She’s ninety-seven now, and we don’t know where the hell she is.
  277. My grandmother took me to church on Sunday all day long, every Sunday into the night. Then Monday evening was the missionary meeting. Tuesday evening was usher board meeting. Wednesday evening was prayer meeting. Thursday evening was visit the sick. Friday evening was choir practice. I mean, and at all those gatherings, we sang.
  278. My grandmother used to embarrass me more, when she would pick me up from school wearing a big fuzzy hat. I didn’t like that.
  279. My grandmother, whom I adored, and who partly raised me, loved Liberace, and she watched Liberace every afternoon, and when she watched Liberace, she’d get dressed up and put on makeup because I think she thought if she could see Liberace, Liberace could see her.
  280. My grandpa was a preacher.
  281. My grandpa was in the Navy, but it wasn’t something that was expected or planned for me to do.
  282. My grandson Sam Saunders has been playing golf since he could hold a club and I spent a lot of time with him over the years. Like my father taught me, I showed him the fundamentals of the game and helped him make adjustments as he and his game matured over the years.
  283. My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with your failure.
  284. My great hope is to laugh as much as I cry; to get my work done and try to love somebody and have the courage to accept the love in return.
  285. My greatest achievement is being able to write records that are real snapshots of what’s going on in my life. I won’t repeat myself for the sake of commerce, or to please other people.
  286. My greatest blessing has been the birth of my son. My next greatest blessing has been my ability to turn people into children of mine.
  287. My greatest disappointment is that I believe that those of us who went through the war and tried to write about it, about their experience, became messengers. We have given the message, and nothing changed.
  288. My greatest environments in which I can grow, or grow up, is in personal romantic relationships with a man.
  289. My greatest joy comes from creativity: from feeling that I have been able to identify a certain aspect of human nature and crystallise a phenomenon in words.
  290. My greatest love in life is to develop projects. I just get a huge kick out of that. I’ve been doing it since ever I could.
  291. My greatest qualification for writing fiction was my ability to lie with a straight face as a child.
  292. My guiding principle is this: Guilt is never to be doubted.
  293. My hair grows and grows; you cannot stop it – that fellow grows, it grows wild.
  294. My hair routine is to let someone else do it.
  295. My hands are delicate and elegant, thank you very much. They’re well-kept; my nails are clean.
  296. My head is full of shifting patterns and polyrhythmic stuff; but I want to use all acoustic instruments and create this kind of tapestry of interlocking lulling parts.
  297. My heart aches for America and its deceived people.
  298. My heart is in independent film-making. For me, it’s where the fun, gritty storytelling is being told.
  299. My heart is singing for joy this morning! A miracle has happened! The light of understanding has shone upon my little pupil’s mind, and behold, all things are changed!
  300. My heart seems to heal, so that speaks well for my future.
  301. My heritage is Pakistani, and I have loads of Pakistani fans on social media who I would love to connect with.
  302. My hero when I was 14 was Sonny Liston. No matter what kinds of problems you were having with your parents or at school, whatever, Sonny Liston would go and knock guys out, and that made it all right.
  303. My heroes are and were my parents. I can’t see having anyone else as my heroes.
  304. My high school experience was kind of like ‘Mean Girls.’ It was very much like a bad B movie. ‘This is where the jocks sit, and this is where the cheerleaders sit.’ And I never really fit in. I guess I was sort of a theatre geek, but the activity that I was most invested in was speech and debate.
  305. My Hindi is OK. I think I am better with Tamil. I remember the Tamil words.
  306. My history has been to grow the roots as deeply as you can before going on to the next thing. That’s why it took 10 years to go from Union Square Cafe to Gramercy Tavern, and another 10 years to go from Blue Smoke’s first location to its second, and five to go from Shake Shack 1 to Shake Shack 2.
  307. My hobbies just sort of gradually became my vocation.
  308. My home is in Heaven. I’m just traveling through this world.
  309. My hometown was one of the major U.S. Air Force bases.
  310. My hope for my children must be that they respond to the still, small voice of God in their own hearts.
  311. My hope is that this life is not all there is. This life is like preparation for what is coming next, and what is coming next is something so glorious that the Bible says minds can’t conceive it, eye has never seen, your imagination could never even enter into all that God is preparing for those who love him.
  312. My hope is that we continue to nurture the places that we love, but that we also look outside our immediate worlds.
  313. My house is run, essentially, by an adopted, fully clawed cat with a mean nature.
  314. My house was very strange. I didn’t do things other kids did because my parents were very strict – I stayed at home, quiet in my room.
  315. My humanity is bound up in yours, for we can only be human together.
  316. My humor is traced with dark – I’ve got dark patches all over the place.
  317. My husband and I both have our bucket lists. Running a marathon was on mine.
  318. My husband and I had to raise five of my younger brothers and sisters. They lived with us. We sent them to school.
  319. My husband and I have known each other since kindergarten. I had a crush on him in school, but we never dated. Then we saw each other again after high school, and there was something instantly familiar about him. I’m a very shy person and was very closed off. But he allowed me to be myself. And there’s a safety in that.
  320. My husband and I have very similar backgrounds even though we’re years apart. So there are a lot of things that we basically share.
  321. My husband and I met when I was a teenager, and I’ve been with him for more than half of my adult life.
  322. My husband calls me ‘catfish.’ He says I’m all mouth and no brains.
  323. My husband is Dutch, and his family, when you sat down to eat food at the table, you never left the table until you ate living bread and drank living water. They never left the table until they’d read Scripture together. So morning, lunch, suppertime, Scripture was always read at the table, and then there was prayer to close.
  324. My husband is everything to me and without him it’s just not the same.
  325. My husband is the most brilliant father on the planet.
  326. My husband says I look like a Q-tip.
  327. My husband’s a pediatrician, so he and I talk about parenting all the time. You can’t raise children who have more shame resilience than you do.
  328. My idea, as the whole world knows, is that the capitalist system now doesn’t work either for the United States or the world, driving it from crisis to crisis, which are each time more serious.
  329. My idea is always to reach my generation. The wise writer writes for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmasters of ever afterward.
  330. My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person.
  331. My idea of a great holiday is not to go out. It’s to find somewhere where I’m not confronted by people coming up to me and saying, ‘You’re Art Malik, aren’t you?’ It’s quite nice sometimes not to be recognised.
  332. My idea of a real treat is Magic Mountain without standing in line.
  333. My idea of absolute happiness is to be in bed on a rainy day, with my blankie, my cat, and my dog.
  334. My idea of an agreeable person is a person who agrees with me.
  335. My idea of feminism is self-determination, and it’s very open-ended: every woman has the right to become herself, and do whatever she needs to do.
  336. My idea of sexy is that less is more. The less you reveal the more people can wonder.
  337. My ideal audience is on the young side, eager to mutate and move to a higher level of consciousness. I want my images to turn the viewer’s brain into what it is: a flying carpet.
  338. My ideal date would involve a park or rowing in those little boats on a lake.
  339. My ideal is for each to do what he knows and what he can.
  340. My ideal role would be a baddie in a James Bond film. I think the wheelchair and the computer voice would fit the part.
  341. My ideas usually come not at my desk writing but in the midst of living.
  342. My idol has been Franco Corelli. But every singer can teach you something.
  343. My idols are singers like Billie Holiday and Erykah Badu because there’s no gloss on what they do.
  344. My image has swallowed me up! I’ve given so much out to this projected version of myself, but now I have to live up to this character that I don’t even associate half the time.
  345. My influences have been what I call my four Bs – the primary one being the blues, then Borges, Baraka, and Bearden.
  346. My inspiration for new products comes from moments in my life or what’s happening around me.
  347. My interest as an artist is to illuminate the lives of black folks. I definitely am focused on films that illustrate all that we are and all our nuance and all our complicated beauty and mess, and when you’re telling those stories, you gotta have black actors.
  348. My interest in creating anything is that it be useful.
  349. My interest in filmmaking was always very much the visuals and images.
  350. My interesting diet tips are eat early and don’t nosh between meals. I mean, I can pack it away.
  351. My issue with the state of women became incredibly stimulated when I was visiting developing countries and it became obvious that women bore the brunt of so many things in society.
  352. My job as an actress is to make things work and come up with reasons of my own and not just fill in the blanks for anybody else, you know what I mean?
  353. My job as the host of a rock awards show is not to be as divisive as possible, but certainly you want to be able to interject your jokes and how you feel about stuff.
  354. My job is not to represent Washington to you, but to represent you to Washington.
  355. My job is to do. My job is to make women beautiful. What do I have to say?
  356. My job is to look at what politics is doing, not be a politician myself.
  357. My job is to provide the atmosphere and assistance to the contestants to get them to perform at their very best. And if I’m successful doing that, I will be perceived as a nice guy, and the audience will think of me as being a bit of a star.
  358. My job means I work late.
  359. My journey has been good, and by God’s grace, I have not changed.
  360. My justification is that most people my age spend a lot of time thinking about what they’re going to do for the next five or ten years. The time they spend thinking about their life, I just spend drinking.
  361. My karma ran over your dogma.
  362. My key to dealing with stress is simple: just stay cool and stay focused.
  363. My kid will come home from seeing the latest ‘Transformers’ movie, and I’ll ask him, ‘How was it?’ ‘Amazing!’ ‘What was it about?’ ‘I don’t know, but it was amazing!’
  364. My kids always perceived the bathroom as a place where you wait it out until all the groceries are unloaded from the car.
  365. My kids are all pretty big and tough and strong, and I don’t worry about them being bullied – the reverse, be kind to people and don’t ever be a bully yourself, and I think they’ve followed that.
  366. My kids are incredibly secure. More and more of their friends’ parents are divorcing, but my kids have absolute confidence that we’ll stay together forever. That goes a long, long way.
  367. My kids learned to be independent.
  368. My kids miss me when I’m away, but I don’t mind living out of a suitcase. The U.K., U.S., France, Germany, Iraq… it’s such a thrill meeting people of different cultures, learning about and from them. It’s changed my perception about life, humanity and spirituality.
  369. My kind publishers, Toby Mundy and Margaret Stead of Atlantic Books, have commissioned me to write the life of Queen Victoria.
  370. My kitchen has a wood-burning oven, a large worktable, and windows all around, including one above the sink. I think whoever is washing the dishes needs to have a lot of beauty around.
  371. My kitchen’s pink, like skin-tone pink, and I lowered my spice rack so it’s eye level – it’s true! – and my phone, so I can reach it when I fall, it’s right there.
  372. My knowledge of electrical subjects was not acquired in a methodical manner but was picked up from such books as I could get hold of and from such experiments as I could make with my own hands.
  373. My last meal on Earth? The obvious answer is a plate of my mother’s scrambled eggs.
  374. My lasting impression of Truman Capote is that he was a terribly gentle, terribly sensitive, and terribly sad man.
  375. My least favorite aspect of shopping is shopping.
  376. My lectures, based on Islamic teachings, were on various subjects. Some of the titles were, ‘The Intoxication of Life,’ ‘The Purpose of Life,’ ‘The Real Cause of Man’s Distress,’ ‘The Journey to the Goal in Life,’ and, one of my favorites, ‘The Heart of Man.’ They contained important insights that spoke to something deep inside me.
  377. My legacy is almost like a personal challenge to go as far as I can go.
  378. My legacy is so, so important to me.
  379. My legs haven’t disabled me. If anything, they’ve enabled me.
  380. My lens of choice was always the 35 mm. It was more environmental. You can’t come in closer with the 35 mm.
  381. My libertarian friends are probably getting a little upset now but I think that’s because they never appreciate the benefits of local fascism.
  382. My life changed incredibly when I moved from Holland to England.
  383. My life experience has taught me nothing happens by chance. Even the idea of the ball in a roulette game: it’s not chance it ends up in a certain place. It’s forces that are at play.
  384. My life has always been compartmentalized into different aspects. I have my speed skating Olympic pursuits, I have my personal life and have my business life and have my entertainment – TV – Hollywood – whatever have you – always compartmentalizing every aspect of my life.
  385. My life has always been with my dad. Since I can remember, I was raised by my father my entire life. So he’s kind of been that mom and father figure – always.
  386. My life has been a quest for knowledge and understanding, and I am nowhere near having achieved that. And it doesn’t bother me in the least. I will die without having come up with the answers to many things in life.
  387. My life has been a roller coaster ride, but somehow I’ve always been able to land on my feet and still play the guitar.
  388. My life has been long, and believing that life loves the liver of it, I have dared to try many things, sometimes trembling, but daring still.
  389. My life has been one great big joke, a dance that’s walked a song that’s spoke, I laugh so hard I almost choke when I think about myself.
  390. My life has been very full.
  391. My life has never been a part of a big plan. It’s more of an unfolding adventure.
  392. My life has no purpose, no direction, no aim, no meaning, and yet I’m happy. I can’t figure it out. What am I doing right?
  393. My life, in some ways, has been a half-measure. I didn’t commit myself all the way to my marriage and family, because I would have given up more. And I didn’t go all the way with just being completely selfish. I always wonder where my career would be if I was more selfish.
  394. My life is cinematic in some ways.
  395. My life is full of drama, and I don’t have time to worry about something as petty as what I look like.
  396. My life is mine to remember.
  397. My life is my argument.
  398. My life is my message.
  399. My life is not to be somebody else’s impact – you know what I mean?
  400. My life is proof that I don’t need you to do what I do. If there’s no one to see it, I’ll watch it.
  401. My life is ruled by four W’s: my writing, my work, my wife, and my whisky. Not necessarily in that order.
  402. My life is what it is, and I can’t change it. I can change the future, but I can’t do anything about the past.
  403. My life turned out to be beyond my greatest dreams.
  404. My life was filled with family in South Sudan. I am the seventh of nine children, and we grew up in what would be considered a middle-class family. We did not have a lot, but we did have more than a lot of other people.
  405. My life was in Montreal years ago. Best food in the world.
  406. My life’s goal is not to write books; my life’s goal is to know God better today. The neat thing about a goal like that is you can achieve it. Faith is constant; it’s a relationship.
  407. My lighter, more superficial side will always steal a march on the deeper side and therefore always win. You can’t imagine how often I’ve tried to push away this Anne, which is only half of what is known as Anne – to beat her down, hide her.
  408. My lips, I’ve used collagen. I line my lips with collagen.
  409. My little dog, he did not get ill. It is so funny that people get ill on a boat and dogs do not.
  410. My livelihood depends on the art of animators.
  411. My local newspaper, the ‘Bend Bulletin,’ interviewed me while I was at high school after I had just signed with the University of Oregon. I remember I wore a University of Oregon hooded sweatshirt, and they took a picture of me in the long jump pit. I was freezing!
  412. My long-held fear is that Mr. Obama is hiding something about his education. During the endless 2008 campaign, Mr. Obama would not release his college grades. Given that President George W. Bush and Sens. Al Gore and John Kerry all had proved mediocre grades were no impediment to a presidential bid, Mr. Obama likely had other concerns.
  413. My look is a very individual look. I love Pink, but I don’t really dress like Pink.
  414. My look is pretty low maintenance, I have a great team around me for hair and make-up, and they have also taught me some great tricks over the years for when I’m doing my own.
  415. My love is a hummingbird sitting that quiet moment on the bough, as the same cat crouches.
  416. My love of musical theater was certainly not typical. I mean, it was considered to be very, very abnormal, in fact!
  417. My M.O. is just do what you do and don’t feel like you have to make apologies for it. I’m sure there will come a point when I have to apologize for something, but not yet.
  418. My main concern is meeting with public because my main commitment, main interest is promotion of human value, human affection, compassion and religious harmony.
  419. My main hope is eventually, in modern education field, introduce education about warm-heartedness, not based on religion, but based on common experience and a common sort of sense, and then scientific finding.
  420. My main influence is Kool G Rap and Cam’ron, pretty much. If you were to mix those two people up, I wish that would be me… This is my voice. I sound like nobody; I sound like me.
  421. My main objective with every album is to capture a moment in time, which usually makes the whole process very relaxing. I only discover in retrospect when looking back at the songs how my life is going!
  422. My main point about films is that I don’t like the adaptation process, and I particularly don’t like the modern way of comic book-film adaptations, where, essentially, the central characters are just franchises that can be worked endlessly to no apparent point.
  423. My main regret about my years in football was keeping my mouth shut like a little mouse, not daring to speak out because I was told you left the managers to get on with the job and that the chairman must never interfere with the manager’s decisions or the performance of his team.
  424. My mama never wore a pair of pants when I was growing up, and now that’s all she wears. It was so funny for me when I first started seeing Mama wear pants. It was like it wasn’t Mama. Now I’ve bought her many a pantsuit because she just lives in them.
  425. My manager came up with the name ‘State of the Industry,’ and it was just one of those things. It just took off. Well, I don’t know about ‘took off.’ I’m not in the stratosphere.
  426. My manager wants me to dress like a nun and I want to dress like a teenager.
  427. My mantra has always been to have zero regrets in life. Everything I do at one speed, I go all-out.
  428. My mantra was to educate people – to actually give them the know-how they could use – and to do it in a very subversive kind of way. I would entertain them, and I was going to teach them whether they knew it or not.
  429. My mechanics so good, if he cant fix it, it ain’t broken.
  430. My message, especially to young people is to have courage to think differently, courage to invent, to travel the unexplored path, courage to discover the impossible and to conquer the problems and succeed. These are great qualities that they must work towards. This is my message to the young people.
  431. My message to anyone who’s afraid that they can’t write music when they’re happy is ‘Just trust the passion.’ The passion can write a lot of things.
  432. My message to everyone: the next time you hear about migrant children near the border, just picture them as your own. Then think what you would want our government to do.
  433. My message to the people and rulers of Pakistan is, ‘As neighbours, we want peace and friendship and cooperation with you so that together we can change the face of South Asia.’
  434. My method of getting a play across the footlights is like a revolver shooting: every line has a bullet in it and comes with an explosion.
  435. My mind rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me the most abstruse cryptogram, or the most intricate analysis, and I am in my own proper atmosphere. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for mental exaltation.
  436. My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts.
  437. My mind-set is my major attribute.
  438. My ministry’s always been one of social activism. I think a responsible minister must be at some levels involved in the social order.
  439. My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.
  440. My mixed-race background made me a broad person, able to relate to different cultures. But any woman of colour, even a mixed colour, is seen as black in America. So that’s how I regard myself.
  441. My model for business is The Beatles: They were four guys that kept each others’ negative tendencies in check; they balanced each other. And the total was greater than the sum of the parts.
  442. My mom always said, ‘Don’t date a guy who thinks he’s prettier than you.’
  443. My mom always told me that I could be anything I wanted to be. And I truly, actually believed it. And I fought.
  444. My mom and I have been through a lot. But when you think about it, whose life is perfect? It is just really good because we did this together.
  445. My mom and my dad were both very sociable, meeting lots of interesting people.
  446. My mom cleaned toilets for a long time, and she’d seen a lot of terrible things, but she was still the strength of our family. And there are women like that all across the country – all around the world – who show that type of fortitude.
  447. My mom devised a plan to get me out of the house and gave me the choice between ballet or skating. She knew both of those sports were time-consuming and would keep me busy with hours of practice.
  448. My mom eventually got out to Oxnard and started a produce company and was in the strawberry business. My pops was out of the picture by the time I was 7.
  449. My mom, ever the Italian, made braised chicken with tomato.
  450. My mom had a produce business in in Oxnard, and we used to take these long trips to talk to farmers and different distributors. She’d take us with her after picking us up from school, and she’d be blasting all this old soul music and R&B. I knew all those O’Jays songs before I knew Snoop or Dre or Tupac.
  451. My mom had Julia Child and ‘The Fannie Farmer Cookbook’ on top of the refrigerator, and she had a small repertoire of French dishes.
  452. My mom had struggles. My dad had struggles. He raised me as a single parent. I rebelled and almost quit amateur boxing, but my faith in God had a lot to do with me slowly getting my life together.
  453. My mom had this romantic notion of her children playing classical music. The idea is you learn it when you’re still learning language. It’s using the same part of the brain.
  454. My mom had very low expectations for me, and she really had a point. I was a big problem at seventeen. If I had a kid like me, I would have those same expectations.
  455. My mom has always been kind of my backbone. She keeps me strong. She is a mother, a friend. She is really everything to me.
  456. My mom has beautiful eyes, and I inherited a lot of her rituals, accentuating eyes.
  457. My mom is a big scaredy cat, and I inherited that from her.
  458. My mom is a self-taught home cook, so books that offer guidelines on how to organize menus are critical to ‘cook from the book’ people like her.
  459. My mom is definitely my rock.
  460. My mom is great and I make sure that we pray together before every race. She helps me put everything in perspective and remind me of the real reason I run.
  461. My mom is still yelling at me because she needs more autographed pictures.
  462. My mom is very confident and she was always a role model of mine.
  463. My mom is very romantic. As is my dad. They appreciate real romance.
  464. My mom lives in New York still in the home that I grew up in.
  465. My mom passed away when I was 4 years old, and she came from a very conservative Korean background. I feel like my life would’ve been incredibly different had she still been alive.
  466. My mom took me to a taekwondo class, and I fell in love. I was seven years old.
  467. My mom used to model when she was younger, before she went to law school, and I think she thought it was pretty cool. I think my parents saw that acting ultimately made me happy, even though it was a rough ride for a little bit.
  468. My mom used to say that Greek Easter was later because then you get stuff cheaper.
  469. My mom was a problem solver.
  470. My mom was a professional. My dad and mom met each other in a movie called ‘New Faces of 1937.’ My mom went under the name Thelma Leeds, and she did a few movies, and she was really a great singer, and when she married my dad and started to have a family, she sang at parties.
  471. My mom was a terrible parent of young children. And thank God – I thank God every time I think of it – I was sent to my paternal grandmother. Ah, but my mother was a great parent of a young adult.
  472. My mom was born in Korea – Seoul, Korea, during the ’50s, ’51. She was abandoned; her and my uncle were abandoned. My grandfather was a Seabee and adopted my mom and my uncle, and brought them to Compton in the ’50s. That’s where she was raised.
  473. My mom was on the United Way group that decides how to allocate the money and looks at all the different charities and makes the very hard decisions about where that pool of funds is going to go.
  474. My mom was on welfare and the occasional food stamp, but I have never participated in any of those governmental programs, even the ones that kind of work like education, scholarships and whatever, and I managed to do just fine.
  475. My mom wears a lot of gold.
  476. My mom would put me in these preppy little suits and slick my hair to the side. I have these baby pictures of me where I’m this little preppy kid with a sweater tied around my neck.
  477. My mom would take me to restaurants, and the first thing I’d ask for would be a pen and a napkin, and I’d sketch shoes and shoes and shoes.
  478. My mom’s made it clear to me that, like, there’s no trust fund.
  479. My mom’s whole side of the family, they’re all Packers fans. My mom’s a Bears fan. My stepdad is a Vikings guy. So that gets ugly. My mom sits upstairs watching the Bears game; he sits in the basement. They can’t watch it together. Football’s a violent anger in our family dynamic.
  480. My mortal foe can no ways wish me a greater harm than England’s hate; neither should death be less welcome unto me than such a mishap betide me.
  481. My most brilliant achievement was my ability to be able to persuade my wife to marry me.
  482. My most memorable meal was with my parents at Joel Robuchon’s Restaurant Jamin in Paris. It was Christmas 1982, and the flavors – from cauliflower and caviar to crab and tomato – astounded me. It was the first time I remember thinking that I would like to really learn how to cook.
  483. My mother always has embedded in us that you guys rock in different ways, and to be able to celebrate that with each other is just beautiful.
  484. My mother always thought if her mother hadn’t left her, she would have been happy. All the problems she had never would have happened.
  485. My mother always told me it wasn’t polite to ask what people make.
  486. My mother and grandmother both had beautiful skin.
  487. My mother and I used to watch ‘Maude,’ and I think she loved ‘Maude’ because my mother wanted to see strong women out there with a voice.
  488. My mother believed in curses, karma, good luck, bad luck, feng shui. Her amorphous set of beliefs showed me you can pick and choose the qualities of your philosophy, based on what works for you.
  489. My mother came from a very affluent background, very Westernized, while my father was more Eastern. So I’ve had a very good blend of the East and the West. I guess this has been extremely helpful in making my career and the way I function.
  490. My mother didn’t try to stab my father until I was six, but she must have shown signs of oddness before that.
  491. My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.
  492. My mother had a very difficult childhood, having seen her own mother kill herself. So she didn’t always know how to be the nurturing mother that we all expect we should have.
  493. My mother had bought a sewing machine for me. When I went away to college, she gave me a sewing machine, a typewriter and a suitcase, and my mother made $17 a week working as a maid 12 hours a day, and she did that for me.
  494. My mother had introduced me to a lot of my father’s friends because she believed that I would get to know the guy my dad was better through his friends than just in the hospital visits.
  495. My mother has always instilled in us that we should carry ourselves with dignity despite the horror that came with the civil war. She also taught us that where you come from is very important because that’s what makes you who you are. So for me, whatever I’ve gone through had profoundly shaped me; it has given me strength and unwavering faith.
  496. My mother has been famous for longer than anyone else alive.
  497. My mother, I suppose, is still a main figure in my life because her life was so sad and unfair, and she so brave, but also because she was determined to make me into the Sunday-school-recitation little girl I was, from the age of seven or so, fighting not to be.
  498. My mother insisted that I pursue music. I rented out my father’s musical equipment and earned some money. As a child, I wasn’t sure about a career goal, but I was always fascinated by electronic gadgets, specially musical equipment.
  499. My mother is a Telugu, so I have been familiar with the language since childhood.
  500. My mother is an actress, and she used to drag me from theater to theater and reading to reading.
  501. My mother is from Compton, California, but my father is from Hayneville, Alabama, and that’s less than 20 miles from Selma.
  502. My mother is like a character who escaped from the set of a Fellini film. She’s a whole performing universe of her own. Activists would run a mile from her because they could not deal with what she is.
  503. My mother is not somebody who’s troubled by aging.
  504. My mother is really the person I learned to curse from. She discourages me from saying that in interviews. But it’s true.
  505. My mother kept the house clean and we ate good. I didn’t know we were poor until I started giving interviews.
  506. My mother knew how to read music and everything. But I just kinda learned off of records. And so, I was listening to records and I’d play ’em over and over.
  507. My mother left behind three daughters when she went to America and started a new life. I certainly felt abandoned when my father died of a brain tumour; I felt he had abandoned me to this terrible, volatile mother and I had no protection.
  508. My mother, Lillie Specter, was an angel and totally uninterested in politics.
  509. My mother loves me and everything goes well. I have no conflict with her, so that’s not dramatic.
  510. My mother made a lot of things because she thought they’d be healthy for us. There were some very unfortunate experiences with whole wheat bread and bananas. I always tried to get rid of that sandwich and eat one of my friends’ lunches.
  511. My mother made me truly appreciate women.
  512. My mother might find a thin gold chain at the back of a drawer, wadded into an impossibly tight knot, and give it to me to untangle. It would have a shiny, sweaty smell, and excite me: Gold chains linked you to the great fairy tales and myths, to Arabia, and India; to the great weight of the world, but lighter than a feather.
  513. My mother pretty much raised me to be a free spirit. Anything my father would say, she would tell me, ‘No, it’s like this.’
  514. My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and more intelligent than college professors.
  515. My mother said I was a clingy kid until I was about four. I also remember that from the age of eight she and I fought almost every day.
  516. My mother says I was writing before I was crawling. I wrote in the dirt with a twig.
  517. My mother taught me that it is important to be prepared for a last-minute polish.
  518. My mother turned me onto St. Jude back in the days when I was wild and crazy. She took me to the shrine on Rampart Street.
  519. My mother was a big influence. She kept pushing me because I was very shy and inhibited. And schoolwork was very difficult for me because I couldn’t concentrate. I was failing almost every subject. To this day, I’m not too good at reading a book. But I was the president of my high school comedy group, and they treated me like a king.
  520. My mother was a full-time mother. She didn’t have much of her own career, her own life, her own experiences… everything was for her children. I will never be as good a mother as she was. She was just grace incarnate. She was the most generous, loving – she’s better than me.
  521. My mother was a housewife. My father was a garment worker.
  522. My mother was a Jewish General Patton.
  523. My mother was a not-too-devoted atheist. She went to Episcopal church on Christmas Eve every year, and that was mostly it.
  524. My mother was a public school teacher in Virginia, and we didn’t have any money, we just survived on happiness, on being a happy family.
  525. My mother was always fascinated with the fact that I could rhyme so much stuff.
  526. My mother was always supportive.
  527. My mother was born in Latvia. She and most of her family fled from the capital city of Riga in 1944 with the final approach of the Soviet army.
  528. My mother was Catholic, my father was Protestant. There was always a debate going on at home – I think in those days we called them arguments – about who was right and who was wrong.
  529. My mother was making $135 a week, but she had resilience and imagination. She might take frozen vegetables, cook them with garlic, onion and Spam, and it would taste like a four-star dinner.
  530. My mother was the nicest person in the world. I still have people coming to me to say how she was so warm, generous, and kind-hearted. She never washed her dirty linen in public. She always maintained her equations with people.
  531. My mother was very funny. My dad had a great sense of humor. My grandmother, too.
  532. My mother was very strong. Once, she picked up a coconut and smashed it against my father’s head. It taught me about women defending themselves and not collapsing in a heap.
  533. My mother’s belief in spiritual healers grew stronger after our family went through a rough patch following my father’s death. Sufi saint Karimullah Shah Kadri changed our lives, and all of us converted to Sufism. But it wasn’t an instantaneous decision – it took us 10 years to convert. The change in religion was like washing away the past.
  534. My mother’s career was over at 40 but she was still trying to be everyone’s buddy, always smiling for the cameras.
  535. My mother’s eyes were large and brown, like my son’s, but unlike Sam’s, they were always frantic, like a hummingbird who can’t quite find the flower but keeps jabbing around.
  536. My mother’s father was Jewish, so she was very conservative. She liked little, pretty music-orchestral-type things.
  537. My mother’s openness has remained inspiring to me. I strive to be a skeptic, in the best sense of that word: I question everything, and yet I’m open to everything. And I don’t have immovable beliefs. My values shift and grow with my experiences – and as my context changes, so does what I believe.
  538. My mother’s sister was killed in a trolley car accident, so I was raised as one of eight with my sister and six male cousins.
  539. My motivation is not to try to inspire, but rather to do things that inspire me and hopefully that will spread to others.
  540. My motto is to do everything absolutely flat out and to the best of your ability.
  541. My movements, ma’am, are all leg movements. I don’t do nothing with my body.
  542. My movies just kind of sneak up on you. I don’t have to worry too much about what everybody is going to say. Anyway, I really don’t pay attention to what the world says about my movies. I just care about what my buddies think.
  543. My mum always told me I was precious, while my dad always told me I was worthless. I think that’s a good grounding for a balanced life.
  544. My mum and dad aren’t together, but she plays a massive part in my life. We have deep conversations: I tell her where I need support, where I feel she’s lacking, and I support her with whatever she needs. I understand she won’t be here forever, and I want no regrets.
  545. My mum is really fair and has blonde hair, and my dad is not dark, either.
  546. My music comes from many, many, many places. My emotions, my feelings, my thoughts, and conversations I have with people I know who influence me.
  547. My music definitely comes from a place of experience. Everything connects to a truth.
  548. My music fights against the system that teaches to live and die.
  549. My music has always been my solo project.
  550. My music is mostly for the music. And it gives the liberty to do anything which I want. And nobody limits me to one genre of music. But I learn from life and I try to give back to life, in a way, whether it’s the thought of the song or whether it’s the approach to the arrangement or anything.
  551. My music seems to have a bigger mission than I have, which is very soothing but also very strange because people see more in me than I see, which can be terrifying.
  552. My music will go on forever. Maybe it’s a fool say that, but when me know facts me can say facts. My music will go on forever.
  553. My musical development stopped when Frank Sinatra died.
  554. My nails are my rhythm section when I’m writing a song all alone. Some day, I may cut an album, just me and my nails.
  555. My name became known because I was, one might say accidentally the target of state repression and because so many people throughout the country and other parts of the world organized around the demand for my freedom.
  556. My name is Adam Sandler. I’m not particularly talented. I’m not particularly good-looking. And yet I’m a multi-millionaire.
  557. My natural bent is to have an overabundance of energy, and motion-capture essentializes your every breath, your every move. Seeing yourself through that mask, you realize how far you can pull back and make the performance even more powerful.
  558. My natural inclination to be improv rather than an educated character serves me well.
  559. My natural response to a stressful situation is to shut down. I do weird things, like, I don’t cry, I get really cold.
  560. My nephew has type 1 diabetes, and it’s my goal and hope that in his lifetime there will be a cure for diabetes. There’s no place better to give the money to than the Juvenile Diabetes Association.
  561. My new novel ‘Red Hook Road’ began many years ago as a short article in the newspaper.
  562. My next project is ‘Venus Vs,’ which is a documentary that follows tennis star Venus Williams and her effort to get equal-award pay for women at Wimbledon. Most people don’t realize that Venus fought for years to make sure women and men winners of that tennis championship received the same amount in award money.
  563. My novels are about the European reality, not about chases. You want chases, get somebody else’s books.
  564. My number one focus is and will always be football. I wanted to make sure that companies I partner with not only respect that, but also make sense and are quality products. I think Klipsch is synonymous with quality in the sound industry, so it was a natural partnership.
  565. My number-one goal is to never feel like I’m strictly defining myself. The minute I feel like I’m doing that as anything – as theatrical, as feminist, as songwriter – I feel like the minute I name it, I’m stuck in a box.
  566. My objection to Liberalism is this that it is the introduction into the practical business of life of the highest kind namely, politics of philosophical ideas instead of political principles.
  567. My observations are not bread crumbs. They do not dissolve. They are on record, on film printed in books, and found on the Internet. I am happy to share them. For this I was born.
  568. My off-pitch style is probably girly and comfortable. I like a lot of loose-fitting material on top and more tight-fitting material on the bottom.
  569. My office. It’s drab and boring but quiet.
  570. My old dance teacher, Jimmy Wilde, a former European ballroom dancing champion, was so sophisticated.
  571. My old drama coach used to say, ‘Don’t just do something, stand there.’ Gary Cooper wasn’t afraid to do nothing.
  572. My older brother and I read all the time. My father read, but only things related to religion. One year, he did read a set of stories that was called something like ‘365 Stories’ out loud to us. They followed a family for the year, a page a day. They were about kids with simple problems – like a wheel coming off their bicycle.
  573. My only close-to-game-plan is to follow good writing. If the writing is in TV or if it’s in theater or in film, that’s it. It doesn’t really matter what the medium is.
  574. My only description for me is that there’s no throwaway people. That’s the creed that I live by. It doesn’t matter if I’m singing or not. That’s the kind of person that my father and mother wanted me to be. The end obligation is to make people feel good about who they are.
  575. My only drive was to be the best dancer in the world, but I never won the world championship.
  576. My only fault is that I don’t realize how great I really am.
  577. My only fear is that I may live too long. This would be a subject of dread to me.
  578. My only problem with fans is when they turn pro. For example, when all the professional writers were fired by DC in the ’60s, they brought in a generation of comic book fans who would have paid to have written these stories.
  579. My only scheme was to be a rapper.
  580. My only window into the Internet is Twitter because I am afraid of the Internet. I need my mom to hold my hand if I’m going to read anything about me.
  581. My opening words to anybody I hire are, ‘I’m an extremely vulnerable person.’
  582. My opinion is it’s a bridge too far to go to fully autonomous cars.
  583. My opinion is the greatest reward that any government could get is the approval of the people. If the people are happy and the people are at peace and the government has done something for them, that’s the greatest reward I think any government could hope for.
  584. My opinions are aggressive, I admit that. But not my personality. I’m sociable.
  585. My ordination in the Church of God in Christ was at age 9, and I later became a Baptist minister, which I am today.
  586. My organization, National Action Network (NAN), was on the ground talking and meeting with people in Ferguson, just as we did in Staten Island following Eric Garner’s death.
  587. My other badge is enamel.
  588. My overall look on things is a lot more mature than it used to be.
  589. My own approach has always been to push intense emotions down and attempt to deal with them later. When I was younger, I was terrified to express anger because it would often kick-start a horrible reaction in the men in my life.
  590. My own approach has always been to push intense emotions down and attempt to deal with them later.
  591. My own belief is that people can come back from anything. It doesn’t mean that it won’t come at a huge cost.
  592. My own dreams fortunately came true in this great state. I became Mr. Universe; I became a successful businessman. And even though some people say I still speak with a slight accent, I have reached the top of the acting profession.
  593. My own experience is that a certain kind of genius among students is best brought out in bed.
  594. My own experience is use the tools that are out there. Use the digital world. But never lose sight of the need to reach out and talk to other people who don’t share your view. Listen to them and see if you can find a way to compromise.
  595. My own funeral, I’d like to be laid out in a coffin in my own house. I would like my coffin to be put in the double parlor, and I would like all the flowers to be white.
  596. My own husband was divorced when we met, but without kids. I don’t know what I would have done if he’d had them. I got the message very early on that the worst mistake a woman can make is marrying a man with children.
  597. My own life in India, since I came to it in 1893 to make it my home, has been devoted to one purpose, to give back to India her ancient freedom.
  598. My own mother is very accomplished and makes things like bahar breads as though they are going out of fashion – they are like stuffed parathas and can contain anything from potatoes to poppy seeds.
  599. My own rapping skills are quite good, actually. You get this thing, I think it’s called Songify or AutoRap, and you talk into them, and they auto-tune it and make it into a quite interesting musical number. And I got one where it builds it into a rap.
  600. My own thinking has evolved. You find Africanisms in American speech. You find an African influence on United States culture. There are all kinds of Africanisms in America, as you would expect, if you really thought about it… That whole thing is much broader; the influence is much broader than I first understood.
  601. My own time is passing fast enough without some national game to help it along.
  602. My own training is in the field of neuroendocrinology and I really became very fascinated many years ago with the molecules of emotion, molecules that we call neuropeptides.
  603. My own view is that this planet is used as a penal colony, lunatic asylum and dumping ground by a superior civilisation, to get rid of the undesirable and unfit. I can’t prove it, but you can’t disprove it either.
  604. My painting carries with it the message of pain.
  605. My paintings capture the humor, zaniness, and depth of the Batman villains as well as the Freudian motivations of Batman as an all-too-human, venerable, and funny vigilante superhero.
  606. My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
  607. My parents, and librarians along the way, taught me about the space between words; about the margins, where so many juicy moments of life and spirit and friendship could be found. In a library, you could find miracles and truth and you might find something that would make you laugh so hard that you get shushed, in the friendliest way.
  608. My parents are definitely reformed hippies.
  609. My parents are very cool and wildly supportive – maybe almost too much. I want to tell them to chill out.
  610. My parents came from lower-class British backgrounds. But they worked hard and, without formal education, made it where they are today.
  611. My parents certainly didn’t have anything to do with the theater. I’m some kind of accident.
  612. My parents couldn’t give me a whole lot of financial support, but they gave me good genes. My dad is a handsome son-of-a-gun, and my mom is beautiful. And I’ve definitely been the lucky recipient. So, thank you, Mom and Dad.
  613. My parents didn’t make a lot of money. My dad was not a high school graduate – he didn’t have a career as such; he was a printing salesman essentially for most of his working life.
  614. My parents got married late and they had kids late, so I never felt a social or cultural thing to be married or pregnant or a homeowner by a certain age.
  615. My parents had this incredibly vital relationship with an audience, like muscle with blood. This was the main competition I had for my parents’ attention: an audience.
  616. My parents had very high expectations. They expected me to get straight A’s from the time I was in kindergarten.
  617. My parents homeschooled my sister and me for many years. Why? Because the local school insisted that I, being three, should go to preschool, and my sister, being five, should go to kindergarten. The problem? You learn your alphabet in preschool, and I was already reading chapter books.
  618. My parents keep telling me to be thick-skinned in the industry. They tell me how people will put you up on a high platform and then bring you down. They also tell me to not believe in the image created by the hype.
  619. My parents never gave me a nickname. But for my friends, I am everything from ‘Nushki’ to ‘Nusheshwar.’
  620. My parents offered me the idea of ceilinglessness. There was no limit in terms of what was possible; no messages sent to me to say that I couldn’t do anything.
  621. My parents pretty much realized that I would do whatever I wanted, and that was it, really.
  622. My parents shared not only an improbable love, they shared an abiding faith in the possibilities of this nation. They would give me an African name, Barack, or blessed, believing that in a tolerant America your name is no barrier to success.
  623. My parents split up when I was young, and I was living with my mom for a little while, then I was kind of just on my own really young. It wasn’t some kind of global tragedy, it was just never really a very close-knit family. So there was support in the sense that they didn’t stand in my way.
  624. My parents taught me service – not by saying, but by doing. That was my culture, the culture of my family.
  625. My parents, they’re the kind of people that didn’t want me to get a big head, so they just kept challenging me and challenging me.
  626. My parents told me from the time I can remember that, ‘Yeah, you’re adopted. But this is your family.’ I can remember my mom, she tells me this story: when I was little, I was looking at her, and I was like, ‘Why isn’t my skin the same color as yours?’ She was like, ‘Oh, you’re adopted, but I wish I had pretty brown skin like you.’
  627. My parents told me I would become a doctor and then in my spare time I would become a concert pianist. So, both my day job and my spare time were sort of taken care of.
  628. My parents told me, ‘Skating is a privilege, not a right, and school always comes first.’
  629. My parents took me to see plays, starting from when I was very little. Oftentimes, I was too young to understand. I don’t know what my parents were thinking – ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf’ when I was eight years old, that kind of thing. So lots of times, I didn’t understand what was going on, but I just loved the sound of dialogue.
  630. My parents were both born in Virginia, of undistinguished families – second families, perhaps I should say.
  631. My parents were both storytellers. They always spoke with metaphorical richness.
  632. My parents were dealing with evictions and repossessions and electricity getting shut off, and I just realized that I had to get it together.
  633. My parents were passionate about what they did, very cheap, and very focused on doing good in society.
  634. My parents were really political. The news was very important in our home. We basically had dinner every night while watching the news, and then we’d discuss it with our parents.
  635. My parents were really, really cool about supporting what I wanted to do at a really young age. I think I was about 10 when I caught the bug. They would drive me down to New York if there were auditions. When I was 12, I did this show on Broadway called ‘High Society,’ so we moved to New York for the run of that.
  636. My parents were vegetarians. I’d show up at school, this giant black kid, with none of the cool clothes and a tofu sandwich and celery sticks.
  637. My parents were very supportive and always encouraged us. My father was a gentle, nice man. My mother was quite a colorful character and a keen reader who encouraged me to write.
  638. My parents were very supportive. They went to every show. And they never told me not to do what I was doing.
  639. My parents weren’t actors or studio executives.
  640. My parents weren’t married. It wasn’t like my dad up and left. I maintained a steady relationship with my grandparents. My dad’s mother is my nana, and I’m closer to her than almost anybody in this world.
  641. My part in AC/DC is just adding the color on top.
  642. My passion for gardening may strike some as selfish, or merely an act of resignation in the face of overwhelming problems that beset the world. It is neither. I have found that each garden is just what Voltaire proposed in Candide: a microcosm of a just and beautiful society.
  643. My passions were all gathered together like fingers that made a fist. Drive is considered aggression today; I knew it then as purpose.
  644. My peers, lately, have found companionship through means of intoxication – it makes them sociable. I, however, cannot force myself to use drugs to cheat on my loneliness – it is all that I have – and when the drugs and alcohol dissipate, will be all that my peers have as well.
  645. My people would love it if I smiled more, if I was more ‘approachable.’
  646. My perfect morning is spent drinking coffee, eating porridge and reading the paper at a local cafe.
  647. My perfect weekend is going for a walk with my family in the park. I don’t think there’s anything better.
  648. My performance outfits are very Marie Antoinette, sparkly corsets… and full skirts. And then we do another look that’s ’50s-inspired. Poufy skirts, big bows. Very fun, girlie and young, but otherwise, when I’m not in costume, I dress really normal.
  649. My personal goals are to fight and beat the best opponent possible.
  650. My personal style is a mixture of, like, girly, throwback, like retro ’50s pin-ups, floral, like hippies, like anything feminine, and like flirty.
  651. My personal style statement is very casual. And for me, comfort tops the chart over anything else.
  652. My personal taste doesn’t enter into it a lot when I make my decisions as to what to parody.
  653. My personal writing philosophy is to try and write better every day.
  654. My philosophy has always been, ‘do what you love and the money will follow.’
  655. My philosophy is, it’s always very rewarding when you can make an audience laugh. I don’t mind making fun of myself. I like self-deprecating comedy. But I’d like you to laugh with me occasionally, too.
  656. My philosophy is it’s none of my business what people say of me and think of me. I am what I am, and I do what I do. I expect nothing and accept everything. And it makes life so much easier.
  657. My philosophy is: It’s none of my business what people say of me and think of me.
  658. My philosophy is simple: It’s a down-home, common, horse-sense approach to things.
  659. My philosophy of life is that if we make up our mind what we are going to make of our lives, then work hard toward that goal, we never lose – somehow we win out.
  660. My photography changed from being more documentary-like to arranging things more, and that came into being partly because I started doing music videos, and I incorporated some things from the music videos into my photography again, by arranging things more.
  661. My plan was to be able to make a living as an actor.
  662. My plays are ultimately about love, honor, duty, betrayal.
  663. My poet’s heart gives me strength to face political problems, particularly those which have a bearing on my conscience.
  664. My point is, if you want to achieve anything in life, it is not enough to merely wish for it. You must develop that kind of 4:30 AM discipline that distinguishes you from others.
  665. My political mission is as acute as ever. For me, in addition to kind of looking at the world and trying to engage in my society politically, having the kid around sort of makes me check in with myself. I think you’re all busy trying to fix the world, but what about yourself?
  666. My potential is more than can be expressed within the bounds of my race or ethnic identity.
  667. My prayers are being answered for my career. These are prayers I’ve been praying for as a kid.
  668. My preference is for people who can do sketch comedy or situational comedy, where it’s not a joke, but it’s telling a story.
  669. My preparation is about precision. It is a science.
  670. My pride fell with my fortunes.
  671. My principles are more important than the money or my title.
  672. My priority is to turn people – especially kids – on to sports and being active so they don’t even have to think about it being good for their health. If people participate for the fun of it, and believe me – it is fun, then fitness programs will be much more successful.
  673. My problem happens to be near-sightedness – inability to see distance. And this is pretty tough on a golfer.
  674. My professional and human obsession is the nature of language, and my best relationships are with other writers. In many ways, I know George Eliot better than I know my husband.
  675. My public is growing up just as I am. After all, I’m not 19 anymore and if I stick with the sex bit, who will be paying to see me when I’m 50?
  676. My question is why does every African American fighter have to be the villain?
  677. My range is limited.
  678. My real emphasis is on the farmers who are taking care of the land, the farmers who are really thinking about our nourishment.
  679. My real name’s Rakim – my parents named me after the god MC himself.
  680. My real passion is for opera. It was born and developed by listening to records, and my dream as a child was to record entire operas when I grew up, and this dream came true.
  681. My relationship to power and authority is that I’m all for it. People need somebody to watch over them. Ninety-five percent of the people in the world need to be told what to do and how to behave.
  682. My relationships with producers or photographers – these are relationships that took years.
  683. My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind.
  684. My religion is based on truth and non-violence. Truth is my God. Non-violence is the means of realising Him.
  685. My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.
  686. My reputation grows with every failure.
  687. My reputation precedes me now.
  688. My responsibility is to make a film and find my dramatic language; I don’t have any political or social responsibility.
  689. My responsibility is to present things in a way that is realistic and true to the multifaceted world I’ve known… This is how I think the world is, not how it should be.
  690. My responsibility is to speak out on my own convictions.
  691. My role in society, or any artist’s or poet’s role, is to try and express what we all feel. Not to tell people how to feel. Not as a preacher, not as a leader, but as a reflection of us all.
  692. My roots were in acting. That’s all I wanted to be. Even though my father was a radio comedian, it wasn’t cool to say, at a young age, ‘I want to be a comedian.’
  693. My rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them.
  694. My school career was absolutely crucial to me. As an endurance athlete, some of the most important years are maybe when you are 16, 17, and 18. For me, getting that right was very important, and my school allowed me to do that.
  695. My search for ways to improve my touch has never ended. We players tried a lot of different things and compared notes. Little fads would set in.
  696. My second favorite household chore is ironing. My first being hitting my head on the top bunk bed until I faint.
  697. My second wife, the mother of one of my sons, died of murder. I was not with her, but I could have saved her. I think.
  698. My self-publishing adventure led to my work being picked up by a traditional publisher and eventually hitting the bestseller lists. That led to two more bestselling novels.
  699. My senior year of high school, I got into UCLA, but my family couldn’t afford it.
  700. My share of the work may be limited, but the fact that it is work makes it precious.
  701. My sister and I fought a lot when we were kids. I was the little bratty sister, and she would kind of walk away, not wanting to be associated with me.
  702. My sister and I – she’s a musician – we jam all the time. We always play around for giggles with stuff that seem unconventional or stuff that seems funny. A lot of the stuff sometimes is just a response from jam sessions in her room, so she’ll be on the guitar or the keyboard, and we’ll just start singing and doing stuff.
  703. My sister does all this community-service type stuff in Portland that makes the world a much better place. And I make as much in a two-day commercial shoot as she does in five years, which is ridiculous.
  704. My sister is totally my dad’s daughter because she loves sports.
  705. My sister keeps me grounded.
  706. My sister learned she was a carrier for a recessive disease, Bloom syndrome, late in one of her pregnancies. I remember the panicked call and the weeks of worry as she and her husband awaited his test results; if he was also a carrier, this meant their daughter had a one in four chance of being born with the disorder.
  707. My sisters and my mom, those people help me get through every single day.
  708. My sisters are stronger and my brother’s bigger than me.
  709. My skin gets so dry and chapped, and the second I get off the plane, I apply so much sunscreen.
  710. My small experience on ‘Dancing with the Stars’ allowed me to slowly appreciate the Waltz and Viennese Waltz, but to see it in Vienna is something much different.
  711. My sole focus is to help bring a World Cup back to the U.S.
  712. My son, Arzhel, is two, and he eats vegetables twice a day. We have a vegetable garden on our farm in the Southwest, and he gets two baskets, one over each arm, and says, ‘Garden, Papa!’ and then he eats what he picks.
  713. My son has died of AIDS.
  714. My son likes to go see mines and electric plants, or the Large Hadron Collider, and we’ve had a chance to see a lot of interesting stuff.
  715. My son says I never tell stories about anyone who’s living.
  716. My son was five months old, and I built a makeshift studio in my living room so that I could do the attachment parenting approach and write the record at the same time. That was fortuitous, that we could build that in the house.
  717. My songs always sound a lot better in person than they do on the record.
  718. My songs are just little letters to me.
  719. My songs are like my children – I expect them to support me when I’m old.
  720. My songs are the door to every dream I’ve ever had and every success I’ve ever achieved.
  721. My songs aren’t bubble gum pop dance songs and I don’t have background dancers on every single song.
  722. My songwriting is like extending a hand to the listener.
  723. My son’s full real name is Duncan Zowie Haywood. As a toddler, he was called by his second name Zowie. But it was such an identifiable name during the Seventies that if I called him loudly in public places, everyone would turn to stare, so I started calling him Joey to take the pressure off.
  724. My speed is a gift from God, and I run for His glory. Whatever I do, it all comes from him.
  725. My speed is something that has made a difference to my whole career. When I’ve felt quick and I’m moving well, it makes a huge difference to my entire game. When I feel a bit slower, I end up doing a lot more defending. When I’m a bit quicker to the ball, I feel I can attack a lot more.
  726. My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.
  727. My spiritual life is… sometimes I have access to it and sometimes I don’t. When I do have access to it, it’s usually a sense of my understanding what the best course of action or the best thing for me to do. By best, I mean when I have a real sense of doing the right thing and doing good for people and the connected universe of everybody.
  728. My spleen burst. I remember feeling my heart beating really fast. Beating right out of my chest.
  729. My staff’s job is to adjust to circumstances with technical precision and artful grace so that every patron has a wonderful experience.
  730. My stepdad provided me with an amazing childhood. I played outside like a normal kid, I rode my bike, I walked to school, but the happiest times were when I was acting.
  731. My store, Wine Library, outsells big national chains. How do you think we do it? It started with hustle. I always say that our success wasn’t due to my hundreds of online videos about wine that went viral, but to the hours I spent talking to people online afterward, making connections and building relationships.
  732. My stories are never quite good enough.
  733. My story as an artist has been about trial and error. It’s been about artist development, character building, struggle, happiness and failure, family, and music.
  734. My strength is as the strength of ten, because my heart is pure.
  735. My strength never came from political echelons, it came from the family. And from the fields and the lands and the flowers and everything I see there. My strength came from there.
  736. My style icons are Lucille Ball for her bouffant hair and all the updos, James Dean for his rockabilly style – the denim and rolled-up T-shirt thing. And I am also inspired by Dita Von Teese and Gwen Stefani. Their style is retro, but it’s still very feminine at the same time.
  737. My style in Italian is very old-style.
  738. My style is a bit of what I like to call chic-casual. It is easy and comfortable.
  739. My style is clubby and groovy – you can jump to it, but you don’t just have to just jump to it. It’s not just really bass-heavy and hurts your ears; you move with it, and it sounds kind of tribal.
  740. My style is not to challenge anything.
  741. My style offstage is so different from onstage. I love a pair of sexy heels with jeans, a nice jacket, or a little dress.
  742. My style was established in the Forties and Fifties, then got dragged through the decades and picked up a couple more things on the way.
  743. My success isn’t a result of arrogance – it’s a result of belief.
  744. My take is that acting is acting. A performance is a performance. With performance capture, if you don’t get the performance on the day, you can’t enhance the performance.
  745. My target is to make the players as rich as possible within the financial constraints of the club. My target is not to give them less money. I’m happy to make them rich.
  746. My task over the last two years hasn’t just been to stop the bleeding. My task has also been to try to figure out how do we address some of the structural problems in the economy that have prevented more Googles from being created.
  747. My tattoo is a phoenix. I got the first when I was 16. I hid it for years.
  748. My team and I used the actual footage to create a three-act story of the life of Ayrton Senna. There are no talking heads and no voiceover. Senna narrates his own epic, dramatic, thrilling journey.
  749. My teammates have put me in all different kinds of positions to score goals, and I can’t say it enough, and I really through and through believe it in my heart that I’m only as good as my teammates allow me to be.
  750. My tenure at ‘The Daily Show’ started during the decade after September 11, and fear of Muslims was at an all-time high. Politicians and the media seemed to dial the fright, mistrust, and animosity up to a fever pitch to gain votes and ratings.
  751. My tenure in the Senate was really as an independent and whichever, regardless of party label.
  752. My theme song is ‘One Tin Soldier’ by Coven.
  753. My theory has always been, that if we are to dream, the flatteries of hope are as cheap, and pleasanter, than the gloom of despair.
  754. My theory is that many of the things that move us are things we long for but find hard to do.
  755. My theory is that sometimes writers write books because they want to read them, and they aren’t there to be read. And I think that was true of me.
  756. My theory on housework is, if the item doesn’t multiply, smell, catch fire, or block the refrigerator door, let it be. No one else cares. Why should you?
  757. My thing is that if you love the sport, appreciate the sport as a whole. If you love the sport, you love the slick boxer; you love the guy who can box and punch. You love the brawler.
  758. My thing is this; if I’m sick enough to think it, then I’m sick enough to say it.
  759. My thing of not playing offensive tackle is the health issue. I don’t want to be that big. That could end up not being good for your health.
  760. My thing with fans is, it’s always about being really good to them and taking the time to take every picture. If there are 300 people, you should take 300 pictures – you shouldn’t take 250 because then fifty people will go home sad. Why would you do that?
  761. My three addictions of choice are food, love and work.
  762. My three children have brought me great joy.
  763. My toughest fight was with my first wife.
  764. My toys were those of a boy: skates, bicycles.
  765. My trainer don’t tell me nothing between rounds. I don’t allow him to. I fight the fight. All I want to know is did I win the round. It’s too late for advice.
  766. My training has been in Hindustani classical, and I have done a six-week course in English vocals at Berklee. The holistic learning has helped me a lot.
  767. My training really was at the ‘New York Times,’ you know. When I got there, I was literally supposed to stay there for five weeks, and I got lucky like nobody, you know, like nobody’s business.
  768. My two boys were the same ages as the kids in the show. In real life or in between the breaks I was raising two kids off camera who were not unlike the two kids who were being paid to be my kids.
  769. My ultimate goal is to create operating systems for myself that allow me to think as little as possible about the silly decisions you can make all day long – like what to eat or where we should meet – so I can focus on making real decisions. Because mental energy is a finite quantity.
  770. My uncle played rugby, and my dad played football, and they used to argue which game was the roughest – and everybody agreed rugby was. It’s a great team sport, and to be successful, every person has to play in the same level.
  771. My unpredictability is what separates me. If you move in so many ways, your opponent is not focused on what he’s doing. He’s focusing in on what you’re doing, and it freezes him. When they freeze and you hit, they shatter like glass.
  772. My use of the medium – photography – is in some ways traditional.
  773. My vantage point on the world is the operating room where I see my patients.
  774. My varying pairs of legs can be quite practical or quite impractical, and I don’t judge them either way. Some are for getting around a 12-hour day, pounding the pavement, and some are to feel like I can transform my own body into a workable, changing piece of art.
  775. My very first car was a grey Alfa Romeo Alfasud, which I got in 1987. But, in our family, all cars were for sale – so they might be there in the morning and were gone at night. In the mid-90s, I joined Porsche and the Carrera was the car, and the Carrera 4S was the one they gave me. As a wee boy from Dumfries, I couldn’t believe it.
  776. My very, very first moment on set on ‘Lord of the Rings’ in 2000 was me in a lycra suit, six and a half thousand feet up on a mountain in New Zealand, standing in front of 250 crew who were all wondering what I was doing – myself included.
  777. My view is regardless of whether you think prohibiting abortion is good or whether you think prohibiting abortion is bad, regardless of how you come out on that, my only point is the Constitution does not say anything about it. It leaves it up to democratic choice.
  778. My view is that at a younger age your optimism is more and you have more imagination etc. You have less bias.
  779. My view is when you use violence on your people, that never ends well.
  780. My view of democratic socialism builds on the success of many other countries around the world that have done a far better job than we have in protecting the needs of their working families, their elderly citizens, the children, the sick and the poor.
  781. My views about God come from my dad. Dad told me that he believed Nature, which to him included humankind, to be so beautiful, so magnificent, that there had to be something behind it all.
  782. My vision is for a fully reusable rocket transport system between Earth and Mars that is able to re-fuel on Mars – this is very important – so you don’t have to carry the return fuel when you go there.
  783. My voice went recently, never happened before, off like a tap. I had to sit in silence for nine days, chalkboard around my neck. Like an old-school mime. Like a kid in the naughty corner. Like a Victorian mute.
  784. My way of getting the best from people on a set is to notice their work, to make every prop master, every seamstress, part of ‘The Newsroom’ or ‘The West Wing’ or ‘Steve Jobs.’
  785. My way of joking is to tell the truth. That’s the funniest joke in the world.
  786. My weak spot is laziness. Oh, I have a lot of weak spots: cookies, croissants.
  787. My weaknesses have always been food and men – in that order.
  788. My weaknesses… I wish I could come up with something. I’d probably have the same pause if you asked me what my strengths are. Maybe they’re the same thing.
  789. My whole act is off the top of my head.
  790. My whole background is character acting: weird costumes, fat suits, playing men, playing animals – I’ve never played anyone with whom there’s any overlapping Venn diagram.
  791. My whole being and approach to work is shaped by Karan Johar. From him, I have learned that people should love to work with you, and you should give out warmth and energy to them.
  792. My whole life and my whole career, even through my music, I tell people: let’s unify; let’s show more love.
  793. My whole life has been one big improvisation.
  794. My whole life is about winning. I don’t lose often. I almost never lose.
  795. My whole life is classical now. Except my wife. I don’t have a classical wife. I have a classy wife, but I don’t have a classical wife.
  796. My whole life, I’ve loved ’80s synth and goth rock like The Sisters of Mercy and Depeche Mode.
  797. My whole M.O. in my 20s was being in as many different types of films as you can. Working with as many different types of directors as you can. I think, in part, that’s what I wanted to do as an actor.
  798. My whole thing was being wanted and being accepted by a ball club. That was the most important thing to me.
  799. My wife and I do not argue. We communicate. We talk. But we’ve never fought in our entire relationship.
  800. My wife and I love each other very much.
  801. My wife and I tried two or three times in the last 40 years to have breakfast together, but it was so disagreeable we had to stop.
  802. My wife and I, unlike many intellectuals, spent five years working on assembly lines. We came to fully understand the criticisms of the industrial age, in which you are an appendage of a machine that sets the pace.
  803. My wife, Barbara, is great. She arranges when I do work that I have a day off between performances.
  804. My wife came into my life, and my mother still wanted to be the boss.
  805. My wife changes the way that I dress. She makes me dress nicer than I want to dress. I feel like I perpetually dress like a 14-year-old boy, and she makes me stand up straight and wear clean clothes.
  806. My wife Elizabeth and I started The Really Terrible Orchestra for people like us who are pretty hopeless musicians who would like to play in an orchestra. It has been a great success. We give performances; we’ve become the most famous bad orchestra in the world.
  807. My wife Gwenaelle prepares an ‘energy shot’ for me for breakfast. It’s a mix of linseed, cereal, and raisins, with fresh fruit like kiwi. She also adds yogurt for added texture and some pollen and honey for an energy booster.
  808. My wife has about everything I can think of.
  809. My wife is 37 years younger than me. I don’t feel the difference.
  810. My wife is a very attractive woman, and she’s always worried about her diet. But she doesn’t pay attention to me, and I don’t pay attention to her. She’s a vegetarian, and it drives me crazy.
  811. My wife is already in Heaven.
  812. My wife is great. She always goes to the bank to see if the check has cleared.
  813. My wife is pretty geeky and will occasionally quote ‘Anchorman’ at me.
  814. My wife is the greatest person I have ever known. She is just a living doll; she is great person and a great mom. We have a girl and a boy, and we are going to have another boy.
  815. My wife is troubled by the things I forget. I am troubled by the things she recollects.
  816. My wife likes me to point out that she puts our daughter down to sleep more often than I do, which gives me time to write stupid books about it.
  817. My wife says I can’t remember if she has milk in coffee.
  818. My wife thinks she’s better than me at puzzles. I haven’t given in on that one yet.
  819. My wife used to be an anchorwoman in Arizona, so she knew John McCain, and she liked him, and I kinda liked him.
  820. My wife Victoria Harwood was art director on ‘Far North,’ and she had designed my student film, ‘The Sheep Thief.’
  821. My wife was born in Korea, and we met in music college; she was there for vocal, and I was there for drums.
  822. My wish is for gay to become less of a label, and more of just one of many great colors in the collective box of humanity.
  823. My work and my family are very important to me.
  824. My work has social implications, it functions in a social arena.
  825. My work is about my life, and what I want to do with it.
  826. My work is intensely personal.
  827. My work is not about my life history. It’s not about the story of my neurosis.
  828. My work is not directly about the social or political.
  829. My work is really simple. They say ‘action,’ I do my stuff; they say, ‘cut!’
  830. My work is the only ground I’ve ever had to stand on. To put it bluntly, I seem to have a whole superstructure with no foundation, but I’m working on the foundation.
  831. My workouts are mostly interval-based, so I’m never running at a constant speed. I’m always switching it up because I don’t want my body getting used to one thing in particular.
  832. My world is much bigger than music, and that’s why I always fight the ‘rock’ label.
  833. My worst days are still pretty good days. That’s something I might lose in the moment sometimes, but I have a pretty good grasp of it.
  834. My worst fear is my music won’t connect with the public.
  835. My writing always came out of a very personal place, out of an attempt to stay sane.
  836. My writing day has grown shorter as I’ve aged, although it seems to produce the same number of pages.
  837. My writing is jagged and harsh, I want it to remain that way; I don’t want it smoothed out.
  838. My writing often contains souvenirs of the day – a song I heard, a bird I saw – which I then put into the novel.
  839. My writing philosophy is throwing spaghetti against the wall. That’s how I take pictures, too. If I take 100, surely one will be good.
  840. My youngest sister, Cindy, has Down syndrome, and I remember my mother spending hours and hours with her, teaching her to tie her shoelaces on her own, drilling multiplication tables with Cindy, practicing piano every day with her. No one expected Cindy to get a Ph.D.! But my mom wanted her to be the best she could be, within her limits.
  841. Myself, Eric Wareheim, and Jason Woliner decided to start a Food Club where the three of us go to restaurants with a couple of other people. The three of us are the captains of the Food Club, so we have to wear the captains’ hats.
  842. Myself, first of all, I am a Jew. And that is the most important thing for me.
  843. ‘Mystic River’ just smelled interesting to me. So I read it and liked it right away. Even the dialogue in it was great.
  844. Mystical explanations are thought to be deep; the truth is that they are not even shallow.
  845. Mysticism is the mistake of an accidental and individual symbol for an universal one.
  846. Mythology does not interest me. Nor does history. But the possible overlap between history and mythology excites me immensely.
  847. Mythology is a set of primitive lies that people rarely believe. This is rather different from history, which is a set of lies that people actually believe.
  848. Mythology is like a game of Chinese Whispers. What goes in at one end of the human circle is rarely what emerges at the other end.
  849. Mythology works… because Indians have been bred on myths.
  850. Mythopoeia has taken off in the Indian diaspora because there has been a change in readership from a mature audience to a younger one. This lot has a desperate yearning to reconnect. They want to consume mythology but in a well-packaged and easily digestible way.
  851. Myths and creeds are heroic struggles to comprehend the truth in the world.
  852. Myths are public dreams, dreams are private myths.
  853. Myths grow all the time. If I was to listen to the number of times I’ve thrown teacups then we’ve gone through some crockery in this place. It’s completely exaggerated, but I don’t like people arguing back with me.
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